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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
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Climate of the Past (CP)
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.981
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 7  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1814-9324 - ISSN (Online) 1814-9332
Published by European Geosciences Union Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Climatic and societal impacts in Scandinavia following the 536 and
           540 CE volcanic double event

    • Abstract: Climatic and societal impacts in Scandinavia following the 536 and 540 CE volcanic double event
      Evelien van Dijk, Ingar Mørkestøl Gundersen, Anna de Bode, Helge Høeg, Kjetil Loftsgarden, Frode Iversen, Claudia Timmreck, Johann Jungclaus, and Kirstin Krüger
      Clim. Past, 19, 357–398, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-357-2023, 2023
      The mid-6th century was one of the coldest periods of the last 2000 years as characterized by great societal changes. Here, we study the effect of the volcanic double event in 536 CE and 540 CE on climate and society in southern Norway. The combined climate and growing degree day models and high-resolution pollen and archaeological records reveal that the northern and western sites are vulnerable to crop failure with possible abandonment of farms, whereas the southeastern site is more resilient.
      PubDate: Fri, 03 Feb 2023 17:06:23 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-357-2023 2023

       
  • Causes of the weak emergent constraint on climate sensitivity at the Last
           Glacial Maximum

    • Abstract: Causes of the weak emergent constraint on climate sensitivity at the Last Glacial Maximum
      Martin Renoult, Navjit Sagoo, Jiang Zhu, and Thorsten Mauritsen
      Clim. Past, 19, 323–356, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-323-2023, 2023
      The relationship between the Last Glacial Maximum and the sensitivity of climate models to a doubling of CO2 can be used to estimate the true sensitivity of the Earth. However, this relationship has varied in successive model generations. In this study, we assess multiple processes at the Last Glacial Maximum which weaken this relationship. For example, how models respond to the presence of ice sheets is a large contributor of uncertainty.
      PubDate: Thu, 02 Feb 2023 17:06:23 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-323-2023 2023

       
  • Temporal variations of surface mass balance over the last 5000 years
           around Dome Fuji, Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica

    • Abstract: Temporal variations of surface mass balance over the last 5000 years around Dome Fuji, Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica
      Ikumi Oyabu, Kenji Kawamura, Shuji Fujita, Ryo Inoue, Hideaki Motoyama, Kotaro Fukui, Motohiro Hirabayashi, Yu Hoshina, Naoyuki Kurita, Fumio Nakazawa, Hiroshi Ohno, Konosuke Sugiura, Toshitaka Suzuki, Shun Tsutaki, Ayako Abe-Ouchi, Masashi Niwano, Frédéric Parrenin, Fuyuki Saito, and Masakazu Yoshimori
      Clim. Past, 19, 293–321, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-293-2023, 2023
      We reconstructed accumulation rate around Dome Fuji, Antarctica, over the last 5000 years from 15 shallow ice cores and seven snow pits. We found a long-term decreasing trend in the preindustrial period, which may be associated with secular surface cooling and sea ice expansion. Centennial-scale variations were also found, which may partly be related to combinations of volcanic, solar and greenhouse gas forcings. The most rapid and intense increases of accumulation rate occurred since 1850 CE.
      PubDate: Thu, 02 Feb 2023 17:06:23 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-293-2023 2023

       
  • Using data and models to infer climate and environmental changes during
           the Little Ice Age in tropical West Africa

    • Abstract: Using data and models to infer climate and environmental changes during the Little Ice Age in tropical West Africa
      Anne-Marie Lézine, Maé Catrain, Julián Villamayor, and Myriam Khodri
      Clim. Past, 19, 277–292, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-277-2023, 2023
      Data and climate simulations were used to discuss the West African Little Ice Age (LIA). We show a clear opposition between a dry Sahel–savannah zone and a humid equatorial sector. In the Sahel region, the LIA was characterized by a gradual drying trend starting in 1250 CE after two early warning signals since 1170 CE. A tipping point was reached at 1800 CE. Drying events punctuated the LIA, the largest of which dated to ca. 1600 CE and was also recorded in the savannah zone.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Feb 2023 17:06:23 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-277-2023 2023

