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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
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The Cryosphere (TC)
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.034
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 13  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1994-0416 - ISSN (Online) 1994-0424
Published by Copernicus Publications Homepage  [54 journals]
  • A novel framework to investigate wind-driven snow redistribution over an
           Alpine glacier: combination of high-resolution terrestrial laser scans and
           large-eddy simulations

    • Abstract: A novel framework to investigate wind-driven snow redistribution over an Alpine glacier: combination of high-resolution terrestrial laser scans and large-eddy simulations
      Annelies Voordendag, Brigitta Goger, Rainer Prinz, Tobias Sauter, Thomas Mölg, Manuel Saigger, and Georg Kaser
      The Cryosphere, 18, 849–868, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-849-2024, 2024
      Wind-driven snow redistribution affects glacier mass balance. A case study of Hintereisferner glacier in Austria used high-resolution observations and simulations to model snow redistribution. Simulations matched observations, showing the potential of the model for studying snow redistribution on other mountain glaciers.
      PubDate: Fri, 23 Feb 2024 17:07:07 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-849-2024 2024

       
  • Ice plate deformation and cracking revealed by an in situ-distributed
           acoustic sensing array

    • Abstract: Ice plate deformation and cracking revealed by an in situ-distributed acoustic sensing array
      Jun Xie, Xiangfang Zeng, Chao Liang, Sidao Ni, Risheng Chu, Feng Bao, Rongbing Lin, Benxin Chi, and Hao Lv
      The Cryosphere, 18, 837–847, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-837-2024, 2024
      Seismology can help study the mechanism of disintegration of floating ice plates. We conduct a seismic experiment on a frozen lake using a distributed acoustic sensing array. Icequakes and low-frequency events are detected with an artificial intelligence method. Our study demonstrates the merit of distributed acoustic sensing array in illuminating the internal failure process and properties of the ice shelf, which eventually contributes to the understanding and prediction of ice shelf collapse.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Feb 2024 17:07:07 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-837-2024 2024

       
  • Meteoric water and glacial melt in the southeastern Amundsen Sea: a time
           series from 1994 to 2020

    • Abstract: Meteoric water and glacial melt in the southeastern Amundsen Sea: a time series from 1994 to 2020
      Andrew N. Hennig, David A. Mucciarone, Stanley S. Jacobs, Richard A. Mortlock, and Robert B. Dunbar
      The Cryosphere, 18, 791–818, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-791-2024, 2024
      A total of 937 seawater paired oxygen isotope (δ18O)–salinity samples collected during seven cruises on the SE Amundsen Sea between 1994 and 2020 reveal a deep freshwater source with δ18O − 29.4±1.0‰, consistent with the signature of local ice shelf melt. Local mean meteoric water content – comprised primarily of glacial meltwater – increased between 1994 and 2020 but exhibited greater interannual variability than increasing trend. 
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Feb 2024 18:53:56 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-791-2024 2024

       
  • Partial melting in polycrystalline ice: pathways identified in 3D neutron
           tomographic images

    • Abstract: Partial melting in polycrystalline ice: pathways identified in 3D neutron tomographic images
      Christopher J. L. Wilson, Mark Peternell, Filomena Salvemini, Vladimir Luzin, Frieder Enzmann, Olga Moravcova, and Nicholas J. R. Hunter
      The Cryosphere, 18, 819–836, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-819-2024, 2024
      As the temperature increases within a deforming ice aggregate, composed of deuterium (D2O) ice and water (H2O) ice, a set of meltwater segregations are produced. These are composed of H2O and HDO and are located in conjugate shear bands and in compaction bands which accommodate the deformation and weaken the ice aggregate. This has major implications for the passage of meltwater in ice sheets and the formation of the layering recognized in glaciers.
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Feb 2024 18:53:56 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-819-2024 2024

       
  • Globally consistent estimates of high-resolution Antarctic ice mass
           balance and spatially resolved glacial isostatic adjustment

    • Abstract: Globally consistent estimates of high-resolution Antarctic ice mass balance and spatially resolved glacial isostatic adjustment
      Matthias O. Willen, Martin Horwath, Eric Buchta, Mirko Scheinert, Veit Helm, Bernd Uebbing, and Jürgen Kusche
      The Cryosphere, 18, 775–790, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-775-2024, 2024
      Shrinkage of the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) leads to sea level rise. Satellite gravimetry measures AIS mass changes. We apply a new method that overcomes two limitations: low spatial resolution and large uncertainties due to the Earth's interior mass changes. To do so, we additionally include data from satellite altimetry and climate and firn modelling, which are evaluated in a globally consistent way with thoroughly characterized errors. The results are in better agreement with independent data.
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Feb 2024 18:53:56 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-775-2024 2024

