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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 112 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 199)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 134)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 66)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Developments in Atmospheric Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Weather     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Climate Change Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Mathematics of Climate and Weather Forecasting     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Change and Adaptation in Socio-Ecological Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
The Cryosphere Discussions (TCD)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Climate Summary of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Large Marine Ecosystems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Nīvār     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access  
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Meteorologia     Open Access  
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Climate Change Economics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.115
Number of Followers: 26  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2010-0078 - ISSN (Online) 2010-0086
Published by World Scientific Homepage  [119 journals]
  • HOW CARBON MARKET COOPERATION CHANGES THE ENERGY SYSTEMS IN NORTHEAST ASIA
    • Authors: MINHO BAEK, QIMIN CHAI, SUDUK KIM
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 11, Issue 02, May 2020.
      This paper explores the impact of international emissions trading (IET) among Korea, China, and Japan, three countries that would form the largest potential carbon market in the world. The Nationally Determined Contribution for each country forms the basis of scenario analyses using GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model). As expected, China emerges as the sole net seller of emissions permits while Korea and Japan are the net purchasers of emission permits produced by China. All participants enjoy gains from emissions trading. The implementation of IET changes the power systems of Korea and Japan by favoring increased conventional fossil fuel usage over renewable power technologies or attached carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies, while China’s power system moves in the opposite direction, by boosting the deployment of renewables and CCS-attached technologies. Considering the counterproductive incentives for Korea and Japan to consume more carbon-intensive energy sources, each country should consider such issues carefully before officially adopting IET as the pillar of climate policy.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-07-10T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820500104
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 02 (2020)
       
  • WEATHER AT DIFFERENT GROWTH STAGES, MULTIPLE PRACTICES AND RISK EXPOSURES:
           PANEL DATA EVIDENCE FROM ETHIOPIA
    • Authors: HAILEMARIAM TEKLEWOLD, ALEMU MEKONNEN
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 11, Issue 02, May 2020.
      This study investigates the effects of combinations of climate smart agricultural practices on risk exposure and cost of risk. We do this by examining the different risk components — mean, variance, skewness, and kurtosis — in a multinomial treatment effects framework by controlling weather variables for key stages of crop growth. We found that adoption of combinations of practices is widely viewed as a risk-reducing insurance strategy that can increase farmers’ resilience to production risk. The hypothesis of equality of weather parameters across crop development stages is also rejected. The heterogeneous effects of weather across crop growth stages have important implications for climate change adaptation to maximize quasi-option value. For a country that has the vision to build a climate-resilient economy, this knowledge is valuable to identify a combination of climate smart practices that minimizes production risk under variable weather conditions.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-06-17T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820500098
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 02 (2020)
       
  • COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF EMISSION REDUCTION TARGETS TOWARD INDC
           IMPLEMENTATION IN MALAYSIA, INDONESIA AND THAILAND BY 2050
    • Authors: ABUL QUASEM AL-AMIN, MD. SUJAHANGIR KABIR SARKAR, ADEEL AHMED, BRENT DOBERSTEIN
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 11, Issue 02, May 2020.
      Global warming is becoming increasingly evident as greenhouse gas emissions increase worldwide and affect the environment, health and economy. Many Southeast Asian countries face this reality and hence they are concerned about setting and achieving an effective emission reduction strategy. As such, this study analyzes and compares emission reduction targets on selected Southeast Asian countries, including Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand, by using a long-run Regional Dynamic Integrated Model of the Climate and Economy (RdICME). This study considers the comparative outcomes of BAU (Business as Usual: base case) and INDC (Intended Nationally Determined Contributions) scenarios for the 40-year period from 2010 to 2050. According to BAU scenario, carbon emissions are projected to gradually increase in all countries; however, if Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand apply their INDC targets as agreed upon in the 2015 Paris Agreement, all three countries will experience significant emissions reductions after 2030. Specifically, by 2050, total emissions will be reduced by 33.88%, 42.50% and 41.68% in Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand, respectively, if the countries implement their INDCs. According to the INDC targets, all three countries will experience a net reduction of per capita emission intensity by 2030 and onwards; however, Malaysia is projected to face lower marginal damage costs whereas Indonesia and Thailand will face higher marginal damage costs for 2010–2050. This study also finds that the amount of planned investment for INDC emissions reduction is currently insufficient to achieve planned targets. The findings from this study would help country-specific policymakers to oversee the likely gaps to be fulfilled within 2030–2050.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-06-04T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820500116
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 02 (2020)
       
