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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 112 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Change and Adaptation in Socio-Ecological Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Climate Change Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access  
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climate Summary of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 66)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Developments in Atmospheric Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access  
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 198)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Large Marine Ecosystems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mathematics of Climate and Weather Forecasting     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 134)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Nīvār     Open Access  
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revista Brasileira de Meteorologia     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access  
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal  
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
The Cryosphere Discussions (TCD)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access  
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Climate of the Past (CP)
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.981
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 5  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1814-9324 - ISSN (Online) 1814-9332
Published by Copernicus Publications Homepage  [62 journals]
  • Large-scale climate signals of a European oxygen isotope network from tree
           rings

    • Abstract: Large-scale climate signals of a European oxygen isotope network from tree rings
      Daniel F. Balting, Monica Ionita, Martin Wegmann, Gerhard Helle, Gerhard H. Schleser, Norel Rimbu, Mandy B. Freund, Ingo Heinrich, Diana Caldarescu, and Gerrit Lohmann
      Clim. Past, 17, 1005–1023, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-1005-2021, 2021
      To extend climate information back in time, we investigate the climate sensitivity of a δ18O network from tree rings, consisting of 26 European sites and covering the last 400 years. Our results suggest that the δ18O variability is associated with large-scale anomaly patterns that resemble those observed for the El Niño–Southern Oscillation. We conclude that the investigation of large-scale climate signals far beyond instrumental records can be done with a δ18O network derived from tree rings.
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T15:24:26+02:00
       
  • Comparison of the oxygen isotope signatures in speleothem records and
           iHadCM3 model simulations for the last millennium

    • Abstract: Comparison of the oxygen isotope signatures in speleothem records and iHadCM3 model simulations for the last millennium
      Janica C. Bühler, Carla Roesch, Moritz Kirschner, Louise Sime, Max D. Holloway, and Kira Rehfeld
      Clim. Past, 17, 985–1004, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-985-2021, 2021
      We present three new isotope-enabled simulations for the last millennium (850–1850 CE) and compare them to records from a global speleothem database. Offsets between the simulated and measured oxygen isotope ratios are fairly small. While modeled oxygen isotope ratios are more variable on decadal timescales, proxy records are more variable on (multi-)centennial timescales. This could be due to a lack of long-term variability in complex model simulations, but proxy biases cannot be excluded.
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T15:24:26+02:00
       
  • Reconstruction and analysis of extreme drought and flood events in the
           Hanjiang River basin since 1426

    • Abstract: Reconstruction and analysis of extreme drought and flood events in the Hanjiang River basin since 1426
      Xiaodan Zhang, Guoyu Ren, Yuda Yang, He Bing, Zhixin Hao, and Panfeng Zhang
      Clim. Past Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-43,2021
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      This study, by using the yearly drought and flood grades reconstructed based on historical documents, and a set of criteria for identifying extreme droughts and floods, constructs a historical series of extreme droughts and floods in the Hanjiang River Basin from 1426–2017. The possible linkages of extreme droughts and floods with Asian monsoon , strong ENSO and large volcanic eruptions were also discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-05-05T15:24:26+02:00
       
  • CHELSA-TraCE21k v1.0. Downscaled transient temperature and precipitation
           data since the last glacial maximum

    • Abstract: CHELSA-TraCE21k v1.0. Downscaled transient temperature and precipitation data since the last glacial maximum
      Dirk Nikolaus Karger, Michael P. Nobis, Signe Normand, Catherine H. Graham, and Niklaus E. Zimmermann
      Clim. Past Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-30,2021
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Here we present global monthly climatologies for temperature and precipitation at high spatial resolution for the last 21,000 years. The topography at all time steps is created by combining high resolution information on glacial cover from current and Last Glacial Maximum glacier databases with the interpolation of an ice sheet model and a coupling to mean annual temperatures from a global circulation model.
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • Dating of an East Antarctic ice core (GV7) by high resolution chemical
           stratigraphies

    • Abstract: Dating of an East Antarctic ice core (GV7) by high resolution chemical stratigraphies
      Raffaello Nardin, Mirko Severi, Alessandra Amore, Silvia Becagli, Francois Burgay, Laura Caiazzo, Virginia Ciardini, Giuliano Dreossi, Massimo Frezzotti, Sang-Bum Hong, Ishaq Khan, Bianca Maria Narcisi, Marco Proposito, Claudio Scarchilli, Enricomaria Selmo, Andrea Spolaor, Barbara Stenni, and Rita Traversi
      Clim. Past Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-44,2021
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      The first step to exploit all the potential information buried into ice cores is to produce a reliable age scale. Basing on chemical and isotopic stratigraphies from the 197 m long Antarctic GV7 ice core, an accurate dating was achieved showing that the archive spans roughly the last 830 years. The relatively high accumulation rate allowed using the non-sea salt-sulphate seasonal pattern for counting annual layers. Accumulation rate reconstruction exhibited a slight rise since 18th century.
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • On the phenomenon of the blue sun