       
  • Bayesian physical–statistical retrieval of snow water equivalent and
           snow depth from X- and Ku-band synthetic aperture radar – demonstration
           using airborne SnowSAr in SnowEx'17

    • Abstract: Bayesian physical–statistical retrieval of snow water equivalent and snow depth from X- and Ku-band synthetic aperture radar – demonstration using airborne SnowSAr in SnowEx'17
      Siddharth Singh, Michael Durand, Edward Kim, and Ana P. Barros
      The Cryosphere, 18, 747–773, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-747-2024, 2024
      Seasonal snowfall accumulation plays a critical role in climate. The water stored in it is measured by the snow water equivalent (SWE), the amount of water released after completely melting. We demonstrate a Bayesian physical–statistical framework to estimate SWE from airborne X- and Ku-band synthetic aperture radar backscatter measurements constrained by physical snow hydrology and radar models. We explored spatial resolutions and vertical structures that agree well with ground observations.
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Feb 2024 18:53:56 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-747-2024 2024

       
  • A low-cost and open-source approach for supraglacial debris thickness
           mapping using UAV-based infrared thermography

    • Abstract: A low-cost and open-source approach for supraglacial debris thickness mapping using UAV-based infrared thermography
      Jérôme Messmer and Alexander Raphael Groos
      The Cryosphere, 18, 719–746, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-719-2024, 2024
      The lower part of mountain glaciers is often covered with debris. Knowing the thickness of the debris is important as it influences the melting and future evolution of the affected glaciers. We have developed an open-source approach to map variations in debris thickness on glaciers using a low-cost drone equipped with a thermal infrared camera. The resulting high-resolution maps of debris surface temperature and thickness enable more accurate monitoring and modelling of debris-covered glaciers.
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Feb 2024 18:53:56 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-719-2024 2024

       
  • Brief communication: An ice-debris avalanche in the Nupchu Valley,
           Kanchenjunga Conservation Area, eastern Nepal

    • Abstract: Brief communication: An ice-debris avalanche in the Nupchu Valley, Kanchenjunga Conservation Area, eastern Nepal
      Alton C. Byers, Marcelo Somos-Valenzuela, Dan H. Shugar, Daniel McGrath, Mohan B. Chand, and Ram Avtar
      The Cryosphere, 18, 711–717, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-711-2024, 2024
      In spite of enhanced technologies, many large cryospheric events remain unreported because of their remoteness, inaccessibility, or poor communications. In this Brief communication, we report on a large ice-debris avalanche that occurred sometime between 16 and 21 August 2022 in the Kanchenjunga Conservation Area (KCA), eastern Nepal. 
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Feb 2024 16:57:02 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-711-2024 2024

       
  • Evaporative controls on Antarctic precipitation: an ECHAM6 model study
           using innovative water tracer diagnostics

    • Abstract: Evaporative controls on Antarctic precipitation: an ECHAM6 model study using innovative water tracer diagnostics
      Qinggang Gao, Louise C. Sime, Alison J. McLaren, Thomas J. Bracegirdle, Emilie Capron, Rachael H. Rhodes, Hans Christian Steen-Larsen, Xiaoxu Shi, and Martin Werner
      The Cryosphere, 18, 683–703, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-683-2024, 2024
      Antarctic precipitation is a crucial component of the climate system. Its spatio-temporal variability impacts sea level changes and the interpretation of water isotope measurements in ice cores. To better understand its climatic drivers, we developed water tracers in an atmospheric model to identify moisture source conditions from which precipitation originates. We find that mid-latitude surface winds exert an important control on moisture availability for Antarctic precipitation.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Feb 2024 16:57:02 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-683-2024 2024

       
  • Brief communication: Rapid acceleration of the Brunt Ice Shelf after
           calving of iceberg A-81

    • Abstract: Brief communication: Rapid acceleration of the Brunt Ice Shelf after calving of iceberg A-81
      Oliver J. Marsh, Adrian J. Luckman, and Dominic A. Hodgson
      The Cryosphere, 18, 705–710, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-705-2024, 2024
      The Brunt Ice Shelf has accelerated rapidly after calving an iceberg in January 2023. A decade of GPS data show that the rate of acceleration in August 2023 was 30 times higher than before calving, and velocity has doubled in 6 months. Satellite velocity maps show the extent of the change. The acceleration is due to loss of contact between the ice shelf and a pinning point known as the McDonald Ice Rumples. The observations highlight how iceberg calving can directly impact ice shelves.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Feb 2024 16:57:02 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-705-2024 2024

       
  • Coupling MAR (Modèle Atmosphérique Régional) with PISM (Parallel Ice
           Sheet Model) mitigates the positive melt–elevation feedback