  • DESIGNING A GLOBALLY ACCEPTABLE CARBON TAX SCHEME TO ADDRESS
           COMPETITIVENESS AND LEAKAGE CONCERNS
    • Authors: LEI ZHU, LIANBIAO CUI, JOACHIM SCHLEICH
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 11, Issue 02, May 2020.
      To address competitiveness and leakage concerns in international climate policy, this paper proposes a differentiated carbon tax scheme (DCT), which largely preserves the relative competitive positions of developed and developing countries. The paper first presents a theoretical model from which to derive the DCT. Then, employing a global trade analysis model, competitiveness and leakage effects under a DCT are simulated and contrasted to those of a unilateral carbon tax, a carbon tariff, and a uniform carbon tax. The results of our analysis suggest that: (1) under the proposed DCT, emission reductions in developed and developing countries are higher and leakage is lower than under a carbon tariff; (2) the DCT has weaker competitiveness effects than a carbon tariff; and (3) the DCT is more favorable to developing countries’ output and welfare than a carbon tariff or a uniform global carbon tax. Developing countries may therefore embrace a DCT as an intermediate step towards the implementation of a global carbon tax.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-05-30T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820500086
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 02 (2020)
       
  • THE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF GLOBAL WARMING ON CHINESE CITIES
    • Authors: XIAO-CHEN YUAN, ZHIMING YANG, YI-MING WEI, BING WANG
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 11, Issue 02, May 2020.
      There is a substantial concern for the economic impacts of global warming. This study identifies the effects of seasonal temperatures on total economic output in the cities of China, and then projects the changes in local economic performance under future climate and development scenarios. The results suggest that there are significant negative effects of warm seasonal temperature but positive effects of cold seasonal temperature on economic growth. These different effects increase as more lags of temperature are included. By 2090, the cities may have the average reduction of 44% in GDP per capita under RCP8.5, but some of them in Northeast China are predicted to get positive impacts under RCP2.6. The difference in the estimated aggregate impacts under the two RCPs could be as much as 24%. The poor cities are likely to have higher economic damages, which amplifies the economic inequality. Finally, the ranges of economic impacts projected by different climate models are presented.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-04-15T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820500074
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 02 (2020)
       
  • CLIMATE CHANGE AND EXTERNALITY
    • Authors: ZILI YANG
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Climate change is an externality phenomenon. The DICE/RICE models are IAMs that treat climate change as an externality explicitly. Such a feature of DICE/RICE is recognized by the Nobel Committee and is one of the primary reasons for its influence. This paper argues the essentiality of incorporating external effects of climate change in our understanding of climate change from a socio-economic perspective; points out the biases of missing the externality elements in climate change economics; outlining the crucial role of externality in IAM modeling.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-10-23T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820400072
       
  • WHAT THE FUTURE MIGHT HOLD: DISTRIBUTIONS OF REGIONAL SECTORAL DAMAGES FOR
           THE UNITED STATES — ESTIMATES AND MAPS IN AN EXHIBITION
    • Authors: GARY YOHE, JACQUELINE WILLWERTH, JAMES E. NEUMANN, ZOE KERRICH
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      The text and associated Supplemental Materials contribute internally consistent and therefore entirely comparable regional, temporal, and sectoral risk profiles to a growing literature on regional economic vulnerability to climate change. A large collection of maps populated with graphs of Monte-Carlo simulation results support a communication device in this regard — a convenient visual that we hope will make comparative results tractable and credible and resource allocation decisions more transparent. Since responding to climate change is a risk-management problem, it is important to note that these results address both sides of the risk calculation. They characterize likelihood distributions along four alternative emissions futures (thereby reflecting the mitigation side context); and they characterize consequences along these transient trajectories (which can thereby inform planning for the iterative adaptation side). Looking across the abundance of sectors that are potentially vulnerable to some of the manifestations of climate change, the maps therefore hold the potential of providing comparative information about the magnitude, timing, and regional location of relative risks. This is exactly the information that planners who work to protect property and public welfare by allocating scarce resources across competing venues need to have at their disposal — information about relative vulnerabilities across time and space and contingent on future emissions and future mitigation. It is also the type of information that integrated assessment researchers need to calibrate and update their modeling efforts — scholars who are exemplified by Professor Nordhaus who created and exercised the Dynamic Integrated Climate-Economy and Regional Integrated Climate-Economy models.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-10-12T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820400023
       
