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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)
Number of Followers: 16  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1680-7367 - ISSN (Online) 1680-7375
Published by Copernicus Publications Homepage  [54 journals]
  • A new process-based and scale-aware desert dust emission scheme for global
           climate models – Part II: Evaluation in the Community Earth System Model
           version 2 (CESM2)

    • Abstract: A new process-based and scale-aware desert dust emission scheme for global climate models – Part II: Evaluation in the Community Earth System Model version 2 (CESM2)
      Danny M. Leung, Jasper F. Kok, Longlei Li, Natalie M. Mahowald, David M. Lawrence, Simone Tilmes, Erik Kluzek, Martina Klose, and Carlos Pérez García-Pando
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2287–2318, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2287-2024, 2024
      This study uses a premier Earth system model to evaluate a new desert dust emission scheme proposed in our companion paper. We show that our scheme accounts for more dust emission physics, hence matching better against observations than other existing dust emission schemes do. Our scheme's dust emissions also couple tightly with meteorology, hence likely improving the modeled dust sensitivity to climate change. We believe this work is vital for improving dust representation in climate models.
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Feb 2024 04:04:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2287-2024 2024

       
  • Contrail formation on ambient aerosol particles for aircraft with hydrogen
           combustion: a box model trajectory study

    • Abstract: Contrail formation on ambient aerosol particles for aircraft with hydrogen combustion: a box model trajectory study
      Andreas Bier, Simon Unterstrasser, Josef Zink, Dennis Hillenbrand, Tina Jurkat-Witschas, and Annemarie Lottermoser
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2319–2344, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2319-2024, 2024
      Using hydrogen as aviation fuel affects contrails' climate impact. We study contrail formation behind aircraft with H2 combustion. Due to the absence of soot emissions, contrail ice crystals are assumed to form only on ambient particles mixed into the plume. The ice crystal number, which strongly varies with temperature and aerosol number density, is decreased by more than 80 %–90 % compared to kerosene contrails. However H2 contrails can form at lower altitudes due to higher H2O emissions.
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Feb 2024 04:04:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2319-2024 2024

       
  • Evaluation of WRF-Chem-simulated meteorology and aerosols over northern
           India during the severe pollution episode of 2016

    • Abstract: Evaluation of WRF-Chem-simulated meteorology and aerosols over northern India during the severe pollution episode of 2016
      Prerita Agarwal, David S. Stevenson, and Mathew R. Heal
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2239–2266, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2239-2024, 2024
      Air pollution levels across northern India are amongst some of the worst in the world, with episodic and hazardous haze events. Here, the ability of the WRF-Chem model to predict air quality over northern India is assessed against several datasets. Whilst surface wind speed and particle pollution peaks are over- and underestimated, respectively, meteorology and aerosol trends are adequately captured, and we conclude it is suitable for investigating severe particle pollution events. 
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Feb 2024 04:04:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2239-2024 2024

       
  • Measurement report: Nocturnal subsidence behind the cold front enhances
           surface particulate matter in plains regions: observations from the mobile
           multi-lidar system

    • Abstract: Measurement report: Nocturnal subsidence behind the cold front enhances surface particulate matter in plains regions: observations from the mobile multi-lidar system
      Yiming Wang, Haolin Wang, Yujie Qin, Xinqi Xu, Guowen He, Nanxi Liu, Shengjie Miao, Xiao Lu, Haichao Wang, and Shaojia Fan
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2267–2285, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2267-2024, 2024
      We conducted a vertical measurement of winter PM2.5 using a mobile multi-lidar system in four cities. Combined with the surface PM2.5 data, the ERA5 reanalysis data, and GEOS-Chem simulations during Dec 2018–Feb 2019, we found that transport nocturnal PM2.5 enhancement by subsidence (T-NPES) events widely occurred with high frequencies in plains regions in eastern China but happened less often in basin regions like Xi’an and Chengdu. We propose a conceptual model of the T-NPES events.
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Feb 2024 04:04:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2267-2024 2024