       
  • Investigating hydroclimatic impacts of the 168–158 BCE volcanic
           quartet and their relevance to the Nile River basin and Egyptian history

    • Abstract: Investigating hydroclimatic impacts of the 168–158 BCE volcanic quartet and their relevance to the Nile River basin and Egyptian history
      Ram Singh, Kostas Tsigaridis, Allegra N. LeGrande, Francis Ludlow, and Joseph G. Manning
      Clim. Past, 19, 249–275, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-249-2023, 2023
      This work is a modeling effort to investigate the hydroclimatic impacts of a volcanic quartet during 168–158 BCE over the Nile River basin in the context of Ancient Egypt's Ptolemaic era (305–30 BCE). The model simulated a robust surface cooling (~ 1.0–1.5 °C), suppressing the African monsoon (deficit of> 1 mm d−1 over East Africa) and agriculturally vital Nile summer flooding. Our result supports the hypothesized relation between volcanic eruptions, hydroclimatic shocks, and societal impacts.
      PubDate: Fri, 27 Jan 2023 07:40:23 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-249-2023 2023

       
  • Mid-Holocene reinforcement of North Atlantic atmospheric circulation
           variability from a western Baltic lake sediment record

    • Abstract: Mid-Holocene reinforcement of North Atlantic atmospheric circulation variability from a western Baltic lake sediment record
      Markus Czymzik, Rik Tjallingii, Birgit Plessen, Peter Feldens, Martin Theuerkauf, Matthias Moros, Markus J. Schwab, Carla K. M. Nantke, Silvia Pinkerneil, Achim Brauer, and Helge W. Arz
      Clim. Past, 19, 233–248, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-233-2023, 2023
      Productivity increases in Lake Kälksjön sediments during the last 9600 years are likely driven by the progressive millennial-scale winter warming in northwestern Europe, following the increasing Northern Hemisphere winter insolation and decadal to centennial periods of a more positive NAO polarity. Strengthened productivity variability since ∼5450 cal yr BP is hypothesized to reflect a reinforcement of NAO-like atmospheric circulation.
      PubDate: Thu, 26 Jan 2023 07:40:23 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-233-2023 2023

       
  • The weather diary of Georg Christoph Eimmart for Nuremberg,
           1695–1704

    • Abstract: The weather diary of Georg Christoph Eimmart for Nuremberg, 1695–1704
      Stefan Brönnimann
      Clim. Past Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/cp-2022-98,2023
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Weather reconstructions could help to better understand the mechanisms leading to, and the impacts caused by, climatic changes. This requires daily weather information such as diaries. Here I present the weather diary by Georg Christoph Eimmart, Nuremberg, covering 1695–1704. This was a particularly cold period in Europe, and the diary helps to better characterise this climatic anomaly.
      PubDate: Thu, 26 Jan 2023 07:40:23 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-2022-982023

       
  • Holocene climate and oceanography of the coastal Western United States and
           California Current System

    • Abstract: Holocene climate and oceanography of the coastal Western United States and California Current System
      Hannah M. Palmer, Veronica Padilla Vriesman, Caitlin M. Livsey, Carina R. Fish, and Tessa M. Hill
      Clim. Past, 19, 199–232, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-199-2023, 2023
      To better understand and contextualize modern climate change, this systematic review synthesizes climate and oceanographic patterns in the Western United States and California Current System through the most recent 11.75 kyr. Through a literature review and coded analysis of past studies, we identify distinct environmental phases through time and linkages between marine and terrestrial systems. We explore climate change impacts on ecosystems and human–environment interactions.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Jan 2023 19:01:50 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-199-2023 2023

       
  • A global compilation of diatom silica oxygen isotope records from lake
           sediment – trends, and implications for climate reconstruction