    • Abstract: Coupling MAR (Modèle Atmosphérique Régional) with PISM (Parallel Ice Sheet Model) mitigates the positive melt–elevation feedback
      Alison Delhasse, Johanna Beckmann, Christoph Kittel, and Xavier Fettweis
      The Cryosphere, 18, 633–651, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-633-2024, 2024
      Aiming to study the long-term influence of an extremely warm climate in the Greenland Ice Sheet contribution to sea level rise, a new regional atmosphere–ice sheet model setup was established. The coupling, explicitly considering the melt–elevation feedback, is compared to an offline method to consider this feedback. We highlight mitigation of the feedback due to local changes in atmospheric circulation with changes in surface topography, making the offline correction invalid on the margins.
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Feb 2024 16:57:02 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-633-2024 2024

       
  • Extreme events of snow grain size increase in East Antarctica and their
           relationship with meteorological conditions

    • Abstract: Extreme events of snow grain size increase in East Antarctica and their relationship with meteorological conditions
      Claudio Stefanini, Giovanni Macelloni, Marion Leduc-Leballeur, Vincent Favier, Benjamin Pohl, and Ghislain Picard
      The Cryosphere, 18, 593–608, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-593-2024, 2024
      Local and large-scale meteorological conditions have been considered in order to explain some peculiar changes of snow grains on the East Antarctic Plateau from 2000 to 2022, by using remote sensing observations and reanalysis. We identified some extreme grain size events on the highest ice divide, resulting from a combination of conditions of low wind speed and low temperature. Moreover, the beginning of seasonal grain growth has been linked to the occurrence of atmospheric rivers.
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Feb 2024 16:57:02 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-593-2024 2024

       
  • Snow water equivalent retrieval over Idaho – Part 1: Using Sentinel-1
           repeat-pass interferometry

    • Abstract: Snow water equivalent retrieval over Idaho – Part 1: Using Sentinel-1 repeat-pass interferometry
      Shadi Oveisgharan, Robert Zinke, Zachary Hoppinen, and Hans Peter Marshall
      The Cryosphere, 18, 559–574, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-559-2024, 2024
      The seasonal snowpack provides water resources to billions of people worldwide. Large-scale mapping of snow water equivalent (SWE) with high resolution is critical for many scientific and economics fields. In this work we used the radar remote sensing interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to estimate the SWE change between 2 d. The error in the estimated SWE change is less than 2 cm for in situ stations. Additionally, the retrieved SWE using InSAR is correlated with lidar snow depth. 
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Feb 2024 16:57:02 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-559-2024 2024

       
  • Disentangling the drivers of future Antarctic ice loss with a historically
           calibrated ice-sheet model

    • Abstract: Disentangling the drivers of future Antarctic ice loss with a historically calibrated ice-sheet model
      Violaine Coulon, Ann Kristin Klose, Christoph Kittel, Tamsin Edwards, Fiona Turner, Ricarda Winkelmann, and Frank Pattyn
      The Cryosphere, 18, 653–681, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-653-2024, 2024
      We present new projections of the evolution of the Antarctic ice sheet until the end of the millennium, calibrated with observations. We show that the ocean will be the main trigger of future ice loss. As temperatures continue to rise, the atmosphere's role may shift from mitigating to amplifying Antarctic mass loss already by the end of the century. For high-emission scenarios, this may lead to substantial sea-level rise. Adopting sustainable practices would however reduce the rate of ice loss.
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Feb 2024 16:57:02 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-653-2024 2024

       
  • Recent warming trends of the Greenland ice sheet documented by historical
           firn and ice temperature observations and machine learning

    • Abstract: Recent warming trends of the Greenland ice sheet documented by historical firn and ice temperature observations and machine learning
      Baptiste Vandecrux, Robert S. Fausto, Jason E. Box, Federico Covi, Regine Hock, Åsa K. Rennermalm, Achim Heilig, Jakob Abermann, Dirk van As, Elisa Bjerre, Xavier Fettweis, Paul C. J. P. Smeets, Peter Kuipers Munneke, Michiel R. van den Broeke, Max Brils, Peter L. Langen, Ruth Mottram, and Andreas P. Ahlstrøm
      The Cryosphere, 18, 609–631, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-609-2024, 2024
      How fast is the Greenland ice sheet warming' In this study, we compiled 4500+ temperature measurements at 10 m below the ice sheet surface (T10m) from 1912 to 2022. We trained a machine learning model on these data and reconstructed T10m for the ice sheet during 1950–2022. After a slight cooling during 1950–1985, the ice sheet warmed at a rate of 0.7 °C per decade until 2022. Climate models showed mixed results compared to our observations and underestimated the warming in key regions.
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Feb 2024 16:57:02 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-609-2024 2024