    • Abstract: On the phenomenon of the blue sun
      Nellie Wullenweber, Anna Lange, Alexei Rozanov, and Christian von Savigny
      Clim. Past, 17, 969–983, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-969-2021, 2021
      This study investigates the physical processes leading to the rare phenomenon of the sun appearing blue or green. The phenomenon is caused by anomalous scattering by, e.g., volcanic or forest fire aerosols. Unlike most other studies, our study includes a full treatment of the effect of Rayleigh scattering on the colour of the sun. We investigate different factors and revisit a historic example, i.e. the Canadian forest fires in 1950, that led to blue sun events in different European countries.
      PubDate: 2021-04-30T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • Climate & Ecology in the Rocky Mountain Interior After the Early Eocene
           Climatic Optimum

    • Abstract: Climate & Ecology in the Rocky Mountain Interior After the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum
      Rebekah A. Stein, Nathan D. Sheldon, Sarah E. Allen, Michael E. Smith, Rebecca M. Dzombak, and Brian R. Jicha
      Clim. Past Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-45,2021
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Modern climate change drives us to look to the past to understand how well prior life adapted to warm periods. During the early Eocene, a warm period approximately 50 million years ago, southwest Wyoming was covered by a giant lake. This lake and surrounding environments made for excellent preservation of ancient soils, plant fossils, and more. Using geochemical tools and plant fossils, we determine the region was a warm, wet forest and that elevated temperatures were maintained by volcanoes.
      PubDate: 2021-04-29T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • Does a difference in ice sheets between Marine Isotope Stages 3 and 5a
           affect the duration of stadials'

    • Abstract: Does a difference in ice sheets between Marine Isotope Stages 3 and 5a affect the duration of stadials'
      Sam Sherriff-Tadano, Ayako Abe-Ouchi, Akira Oka, Takahito Mitsui, and Fuyuki Saito
      Clim. Past Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-47,2021
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Glacial periods underwent climate shifts between warm states and cold states on a millennial time-scale. Frequency of these climate shifts varied along time, and it was shorter during mid-glacial period compared to early-glacial period. In this study, from climate simulations of early and mid-glacial periods with a comprehensive climate model, we show that the larger ice sheet in mid-glacial compared to early-glacial could contributed to the frequent climate shifts during mid-glacial period.
      PubDate: 2021-04-29T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • Reconstructing burnt area during the Holocene: an Iberian case study

    • Abstract: Reconstructing burnt area during the Holocene: an Iberian case study
      Yicheng Shen, Luke Sweeney, Mengmeng Liu, Jose Antonio Lopez Saez, Sebastián Pérez-Díaz, Reyes Luelmo-Lautenschlaeger, Graciela Gil-Romera, Dana Hoefer, Gonzalo Jiménez-Moreno, Heike Schneider, I. Colin Prentice, and Sandy P. Harrison
      Clim. Past Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-36,2021
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 2 comments)
      We present a method to reconstruct burnt area using a relationship between pollen and charcoal abundances, and calibration of charcoal abundance using modern observations of burnt area. We use this method to reconstruct changes in burnt area over the past 12,000 years from sites in Iberia. We show that regional changes in burnt area reflect known changes in climate, with high burnt area during warming intervals and low burnt area when the climate was cooler and/or wetter than today.
      PubDate: 2021-04-29T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • Tree-ring-based spring precipitation reconstruction in the Sikhote-Alin'
           Mountain range

    • Abstract: Tree-ring-based spring precipitation reconstruction in the Sikhote-Alin' Mountain range
      Olga Ukhvatkina, Alexander Omelko, Dmitriy Kislov, Alexander Zhmerenetsky, Tatyana Epifanova, and Jan Altman
      Clim. Past, 17, 951–967, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-951-2021, 2021
      We present the first precipitation reconstructions for three sites along a latitudinal gradient in the Sikhote-Alin' mountains (Russian Far East). The reconstructions are based on Korean pine tree rings. We found that an important limiting factor for this species growth was precipitation during the spring-to-early-summer period. The periodicity found in our reconstructions suggests the influence of El Niño–Southern Oscillation and Pacific Dedacadal Oscillation on the region's climate.
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • Could phenological records from Chinese poems of the Tang and Song
           dynasties (618–1279 CE) be reliable evidence of past climate
           changes'