  • INTRODUCTION TO THE SPECIAL ISSUE COMMEMORATING WILLIAM NORDHAUS
    • Authors: Robert Mendelsohn
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-10-08T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820030025
       
  • INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT AND CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Authors: ROBERT MENDELSOHN
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      The crowning achievement of the many published papers and books that William Nordhaus has published on climate change is the development of a simple Integrated Assessment Model of climate change. Embedding natural science insights into an economic framework reveals one can “solve” this difficult problem “for the greatest good, for the greatest number, and for the longest time”. Making certain that all the pieces are empirically based, and fit tightly together, and are internally consistent reveals this to be a masterpiece in the fine art of Integrated Assessment.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-10-07T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820400047
       
  • INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT MODELING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE IN CHINA
    • Authors: DAIGEE SHAW, ZILI YANG
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-10-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820030013
       
  • ROLLING THE DICE IN THE CORRIDORS OF POWER: WILLIAM NORDHAUS’S IMPACTS
           ON CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY
    • Authors: JOSEPH E. ALDY, ROBERT N. STAVINS
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      The seminal contributions of William Nordhaus to scholarship on the long-run macroeconomics of global climate change are clear. Much more challenging to identify are the impacts of Nordhaus and his research on public policy in this domain. We examine three conceptually distinct pathways for that influence: his personal participation in the policy world; his research’s direct contribution to the formulation and evaluation of public policy; and his research’s indirect role informing public policy. Many of the themes that emerge in this assessment of the contributions of one of the most important economists to have worked in the domain of climate change analysis apply more broadly to the roles played by other leading economists in this and other policy domains.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-10-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820400011
       
  • U.S. HOUSEHOLD PREFERENCES FOR CLIMATE AMENITIES: DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS AND
           ROBUSTNESS TESTING
    • Authors: JARED C. CARBONE, SUL-KI LEE, YUZHOU SHEN
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      We estimate how climate amenities influence where households decide to reside in the United States with two main objectives in mind: (i) to produce estimates with sufficient demographic detail to inform demographic population projections for use in climate impact analysis; (ii) to study the robustness of estimates from the existing literature. With respect to the former goal, we find important differences in job-related migration motives by age group and in the overall propensity to migrate among households with children. With respect to the latter aim, our framework shares a common methodological approach with other, recent attempts to recover climate preferences, allowing us to explore the consequences of a number of key assumptions in a systematic manner. Consistent with the existing literature, we find relatively robust estimates of the impact of the frequency of extreme heat days on household location decisions. The impacts of other common measures of climate, including the frequency of extreme cold days, average summer and winter temperatures, annual precipitation, humidity and frequency of sunshine, do not show a strong enough signal in the data to be estimated with precision.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-09-15T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820500165
       
  • ASSESSING GLOBAL AND NATIONAL ECONOMIC LOSSES FROM CLIMATE CHANGE: A STUDY
           BASED ON CGEM-IAM IN CHINA
    • Authors: TIANPENG WANG, FEI TENG, XILIANG ZHANG
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Integrated assessment models (IAMs) have been widely used to inform policymaking on climate change. However, few Chinese IAMs have merely been involved in international model comparison. In this study, we develop an IAM, namely, CGEM-IAM, by coupling a global recursive dynamic CGE model with a simple climate model and establishing a climate impact assessment module based on a system of indirect damage functions. By using the CGEM-IAM, we analyze economic losses due to climate impacts under various scenarios. Results reveal that under the baseline scenario, the global annual loss due to climate change will reach $1628 billion (constant 2011 USD) in 2050, which represents approximately 0.79% of the global GDP in that year. The achievement of current commitments by countries promotes the slight reduction of the annual economic losses to $1398 billion in 2050. Under the 2-degree scenario, approximately 50% of the economic losses could be avoided. Developing countries and regions are vulnerable to the negative impact of climate change and could suffer from 85% of global economic losses, whereas China accounts for approximately 1% of global total climate impacts. Although the climate damage estimated by CGEM-IAM is comparable with the IAMs DICE and FUND models at the aggregate level, they are inconsistent at the sector distribution. Therefore, additional efforts should compare multiple models at the regional and sectoral levels in detail.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-08-24T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820410031
       
