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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 206)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 65)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Climate Change Economics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.115
Number of Followers: 52  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2010-0078 - ISSN (Online) 2010-0086
Published by World Scientific Homepage  [121 journals]
  • EXTREME HEAT REDUCES INDIVIDUAL HAPPINESS

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      Authors: FANGLIN CHEN, XIN ZHANG, ZHONGFEI CHEN
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 15, Issue 02, May 2024.
      Using individual-level happiness data in Chinese General Social Survey (CGSS) and county-level temperature data, this study analyzes the impact of extreme high temperature on happiness. Results show that extreme heat reduces individuals’ happiness. Specifically, each additional day spent experiencing extreme temperatures resulted in a 0.005 unit decrease in happiness. Results remained robust after modifying the model specification and variable measures. Further analysis shows that extreme heat more strongly affects the low-income and nonair-conditioned groups. Results of the mechanism analysis showed that extreme high temperature mainly affects the individual’s happiness by reducing the individual’s income and health. Thus, the effects of extreme heat on happiness are gradually amplified, in turn exacerbating environmental inequality. This study analyzes the negative impact of climate change from the perspective of social welfare and reveals the internal mechanism of environmental inequality, thus providing a reference for policy formulation.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-06-06T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823400043
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 02 (2024)
       
  • ECONOMICS OF COOLING AND HEATING: A REVIEW OF RECENT ADVANCES

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      Authors: Chu Wei, Wenji Zhou, Andreas Löschel, Xiao-Bing Zhang
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 15, Issue 02, May 2024.

      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824030015
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 02 (2024)
       
  • INCOME, EXTREME TEMPERATURE, AND RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION IN
           THE SPANISH PROVINCES

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      Authors: MARIA DEL P. PABLO-ROMERO, ANTONIO SÁNCHEZ-BRAZA, CLAUDIA PRISCILA IZQUIERDO
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 15, Issue 02, May 2024.
      The effect of income and extreme temperatures on the residential electricity consumption in Spain is analyzed. An electricity demand function is estimated by means of ordinary least squares-Driscoll and Kraay, feasible generalized least squares, and quantiles panel data techniques, for the total of the sample, and by coastal climatic zones. The results support the energy-environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis for Spain, the continental, and Mediterranean zones. An N form is found for the Atlantic zone. The results also reflect that increases in temperature above 22∘C and decreases below 15∘C increase electricity consumption, this increase being progressive as temperatures vary. Thus, extreme temperature generates electricity consumption growth. The Mediterranean zone is most sensitive to these temperature changes. The results also show that electricity consumption is more sensitive to cold than to heat. The results suggest an inefficient use of heating and cooling appliances in the areas with the highest electricity consumption.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824500040
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 02 (2024)
       
  • THE (NON)DISCLOSURE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY: THE CASE OF COOLING TECHNOLOGIES
           ACROSS AFRICA

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      Authors: PILLE-RIIN AJA, LOUIS-GAËTAN GIRAUDET, SÉBASTIEN HOUDE
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 15, Issue 02, May 2024.
      The adoption of air conditioning (AC) could grow exponentially across Africa under the joint effect of acute warming, sustained income growth, and rapid urbanization. The implications for greenhouse gas emissions will crucially depend on the energy efficiency of the models adopted. Little is known, however, about how energy efficiency information is conveyed to consumers in these markets. To fill this gap, we gathered data on cooling appliances characteristics from Africa’s largest e-commerce platform, serving 13 countries — Algeria, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, Morocco, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Tunisia, and Uganda. We find that less than 10% of the AC models available on the marketplace (N = 1229) have information disclosed about their energy performance. Information disclosure appears to be highly idiosyncratic with weak strategic motives. This overall lack of information about energy efficiency represents an important challenge for enforcing energy performance standards and steering demand toward energy-efficient cooling appliances.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824400049
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 02 (2024)
       
  • IMPACTS OF GLOBAL WARMING ON REGIONAL ENERGY AND ECONOMY: UNEVEN
           CONSEQUENCES ARISING FROM GLOBAL WARMING-INDUCED HEATING AND COOLING
           DEMAND OF HOUSEHOLDS

