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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 159)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 151)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 71)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 63)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
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Climate Change Economics
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.115
Number of Followers: 50  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2010-0078 - ISSN (Online) 2010-0086
Published by World Scientific Homepage  [120 journals]
  • INTRODUCTION: WAYS TO ACHIEVE GREEN ECONOMIC RECOVERY AND MITIGATE
           GREENHOUSE GASES IN THE POST-COVID-19 ERA

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      Authors: Farhad Taghizadeh-Hesary, Naoyuki Yoshino, Muhammad Mohsin, Nawazish Mirza
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 13, Issue 03, August 2022.

      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822030026
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 03 (2022)
       
  • NEXUS OF CLIMATE CONDITIONS WITH ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL GROWTH INTEGRATION:
           HOW DO ECONOMIC INDICATORS MATTER'

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      Authors: YANLIANG ZHU, KAIFENG WANG, ROBINA IRAM
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 13, Issue 03, August 2022.
      There has been a change in economic research from focusing on economic growth to focusing on sustainable development when it comes to economic development. This research aims to examine the link between China’s socioeconomic progress and the degradation of the environment. Between 1995 and 2018, the information in this study was collected. We looked at factors including the percentage of tourism in total exports, total and renewable energy consumption and GDP per capita when calculating the emissions they have on the environment. CO2 emission shows long-term causation, but the feedback causality hypothesis holds in the short term between the variables of concern. There is a one-way correlation between GDP, CO2 emissions and the use of renewable energy; access to better water, sanitation and electricity; access to renewable energy; and access to improved water, sanitation and electricity to CO2 emissions. It was shown that CO2 emissions, GDP and energy usage had a positive long-term correlation. In contrast, tourism, renewable energy and access to better water and sanitation all had a negative long-term correlation. GDP’s contribution to future CO2 emission fluctuations ranges from 7% to 25%, with energy use at 7%–15%, renewable energy use at 1%–4.5% and tourism at 5.8%–10%. Meanwhile, access to better water, sanitation and electricity is at 9%, 1.13% and 3%, respectively, according to the variance decomposition analysis. Sustainable development in China necessitates a strong policy to adopt renewable energy sources, sustainable tourism growth and improved access to safe drinking water, sanitary facilities and power.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822400152
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 03 (2022)
       
  • ANALYSIS OF THE CARBON ALLOWANCE ALLOCATION AND SECTORAL COVERAGE IN THE
           CARBON MARKET UNDER THE NEW CLIMATE AMBITION: A CASE STUDY IN CHINA

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      Authors: SI CHENG, JIHONG ZHANG, SHAOZHOU QI
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 13, Issue 03, August 2022.
      Reasonable allocation of carbon allowances and determination of coverage in the carbon market are essential to the realization of the emissions reduction goal. Using China as an example, we propose a multi-criteria allocation scheme based on the principle of equity, efficiency and feasibility, considering carbon abatement costs and carbon leakage risks. An improved zero-sum gains-data envelopment analysis model in accordance with China’s new carbon intensity target in climate ambition is used for allowance allocation. Subsequently, the sectoral coverage choice of the carbon market is proposed. We obtain an optimal reallocation scheme after five iterations. The results show that the allocation method in this study can better promote the carbon market to reduce emissions at a lower cost while preventing carbon leakage to a certain extent. Based on the contribution to the overall emission reduction, the emission reduction costs and carbon leakage risks, we further classify the sectors into three categories. With China as an example, these findings lay a scientific basis for China to achieve its climate ambition through the carbon market, and also have global implications in regard to developing a more scientific allocation scheme, especially for carbon markets in emerging and developing countries.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822400164
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 03 (2022)
       
  • TACKLING CARBON INTENSITY WITH GREEN FINANCE IN THE COVID-19-ERA:
           RECOMMENDATIONS FOR OECD ECONOMIES

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      Authors: LIJING LU, HAIYANG ZHENG, MEILAN CHEN, HINA NAJAM
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 13, Issue 03, August 2022.
      Green financing has been examined in the literature. However, its impact on carbon intensity has not been fully investigated. This research sets out to fill this gap by using the dimensions of green loans, securities, insurance, and investment. In exploring the connections between green financing, nonfossil energy use, and carbon intensity, we utilized data from 2016 to 2020 to run an advanced quantile modeling. We applied the decision-making unit-method of data envelopment analysis for analyses. Our main findings are as follows. Rapid advances in the green finance sector in Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries were coupled with an increase in nonfossil energy usage, resulting in a decline in carbon intensity. When the growth in nonfossil energy consumption was reduced, green investment was put on hold, and the green financing industry would be negatively impacted. The role of green financing and carbon intensity in nonfossil energy use is coupled with strong government policy interventions. Nonetheless, the effects of green finance initiatives often lag. Moreover, these effects are inconsistent. This research suggests new methods to increase the use of nonfossil energy, build a carbon trading market, and increase the consumption of green financing policies post COVID-19.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822400140
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 03 (2022)
       