    • Abstract: A global compilation of diatom silica oxygen isotope records from lake sediment – trends, and implications for climate reconstruction
      Philip Meister, Anne Alexandre, Hannah Bailey, Philip Barker, Boris K. Biskaborn, Ellie Broadman, Rosine Cartier, Bernhard Chapligin, Martine Couapel, Jonathan R. Dean, Bernhard Diekmann, Poppy Harding, Andrew C. G. Henderson, Armand Hernandez, Ulrike Herzschuh, Svetlana S. Kostrova, Jack Lacey, Melanie J. Leng, Andreas Lücke, Anson W. Mackay, Eniko Katalin Magyari, Biljana Narancic, Cécile Porchier, Gunhild Rosqvist, Aldo Shemesh, Corinne Sonzogni, George E. A. Swann, Florence Sylvestre, and Hanno Meyer
      Clim. Past Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/cp-2022-96,2023
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Atoms of the element Oxygen exists in different varieties which have slightly different masses and behave differently in the global water cycle during e.g. rain formation and evaporation. Diatoms are microscopic algaea which use oxygen in building their shells and thereby store the oxygen signature of the water they live in. We have compiled and analyzed previously published data from diatoms from lake sediments around the globe and found common patterns suggesting a common climate signal.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Jan 2023 19:01:50 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-2022-962023

       
  • Effects of LGM sea surface temperature and sea ice extent on the
           isotope-temperature slope at polar ice core sites

    • Abstract: Effects of LGM sea surface temperature and sea ice extent on the isotope-temperature slope at polar ice core sites
      Alexandre Cauquoin, Ayako Abe-Ouchi, Takashi Obase, Wing-Le Chan, André Paul, and Martin Werner
      Clim. Past Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/cp-2023-3,2023
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Stable water isotopes are tracers of climate processes occurring in the hydrological cycle. They are widely used to reconstruct the past variations of polar temperature before the instrumental era thanks to their measurements in ice cores. However, the relationship between measured isotopes and temperature has still large uncertainties. In our study, we investigate how the sea surface conditions (temperature, sea ice, ocean circulation) impact this relationship for a cold to warm climate change.
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Jan 2023 19:01:50 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-2023-32023

       
  • Sensitivity of Heinrich-type ice-sheet surge characteristics to boundary
           forcing perturbations

    • Abstract: Sensitivity of Heinrich-type ice-sheet surge characteristics to boundary forcing perturbations
      Clemens Schannwell, Uwe Mikolajewicz, Florian Ziemen, and Marie-Luise Kapsch
      Clim. Past, 19, 179–198, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-179-2023, 2023
      Heinrich-type ice-sheet surges are recurring events over the course of the last glacial cycle during which large numbers of icebergs are discharged from the Laurentide ice sheet into the ocean. These events alter the evolution of the global climate. Here, we use model simulations of the Laurentide ice sheet to identify and quantify the importance of various climate and ice-sheet parameters for the simulated surge cycle.
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Jan 2023 19:01:50 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-179-2023 2023

       
  • Deglacial records of terrigenous organic matter accumulation off the Yukon
           and Amur rivers based on lignin phenols and long-chain n-alkanes

    • Abstract: Deglacial records of terrigenous organic matter accumulation off the Yukon and Amur rivers based on lignin phenols and long-chain n-alkanes
      Mengli Cao, Jens Hefter, Ralf Tiedemann, Lester Lembke-Jene, Vera D. Meyer, and Gesine Mollenhauer
      Clim. Past, 19, 159–178, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-159-2023, 2023
      We use sediment records of lignin to reconstruct deglacial vegetation change and permafrost mobilization, which occurred earlier in the Yukon than in the Amur river basin. Sea ice extent or surface temperatures of adjacent oceans might have had a strong influence on the timing of permafrost mobilization. In contrast to previous evidence, our records imply that during glacial peaks of permafrost decomposition, lipids and lignin might have been delivered to the ocean by identical processes.
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Jan 2023 19:01:50 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-159-2023 2023