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      Authors: LIN MA, TAOYUAN WEI, KALLE NORDLING, ASBJØRN AAHEIM
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 15, Issue 02, May 2024.
      The impacts of global warming vary across regions. This paper studies the distributional implications of global warming impacts on household energy use for heating and cooling and the induced macroeconomic responses under different scenarios. Our research updates the direct impact of global warming on household energy demand in 140 regions worldwide by utilizing existing estimations of damage functions related to temperature changes. Subsequently, the updated direct impact is used in a global static computable general equilibrium (CGE) model to evaluate the macroeconomic responses. We find that at the global level, the market effects cause a reduction in the direct impact on the demand for oil and gas, while that for electricity displays a positive but moderate growth. Whereas the regional effects vary across countries and lead to changes in both directions, in which the autonomous adaptation embodied in the global market plays a vital role. Furthermore, we find strong inequality in the socioeconomic responses to global warming across regions. Notably, low-income countries are most strongly affected by increased primary energy use and decreased gross domestic product (GDP). Disparities in the impacts on carbon-based energy sources yield a near-perfect inequality as per the adjusted Gini index for CO2 emission changes, which potentially intensify the distributional consequences of global climate change.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824500052
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 02 (2024)
       
  • CLIMATE CHANGE AND HOUSEHOLD ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION INEQUALITY IN CHINA

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      Authors: DENGKE CHEN, SHIYI CHEN, HAO JIN
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 15, Issue 02, May 2024.
      Based on the micro-data of China’s Urban Household Survey, this paper investigates the impact of climate change on household electricity consumption inequality by using a two-way fixed effect model. The result reveals that households are more likely to purchase air conditioning (AC) and consume more electricity in response to extreme weather shocks. Furthermore, it is observed that high-income households are better equipped to mitigate the negative effects of extreme weather, as they possess a larger proportion of AC units and are more likely to acquire new ones to cope with extremely high temperatures. Finally, the study finds that extreme weather shocks exacerbate inequality in household electricity consumption.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-03-09T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824400013
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 02 (2024)
       
  • THE IMPACT OF INTERGENERATIONAL PARENTING ON AC COOLING DEMAND: EVIDENCE
           FROM SOUTHERN CHINA

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      Authors: MENGSHU ZHU, RUOHAN ZHONG, CHU WEI
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 15, Issue 02, May 2024.
      Given ever-increasing temperatures, household air conditioner (AC) usage is increasing rapidly, posing significant sustainability challenges. Identifying the drivers of residential demand is critical, especially in developing countries such as China. In contrast to assumptions made by the existing literature, intergenerational parenting and multigenerational households are widespread in China. To address this oversight, this study is the first to use data from an appliance-level, 15-min AC operation database from southern China to quantify the impact of intergenerational parenting families on cooling-related electricity consumption and examine its mechanisms. First, intergenerational parenting significantly positively impacts such consumption. Compared to working-age households, Intergenerational households consume 49% more electricity for cooling, and families with children consume 28% more. In contrast, families with older adults but no children use 6% less electricity for cooling than working-age families. Second, intergenerational families use the AC for 0.5 additional hours per day, set the temperature 0.9°C lower, and keep the AC idle longer than working-age households. Third, intergenerational parenting’s impact shows an M-shaped pattern throughout the day (peaking at 9:00 and 17:00). Fourth, working-age adults significantly moderate the impact of intergenerational parenting on electricity demand.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-03-07T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824400037
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 02 (2024)
       
  • INVESTIGATING THE IMPACT OF INFORMATION FEEDBACK ON RESIDENTS’
           ENERGY-SAVING BEHAVIOR IN THE HEATING SECTOR

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      Authors: HONGGUANG NIE, FENGJIAO MU, YING FAN
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 15, Issue 02, May 2024.
      Global fossil energy consumption is a significant source of carbon dioxide emissions and a major cause of global climate change. Heat consumption in the residential sector is an important part of this consumption. Based on reinforcement theory, this study analyzed the influence mechanism of information feedback on the residents’ energy-saving behaviors and applied the survey data from 1248 households in three Western European countries to analyze the impact of heat consumption information feedback on four typical heat-saving behaviors of residents. Finally, it applied the probit model to measure the quantitative effect of information feedback on the heat-saving behavior. Four heat-saving behaviors were considered: “improving house insulation”, “setting the thermostat to 20°C or below”, “turning the heat down at night” and “closing the windows when the heating is running”. The empirical results showed that heat consumption information feedback has a significant impact on residents’ heat-saving behavior. After adding the controlling variables, such as demographic variables, willingness to pay for greenness, environmental concern and environmental belief, the estimated results changed slightly, but the estimates of the study are still significant. According to the estimates, residents who can obtain the heat consumption information feedback timely were 9.3%, 5.2%, 5.9% and 4.3% more likely than residents who can’t obtain the heat consumption information feedback timely to adopt the heat-saving behaviors of “improving house insulation”, “setting the thermostat to 20°C or below”, “turning the heat down at night” and “closing the windows when the heating is running”.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823400079
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 02 (2024)
       
