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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
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Climate Change Economics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.115
Number of Followers: 52  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2010-0078 - ISSN (Online) 2010-0086
Published by World Scientific Homepage  [121 journals]
  • INVESTIGATING THE IMPACT OF INFORMATION FEEDBACK ON RESIDENTS’
           ENERGY-SAVING BEHAVIOR IN THE HEATING SECTOR

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      Authors: HONGGUANG NIE, FENGJIAO MU, YING FAN
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Global fossil energy consumption is a significant source of carbon dioxide emissions and a major cause of global climate change. Heat consumption in the residential sector is an important part of this consumption. Based on reinforcement theory, this study analyzed the influence mechanism of information feedback on the residents’ energy-saving behaviors and applied the survey data from 1248 households in three Western European countries to analyze the impact of heat consumption information feedback on four typical heat-saving behaviors of residents. Finally, it applied the probit model to measure the quantitative effect of information feedback on the heat-saving behavior. Four heat-saving behaviors were considered: “improving house insulation”, “setting the thermostat to 20°C or below”, “turning the heat down at night” and “closing the windows when the heating is running”. The empirical results showed that heat consumption information feedback has a significant impact on residents’ heat-saving behavior. After adding the controlling variables, such as demographic variables, willingness to pay for greenness, environmental concern and environmental belief, the estimated results changed slightly, but the estimates of the study are still significant. According to the estimates, residents who can obtain the heat consumption information feedback timely were 9.3%, 5.2%, 5.9% and 4.3% more likely than residents who can’t obtain the heat consumption information feedback timely to adopt the heat-saving behaviors of “improving house insulation”, “setting the thermostat to 20°C or below”, “turning the heat down at night” and “closing the windows when the heating is running”.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823400079
       
  • DOES WOODFUEL PRICE DISTORTION INHIBIT ECO-EFFICIENCY IN WOODFUEL
           EXPLOITATION SYSTEMS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA' EVIDENCE FROM CAMEROON

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      Authors: MOUSTAPHA MOUNMEMI, NOUROU MOHAMMADOU, GEORGES KOBOU
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study is to assess the impacts of woodfuel prices distortion on the eco-efficiency of woodfuel exploitation systems. The study, conducted in Cameroon, involved 415 randomly selected woodfuel operators. To achieve this, the marginal opportunity cost approach and the stochastic specification of the production technology were used to assess the price distortion degree and the eco-efficiency indices, respectively. In doing so, the 2SLS allowed to evaluate the impacts of woodfuel prices distortion on eco-efficiency of woodfuel exploitation systems. From this study, we conclude that the woodfuel prices distortion does not encourage eco-efficient exploitation of this resource. A 1% increase in the degree of distortion results in a reduction in eco-efficiency of −0.019 points. Including the optimal price in the woodfuel pricing system will improve eco-efficiency by 0.030 points. In view of these results, a marginal opportunity cost pricing system that takes into account all the exploitation costs ignored by the market price like user costs associated with resource depletion and the external costs associated with CO2 emissions will encourage producers to adopt a sustainable woodfuel exploitation path.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823400080
       
  • CLIMATE CHANGE, ADAPTATION AND ECONOMIC OUTCOMES: EVIDENCE FROM
           AGRICULTURE IN INDIA

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      Authors: COSTANZA MARIA FILECCIA
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Agriculture is strongly affected by climate change (CC). However, its vulnerability is also determined by how farmers adapt to these long-run changes. Using an innovative approach recently proposed in the literature, this study investigates whether it is possible to find evidence of long-run adaptation in the climate-yield relationship of India’s agriculture and what the implications for future scenarios may be. District-level time series data on rice and chickpea yield are combined with weather data on cumulative growing season precipitation and growing degree days, and a quadratic regression with fixed effects augmented with climate penalty terms to account for climate adaptation is used. The estimates are utilized to extrapolate future scenarios. The estimation results suggest that rice might have some potential adaptation to precipitation, although adaptation to temperature appears to be dependent on irrigation. Chickpeas, on the other hand, adapt to temperature whereas adaptation to precipitation is limited. The findings also reveal that crop yields in projected climate scenarios are expected to respond differently depending on whether adaptation measures are implemented or not. Adaptation measures are likely to mitigate CC and reduce crop yield losses while also increasing productivity in some crops.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500288
       
