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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
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The Cryosphere (TC)
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.034
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 8  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1994-0416 - ISSN (Online) 1994-0424
Published by Copernicus Publications Homepage  [54 journals]
  • Climate warming shortens ice durations and alters freeze and break-up
           patterns in Swedish water bodies

    • Abstract: Climate warming shortens ice durations and alters freeze and break-up patterns in Swedish water bodies
      Sofia Hallerbäck, Laurie S. Huning, Charlotte Love, Magnus Persson, Katarina Stensen, David Gustafsson, and Amir AghaKouchak
      The Cryosphere, 16, 2493–2503, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2493-2022, 2022
      Using unique data, some dating back to the 18th century, we show a significant trend in shorter ice duration, later freeze, and earlier break-up dates across Sweden. In recent observations, the mean ice durations have decreased by 11–28 d and the chance of years with an extremely short ice cover duration (less than 50 d) have increased by 800 %. Results show that even a 1 °C increase in air temperatures can result in a decrease in ice duration in Sweden of around 8–23 d.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Jun 2022 20:18:03 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-16-2493-2022 2022

       
  • Three different glacier surges at a spot: what satellites observe and what
           not

    • Abstract: Three different glacier surges at a spot: what satellites observe and what not
      Frank Paul, Livia Piermattei, Désirée Treichler, Lin Gilbert, Luc Girod, Andreas Kääb, Ludivine Libert, Thomas Nagler, Tazio Strozzi, and Jan Wuite
      The Cryosphere, 16, 2505–2526, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2505-2022, 2022
      Glacier surges are widespread in the Karakoram and have been intensely studied using satellite data and DEMs. We use time series of such datasets to study three glacier surges in the same region of the Karakoram. We found strongly contrasting advance rates and flow velocities, maximum velocities of 30 m d−1, and a change in the surge mechanism during a surge. A sensor comparison revealed good agreement, but steep terrain and the two smaller glaciers caused limitations for some of them.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Jun 2022 20:18:03 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-16-2505-2022 2022

       
  • Impact of freshwater runoff from the southwest Greenland Ice Sheet on
           fjord productivity since the late 19th century

    • Abstract: Impact of freshwater runoff from the southwest Greenland Ice Sheet on fjord productivity since the late 19th century
      Mimmi Oksman, Anna Bang Kvorning, Signe Hillerup Larsen, Kristian Kjellerup Kjeldsen, Kenneth David Mankoff, William Colgan, Thorbjørn Joest Andersen, Niels Nørgaard-Pedersen, Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz, Naja Mikkelsen, and Sofia Ribeiro
      The Cryosphere, 16, 2471–2491, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2471-2022, 2022
      One of the questions facing the cryosphere community today is how increasing runoff from the Greenland Ice Sheet impacts marine ecosystems. To address this, long-term data are essential. Here, we present multi-site records of fjord productivity for SW Greenland back to the 19th century. We show a link between historical freshwater runoff and productivity, which is strongest in the inner fjord – influenced by marine-terminating glaciers – where productivity has increased since the late 1990s.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Jun 2022 20:18:03 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-16-2471-2022 2022

       
  • Controls on Greenland moulin geometry and evolution from the Moulin Shape
           model

    • Abstract: Controls on Greenland moulin geometry and evolution from the Moulin Shape model
      Lauren C. Andrews, Kristin Poinar, and Celia Trunz
      The Cryosphere, 16, 2421–2448, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2421-2022, 2022
      We introduce a model for moulin geometry motivated by the wide range of sizes and shapes of explored moulins. Moulins comprise 10–14 % of the Greenland englacial–subglacial hydrologic system and act as time-varying water storage reservoirs. Moulin geometry can vary approximately 10 % daily and over 100 % seasonally. Moulin shape modulates the efficiency of the subglacial system that controls ice flow and should thus be included in hydrologic models.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 20:18:03 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-16-2421-2022 2022

       
  • Unravelling the long-term, locally heterogenous response of Greenland
           glaciers observed in archival photography

    • Abstract: Unravelling the long-term, locally heterogenous response of Greenland glaciers observed in archival photography
      Michael A. Cooper, Paulina Lewińska, William A. P. Smith, Edwin R. Hancock, Julian A. Dowdeswell, and David M. Rippin
      The Cryosphere, 16, 2449–2470, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2449-2022, 2022
      Here we use old photographs gathered several decades ago to expand the temporal record of glacier change in part of East Greenland. This is important because the longer the record of past glacier change, the better we are at predicting future glacier behaviour. Our work also shows that despite all these glaciers retreating, the rate at which they do this varies markedly. It is therefore important to consider outlet glaciers from Greenland individually to take account of this differing behaviour.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 20:18:03 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-16-2449-2022 2022

       
  • Topographic and vegetation controls of the spatial distribution of snow
           depth in agro-forested environments by UAV-lidar