  • DOES WOODFUEL PRICE DISTORTION INHIBIT ECO-EFFICIENCY IN WOODFUEL
           EXPLOITATION SYSTEMS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA' EVIDENCE FROM CAMEROON

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      Authors: MOUSTAPHA MOUNMEMI, NOUROU MOHAMMADOU, GEORGES KOBOU
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 15, Issue 02, May 2024.
      The aim of this study is to assess the impacts of woodfuel prices distortion on the eco-efficiency of woodfuel exploitation systems. The study, conducted in Cameroon, involved 415 randomly selected woodfuel operators. To achieve this, the marginal opportunity cost approach and the stochastic specification of the production technology were used to assess the price distortion degree and the eco-efficiency indices, respectively. In doing so, the 2SLS allowed to evaluate the impacts of woodfuel prices distortion on eco-efficiency of woodfuel exploitation systems. From this study, we conclude that the woodfuel prices distortion does not encourage eco-efficient exploitation of this resource. A 1% increase in the degree of distortion results in a reduction in eco-efficiency of −0.019 points. Including the optimal price in the woodfuel pricing system will improve eco-efficiency by 0.030 points. In view of these results, a marginal opportunity cost pricing system that takes into account all the exploitation costs ignored by the market price like user costs associated with resource depletion and the external costs associated with CO2 emissions will encourage producers to adopt a sustainable woodfuel exploitation path.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823400080
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 02 (2024)
       
  • DO HIGH TEMPERATURES DAMPEN CHINESE URBAN HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION'

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      Authors: XUAN CHEN, LAN-CUI LIU, JUAN-JUAN HOU, XUE GAO
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 15, Issue 02, May 2024.
      Increased extreme heat is one of the clearest manifestations of climate change, but its impact on household consumption is poorly understood. This paper estimates the effects of high temperatures on total household consumption. We find an inverted U-shaped relationship, with high temperatures (≥ 30∘C) reducing total household consumption by 7.18% compared with the reference group from 5∘C to 10∘C. In the living consumption subcategory, expenditures for eating out decline by 9.59%, whereas expenditures for protective gear, fuel, and housing increase. Expenditures in the going-out category generally decrease but vary with distance, vehicles, and sites. Spending on all types of public transportation and outdoor recreation decreases regardless of distance, whereas private transportation and short-distance indoor recreation expenditures increase slightly. Our findings indicate that households alleviate high-temperature impacts mainly by reducing expenditures outside the home and increasing expenditures on at-home or indoor activities.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-01-26T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500264
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 02 (2024)
       
  • HETEROGENEOUS RESPONSES OF COMMERCIAL BANKS TO VARIOUS CLIMATE RISKS:
           EVIDENCE FROM 42 A-SHARE LISTED BANKS IN CHINA

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      Authors: WENNA FAN, FENG WANG, HAO ZHANG, RUI LING, HONGFEI JIANG
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Financial supervisors across the world recognize the threats posed by climate change. This research aims to examine the immediate impact of climate risks on bank returns using an event study methodology, with data from 42 A-share listed banks in China spanning the years 2012–2022. The findings reveal a delayed effect of climate risks on commercial banks. Hydrological disasters such as floods significantly reduce the returns of large state-owned, national joint-stock, and city commercial banks. Additionally, the launch of China’s carbon emissions trading market leads to a short-term decline in returns for national joint-stock banks, while rising loan exposure and weakening market sensitivity (MS), induced by climate change, reduce the returns of commercial banks. However, bolstering credit risk management proves effective in enhancing profitability. This study provides insights at the market level into the financial implications of climate change for banking institutions, supplementing existing evidence.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-06-05T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824500064
       
  • THE IMPACT OF CHINA’S “DUAL-CARBON GOAL” ON THE STOCK MARKET:
           EVIDENCE FROM THE PHOTOVOLTAIC INDUSTRY

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      Authors: CHUANGYE YAN, MINGJUN HE, FANG LI, LILI ZHU
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      After the Chinese government’s announcement to achieve the goal of “carbon peaking and carbon neutrality”, the solar photovoltaic power generation industry in the country has experienced rapid development. This paper examines the impact of China’s “dual-carbon” goal on the country’s photovoltaic industry. Photovoltaic companies listed on the stock market are selected and the stock price data of these selected companies from June 1, 2020 to January 28, 2022 are tested for potential structural changes. The paper adopts the Quandt–Andrews test and the results show that the four selected companies have indeed undergone structural changes within one year after the announcement of the dual-carbon goal, and that the demand for photovoltaic power generation equipment has increased significantly. Finally, some suggestions are put forward for enhancing the photovoltaic industry after the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824400062
       