       
  • Snow water equivalent retrieval over Idaho – Part 2: Using L-band UAVSAR
           repeat-pass interferometry

    • Abstract: Snow water equivalent retrieval over Idaho – Part 2: Using L-band UAVSAR repeat-pass interferometry
      Zachary Hoppinen, Shadi Oveisgharan, Hans-Peter Marshall, Ross Mower, Kelly Elder, and Carrie Vuyovich
      The Cryosphere, 18, 575–592, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-575-2024, 2024
      We used changes in radar echo travel time from multiple airborne flights to estimate changes in snow depths across Idaho for two winters. We compared our radar-derived retrievals to snow pits, weather stations, and a 100 m resolution numerical snow model. We had a strong Pearson correlation and root mean squared error of 10 cm relative to in situ measurements. Our retrievals also correlated well with our model, especially in regions of dry snow and low tree coverage.
      PubDate: Mon, 12 Feb 2024 16:57:02 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-575-2024 2024

       
  • Seasonal to decadal dynamics of supraglacial lakes on debris-covered
           glaciers in the Khumbu region, Nepal

    • Abstract: Seasonal to decadal dynamics of supraglacial lakes on debris-covered glaciers in the Khumbu region, Nepal
      Lucas Zeller, Daniel McGrath, Scott W. McCoy, and Jonathan Jacquet
      The Cryosphere, 18, 525–541, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-525-2024, 2024
      In this study we developed methods for automatically identifying supraglacial lakes in multiple satellite imagery sources for eight glaciers in Nepal. We identified a substantial seasonal variability in lake area, which was as large as the variability seen across entire decades. These complex patterns are not captured in existing regional-scale datasets. Our findings show that this seasonal variability must be accounted for in order to interpret long-term changes in debris-covered glaciers.
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Feb 2024 17:02:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-525-2024 2024

       
  • Evaluation of satellite methods for estimating supraglacial lake depth in
           southwest Greenland

    • Abstract: Evaluation of satellite methods for estimating supraglacial lake depth in southwest Greenland
      Laura Melling, Amber Leeson, Malcolm McMillan, Jennifer Maddalena, Jade Bowling, Emily Glen, Louise Sandberg Sørensen, Mai Winstrup, and Rasmus Lørup Arildsen
      The Cryosphere, 18, 543–558, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-543-2024, 2024
      Lakes on glaciers hold large volumes of water which can drain through the ice, influencing estimates of sea level rise. To estimate water volume, we must calculate lake depth. We assessed the accuracy of three satellite-based depth detection methods on a study area in western Greenland and considered the implications for quantifying the volume of water within lakes. We found that the most popular method of detecting depth on the ice sheet scale has higher uncertainty than previously assumed.
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Feb 2024 17:02:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-543-2024 2024

       
  • Improved monitoring of subglacial lake activity in Greenland

    • Abstract: Improved monitoring of subglacial lake activity in Greenland
      Louise Sandberg Sørensen, Rasmus Bahbah, Sebastian B. Simonsen, Natalia Havelund Andersen, Jade Bowling, Noel Gourmelen, Alex Horton, Nanna B. Karlsson, Amber Leeson, Jennifer Maddalena, Malcolm McMillan, Anne Solgaard, and Birgit Wessel
      The Cryosphere, 18, 505–523, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-505-2024, 2024
      Under the right topographic and hydrological conditions, lakes may form beneath the large ice sheets. Some of these subglacial lakes are active, meaning that they periodically drain and refill. When a subglacial lake drains rapidly, it may cause the ice surface above to collapse, and here we investigate how to improve the monitoring of active subglacial lakes in Greenland by monitoring how their associated collapse basins change over time.
      PubDate: Tue, 06 Feb 2024 17:02:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-505-2024 2024

       
  • Non-destructive multi-sensor core logging allows for rapid imaging and
           estimation of frozen bulk density and volumetric ice content in permafrost
           cores

    • Abstract: Non-destructive multi-sensor core logging allows for rapid imaging and estimation of frozen bulk density and volumetric ice content in permafrost cores
      Joel Pumple, Alistair Monteath, Jordan Harvey, Mahya Roustaei, Alejandro Alvarez, Casey Buchanan, and Duane Froese
      The Cryosphere, 18, 489–503, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-18-489-2024, 2024
      Ice content is a critical variable in the context of thawing permafrost, and permafrost cores provide a means to measure the characteristics of frozen ground; however, these measurements are typically destructive and time intensive. Multi-sensor core logging (MSCL) provides a fast, non-destructive method to image permafrost cores, measure bulk density, and estimate ice content. The use of MSCL will improve existing digital permafrost archives by adding high-quality and reproducible data.
      PubDate: Fri, 02 Feb 2024 21:11:25 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-18-489-2024 2024

       
 
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