    • Abstract: Could phenological records from Chinese poems of the Tang and Song dynasties (618–1279 CE) be reliable evidence of past climate changes'
      Yachen Liu, Xiuqi Fang, Junhu Dai, Huanjiong Wang, and Zexing Tao
      Clim. Past, 17, 929–950, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-929-2021, 2021
      There are controversies about whether poetry can be used as one of the evidence sources for past climate changes. We tried to discuss the reliability and validity of phenological records from poems of the Tang and Song dynasties (618–1279 CE) by analyzing their certainties and uncertainties. A standardized processing method for phenological records from poems is introduced. We hope that this study can provide a reference for the extraction and application of phenological records from poems.
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • Climate and ice sheet evolutions from the last glacial maximum to the
           pre-industrial period with an ice sheet – climate coupled model

    • Abstract: Climate and ice sheet evolutions from the last glacial maximum to the pre-industrial period with an ice sheet – climate coupled model
      Aurélien Quiquet, Didier M. Roche, Christophe Dumas, Nathaëlle Bouttes, and Fanny Lhardy
      Clim. Past Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-39,2021
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      In this paper we discuss results obtained with a set of coupled ice sheet – climate model experiments for the last 26 kyrs. The model displays a large sensitivity of the oceanic circulation to the amount of the freshwater flux resulting from ice sheet melting. Ice sheet geometry changes alone are not enough to lead to abrupt climate events and rapid warming at high latitudes are here only reported during abrupt oceanic circulation recoveries that occurred when accounting for freshwater flux.
      PubDate: 2021-04-26T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • Controlling water infrastructure and codifying water knowledge:
           institutional responses to severe drought in Barcelona (1620–1650)

    • Abstract: Controlling water infrastructure and codifying water knowledge: institutional responses to severe drought in Barcelona (1620–1650)
      Santiago Gorostiza, Maria Antònia Martí Escayol, and Mariano Barriendos
      Clim. Past, 17, 913–927, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-913-2021, 2021
      How did cities respond to drought during the 17th century' This article studies the strategies followed by the city government of Barcelona during the severely dry period from 1620 to 1650. Beyond the efforts to expand urban water supply sources and to improve the maintenance of the system, the city government decided to compile knowledge about water infrastructure into a book and to restrict access to it. This management strategy aimed to increase the city's control over water.
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • Dynamics of the Mediterranean droughts from 850 to 2099 CE in the
           Community Earth System Model

    • Abstract: Dynamics of the Mediterranean droughts from 850 to 2099 CE in the Community Earth System Model
      Woon Mi Kim and Christoph C. Raible
      Clim. Past, 17, 887–911, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-887-2021, 2021
      The analysis of the dynamics of western central Mediterranean droughts for 850–2099 CE in the Community Earth System Model indicates that past Mediterranean droughts were driven by the internal variability. This internal variability is more important during the initial years of droughts. During the transition years, the longevity of droughts is defined by the land–atmosphere feedbacks. In the future, this land–atmosphere feedbacks are intensified, causing a constant dryness over the region.
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • Land–sea temperature contrasts at the Last Interglacial and their impact
           on the hydrological cycle

    • Abstract: Land–sea temperature contrasts at the Last Interglacial and their impact on the hydrological cycle
      Nicholas King-Hei Yeung, Laurie Menviel, Katrin J. Meissner, Andréa S. Taschetto, Tilo Ziehn, and Matthew Chamberlain
      Clim. Past, 17, 869–885, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-869-2021, 2021
      The Last Interglacial period (LIG) is characterised by strong orbital forcing compared to the pre-industrial period (PI). This study compares the mean climate state of the LIG to the PI as simulated by the ACCESS-ESM1.5, with a focus on the southern hemispheric monsoons, which are shown to be consistently weakened. This is associated with cooler terrestrial conditions in austral summer due to decreased insolation, and greater pressure and subsidence over land from Hadley cell strengthening.
      PubDate: 2021-04-21T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • The 1921 European drought: Impacts, reconstruction and drivers