  • ACHIEVING GREENHOUSE GAS MITIGATION THROUGH CLIMATE CHANGE CONTROL WITH
           THE ROLE OF FINANCIAL DEVELOPMENT IN COVID-19 PERIOD

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      Authors: ZHEN LIU, JIALI TIAN, LEILING WANG, RUBAB GUL
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 13, Issue 03, August 2022.
      The study inquired the role of financial development (FD) on climate change control in COVID-19 period to identify the ways useful to achieve greenhouse gas mitigation in BRICS economies. BRICS countries are included because of their high energy-environment dependence and their need for climate financing through FD promoting greenhouse gas emission. The projected role of FD activity on climate change mitigation is inferred using the generalized methods of moments (GMM). The study results indicated that five out of the six climate change mitigation indicators have a long-term correlation with BRICS’s CO2 emissions. On the other side, there is no evidence of integration between variables in Russia. Moreover, the findings revealed that there 18% rise in FD is estimated, this raised the probability of effective climate change mitigation by 39% in the post-COVID-period, and it reduces greenhouse gas mitigations by 24.7%. The results also highlighted that there is a one-way correlation between energy use and climate drifts. On these findings, policymakers and environmental regulators in BRICS could take inspiration from our study to plan and revisit greenhouse gas mitigation through proper environmental legislation. Additionally, it also encourages other countries and economies to perform comparable assessments and select the best course of action. Hence, this study provides detailed and viable recommendations for key stakeholders for consideration and application to achieve the intended objectives.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822400139
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 03 (2022)
       
  • PUBLIC SPENDING AS A NEW DETERMINATE OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOAL AND
           GREEN ECONOMIC RECOVERY: POLICY PERSPECTIVE ANALYSIS IN THE POST-COVID ERA
           

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      Authors: ZHEN LIU, TONG YIN, AHMAD ROMADHONI SURYA PUTRA, MUHAMMAD SADIQ
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 13, Issue 03, August 2022.
      Green economy talks about combing final mechanisms that have ecological and macroeconomic system gains. Likewise, this research piece examined the effects of increased spending on fiscal policies and tightening fiscal policies concerning greening the economic activity as the globe reclaims itself from the COVID-19 in China. Analysis was done applying the China longitudinal data for the period 2008–2018. We utilized the ordinary least square as well as the quantile regression equation to meticulously approximate the influences of increased fiscal spending policies in addition to tightening fiscal policies has on greening the economic system acts as the countries reclaim themselves from the pandemic via a formulated green performance indicator of China nations. The findings indicate a rather exciting pattern by saying a percentage growth in fiscal policy led to nearly 6.5% growth, that is, less than 0.5 growth in the minimum carbon dioxide polluting vaporous from energy suppliers, such as natural gas, and a 0.2% less than 0.01 cuts in the midway carbon dioxide polluting liquefied energy suppliers, that is, hydrocarbon byproducts and a nonsignificant expansion of 0.2%, more significant than 0.5 in the entire case scenario coming from polluting dense energy suppliers, that is, from coal byproduct sources. At the same time, a 1% expansion in fiscal policy reduces cumulative carbon dioxide pollution to 0.2%, less than 0.05%. On this score, the presence of the environmental hypothesis was authenticated in all scenarios analyzed. Furthermore, the causality test indicated a dual movement causative correlation between fiscal policy and carbon dioxide pollution and one-way movement concerning the fiscal policy to energy use. The findings demonstrated that China witnessed a rising switch to green advancement in China; their Green Economic Efficiency increased steadily.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822400073
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 03 (2022)
       
  • MEASURING THE IMPACT OF ECONOMIC POLICIES ON CO2 EMISSIONS: WAYS TO
           ACHIEVE GREEN ECONOMIC RECOVERY IN THE POST-COVID-19 ERA