  • ESTIMATING HEALTH CO-BENEFITS OF CLIMATE POLICIES IN CHINA: AN APPLICATION
           OF THE REGIONAL EMISSIONS-AIR QUALITY-CLIMATE-HEALTH (REACH) FRAMEWORK
    • Authors: CHENFEI QU, XI YANG, DA ZHANG, XILIANG ZHANG
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Climate policies can bring local air quality and health co-benefits, which may partially or entirely offset the costs of implementing these policies. In this study, we introduce an integrated health co-benefits assessment model, the Regional Emissions-Air quality-Climate-Health (REACH) Modeling Framework, which is capable of evaluating the impact of policies on air pollution-related mortality and morbidity in the whole economic system overtime at the provincial level for China. We first provide a detailed description of the modeling framework and conduct a case study to estimate the health benefits of different climate policy scenarios. We show that a scenario consistent with the 2∘C target that peaks China’s emissions before 2025 could avoid around 190 thousand premature deaths in 2030. The health benefits could partially or fully cover the policy costs under different assumptions of the value of a statistical life (VSL). Our framework also illustrates that estimated costs and health benefits distribute unevenly across regions in China.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-08-05T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820410043
       
  • THE EFFECTIVE BENCHMARK SELECTION MODEL AND SIMULATION IN THE POWER SECTOR
           OF CHINA’S ETS
    • Authors: SHAOZHOU QI, ANQI HE, JIHONG ZHANG
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      In 2019, the National Carbon Emission Trading Scheme (ETS) of China’s power generation industry was officially launched, and the free allocation and benchmark are the primary ways for allowance allocation in the first phase of the national ETS. The carbon allowance allocation method is the basis for the effective operation of the ETS. In order to evaluate China’s carbon allowance allocation method published by policy, we constructed a selection model of the effective benchmark and combined with three different scenarios such as no generation-right trading market, incomplete generation-right trading market and complete generation-right trading market to simulate the operation of the national ETS in China’s power generation industry. The study shows that: (1) according to the current benchmark value published by policy, the carbon allowance supply will exceed demand in all scenarios. (2) Regardless of the scenario, in order to balance the supply and demand of allowance in the ETS, the effective benchmark value should be adjusted to 35th–50th quantile of the carbon emissions per unit power generation.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-08-03T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820410067
       
  • IMPACTS OF MECHANISMS TO PROMOTE PARTICIPATION IN CLIMATE MITIGATION:
           BORDER CARBON ADJUSTMENTS VERSUS UNIFORM TARIFF MEASURES
    • Authors: KUN ZHANG, QIAO-MEI LIANG, LI-JING LIU, MEI-MEI XUE, BI-YING YU, CE WANG, RONG HAN, YUN-FEI DU, YUN-FEI YAO, JUN-JIE CHANG, JINXIAO TAN, HUA LIAO, YI-MING WEI
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Because free-riding behavior is an inherent characteristic of climate change, how to protect the economic benefits of the emission reduction regions and prompt the noncooperative region to join the emission reduction coalition is particularly important. In this study, we use a global multi-region multi-sector CGE model to compare the impacts of border carbon adjustment (BCA) and two unified tariff mechanisms based on different implementation principles on USA. The results show that the BCA is more effective in reducing carbon leakage in USA than the uniform tariff mechanisms. However, for GDP and welfare losses, the scenario Tariff-carbon-reduction results in greater GDP and welfare losses in USA, which is more conducive to prompting USA to implement carbon reduction policies than the BCA measures. Finally, the sensitivity analysis of carbon price levels and key substitution elasticity further confirmed the results.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-07-20T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820410079
       