  • DO HIGH TEMPERATURES DAMPEN CHINESE URBAN HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION'

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      Authors: XUAN CHEN, LAN-CUI LIU, JUAN-JUAN HOU, XUE GAO
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Increased extreme heat is one of the clearest manifestations of climate change, but its impact on household consumption is poorly understood. This paper estimates the effects of high temperatures on total household consumption. We find an inverted U-shaped relationship, with high temperatures (≥ 30∘C) reducing total household consumption by 7.18% compared with the reference group from 5∘C to 10∘C. In the living consumption subcategory, expenditures for eating out decline by 9.59%, whereas expenditures for protective gear, fuel, and housing increase. Expenditures in the going-out category generally decrease but vary with distance, vehicles, and sites. Spending on all types of public transportation and outdoor recreation decreases regardless of distance, whereas private transportation and short-distance indoor recreation expenditures increase slightly. Our findings indicate that households alleviate high-temperature impacts mainly by reducing expenditures outside the home and increasing expenditures on at-home or indoor activities.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-01-26T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500264
       
  • AUTHOR INDEX Volume 14 (2023)

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      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 14, Issue 04, November 2023.

      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-11-02T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823990014
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 04 (2023)
       
  • INTRODUCTION TO THE SPECIAL ISSUE ON REACHING NET ZERO BY 2050

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      Authors: Robert Mendelsohn, David Maddison, Daigee Shaw
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 14, Issue 04, November 2023.

      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S201000782303001X
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 04 (2023)
       
  • EAST ASIA CLIMATE CLUB: PATHWAY TOWARD 2050 NET-ZERO

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      Authors: DAIGEE SHAW, YU-HSUAN FU, YA-QI CHEN
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 14, Issue 04, November 2023.
      Four major and closely related economies in East Asia, i.e., China, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan, have committed and pledged their pathway and strategies to achieve a net-zero target in the last three years. However, the net-zero pathway and strategy developed by the governments in East Asia and most countries need to be more proactive in many ways. We define four scenarios such as the business-as-usual scenario (BAU), the government pledge scenario (GOV), the East Asia climate club scenario without forming a green club fund (CLUB without the fund), and the East Asia climate club scenario (CLUB). This study first aims to apply the E3ME-FTT model to assess the net-zero pathway and strategies the governments of these four economies have already pledged under the GOV scenario. The results show that, with current pledges, we cannot achieve the net-zero target and will cause a lot of carbon debt. Then, we assess the effectiveness of forming a climate club that the four economies commit to applying four common policy instruments and programs to meet the 2050 net-zero target under the CLUB scenario. The results suggest that creating the East Asia climate club can be an excellent program to facilitate international cooperation on climate change and help to transform it into a green economy in East Asia. It can help reduce CO2 emissions, though not yet meeting the 2050 net-zero target, and have a higher positive impact on GDP. All club members would benefit both environmentally and economically. These economies with stricter environmental regulations will become more closely related as a kind of friend-shoring. As a result, the green trades between these economies increase. To fully reach the target, the four economies must formulate additional net-zero strategies across sectors based on their unique situation and invest more in emission reduction and carbon removal R&D to enhance their capacity and lower costs.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-09-22T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823400055
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 04 (2023)
       
  • IS SOLAR AND BIOGAS A BETTER CHOICE THAN ELECTRICITY AND DIESEL'