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      Authors: WENJI HUANG, HAYOT BERK SAYDALIEV, WASIM IQBAL, MUHAMMAD IRFAN
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 13, Issue 03, August 2022.
      Regional attempts to reduce pollution levels emerging from the European Union (EU) relative to 2010 are contrasted with unique policies of individual member countries’ aims to achieve a 10% reduction per country. Given this scenario, this research expands on the topic by developing a novel framework that links macroeconomic policies, total national expenditure per person, traditional energy use, renewable energy use, and CO2 emissions levels in EU countries from 1990 to 2016. The study utilizes the second generation cross-sectional-autoregressive-distributed lag (CS-ARDL) panel data method. According to the study’s findings, the monetary instruments of growth exacerbated the adverse effects of CO2 emissions, and by tightening monetary policy, the harmful effects of CO2 emissions levels have been reduced. Further, the Granger causality test indicates a bidirectional causality between monetary policy and CO2 emissions levels, and unidirectional causality from the policy assessment for energy use. The finding confirms that the assessment policy recommendations on energy consumption have future effects on ecological value.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822400103
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 03 (2022)
       
  • CLIMATE FINANCE IN THE WAKE OF COVID-19: CONNECTEDNESS OF CLEAN ENERGY
           WITH CONVENTIONAL ENERGY AND REGIONAL STOCK MARKETS

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      Authors: SITARA KARIM, SHABEER KHAN, NAWAZISH MIRZA, SUHA M. ALAWI, FARHAD TAGHIZADEH-HESARY
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 13, Issue 03, August 2022.
      Focusing on raising climate concerns and sustaining a clean ecosystem, the current study strives to examine the connectedness of clean energy markets with conventional energy markets and four regional stock markets of Asia, Pacific, Europe, and America for the period spanning January 1, 2004 to August 31, 2021. We employed the volatility connectedness methodology using dynamic conditional correlation (DCC-GARCH) estimates for analysis purposes. There is pronounced within class connectedness of all markets except conventional energy markets, which showed strong disconnection from the network. However, strong inter-class spillovers are reported between clean energy and regional stock markets. Time-varying analysis revealed that intense spillovers are shaped during the Global Financial Crisis, Shale Oil Crisis, and COVID-19 pandemic. Meanwhile, time-varying net connectedness estimates illuminate that world renewable energy and American stock markets are net transmitters, whereas leftover markets are net recipients of spillovers. Further analysis of sub-sample periods during GFC, SOR, and COVID-19 validate that intense spillovers are formed when markets experience unexpected financial, economic, and global health turmoil. We proposed significant implications for regional stock markets of Asia, Pacific, Europe and America to concentrate on the climate-friendly energy markets than conventional energy markets as they service the clean ecosystem motives more specifically.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822400085
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 03 (2022)
       
  • ENERGY FINANCING, COVID-19 REPERCUSSIONS AND CLIMATE CHANGE: IMPLICATIONS
           FOR EMERGING ECONOMIES

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      Authors: LINHAI ZHAO, HAYOT BERK SAYDALIEV, SAJID IQBAL
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Volume 13, Issue 03, August 2022.
      This study is intended to test the role of renewable energy financing on climate change and to present the implications for the key stakeholders towards the acquisition of post-covid-recovery in the Asian and ASEAN economies. For this, data envelopment analysis (DEA) technique is applied to draw an inference between the constructs. Study finding resulted that higher energy consumption and rise in environmental pollution has brought a great change in the ASEAN and Asian economies’ climate, for which, modern and renewable energy sources are suggested to use for the climate change mitigation. A sufficient amount of funds and the supply of energy finance to mitigate the climate change are eminently needed for the post-covid-recovery. Different financial institutions, banks and finance ministries of countries belonging from the both regions are suggested to play the best role. This is solely possible by pooling the funds in renewable energy sectors to enhance energy efficiency and control the climate change. This must be executed for the long-run period to get the desired outcomes. All the countries of both regions are further suggested to expedite the practices to apply strategic development goals (SDGs) for affordable and clean energy (SDG–7), climate change action (SDG–13) to achieve the national and global strategic objectives.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822400036
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 03 (2022)
       
  • AMBIGUITY AVERSION AND INDIVIDUAL ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE: EVIDENCE
           FROM A FARMER SURVEY IN NORTHEASTERN THAILAND

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      Authors: NAGISA SHIIBA, HIDE-FUMI YOKOO, VORAVEE SAENGAVUT, SIRAPRAPA BUMRUNGKIT
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Understanding the triggers of individual adaptation behavior is critical for empowering those who are highly vulnerable to climate change. This study explores the effect of ambiguity aversion on adaptation behaviors in the context of climate change. We conduct a field survey among 230 rice farmers in northeastern Thailand to examine the association between elicited ambiguity aversion and the implementation of climate change adaptation. We find that ambiguity aversion does not encourage farmers’ adaptation behaviors and can even discourage the uptake of adaptation strategies. The role of ambiguity aversion varies depending on the characteristics of the adaptation strategy: ambiguity-averse farmers are less likely to adopt adaptation strategies that entail shifts from the status-quo. A deliberate approach is needed to understand farmers’ adaptation behaviors outside the laboratory setting and to reduce ambiguity in the results concerning adaptation to increasing climate risk.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500057
       