       
  • Bias correction of OMI HCHO columns based on FTIR and aircraft
           measurements and impact on top-down emission estimates

    • Abstract: Bias correction of OMI HCHO columns based on FTIR and aircraft measurements and impact on top-down emission estimates
      Jean-François Müller, Trissevgeni Stavrakou, Glenn-Michael Oomen, Beata Opacka, Isabelle De Smedt, Alex Guenther, Corinne Vigouroux, Bavo Langerock, Carlos Augusto Bauer Aquino, Michel Grutter, James Hannigan, Frank Hase, Rigel Kivi, Erik Lutsch, Emmanuel Mahieu, Maria Makarova, Jean-Marc Metzger, Isamu Morino, Isao Murata, Tomoo Nagahama, Justus Notholt, Ivan Ortega, Mathias Palm, Amelie Röhling, Wolfgang Stremme, Kimberly Strong, Ralf Sussmann, Yao Té, and Alan Fried
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2207–2237, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2207-2024, 2024
      Formaldehyde observations from satellites can be used to constrain the emissions of volatile organic compounds, but those observations have biases. Using an atmospheric model, aircraft and ground-based remote sensing data, we quantify these biases, propose a correction to the data, and assess the consequence of this correction for the evaluation of emissions.
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Feb 2024 04:04:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2207-2024 2024

       
  • Measurement report: The Palau Atmospheric Observatory and its ozonesonde
           record – continuous monitoring of tropospheric composition and dynamics
           in the tropical western Pacific

    • Abstract: Measurement report: The Palau Atmospheric Observatory and its ozonesonde record – continuous monitoring of tropospheric composition and dynamics in the tropical western Pacific
      Katrin Müller, Jordis S. Tradowsky, Peter von der Gathen, Christoph Ritter, Sharon Patris, Justus Notholt, and Markus Rex
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2169–2193, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2169-2024, 2024
      The Palau Atmospheric Observatory is introduced as an ideal site to detect changes in atmospheric composition and dynamics above the remote tropical western Pacific. We focus on the ozone sounding program from 2016–2021, including El Niño 2016. The year-round high convective activity is reflected in dominant low tropospheric ozone and high relative humidity. Their seasonal distributions are unique compared to other tropical sites and are modulated by the Intertropical Convergence Zone.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Feb 2024 04:04:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2169-2024 2024

       
  • Quantifying SO2 oxidation pathways to atmospheric sulfate using stable
           sulfur and oxygen isotopes: laboratory simulation and field observation

    • Abstract: Quantifying SO2 oxidation pathways to atmospheric sulfate using stable sulfur and oxygen isotopes: laboratory simulation and field observation
      Ziyan Guo, Keding Lu, Pengxiang Qiu, Mingyi Xu, and Zhaobing Guo
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2195–2205, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2195-2024, 2024
      The formation of secondary sulfate needs to be further explored. In this work, we simultaneously measured sulfur and oxygen isotopic compositions to gain an increased understanding of specific sulfate formation processes. The results indicated that secondary sulfate was mainly ascribed to SO2 homogeneous oxidation by OH radicals and heterogeneous oxidation by H2O2 and Fe3+ / O2. This study is favourable for deeply investigating the sulfur cycle in the atmosphere.
      PubDate: Wed, 21 Feb 2024 04:04:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2195-2024 2024

       
  • Opinion: Aerosol remote sensing over the next 20 years

    • Abstract: Opinion: Aerosol remote sensing over the next 20 years
      Lorraine A. Remer, Robert C. Levy, and J. Vanderlei Martins
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2113–2127, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2113-2024, 2024
      Aerosols are small liquid or solid particles suspended in the atmosphere, including smoke, particulate pollution, dust, and sea salt. Today, we rely on satellites viewing Earth's atmosphere to learn about these particles. Here, we speculate on the future to imagine how satellite viewing of aerosols will change. We expect more public and private satellites with greater capabilities, better ways to infer information from satellites, and merging of data with models.
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Feb 2024 04:04:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2113-2024 2024