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      Authors: NADEEM AKMAL, MUHAMMAD QASIM, HASSNAIN SHAH, SUMIA BINT ZAMAN, WAQAS FAROOQ, NAJID AHMAD
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 14, Issue 04, November 2023.
      This study measures the cost-effectiveness of alternate energy sources for irrigation in Pakistan. Primary data has been collected from eight districts of three provinces of Pakistan. Overall, 223 farmers were personally interviewed out of which, 58 farmers were using electric tube-well, 95 diesel tube-well, and 35 each for solar and biogas-operated tube-wells. The cost of extracting one cubic meter of water through electricity, diesel, subsidized electricity, biogas, and solar was $0.180, $0.013, $0.011, $0.010, and $0.005, respectively. The paper concludes that water pumping using alternative energy sources is cost-effective. Major constraints to adopting solar-powered water pumping systems were the high upfront cost, the lack of awareness, and the lack of available spare parts. The constraints to adopting biogas were difficulty operating and managing through winter.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-08-08T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500215
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 04 (2023)
       
  • NET ZERO EMISSIONS OF GREENHOUSE GASES BY 2050: ACHIEVABLE AND AT WHAT
           COST'

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      Authors: JENNIFER MORRIS, Y.-H. HENRY CHEN, ANGELO GURGEL, JOHN REILLY, ANDREI SOKOLOV
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 14, Issue 04, November 2023.
      About 140 countries have announced or are considering net zero targets. To explore the implications of such targets, we apply an integrated earth system–economic model to investigate illustrative net zero emissions scenarios. Given the technologies as characterized in our modeling framework, we find that with net zero targets afforestation in earlier years and biomass energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) technology in later years are important negative emissions technologies, allowing continued emissions from hard-to-reduce sectors and sources. With the entire world achieving net zero by 2050 a very rapid scale-up of BECCS is required, increasing mitigation costs through mid-century substantially, compared with a scenario where some countries achieve net zero by 2050 while others continue some emissions in the latter half of the century. The scenarios slightly overshoot 1.5∘C at mid-century but are at or below 1.5∘C by 2100 with median climate response. Accounting for climate uncertainty, global achievement of net zero by 2050 essentially guarantees that the 1.5∘C target will be achieved, compared to having a 50–50 chance in the scenario without net zero. This indicates a tradeoff between policy costs and likelihood of achieving 1.5∘C.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-07-13T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S201000782340002X
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 04 (2023)
       
  • COSTS AND BENEFITS OF THE PARIS CLIMATE TARGETS

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      Authors: RICHARD S. J. TOL
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 14, Issue 04, November 2023.
      The temperature targets in the Paris Agreement cannot be met without very rapid reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The latter requires large, perhaps prohibitively large subsidies. The central estimate of the costs of climate policy, unrealistically assuming least-cost implementation, is 3.8–5.6% of GDP in 2100. The central estimate of the benefits of climate policy, unrealistically assuming high no-policy emissions and constant vulnerability, is 2.8–3.2% of GDP. The uncertainty about the benefits is larger than the uncertainty about the costs. The Paris targets do not pass the cost-benefit test unless risk aversion is high and discount rate low.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-06-30T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823400031
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 04 (2023)
       
  • EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON FOOD CROP PRODUCTION IN BENIN

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      Authors: GBETONDJI MELAINE ARMEL NONVIDE, ARMAND FRÉJUIS AKPA
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 14, Issue 04, November 2023.
      Climate change becomes a serious threat to all humanity and in particular developing countries where people are more vulnerable because they depend on agriculture for their livelihood. In this study, we analyzed the effects of climatic variables on maize, rice and sorghum yields for 76 of the 77 municipalities in Benin over the period from 1995 to 2019. Using a production function, we specified a panel data model. Estimation of the pooled model and the fixed effect model showed that both precipitation and temperature variation were negatively correlated with production for the full sample and in northern and southern Benin, indicating the robustness of the results. Policies to promote adaptation strategies by facilitating farmers’ access to adaptation strategies need to be strengthened.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-06-19T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500203
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 04 (2023)
       
  • TEMPERATURE AND ENERGY SECURITY: WILL FOREST BIOMASS HELP IN THE
           FUTURE'