    • Abstract: The 1921 European drought: Impacts, reconstruction and drivers
      Gerard van der Schrier, Richard P. Allan, Albert Ossó, Pedro M. Sousa, Hans Van de Vyver, Bert Van Schaeybroeck, Roberto Coscarelli, Angela A. Pasqua, Olga Petrucci, Mary Curley, Mirosław Mietus, Janusz Filipiak, Petr Štěpánek, Pavel Zahradníček, Rudolf Brázdil, Ladislava Řezníčková, Else J. M. van den Besselaar, Ricardo Trigo, and Enric Aguilar
      Clim. Past Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-41,2021
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      The 1921 drought is the most severe European drought since 1900. Its impacts on society and the physical characteristics are described using newly recovered meteorological observations and a survey from newspapers reports. Finally, the drivers of the drought are analysed. While none of the seasons in 1920 and 1921 tops the scale of having the largest precipitation deficit on record, the conservative nature of drought amplifies the lack of rain in late 1920 into the 1921 spring and summer.
      PubDate: 2021-04-21T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • The triple oxygen isotope composition of phytoliths, a new proxy of
           atmospheric relative humidity: controls of soil water isotope composition,
           temperature, CO2 concentration and relative humidity

    • Abstract: The triple oxygen isotope composition of phytoliths, a new proxy of atmospheric relative humidity: controls of soil water isotope composition, temperature, CO2 concentration and relative humidity
      Clément Outrequin, Anne Alexandre, Christine Vallet-Coulomb, Clément Piel, Sébastien Devidal, Amaelle Landais, Martine Couapel, Jean-Charles Mazur, Christophe Peugeot, Monique Pierre, Frédéric Prié, Jacques Roy, Corinne Sonzogni, and Claudia Voigt
      Clim. Past Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-34,2021
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Continental atmospheric humidity is a key climate parameter poorly captured by global climate models. Model-data comparison approaches applicable beyond the instrumental period are essential to progress on this issue but face a lack of quantitative relative humidity proxies. Here, we calibrate the triple oxygen isotope composition of phytoliths as a new quantitative proxy of continental relative humidity suitable for past climate reconstructions.
      PubDate: 2021-04-21T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • Simulation of the mid-Pliocene Warm Period using HadGEM3: Experimental
           design and results from model-model and model-data comparison

    • Abstract: Simulation of the mid-Pliocene Warm Period using HadGEM3: Experimental design and results from model-model and model-data comparison
      Charles J. R. Williams, Alistair A. Sellar, Xin Ren, Alan M. Haywood, Peter Hopcroft, Stephen J. Hunter, William H. G. Roberts, Robin S. Smith, Emma J. Stone, Julia C. Tindall, and Daniel J. Lunt
      Clim. Past Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-40,2021
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Computer simulations of the geological past are an important tool to improve our understanding of climate change. We present results from a simulation using the latest version of the UK’s climate model, the mid-Pliocene (approximately 3 million years ago). The simulation reproduces temperatures as expected, and shows some improvement relative to previous versions of the same model. The simulation is, however, arguably too warm when compared to other models and available observations.
      PubDate: 2021-04-21T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • Bottom water oxygenation changes in the Southwestern Indian Ocean as an
           indicator for enhanced respired carbon storage since the last glacial
           inception

    • Abstract: Bottom water oxygenation changes in the Southwestern Indian Ocean as an indicator for enhanced respired carbon storage since the last glacial inception
      Helen Eri Amsler, Lena Mareike Thöle, Ingrid Stimac, Walter Geibert, Minoru Ikehara, Gerhard Kuhn, Oliver Esper, and Samuel Laurent Jaccard
      Clim. Past Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-2021-29,2021
      Preprint under review for CP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      We present sedimentary redox-sensitive trace metal records from five sediment cores retrieved from the SW Indian Ocean. These records are indicative of oxygen-depleted conditions during cold periods and enhanced oxygenation during interstadials. Our results thus suggest that deep ocean oxygenation changes were mainly controlled by ocean ventilation and that a generally more sluggish circulation contributed to sequester remineralized carbon away from the atmosphere during glacial periods.
      PubDate: 2021-04-20T16:32:12+02:00
       
  • Snapshots of mean ocean temperature over the last 700 000 years using
           noble gases in the EPICA Dome C ice core

    • Abstract: Snapshots of mean ocean temperature over the last 700 000 years using noble gases in the EPICA Dome C ice core
      Marcel Haeberli, Daniel Baggenstos, Jochen Schmitt, Markus Grimmer, Adrien Michel, Thomas Kellerhals, and Hubertus Fischer
      Clim. Past, 17, 843–867, https://doi.org/10.5194/cp-17-843-2021, 2021
      Using the temperature-dependent solubility of noble gases in ocean water, we reconstruct global mean ocean temperature (MOT) over the last 700 kyr using noble gas ratios in air enclosed in polar ice cores. Our record shows that glacial MOT was about 3 °C cooler compared to the Holocene. Interglacials before 450 kyr ago were characterized by about 1.5 °C lower MOT than the Holocene. In addition, some interglacials show transient maxima in ocean temperature related to changes in ocean circulation.
      PubDate: 2021-04-14T16:32:12+02:00
       
 
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