  • FARMERS’ PERCEPTION OF CLIMATE CHANGE COMPARED WITH OBJECTIVE DATA:
           EVIDENCE FROM THE CENTRAL REGION OF GHANA
    • Authors: SAMUEL KWESI NDZEBAH DADZIE
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Many studies of climate change adaptation have relied on farmers’ perceptions of climate change to explain why farmers are adopting new farming methods, and to advise adaptation policy framework that justifies Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) especially in Africa. These studies have rarely verified whether farmers’ perceptions are consistent with observed changes in meteorological conditions to establish sufficient premise. This study compares farmers’ perceptions of changes in precipitation and temperature in a rainfed agriculture region of Ghana against objective measurements made in nearby weather stations in the region. The study finds that farmers correctly perceived the increase in temperature over time but incorrectly perceived a reduction in precipitation, while objective data showed high fluctuations with no clear trend. It is possible that farmers mistakenly assumed reduction in soil moisture meant to support crop growth requirements was caused by less rainfall when in fact it was caused by higher temperature.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-07-17T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820500153
       
  • CAN CARBON TAX COMPLEMENT EMISSION TRADING SCHEME' THE IMPACT OF
           CARBON TAX ON ECONOMY, ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT IN CHINA
    • Authors: BOQIANG LIN, ZHIJIE JIA
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      The problems of excessive CO2 emissions and global warming caused by human activities are becoming more serious. Carbon Tax (CT) and Emission Trading Scheme (ETS) are popular emission mitigation mechanisms. This paper establishes four counter-factual (CF) scenarios with different CT rate, and constructs a dynamic recursive computable general equilibrium (CGE) model, named China Energy-Environment-Economy Analysis (CEEEA) model, to study the impact of different CT rate on the economy, energy and environment. The results indicate that if CT complement ETS, and the cap of ETS is based on grandfathering method, the carbon trading price will reduce due to the changes in carbon allowances demand and supply. CT can share the mitigation pressure from ETS coverages into non-ETS coverages. When CT complement ETS but nothing is changed in mechanism of emission trading, the total emission mitigation effect will reduce slightly but the mitigation cost will reduce significantly. All in all, using CT as the supplement is a good mitigation strategy to release Gross Domestic Product (GDP) loss. But if we want to get more mitigation effect, rising CT rate or a stricter carbon cap may help.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-07-16T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S201000782041002X
       
  • ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE AND AIR POLLUTION IN CHINA THROUGH
           HEALTH AND LABOR SUPPLY PERSPECTIVE: AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT MODEL
           ANALYSIS
    • Authors: CAN WANG, HAI HUANG, WENJIA CAI, MENGZHEN ZHAO, JIN LI, SHIHUI ZHANG, YUAN LIU
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      An energy supply dominated by the use of fossil fuels causes both climate change and air pollution, which have negative impacts on human capital via both health and productivity. In addition, different people are affected differently because of factors such as age, gender and education level. To enhance the understanding of the benefits of low carbon transition from the labor supply perspective and help to identify strategies of collaborative control for CO2 and local air pollutants in China, an integrated assessment model linking the air quality module and the health impact module with a disaggregated labor sector computable general equilibrium (CGE) economic system is developed and applied in this study. Results show some key findings. First, renewable energy development and carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies will contribute significantly to GDP in terms of their impact on air quality improvement by 0.99% and 0.54%, respectively, in 2050. Second, due to differences in labor composition, air pollution has, and will continue to have, the greatest impact on sectors with a higher proportion of male and lower-educated workers — such as the coal sector, and it will have the least impact on sectors with a higher proportion of female and higher-educated workers — such as the public administration sector. Third, the different impacts of sector output will increase economic inequality. Highlights •The economic impact of climate change and air pollution is assessed. •A CGE model with disaggregated labor sectors is developed. •The secondary industry is most affected by pollution from a health perspective. •Low-income groups suffer the largest loss of income due to pollution. •A low carbon policy will improve air quality and economic equity.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-07-13T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820410018
       
  • EXPLORING THE IMPACTS OF CARBON MARKET LINKAGE ON SECTORAL
           COMPETITIVENESS: A CASE STUDY OF BEIJING–TIANJIN–HEBEI REGION BASED ON
           THE CEECPA MODEL
    • Authors: FENG WANG, BEIBEI LIU, BING ZHANG
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Emission trading could increase the production cost of sectors, and thus has significant impacts on sectoral competitiveness. This study takes the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei (BTH) region as an example to explore the impacts of different carbon market linkage scenarios on regional sectoral competitiveness by using the CEECPA model, a static multi-region and multi-sector Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model in China. Results show that carbon market linkage can mitigate the adverse impacts of emission trading on regional sectoral competitiveness across the BTH region. However, carbon market linkage may lead to the imbalances of regional sectoral competitiveness. In particular, energy production and energy-intensive sectors in Hebei would experience higher sectoral competitive losses under the restricted linkage scenario. Revenue recycling can effectively reduce sectoral competitive losses from carbon market linkage. Especially, using revenues to deduct indirect tax can make the sectoral competitive losses in Hebei significantly decrease. Policy implications are proposed to facilitate emission mitigation and balanced industrial development in China.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-07-09T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820410055
       