  • AN ECONOMY-WIDE FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING THE STRANDED ASSETS OF ENERGY
           PRODUCTION SECTOR UNDER CLIMATE POLICIES

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      Authors: YEN-HENG HENRY CHEN, ERIK LANDRY, JOHN M. REILLY
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Climate change mitigation efforts, which require the transition away from carbon-intensive activities, can pose financial risks for owners of fossil fuel assets and investors that the finance companies are engaged in greenhouse gas-emitting activities. For instance, fossil fuel extraction may be significantly scaled-back, and coal-power plants may be idled or even phased out prematurely, thus becoming stranded assets for the shareholders. Using a global general equilibrium model with detailed energy sector and capital stock structures, we estimate the corresponding stranded assets under various emissions mitigation scenarios. Our findings reveal that, depending on the policy scenario, the global net present value of unrealized fossil fuel output through 2050 relative to a “no policy” scenario is between 21.5 and 30.6 trillion USD, and that of stranded assets in coal power generation is between 1.3 and 2.3 trillion USD. The analytical framework presented in our study complements existing research, in which macroeconomic variables required for estimating the stranded assets are often derived from models with more simplified assumptions. Therefore, individual firms and financial institutions can combine our economy-wide analysis with details on their own investment portfolios to determine their climate-related transition risk exposure.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-07-28T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500033
       
  • ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE IN ARID LANDS: EVIDENCE FROM PASTORAL AREAS
           OF SENEGAL

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      Authors: BEYE ASSANE, DIOP WAOUNDÉ
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      This paper analyzes the determinants of adaptation options in pastoral drylands and investigates whether adaptation strategies can be used jointly. We assume that decisions can be made jointly as complements or substitutes and investigates whether herders in Senegal adapt to climate change by pursuing multiple strategies. We use a multinomial probit model with primary data collected from 410 herders of Senegalese drylands to identify adaptation determinants. Results show that 73.7% of the surveyed households rely on at least one adaptation strategy including storage of livestock feed, increased mobility, changes in water management, diversification of activities and changes in herd composition. Moreover, we notice that adaptation decisions of pastoral households can be taken jointly and those with mobility do not pursue other adaptation strategies, while those lacking mobility undertake multiple strategies. The diversity of factors explaining adaptation calls for targeted policies that promote adaptation strategies to strengthen the resilience of pastoralists.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-06-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S201000782350001X
       
  • A POST-COVID-19 ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF THE CHILEAN NDC REVISION

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      Authors: FRÉDÉRIC BABONNEAU, MARC VIELLE
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Last year, Chile updated its Nationally Determined Contributions, moving from intensity-based emissions reductions to an effective emissions target. This paper aims to assess the economic and environmental impacts of this change in the current context of high uncertainty Chile faces with social protests and the COVID-19 pandemic. Using the computable general equilibrium model GEMINI-E3, we performed a sensitivity analysis assuming different levels of economic growth through 2030. Though at first glance the revised commitments appear more ambitious, we found that they could lead to higher emissions in low-growth scenarios. The results show that intensity-based emissions targets indeed become less stringent when assuming high levels of economic growth and thus may result in highly uncertain effective emissions in 2030. On the other hand, given the uncertainty surrounding Chilean economic growth, the updated commitments would be politically more amenable as it would lead to lower welfare losses. In addition, we analyze different redistribution schemes of a CO2 tax and we show that a per capita redistribution rule makes the CO2 tax more progressive and thus fiscally more acceptable.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007823500021
       
  • IMPLICATIONS OF CARBON TRADE WITH ENDOGENOUS PERMITS FOR POST-PARIS
           CLIMATE AGREEMENTS

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      Authors: SHUMIN YU, YINHAO WU
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      With an intention to pursue an international carbon trade system and to find its implications for post-Paris climate agreements, we develop in this paper an international climate policy game with a mitigation agreement and a carbon market with endogenous permits choice. We explore incentives in a game-theoretic model for market participation, incentives to join a mitigation agreement and the interlinkages between the two. Our numerical results show that the presence of a carbon market with endogenous permits choice could improve the single mitigation coalition by engaging more regions with climate mitigation actions and inducing the Pareto improvement to some specific mitigation coalitions. Yet, more alternative strategic options offered by carbon trade are a disincentive for some regions to join a mitigation coalition. Nonetheless, this minor negative influence can be overwhelmed by more involvement in climate actions, higher global mitigation level and welfare gains resulted from an extra carbon market.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822500063
       