       
  • Investigation of the renewed methane growth post-2007 with high-resolution
           3-D variational inverse modeling and isotopic constraints

    • Abstract: Investigation of the renewed methane growth post-2007 with high-resolution 3-D variational inverse modeling and isotopic constraints
      Joël Thanwerdas, Marielle Saunois, Antoine Berchet, Isabelle Pison, and Philippe Bousquet
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2129–2167, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2129-2024, 2024
      We investigate the causes of the renewed growth of atmospheric methane (CH4) after 2007 using inverse modeling. We use the additional information provided by observations of CH4 isotopic compositions to better differentiate between the emission categories. Accounting for the large uncertainties in source signatures, our results suggest that the post-2007 increase in atmospheric CH4 was caused by similar increases in emissions from (1) fossil fuels and (2) agriculture and waste.
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Feb 2024 04:04:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2129-2024 2024

       
  • How well do Earth system models reproduce the observed aerosol response to
           rapid emission reductions' A COVID-19 case study

    • Abstract: How well do Earth system models reproduce the observed aerosol response to rapid emission reductions' A COVID-19 case study
      Ruth A. R. Digby, Nathan P. Gillett, Adam H. Monahan, Knut von Salzen, Antonis Gkikas, Qianqian Song, and Zhibo Zhang
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2077–2097, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2077-2024, 2024
      The COVID-19 lockdowns reduced aerosol emissions. We ask whether these reductions affected regional aerosol optical depth (AOD) and compare the observed changes to predictions from Earth system models. Only India has an observed AOD reduction outside of typical variability. Models overestimate the response in some regions, but when key biases have been addressed, the agreement is improved. Our results suggest that current models can realistically predict the effects of future emission changes.
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Feb 2024 07:47:55 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2077-2024 2024

       
  • Increase in precipitation scavenging contributes to long-term reductions
           of light-absorbing aerosol in the Arctic

    • Abstract: Increase in precipitation scavenging contributes to long-term reductions of light-absorbing aerosol in the Arctic
      Dominic Heslin-Rees, Peter Tunved, Johan Ström, Roxana Cremer, Paul Zieger, Ilona Riipinen, Annica M. L. Ekman, Konstantinos Eleftheriadis, and Radovan Krejci
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2059–2075, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2059-2024, 2024
      Light-absorbing atmospheric particles (e.g. black carbon – BC) exert a warming effect on the Arctic climate. We show that the amount of particle light absorption decreased from 2002 to 2023. We conclude that in addition to reductions in emissions of BC, wet removal plays a role in the long-term reduction of BC in the Arctic, given the increase in surface precipitation experienced by air masses arriving at the site. The potential impact of biomass burning events is shown to have increased.
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Feb 2024 07:47:55 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2059-2024 2024

       
  • Oxygenated organic molecules produced by low-NOx photooxidation of
           aromatic compounds: contributions to secondary organic aerosol and steric
           hindrance

    • Abstract: Oxygenated organic molecules produced by low-NOx photooxidation of aromatic compounds: contributions to secondary organic aerosol and steric hindrance
      Xi Cheng, Yong Jie Li, Yan Zheng, Keren Liao, Theodore K. Koenig, Yanli Ge, Tong Zhu, Chunxiang Ye, Xinghua Qiu, and Qi Chen
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2099–2112, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2099-2024, 2024
      In this study we conducted laboratory measurements to investigate the formation of gas-phase oxygenated organic molecules (OOMs) from six aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We provide a thorough analysis on the effects of precursor structure (substituents and ring numbers) on product distribution and highlight from a laboratory perspective that heavy (e.g., double-ring) aromatic VOCs are important in initial particle growth during secondary organic aerosol formation.
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Feb 2024 07:47:55 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2099-2024 2024