  • STOCK MARKET RESPONSE TO METEOROLOGICAL DISASTER RISK: FROM LIQUIDITY
           PERSPECTIVE

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      Authors: JIE Wu, YUNONG WANG, XIAOGUANG YANG
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the impact of meteorological disaster risk perception on stock liquidity of Chinese listed companies by constructing meteorological disaster risk perception indicators through the Baidu index. Empirical evidence reveals that an increase in meteorological disaster risk perception decreases investors’ risk appetite and increases investors’ loss aversion, which in turn negatively affects stock liquidity. In addition, the increase in meteorological disaster risk perception also shrinks stock trading volume by reducing investor sentiment. The negative effect of meteorological disaster risk perception on stock liquidity is more pronounced in summer and winter and for firms located in water-rich areas. The findings of this study provide empirical evidence from investors’ perspective for understanding the impact of meteorological disasters on stock market liquidity.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-05-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824400074
       
  • FACT OR FICTION' — CLIMATE CHANGE RISK AND TRADE CREDIT

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      Authors: HUANG-PING YEN, XIAOTONG YUE, KUNG-CHENG HO, XIAORAN KONG
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      The economic consequences of frequent weather events at the firm level have received considerable attention in recent years. This study empirically investigates the impact of climate change risk on firms’ trade credit, using Chinese-listed firms as research subjects. The results suggested that climate change risk has a negative impact on corporate trade credit by deepening firms’ financial distress and lowering the level of industry competitiveness. Both digital transformation and government transparency were found to have a significant negative moderating effect. Heterogeneity analyses showed that firms without environmental background executives, nonstate-owned firms, and nongreen firms were more significantly affected. Finally, we found that the green, low-carbon city pilot policy had a benign effect on corporate trade credit.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824400050
       
  • CLIMATE RISKS AND PREDICTABILITY OF COMMODITY RETURNS AND VOLATILITY:
           EVIDENCE FROM OVER 750 YEARS OF DATA

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      Authors: JACOBUS NEL, RANGAN GUPTA, MARK E. WOHAR, CHRISTIAN PIERDZIOCH
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      We analyze whether metrics of climate risks, as captured primarily by changes in temperature anomaly and its stochastic volatility (SV), can predict returns and volatility of 25 commodities, covering the overall historical period of 1258 to 2021. To this end, we apply a higher-order nonparametric causality-in-quantiles test to not only uncover potential in-sample predictability in the entire conditional distribution of commodity returns and volatility but also to account for nonlinearity and structural breaks which exist between commodity returns and the metrics of climate risks. We find that, unlike in the misspecified linear Granger causality tests, climate risks do predict commodity returns and volatility, though the impact on the latter is stronger, in terms of the coverage of the conditional distribution. Insights from our findings can benefit academics, investors, and policymakers in their decision-making.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-05-08T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824500039
       
  • CLIMATE-SMART CITY: CAN CHINA’S SMART CITY POLICY LEAD TO LOW-CARBON
           DEVELOPMENT OF CITIES'

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      Authors: KANGYIN DONG, FARHAD TAGHIZADEH-HESARY, CONGYU ZHAO
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      As an intensive mode of urbanization, a smart city may be conducive to achieving a win–win situation of regulating the urban economy and the environment. Based on a quasi-natural experiment in three batches of smart pilot cities, we use the difference-in-differences (DID) method to examine the impact of the smart city policy on CO2 emissions by adopting city panel data in China during the period 2003–2017. This study also explores the influence mechanism and heterogeneous effects of smart city policy. The empirical results indicate that China’s smart city policy effectively lowered CO2 emissions by approximately 1.83%. This primary finding remains reliable using the propensity score matching (PSM)-DID method for robustness check. Moreover, the smart city policy not only directly inhibits CO2 emissions, but also indirectly influences CO2 emissions through scale, structure, and technology effects. Regarding city heterogeneity, the first-tier cities in the eastern area, which have larger population scale and more resource endowments, tend to have stronger negative impacts on CO2 emissions. Based on these conclusions, we highlight several specific policy measures for reducing CO2 emissions and achieving dual carbon targets in China.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824500015
       
  • THE FACTORS INFLUENCING THE JOINT PURCHASE OF ELECTRIC VEHICLE AND SOLAR
           PHOTOVOLTAICS: EVIDENCE FROM CALIFORNIA