    • Abstract: Topographic and vegetation controls of the spatial distribution of snow depth in agro-forested environments by UAV-lidar
      Vasana Dharmadasa, Christophe Kinnard, and Michel Baraër
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/tc-2022-124,2022
      Preprint under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      This study highlights the successful usage of UAV-lidar to monitor small-scale snow depth distribution. Our results show that underlying topography and wind-redistribution of snow along forest edges govern the snow depth variability at agro-forested sites, while forest structure variability dominates snow depth variability in the coniferous environment. This emphasizes the importance of including and better representing these processes in process-based models for accurate snowpack estimates.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 20:18:03 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-2022-1242022

       
  • The collapse of the Laurentide-Cordilleran ice saddle and early opening of
           the Mackenzie Valley, Northwest Territories, constrained by 10Be exposure
           dating

    • Abstract: The collapse of the Laurentide-Cordilleran ice saddle and early opening of the Mackenzie Valley, Northwest Territories, constrained by 10Be exposure dating
      Benjamin J. Stoker, Martin Margold, John C. Gosse, Alan J. Hidy, Alistair J. Monteath, Joseph M. Young, Niall Gandy, Lauren J. Gregoire, Sophie L. Norris, and Duane Froese
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/tc-2022-120,2022
      Preprint under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      During the last glaciation, the Laurentide Ice Sheet was the largest of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets. In northern Canada, it covered the Mackenzie Valley, altering the drainage systems and blocking species migration between North America and Beringia. Here we reconstruct the deglaciation of the Laurentide Ice Sheet in the Mackenzie Valley region and discuss the implications for the migration of early humans into North America, the drainage of glacial lakes, and past sea-level rise.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 20:18:03 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-2022-1202022

       
  • Land–atmosphere interactions in sub-polar and alpine climates in the
           CORDEX flagship pilot study Land Use and Climate Across Scales (LUCAS)
           models – Part 1: Evaluation of the snow-albedo effect

    • Abstract: Land–atmosphere interactions in sub-polar and alpine climates in the CORDEX flagship pilot study Land Use and Climate Across Scales (LUCAS) models – Part 1: Evaluation of the snow-albedo effect
      Anne Sophie Daloz, Clemens Schwingshackl, Priscilla Mooney, Susanna Strada, Diana Rechid, Edouard L. Davin, Eleni Katragkou, Nathalie de Noblet-Ducoudré, Michal Belda, Tomas Halenka, Marcus Breil, Rita M. Cardoso, Peter Hoffmann, Daniela C. A. Lima, Ronny Meier, Pedro M. M. Soares, Giannis Sofiadis, Gustav Strandberg, Merja H. Toelle, and Marianne T. Lund
      The Cryosphere, 16, 2403–2419, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2403-2022, 2022
      Snow plays a major role in the regulation of the Earth's surface temperature. Together with climate change, rising temperatures are already altering snow in many ways. In this context, it is crucial to better understand the ability of climate models to represent snow and snow processes. This work focuses on Europe and shows that the melting season in spring still represents a challenge for climate models and that more work is needed to accurately simulate snow–atmosphere interactions.
      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jun 2022 20:18:03 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-16-2403-2022 2022

       
  • Climatology and Surface Impacts of Atmospheric Rivers on West Antarctica

    • Abstract: Climatology and Surface Impacts of Atmospheric Rivers on West Antarctica
      Michelle L. Maclennan, Jan T. M. Lenaerts, Christine A. Shields, Andrew O. Hoffman, Nander Wever, Megan Thompson-Munson, Andrew C. Winters, Erin C. Pettit, Theodore A. Scambos, and Jonathan D. Wille
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/tc-2022-101,2022
      Preprint under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Atmospheric rivers are masses of air that transport large amounts of moisture and heat towards the poles. Here, we use a combination of weather observations and models to quantify the amount of snowfall caused by atmospheric rivers in West Antarctica, which is about 10 % of the total snowfall each year. We then examine a unique event that occurred in early February 2020, when three atmospheric rivers made landfall over West Antarctica in rapid succession, leading to snowfall and surface melt.
      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jun 2022 20:18:03 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-2022-1012022

       
  • The stability of present-day Antarctic grounding lines – Part A: No
           indication of marine ice sheet instability in the current geometry

    • Abstract: The stability of present-day Antarctic grounding lines – Part A: No indication of marine ice sheet instability in the current geometry
      Benoît Urruty, Emily A. Hill, Ronja Reese, Julius Garbe, Olivier Gagliardini, Gael Durand, Fabien Gillet-Chaulet, G. Hilmar Gudmundsson, Ricarda Winkelmann, Mondher Chekki, David Chandler, and Petra M. Langebroek
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/tc-2022-104,2022
      Preprint under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Retreat of the Antarctic grounding lines could destabilise large parts of the ice sheet. We use three ice sheet models to show that the present-day locations of Antarctic grounding lines are stable with respect to a small perturbation away from their current position. This suggests that self-sustained retreat of grounding lines, due to an internal instability, has not begun. Instead, the currently observed retreat is likely due to external forcing alone.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2022 20:18:03 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-2022-1042022