  • Changes in Global Land Use and CO2 Emissions from US Bioethanol
           Production: What Drives Differences in Estimates between Corn and
           Cellulosic Ethanol'

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      Authors: Bryan K. Mignone, Jonathan E. Huster, Sarah Torkamani, Patrick O’Rourke, Marshall Wise
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Land use change (LUC) CO2 emissions associated with bioenergy production depend on the amount of land required to produce bioenergy crops, the carbon stored in such crops (including in the leaves, stalk, roots and soil), and the carbon emitted when another land cover is directly or indirectly displaced as a result. In this study, we use a global integrated assessment model [the Global Change Analysis Model (GCAM)] to explore the differences in estimates of LUC CO2 emissions for two crops (corn and switchgrass) used to produce ethanol in the United States under alternative assumptions about natural lands protection. Varying the latter assumptions for corn ethanol results in net LUC CO2 emissions between 7 and 41 gCO2 per MJ of ethanol, whereas varying the same assumptions for switchgrass ethanol results in net emissions between [math]26 and 14 gCO2 per MJ of ethanol. The low-end estimate for each occurs when natural lands are assumed to be fully protected everywhere, which leads to significant cropland intensification. The high-end estimate for each occurs when natural lands are assumed to be unprotected everywhere, leading to greater cropland expansion and associated conversion of unmanaged forest and pasture. Results from this study could be used to inform scenarios of future energy system change or life cycle assessment of biofuels for which LUC emissions would be an input.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822500087
       
  • HOW DO WESTERN EUROPEAN FARMS BEHAVE AND RESPOND TO CLIMATE CHANGE' A
           SIMULTANEOUS IRRIGATION-CROP DECISION MODEL

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      Authors: JANKA VANSCHOENWINKEL, MARK VANCAUTEREN, STEVEN VAN PASSEL
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      Most farm adaptations are reactive actions that run the risk of locking farm systems into suboptimal long-term trajectories. This is especially the case with regard to water management as water scarcity will be aggravated by climate change. This paper looks into farm irrigation choices in combination with crop choices because a proper crop choice has the potential to reduce water requirements. It proposes an extended Ricardian model to capture multiple adaptation decisions explicitly. The new simultaneous irrigation-crop farm decision model uses spatially detailed farm-level data of over 18,000 European farms on irrigation and seven different crop choices. The analysis shows that larger farmers and farmers in less water-scarce regions that use irrigation are more sensitive to temperature increases than rain-fed agriculture. This might be explained by the fact that these farmers do not experience the real cost of water scarcity because of which they take less efficient decisions.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822500099
       
  • DOUBLE DIVIDEND REVISITED: NON-REVENUE NEUTRAL TAX REFORMS

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      Authors: TAKUMI HAIBARA
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      The rebound effect requires a rethink of revenue recycling. It is this that this paper offers an alternative to mitigate this effect. Specifically, we adapt and extend the consumption-neutral tax reform of Haibara (Journal of Globalization and Development, 8, 1–11, 2017) to include pollution externalities. Unlike a revenue-neutral tax reform, this reform increases welfare irrespectively of the level of intercommodity tax distortions. With consumption-neutral schemes, exogenous energy efficiency improvements induce higher taxes on the dirty good consumption. Such tax hikes improve welfare more than would be the case in their absence. Consumption-neutral reforms can translate economic costs into a negative rebound effect and increase the first dividend. The double dividend is welcome but need not be a policy priority.
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822500051
       
  • IMPLICIT PRICES OF JOB RISK, CLIMATE, AND AIR POLLUTION: EVIDENCE FROM
           TAIWAN

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      Authors: NAN ZHANG, DAIGEE SHAW, CHUAN-YAO LIN
      Abstract: Climate Change Economics, Ahead of Print.
      We examine the implicit price of job mortality rates, climate, and air pollution in Taiwan under the hedonic wage frame with panel data from 1999 to 2014. We adopt a fixed-effects model to control for the omitted year-specific factors and time-invariant individual, industry, and city factors that may affect the wage. The within-individual variations in climate and air pollution from workers who have changed their job locations make it possible to identify the impacts of climate and air pollution on wages. We find that workers in Taiwan are willing to pay 308 USD (in 2014 value terms) for the January temperature to increase by 1∘C,781 USD for the July temperature to decline by 1∘C, indicating a net loss from global warming. Besides, the implicit price of air quality is 45 USD for PM 10 concentrations to fall by 1 unit ([math]), and the implicit price of job risks is 140 USD per unit (1/100,000).
      Citation: Climate Change Economics
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1142/S2010007822500075
       
 
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