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      Authors: ATIA FERDOUSEE
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Environmentally friendly choices can make more impact when these are taken in combination. For example, purchasing electric vehicles (EV) and solar photovoltaics (PV) simultaneously. Previous studies suggest that although EVs emit fewer pollutants than conventional vehicles, they increase energy consumption, and that usually comes with more environmental damage. Installing solar PV can be a solution by producing energy while reducing our carbon footprints. This study analyzes the factors that influence the joint purchase of EVs and solar PV. The findings show that higher income and higher education levels significantly impact making these choices. The study also reveals that there is a gender gap in this purchase decisions, as nonbinary people show significant negative effects. More specifically, female and nonbinary consumers are less likely to purchase EVs. While considering future decisions, this study finds that higher education and nonbinary gender show similar effects of current choice analysis for future choice analysis. However, women show a positive impact on purchasing EVs but a negative impact on installing solar in the future.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-05-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824500027
       
  • DOES THE DIGITAL ECONOMY CHANGE THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ECONOMIC GROWTH
           AND CARBON EMISSIONS' EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FROM 278 CITIES IN CHINA

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      Authors: JIAOJIAO FAN, XIAOYA GAO, LIN SUN, MENG QIN
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      The rise of the digital economy has had widespread and profound impacts on the economy and society. Extensive literature exists on digital economy and carbon emissions. However, there is a lack of literature focusing on the impact of the digital economy on the relationship between economic development and carbon emissions. This paper examines whether the digital economy has changed the relationship between economic growth and carbon emissions using panel and spatial econometric modeling. Using a panel dataset of 278 prefecture-level cities in China for the period from 2011 to 2019, the results show that there is a significant inverted U-shaped relationship between economic growth and carbon emissions, which is consistent with the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) model. Moreover, the digital economy brings the turning point forward. In terms of spatial decomposition effects, both direct and indirect effects of economic growth on carbon emissions are significant, suggesting that economic growth has a positive impact on carbon emissions both in local cities and in neighboring areas. Overall, these findings provide valuable policy insights for promoting the synergistic development of the digital economy and accelerating the transition to a low-carbon economy.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-03-09T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823400092
       
  • THE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE RISK-TAKING LEVEL OF CHINESE
           COMMERCIAL BANKS: EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FROM CHINESE LOCAL COMMERCIAL BANKS

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      Authors: YUEGANG SONG, WENYUAN CHEN, KANYU ZHANG
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      China’s risk disasters caused by climate change have increased the risk-taking level of China’s commercial banks, posing a threat to the stable development of financial markets. Based on the data from 152 commercial banks in China from 2011 to 2021, this paper uses the fixed effect model to analyze the effect and mechanism of China’s climate change on the risk-taking level of Chinese commercial banks. The main conclusions are as follows. (1) Climate change has significantly improved the risk-taking level of Chinese commercial banks. The results remain significant under the robustness and endogenous tests, such as dealing with endogenous problems, changing variables and adjusting sample intervals. (2) The results of heterogeneity analysis show that under different regions and different types of conditions, the impact of climate change on the risk-taking level of China’s commercial banks is heterogeneous, and the impact is stronger in urban commercial banks and eastern China. (3) The direct economic losses caused by natural disasters caused by climate change affect the risk-taking level of Chinese commercial banks; however, the adjustment of ex ante disaster insurance can weaken the impact of climate change on the risk-taking level of Chinese commercial banks. This paper studies the impact of climate change on the risk-taking level of Chinese commercial banks from the perspective of bank risk-taking level, which is of great significance to enhance the risk prevention awareness of Chinese commercial banks in response to climate change.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-03-09T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007824400025
       
  • ADVANCEMENTS TO THE RICARDIAN ANALYSIS IN THE PAST QUARTER OF THE CENTURY

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      Authors: DIVYA PRAKASH, MEHDI NEMATI, ARIEL DINAR, CORY STRUTHERS, SCOTT MACkENZIE, MATTHEW S. SHUGART
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      This paper presents a comprehensive review of the literature on Ricardian analysis as applied to estimating the impact of climate change on agriculture. Through a survey of published research, we discuss revisions, expansions, and the criticisms researchers have made of the Ricardian analysis since its introduction by Mendelsohn et al. The types of dependent variables and the choice of the climate variables utilized in the Ricardian analysis are synthesized and discussed. Additionally, the paper outlines the distinctions between static and dynamic Ricardian analysis, different farm types, and analyses using aggregate and farm-level data. The paper provides a synthesis of the findings of previous studies related to the study location and farm type and explores open questions and empirical concerns that require investigation in future research.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2024-03-05T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500318
       
 
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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 206)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 65)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  

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