       
  • Brief communication: New sonde to unravel the mystery of polar subglacial
           lakes

    • Abstract: Brief communication: New sonde to unravel the mystery of polar subglacial lakes
      Youhong Sun, Xiaopeng Fan, Bing Li, Yuansheng Li, Guopin Li, Haibin Yu, Hongzhi Li, Dongliang Wang, Nan Zhang, Da Gong, Rusheng Wang, Yazhou Li, and Pavel G. Talalay
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/tc-2022-100,2022
      Preprint under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      The discovery of polar subglacial lakes, rivers, and streams has opened a new frontier of science within a short span. We present new environmentally friendly approach to study subglacial reservoirs based on the concept of freezing-in instrumented probes carrying a tethering power-signal cable. In January 2022, the probe was successfully tested in East Antarctica: it reached the base of the ice sheet and returned to the ice surface with samples of melted water from the basal ice.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2022 20:18:03 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-2022-1002022

       
  • Validation of a fully-coupled radiative transfer model for sea ice with
           albedo and transmittance measurements

    • Abstract: Validation of a fully-coupled radiative transfer model for sea ice with albedo and transmittance measurements
      Zhonghai Jin, Matteo Ottaviani, and Monika Sikand
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/tc-2022-106,2022
      Preprint under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      A rigorous treatment of the sea ice medium has been incorporated in an advanced radiative transfer model. The inherent optical properties of brine pockets and air bubbles are parameterized as a function of the vertical profile of the sea ice physical properties (temperature, salinity and density). We test the model performance using available albedo and transmittance measurements collected during the ICESCAPE and the SHEBA field campaigns.
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Jun 2022 02:50:02 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-2022-1062022

       
  • Snowfall and snow accumulation during the MOSAiC winter and spring seasons

    • Abstract: Snowfall and snow accumulation during the MOSAiC winter and spring seasons
      David N. Wagner, Matthew D. Shupe, Christopher Cox, Ola G. Persson, Taneil Uttal, Markus M. Frey, Amélie Kirchgaessner, Martin Schneebeli, Matthias Jaggi, Amy R. Macfarlane, Polona Itkin, Stefanie Arndt, Stefan Hendricks, Daniela Krampe, Marcel Nicolaus, Robert Ricker, Julia Regnery, Nikolai Kolabutin, Egor Shimanshuck, Marc Oggier, Ian Raphael, Julienne Stroeve, and Michael Lehning
      The Cryosphere, 16, 2373–2402, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2373-2022, 2022
      Based on measurements of the snow cover over sea ice and atmospheric measurements, we estimate snowfall and snow accumulation for the MOSAiC ice floe, between November 2019 and May 2020. For this period, we estimate 98–114 mm of precipitation. We suggest that about 34 mm of snow water equivalent accumulated until the end of April 2020 and that at least about 50 % of the precipitated snow was eroded or sublimated. Further, we suggest explanations for potential snowfall overestimation.
      PubDate: Fri, 17 Jun 2022 02:50:02 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-16-2373-2022 2022

       
  • Simulating the Holocene deglaciation across a marine-terminating portion
           of southwestern Greenland in response to marine and atmospheric forcings

    • Abstract: Simulating the Holocene deglaciation across a marine-terminating portion of southwestern Greenland in response to marine and atmospheric forcings
      Joshua K. Cuzzone, Nicolás E. Young, Mathieu Morlighem, Jason P. Briner, and Nicole-Jeanne Schlegel
      The Cryosphere, 16, 2355–2372, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2355-2022, 2022
      We use an ice sheet model to determine what influenced the Greenland Ice Sheet to retreat across a portion of southwestern Greenland during the Holocene (about the last 12 000 years). Our simulations, constrained by observations from geologic markers, show that atmospheric warming and ice melt primarily caused the ice sheet to retreat rapidly across this domain. We find, however, that iceberg calving at the interface where the ice meets the ocean significantly influenced ice mass change.
      PubDate: Fri, 17 Jun 2022 02:50:02 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-16-2355-2022 2022

       
  • Altimetric observation of wave attenuation through the Antarctic marginal
           ice zone using ICESat-2