       
  • Multi-proxy speleothem-based reconstruction of mid-MIS 3 climate in South
           Africa

    • Abstract: Multi-proxy speleothem-based reconstruction of mid-MIS 3 climate in South Africa
      Jenny Maccali, Anna Nele Meckler, Stein-Erik Lauritzen, Torill Brekken, Helen Aase Rokkan, Alvaro Fernandez, Yves Krüger, Jane Adigun, Stéphane Affolter, and Markus Leuenberger
      Clim. Past Discuss., https//doi.org/10.5194/cp-2023-1,2023
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      The southern coast of South Africa hosts some key archeological sites for the study of early human evolution. Here we present a short but high-resolution record of past changes in hydroclimate and temperature in the southern coast South Africa based on the study of a speleothem collected in Bloukrantz Cave. Overall, the paleoclimate indicators suggest stable temperature from 48.3 to 45.2 ka whereas precipitation was variable with marked short drier episodes.
      PubDate: Thu, 19 Jan 2023 13:26:16 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-2023-12023

       
  • Modeled storm surge changes in a warmer world: the Last Interglacial

    • Abstract: Modeled storm surge changes in a warmer world: the Last Interglacial
      Paolo Scussolini, Job Dullaart, Sanne Muis, Alessio Rovere, Pepijn Bakker, Dim Coumou, Hans Renssen, Philip J. Ward, and Jeroen C. J. H. Aerts
      Clim. Past, 19, 141–157, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-141-2023, 2023
      We reconstruct sea level extremes due to storm surges in a past warmer climate. We employ a novel combination of paleoclimate modeling and global ocean hydrodynamic modeling. We find that during the Last Interglacial, about 127 000 years ago, seasonal sea level extremes were indeed significantly different – higher or lower – on long stretches of the global coast. These changes are associated with different patterns of atmospheric storminess linked with meridional shifts in wind bands.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Jan 2023 13:24:53 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-141-2023 2023

       
  • Sea surface temperature evolution of the North Atlantic Ocean across the
           Eocene–Oligocene transition

    • Abstract: Sea surface temperature evolution of the North Atlantic Ocean across the Eocene–Oligocene transition
      Kasia K. Śliwińska, Helen K. Coxall, David K. Hutchinson, Diederik Liebrand, Stefan Schouten, and Agatha M. de Boer
      Clim. Past, 19, 123–140, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-123-2023, 2023
      We provide a sea surface temperature record from the Labrador Sea (ODP Site 647) based on organic geochemical proxies across the late Eocene and early Oligocene. Our study reveals heterogenic cooling of the Atlantic. The cooling of the North Atlantic is difficult to reconcile with the active Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). We discuss possible explanations like uncertainty in the data, paleogeography and atmospheric CO2 boundary conditions, model weaknesses, and AMOC activity.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jan 2023 13:27:19 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-123-2023 2023

       
  • No changes in overall AMOC strength in interglacial PMIP4 time slices

    • Abstract: No changes in overall AMOC strength in interglacial PMIP4 time slices
      Zhiyi Jiang, Chris Brierley, David Thornalley, and Sophie Sax
      Clim. Past, 19, 107–121, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-107-2023, 2023
      This work looks at a series of model simulations of two past warm climates. We focus on the deep overturning circulation in the Atlantic Ocean. We show that there are no robust changes in the overall strength of the circulation. We also show that the circulation hardly plays a role in changes in the surface climate across the globe.
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Jan 2023 17:43:43 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-107-2023 2023

       
  • Simulations of the Holocene climate in Europe using an interactive
           downscaling within the iLOVECLIM model (version 1.1)