       
  • Jet aircraft lubrication oil droplets as contrail ice-forming particles

    • Abstract: Jet aircraft lubrication oil droplets as contrail ice-forming particles
      Joel Ponsonby, Leon King, Benjamin J. Murray, and Marc E. J. Stettler
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2045–2058, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2045-2024, 2024
      Aerosol emissions from aircraft engines contribute to the formation of contrails, which have a climate impact as important as that of aviation’s CO2 emissions. For the first time, we experimentally investigate the freezing behaviour of water droplets formed on jet lubrication oil aerosol. We show that they can activate to form water droplets and discuss their potential impact on contrail formation. Our study has implications for contrails produced by future aircraft engine and fuel technologies.
      PubDate: Fri, 16 Feb 2024 08:15:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2045-2024 2024

       
  • Moist bias in the Pacific upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS)
           in climate models affects regional circulation patterns

    • Abstract: Moist bias in the Pacific upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) in climate models affects regional circulation patterns
      Felix Ploeger, Thomas Birner, Edward Charlesworth, Paul Konopka, and Rolf Müller
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2033–2043, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2033-2024, 2024
      We present a novel mechanism of how regional anomalies in water vapour concentrations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere impact regional atmospheric circulation systems. These impacts include a displaced upper-level Asian monsoon circulation and strengthened prevailing westerlies in the Pacific region. Current climate models have biases in simulating these regional water vapour anomalies and circulation impacts, but the biases can be avoided by improving the model transport.
      PubDate: Fri, 16 Feb 2024 08:15:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2033-2024 2024

       
  • Technical note: A method for calculating offsets to ozone depletion and
           climate impacts of ozone-depleting substances

    • Abstract: Technical note: A method for calculating offsets to ozone depletion and climate impacts of ozone-depleting substances
      Gabrielle B. Dreyfus, Stephen A. Montzka, Stephen O. Andersen, and Richard Ferris
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 2023–2032, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-2023-2024, 2024
      The Montreal Protocol has put the ozone layer on a path to recovery by phasing out 99 % of banned ozone-damaging substances. Most of these substances are also potent greenhouse gases. Atmospheric monitoring has detected unexpected increases in emissions in several of these banned substances. Here we present an approach for quantifying damage to ozone, climate and health for these emissions and offset by preventing the equivalent emissions of ozone-damaging substances.
      PubDate: Thu, 15 Feb 2024 08:15:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-2023-2024 2024

       
  • Influences of downward transport and photochemistry on surface ozone over
           East Antarctica during austral summer: in situ observations and model
           simulations

    • Abstract: Influences of downward transport and photochemistry on surface ozone over East Antarctica during austral summer: in situ observations and model simulations
      Imran A. Girach, Narendra Ojha, Prabha R. Nair, Kandula V. Subrahmanyam, Neelakantan Koushik, Mohammed M. Nazeer, Nadimpally Kiran Kumar, Surendran Nair Suresh Babu, Jos Lelieveld, and Andrea Pozzer
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 1979–1995, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-1979-2024, 2024
      We investigate surface ozone variability in East Antarctica based on measurements and EMAC global model simulations during austral summer. Nearly half of the surface ozone is found to be of stratospheric origin. The east coast of Antarctica acts as a stronger sink of ozone than surrounding regions. Photochemical loss of ozone is counterbalanced by downward transport of ozone. The study highlights the intertwined role of chemistry and dynamics in governing ozone variations over East Antarctica.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Feb 2024 08:15:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-1979-2024 2024

       
  • Measurement report: Violent biomass burning and volcanic eruptions – a
           new period of elevated stratospheric aerosol over central Europe (2017 to
           2023) in a long series of observations