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      Authors: ALICE FAVERO, JONGHYUN YOO, ADAM DAIGNEAULT, JUSTIN BAKER
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 14, Issue 04, November 2023.
      Despite the numerous technical, logistical, and policy challenges associated with the use of bioenergy to mitigate climate change, the latest IPCC report identifies bioenergy as a high-value and large-scale mitigation option to support the transition to a cleaner energy system. This paper links a climate-economic-energy model and a land model to measure the net mitigation effect of using forest biomass for electricity generation and corresponding implications on global temperature. Through the soft-link, the energy model provides to the land model the cost-effective regional consumption of forest biomass under nine carbon price scenarios and measures the effects of its use on fossil fuel emissions and carbon sequestered in carbon capture and storage (CCS). The land model provides the dynamic supply of forest biomass and measures the change in land management/use under each demand scenario and corresponding changes in carbon sequestered in forests. Results suggest that forest biomass should be part of global mitigation efforts despite the expected small share of electricity sourced from it. The net climate benefits of forest biomass energy vary across scenarios and temporally — in most scenarios increased biomass demand results in near term reductions in global forest carbon stocks, but at carbon prices starting at $40/tCO2e or greater, results show positive net sequestration by 2030. This increased sequestration, coupled with energy emissions displacement and bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) implies substantial long-term mitigation potential for forest biomass energy. Our results suggest that high forest biomass demand pathways could also help reduce the magnitude of future temperature growth. Further, we explore the regional effects on energy security of using forest biomass. Results show that its use can have potential large effects on trade dynamics and regional energy security issues, with 4 of the 17 global regions found to be net exporters of forest biomass.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-06-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500185
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 04 (2023)
       
  • ADOPTION OF ENERGY-EFFICIENT AIR CONDITIONERS AND THE PRINCIPAL-AGENT
           PROBLEM: EVIDENCE FROM CHINA

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      Authors: XIAO-BING ZHANG, CHANG SU, WENJI ZHOU, PING QIN
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      As an important measure for households’ adaptation to climate change, air conditioning is becoming more and more prevailing in developing countries, which implies a larger demand for electricity and highlights the role of energy-efficient air conditioners (ACs) in energy saving. Using household-level data from China, this paper investigates the determinants of households’ adoption of energy-efficient ACs, with a focus on the role of the split-incentive (principal-agent) problem between homeowners and renters in the adoption of energy-efficient ACs. The results show that the principal-agent (PA) problem does exist in the adoption of energy-efficient ACs in Chinese households, with renter-occupied dwellings being about 10.2% more likely to have low energy-efficient ACs installed in dwellings, compared to homeowner-occupied dwellings. Moreover, the increased energy consumption and carbon emissions due to the PA problem in AC investment are calculated based on the estimated agency effect.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-11-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500252
       
  • THE POLICY EFFECT OF CARBON EMISSIONS TRADING ON GREEN TECHNOLOGY
           INNOVATION — EVIDENCE FROM MANUFACTURING ENTERPRISES IN CHINA

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      Authors: JIANG DU, MIAO ZENG, XIN DENG
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Based on the panel data of listed Chinese manufacturing enterprises from 2007 to 2019, this study uses the difference-in-differences-based propensity score matching method (PSM-DID) to explore the policy effect of carbon emissions trading on green technology innovation in manufacturing from the perspective of independent innovation of enterprises. The conclusions of this study show that: (1) Carbon emissions trading has significantly improved the level of green technology innovation of manufacturing enterprises; (2) the policy effect of carbon emissions trading on the green patent application is more than twice as much as on green utility model patent application. Compared with green utility model patent, the pilot policy of carbon emissions trading has a more significant and greater policy effect on the green invention patent application; (3) the private enterprises are more sensitive to the pilot policy of carbon emissions trading than state-owned enterprises (SOEs). The carbon emissions trading in China effectively promotes low-carbon and green development of enterprises.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-11-11T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823400067
       
  • A RICARDIAN ANALYSIS OF CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON JAPAN’s AGRICULTURE:
           ACCOUNTING FOR SOLAR RADIATION