    • Abstract: Simulations of the Holocene climate in Europe using an interactive downscaling within the iLOVECLIM model (version 1.1)
      Frank Arthur, Didier M. Roche, Ralph Fyfe, Aurélien Quiquet, and Hans Renssen
      Clim. Past, 19, 87–106, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-87-2023, 2023
      This paper simulates transcient Holocene climate in Europe by applying an interactive downscaling to the standard version of the iLOVECLIM model. The results show that downscaling presents a higher spatial variability in better agreement with proxy-based reconstructions as compared to the standard model, particularly in the Alps, the Scandes, and the Mediterranean. Our downscaling scheme is numerically cheap, which can perform kilometric multi-millennial simulations suitable for future studies.
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Jan 2023 17:43:43 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-87-2023 2023

       
  • Unraveling the mechanisms and implications of a stronger mid-Pliocene
           Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in PlioMIP2

    • Abstract: Unraveling the mechanisms and implications of a stronger mid-Pliocene Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in PlioMIP2
      Julia E. Weiffenbach, Michiel L. J. Baatsen, Henk A. Dijkstra, Anna S. von der Heydt, Ayako Abe-Ouchi, Esther C. Brady, Wing-Le Chan, Deepak Chandan, Mark A. Chandler, Camille Contoux, Ran Feng, Chuncheng Guo, Zixuan Han, Alan M. Haywood, Qiang Li, Xiangyu Li, Gerrit Lohmann, Daniel J. Lunt, Kerim H. Nisancioglu, Bette L. Otto-Bliesner, W. Richard Peltier, Gilles Ramstein, Linda E. Sohl, Christian Stepanek, Ning Tan, Julia C. Tindall, Charles J. R. Williams, Qiong Zhang, and Zhongshi Zhang
      Clim. Past, 19, 61–85, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-61-2023, 2023
      We study the behavior of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the mid-Pliocene. The mid-Pliocene was about 3 million years ago and had a similar CO2 concentration to today. We show that the stronger AMOC during this period relates to changes in geography and that this has a significant influence on ocean temperatures and heat transported northwards by the Atlantic Ocean. Understanding the behavior of the mid-Pliocene AMOC can help us to learn more about our future climate.
      PubDate: Mon, 09 Jan 2023 21:07:08 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-61-2023 2023

       
  • A cosmogenic nuclide-derived chronology of pre-Last Glacial Cycle
           glaciations during MIS 8 and MIS 6 in northern Patagonia

    • Abstract: A cosmogenic nuclide-derived chronology of pre-Last Glacial Cycle glaciations during MIS 8 and MIS 6 in northern Patagonia
      Tancrède P. M. Leger, Andrew S. Hein, Ángel Rodés, Robert G. Bingham, Irene Schimmelpfennig, Derek Fabel, Pablo Tapia, and ASTER Team
      Clim. Past, 19, 35–59, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-35-2023, 2023
      Over the past 800 thousand years, variations in the Earth’s orbit and tilt have caused antiphased solar insolation intensity in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Paradoxically, glacial records suggest that global ice sheets have responded synchronously to major cold glacial and warm interglacial episodes. To address this puzzle, we present a new detailed glacier chronology that estimates the timing of multiple Patagonian ice-sheet waxing and waning cycles over the past 300 thousand years.
      PubDate: Fri, 06 Jan 2023 21:42:47 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-35-2023 2023

       
  • Frequency of large volcanic eruptions over the past
           200 000 years

    • Abstract: Frequency of large volcanic eruptions over the past 200 000 years
      Eric W. Wolff, Andrea Burke, Laura Crick, Emily A. Doyle, Helen M. Innes, Sue H. Mahony, James W. B. Rae, Mirko Severi, and R. Stephen J. Sparks
      Clim. Past, 19, 23–33, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-19-23-2023, 2023
      Large volcanic eruptions leave an imprint of a spike of sulfate deposition that can be measured in ice cores. Here we use a method that logs the number and size of large eruptions recorded in an Antarctic core in a consistent way through the last 200 000 years. The rate of recorded eruptions is variable but shows no trends. In particular, there is no increase in recorded eruptions during deglaciation periods. This is consistent with most recorded eruptions being from lower latitudes.
      PubDate: Fri, 06 Jan 2023 21:42:47 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/cp-19-23-2023 2023

       
 
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