    • Abstract: Measurement report: Violent biomass burning and volcanic eruptions – a new period of elevated stratospheric aerosol over central Europe (2017 to 2023) in a long series of observations
      Thomas Trickl, Hannes Vogelmann, Michael D. Fromm, Horst Jäger, Matthias Perfahl, and Wolfgang Steinbrecht
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 1997–2021, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-1997-2024, 2024
      In 2023, the lidar team at Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany) celebrated its 50th year of aerosol profiling. The highlight of these activities has been the lidar measurements of stratospheric aerosol carried out since 1976. The observations since 2017 are characterized by severe smoke from several big fires in North America and Siberia and three volcanic eruptions. The sudden increase in the frequency of such strong fire events is difficult to understand.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Feb 2024 08:15:57 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-1997-2024 2024

       
  • Tethered balloon-borne observations of thermal-infrared irradiance and
           cooling rate profiles in the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer

    • Abstract: Tethered balloon-borne observations of thermal-infrared irradiance and cooling rate profiles in the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer
      Michael Lonardi, Elisa F. Akansu, André Ehrlich, Mauro Mazzola, Christian Pilz, Matthew D. Shupe, Holger Siebert, and Manfred Wendisch
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 1961–1978, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-1961-2024, 2024
      Profiles of thermal-infrared irradiance were measured at two Arctic sites. The presence or lack of clouds influences the vertical structure of these observations. In particular, the cloud top region is a source of radiative energy that can promote cooling and mixing in the cloud layer. Simulations are used to further characterize how the amount of water in the cloud modifies this forcing. A case study additionally showcases the evolution of the radiation profiles in a dynamic atmosphere.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Feb 2024 08:09:12 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-1961-2024 2024

       
  • How well are aerosol–cloud interactions represented in climate models'
           – Part 1: Understanding the sulfate aerosol production from the
           2014–15 Holuhraun eruption

    • Abstract: How well are aerosol–cloud interactions represented in climate models' – Part 1: Understanding the sulfate aerosol production from the 2014–15 Holuhraun eruption
      George Jordan, Florent Malavelle, Ying Chen, Amy Peace, Eliza Duncan, Daniel G. Partridge, Paul Kim, Duncan Watson-Parris, Toshihiko Takemura, David Neubauer, Gunnar Myhre, Ragnhild Skeie, Anton Laakso, and James Haywood
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 1939–1960, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-1939-2024, 2024
      The 2014–15 Holuhraun eruption caused a huge aerosol plume in an otherwise unpolluted region, providing a chance to study how aerosol alters cloud properties. This two-part study uses observations and models to quantify this relationship’s impact on the Earth’s energy budget. Part 1 suggests the models capture the observed spatial and chemical evolution of the plume, yet no model plume is exact. Understanding these differences is key for Part 2, where changes to cloud properties are explored.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Feb 2024 08:09:12 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-1939-2024 2024

       
  • Sea spray emissions from the Baltic Sea: comparison of aerosol eddy
           covariance fluxes and chamber-simulated sea spray emissions

    • Abstract: Sea spray emissions from the Baltic Sea: comparison of aerosol eddy covariance fluxes and chamber-simulated sea spray emissions
      Julika Zinke, Ernst Douglas Nilsson, Piotr Markuszewski, Paul Zieger, Eva Monica Mårtensson, Anna Rutgersson, Erik Nilsson, and Matthew Edward Salter
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 24, 1895–1918, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-24-1895-2024, 2024
      We conducted two research campaigns in the Baltic Sea, during which we combined laboratory sea spray simulation experiments with flux measurements on a nearby island. To combine these two methods, we scaled the laboratory measurements to the flux measurements using three different approaches. As a result, we derived a parameterization that is dependent on wind speed and wave state for particles with diameters 0.015–10 μm. This parameterization is applicable to low-salinity waters.
      PubDate: Tue, 13 Feb 2024 08:09:12 +010
      DOI: 10.5194/acp-24-1895-2024 2024

       
 
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