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      Authors: IORI OKAMURA, STEVEN VAN PASSEL, CHARLOTTE FABRI, TETSUJI SENDA
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      This study evaluates the effects of climate change on the net revenue of farmers in Japan. We adopted the Ricardian model, which implicitly accounts for farmers’ full adaptation. The main findings of this study are as follows. First, the Ricardian regression shows that changes in temperature significantly impact farmers’ net revenue. In contrast, changes in precipitation have limited effects on farmers’ net revenue. The results of future predictions showed that the effects of climate change are positive across the country, with varying degrees between north and south. These results are more optimistic than those in the existing literature, which frequently reveal negative climate change impacts in southern Japan. However, it should be noted that this model assumes full adaptation and does not consider the transition costs of farmers, and understanding the actual adaptive measures is an important remaining issue.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500227
       
  • UNDERSTANDING THE CARBON INTENSITY OF SOUTH KOREA’S EXPORTS: A
           MULTIPLICATIVE STRUCTURAL DECOMPOSITION ANALYSIS

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      Authors: TAE-JIN KIM, NIKOLAS TROMP
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the large and growing role of exports in Korea’s carbon emissions, they have been largely overlooked in Korea’s carbon neutrality strategy. With this in mind, we analyze Korea’s aggregate emission intensity of exports (AEIE), an indicator of the environmental efficiency of exports, which decreased from 1.37[math]Kt/$M to 0.74[math]Kt/$M during 2000–2014. Using the multi-regional input-output model and two-stage multiplicative structural decomposition analysis (MSDA), we uncover drivers of changes in the AEIE. Analysis of bilateral AEIE shows that exports to developed countries had a large impact on the decline while exports to developing countries have risen in importance. MSDA shows that the carbon intensity effect contributed most to the decline but that trade in intermediate goods and trade in final goods were also important. At the sectoral level, manufacturers of basic metals, electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning supply and transportation sectors were shown to be important drivers of the decline in the AEIE. As the first study to analyze the drivers of Korea’s AEIE, this paper suggests various abatement policies to help achieve the goal of carbon neutrality by 2050.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500239
       
  • DROUGHT AND HOTTER TEMPERATURE IMPACTS ON SUICIDE: EVIDENCE FROM THE
           MURRAY–DARLING BASIN, AUSTRALIA

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      Authors: YING Xu, SARAH ANN WHEELER, ALEC ZUO
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      The Murray–Darling Basin (MDB) is Australia’s prime agricultural region, where drought and hotter weather pose a significant threat to rural residents’ mental health – hence increasing their potential suicide risk. We investigate the impact of drought and hotter temperatures on monthly suicide within local areas in the MDB, from 2006–2016. Using Poisson fixed-effects regression modeling, we found that extreme drought and hotter temperatures were associated with increased total suicide rates. The effects of extreme drought and temperature on suicide were heterogeneous across gender and age groups, with younger men more vulnerable. Areas with higher percentages of Indigenous and farmer populations were identified as hot spots, and were vulnerable to increased temperatures and extreme drought. Green space coverage (and to some extent higher incomes) moderated the drought and suicide relationship. Providing targeted interventions in vulnerable groups and hot spot areas is warranted to reduce the suicide effect of climate change.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-09-15T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500240
       
  • ANALYZING THE LONG-RUN AND SHORT-RUN IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WHEAT
           AND MAIZE YIELD IN WESTERN HIMALAYAN REGION OF INDIA

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      Authors: TAHIR FAZAL CHOUDHARY, MEENAKSHI GUPTA
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      This study attempts to analyze the impact of climate change on the productivity of agricultural crops (wheat and maize), in the western Himalayan region of India for the period 1998–2019. The study implies second-generation panel estimation techniques. The Panel Autoregressive Distributed Lags (ARDL) method is used to analyze the long-and short-run effect of climatic variables i.e., average temperature, temperature range, and average precipitation on the yield of wheat and maize. The finding of the Panel ARDL shows that the average temperature of kharif season negatively affects the maize yield both in long run and short run, whereas the average temperature of rabi season has a negatively significant effect on wheat yield in long run and positively significant effect on wheat yield in short run. The average precipitation of rabi season has a positively significant effect on wheat yield both in long run and short run. The study recommends the development of advanced irrigation system, and the implementation of the insurance scheme by the Government and to adopt climate-smart farming techniques.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2023-06-10T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500197
       
 
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