    • Abstract: Altimetric observation of wave attenuation through the Antarctic marginal ice zone using ICESat-2
      Jill Brouwer, Alexander D. Fraser, Damian J. Murphy, Pat Wongpan, Alberto Alberello, Alison Kohout, Christopher Horvat, Simon Wotherspoon, Robert A. Massom, Jessica Cartwright, and Guy D. Williams
      The Cryosphere, 16, 2325–2353, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2325-2022, 2022
      The marginal ice zone is the region where ocean waves interact with sea ice. Although this important region influences many sea ice, ocean and biological processes, it has been difficult to accurately measure on a large scale from satellite instruments. We present new techniques for measuring wave attenuation using the NASA ICESat-2 laser altimeter. By measuring how waves attenuate within the sea ice, we show that the marginal ice zone may be far wider than previously realised.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 02:50:02 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-16-2325-2022 2022

       
  • Stochastic analysis of cone penetration tests in snow

    • Abstract: Stochastic analysis of cone penetration tests in snow
      Pyei Phyo Lin, Isabel Peinke, Pascal Hagenmuller, Matthias Wächter, M. Reza Rahimi Tabar, and Joachim Peinke
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/tc-2022-111,2022
      Preprint under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Characterization of layers of snowpack with highly resolved cone penetration tests leads to detailed fluctuating signals. We used advanced stochastic analysis to differentiate snow types by interpreting the signals as a mixture of continuous and discontinuous random fluctuations. These two types of fluctuations seem to correspond to different mechanisms of drag force generation during the experiments. The proposed methodology thus provides new insights to the characterization of snow layers.
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 02:50:02 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-2022-1112022

       
  • Correlation dispersion as a measure to better estimate uncertainty in
           remotely sensed glacier displacements

    • Abstract: Correlation dispersion as a measure to better estimate uncertainty in remotely sensed glacier displacements
      Bas Altena, Andreas Kääb, and Bert Wouters
      The Cryosphere, 16, 2285–2300, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2285-2022, 2022
      Repeat overflights of satellites are used to estimate surface displacements. However, such products lack a simple error description for individual measurements, but variation in precision occurs, since the calculation is based on the similarity of texture. Fortunately, variation in precision manifests itself in the correlation peak, which is used for the displacement calculation. This spread is used to make a connection to measurement precision, which can be of great use for model inversion.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Jun 2022 21:44:15 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-16-2285-2022 2022

       
  • Chronostratigraphy of the Larsen blue-ice area in northern Victoria Land,
           East Antarctica, and its implications for paleoclimate

    • Abstract: Chronostratigraphy of the Larsen blue-ice area in northern Victoria Land, East Antarctica, and its implications for paleoclimate
      Giyoon Lee, Jinho Ahn, Hyeontae Ju, Florian Ritterbusch, Ikumi Oyabu, Christo Buizert, Songyi Kim, Jangil Moon, Sambit Ghosh, Kenji Kawamura, Zheng-Tian Lu, Sangbum Hong, Chang Hee Han, Soon Do Hur, Wei Jiang, and Guo-Min Yang
      The Cryosphere, 16, 2301–2324, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2301-2022, 2022
      Blue-ice areas (BIAs) have several advantages for reconstructing past climate. However, the complicated ice flow in the area hinders constraining the age. We applied state-of-the-art techniques and found that the ages cover the last deglaciation period. Our study demonstrates that the BIA in northern Victoria Land may help reconstruct the past climate during the termination of the last glacial period.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Jun 2022 21:44:15 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-16-2301-2022 2022

       
  • Impact of runoff temporal distribution on ice dynamics

    • Abstract: Impact of runoff temporal distribution on ice dynamics
      Basile de Fleurian, Richard Davy, and Petra M. Langebroek
      The Cryosphere, 16, 2265–2283, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-16-2265-2022, 2022
      As temperature increases, more snow and ice melt at the surface of ice sheets. Here we use an ice dynamics and subglacial hydrology model with simplified geometry and climate forcing to study the impact of variations in meltwater on ice dynamics. We focus on the variations in length and intensity of the melt season. Our results show that a longer melt season leads to faster glaciers, but a more intense melt season reduces glaciers' seasonal velocities, albeit leading to higher peak velocities.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Jun 2022 21:44:15 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-16-2265-2022 2022

       
  • High-resolution debris cover mapping using UAV-derived thermal imagery:
           limits and opportunities

    • Abstract: High-resolution debris cover mapping using UAV-derived thermal imagery: limits and opportunities
      Deniz Tobias Gök, Dirk Scherler, and Leif Stefan Anderson
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/tc-2022-113,2022
      Preprint under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      High resolution debris thickness mapping using land surface temperature (LST) measured from an unpiloted aerial vehicle (UAV) at various times of a day. LSTs from UAVs require calibration that varies in time. We test two approaches to quantify supraglacial debris cover and we find find that the non-linearity of the relationship between LST and debris thickness increases with LST. Choosing the best model to predict debris thickness depends on the time of the day and the terrain aspect.
      PubDate: Wed, 15 Jun 2022 21:44:15 +020
      DOI: 10.5194/tc-2022-1132022

       
 
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