  • CLIMATE AND HEALTH BENEFITS OF PHASING OUT IRON & STEEL PRODUCTION
           CAPACITY IN CHINA: FINDINGS FROM THE IMED MODEL
    • Authors: BO-SHU LI, YAN CHEN, SHAOHUI ZHANG, ZHERU WU, JANUSZ COFALA, HANCHENG Dai
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      In recognition of the negative climate change and deteriorative air quality, the iron and steel industry in China was subject to production capacity phase-out policy (PCPP), which is deeply influencing industrial restructuring and national emission reduction targets. However, researches that quantitatively estimated the comprehensive impacts of such structural adjustment policy remain scant. For this purpose, this study expands and soft-links between GAINS and IMED models to characterize the impacts of climate change and PM[math]-attributed health co-benefits. Results showed the PCPP based on scale limitation to eliminate backward capacities in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region yields total benefits of 34.9 billion Yuan (4.2 billion USD), 89% of total coming from energy saving and carbon mitigation, more than policy costs (20.0 billion Yuan) in 2020, but the gap between benefit-cost will keep narrowing to [math]2.8 billion Yuan ([math]0.3 billion USD) in 2020–2030, indicating that policy improvement is needed in the long run. To further increase policy co-benefits and achieve multiple policy targets, the policymaker should readjust the PCPP by switching scale limitation to energy efficiency constraint. If doing that, the difference of benefit-cost will achieve 42.5 billion Yuan (5.1 billion USD). The regional disparity also exits due to the diverse ratio of benefit-cost in the selected provinces, calling for necessary fiscal incentives to the less developed area, e.g., Hebei, to promote closer integration.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-06-18T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820410080
       
  • ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACTS OF THE NDC SCENARIO ON ENERGY AND INDUSTRIAL
           STRUCTURE IN MAJOR COUNTRIES
    • Authors: LIU CHANGXIN, WU JING, WANG ZHENG, WU LEYING
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      The IAM model EMRICES was adopted to analyze the energy and industrial structure trends of the major countries in the world. In the aspect of energy consumption, the energy varieties are subdivided and a random shock model is introduced to depict the declining trend of energy intensity in different sectors. In the aspect of industrial structure, CGE model is used to describe the trend of economic growth. The NDC constraints would affect the total economic output and energy consumption of various industries according to the emission reduction cost function in EMRICES. The results show that the global temperature would be 2.61∘C by 2100 under NDC constraints, and it is still unable to achieve the target of 2∘C warming. The global carbon emission mitigation should be paid to more attention. In terms of energy consumption, the proportion of nonfossil energy and natural gas consumption will be greatly increased. The change of industrial competitive advantage represented by location quotient shows that China’s manufacturing competitiveness will decline, but its relative concentration and specialization level are still higher than the global average level. India’s manufacturing development will improve. In the financial sector, the United States would still be the leader.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-06-18T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820410092
       
  • EXCESS VULNERABILITY FROM SUBSIDIZED FLOOD INSURANCE: HOUSING MARKET
           ADAPTATION WHEN PREMIUMS EQUAL EXPECTED FLOOD DAMAGE
    • Authors: SCOTT J. COLBY, KATHERINE Y. ZIPP
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      We calculate there are 8.1% more houses in Allegheny County, PA (Pittsburgh) due to flood insurance subsidies. Conversely, if/when National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) premiums rise by 50% to equal expected damages, property values will decrease by 8.8% in the short-term, with about half of that recuperated in the long run (4.7%) as quality-adjusted housing stocks contract by 7.5% over decades. This analysis informs community planning and current NFIP revisions that strive to balance solvency and social consequences. Furthermore, our extension of Poterba’s (1984) dynamic user-cost of housing model can be used in integrated assessment models of climate change adaptation.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2020-06-08T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007820500128
       
 
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