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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.032
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 43  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1680-7316 - ISSN (Online) 1680-7324
Published by Copernicus Publications Homepage  [54 journals]
  • Cluster-based characterization of multi-dimensional tropospheric ozone
           variability in coastal regions: an analysis of lidar measurements and
           model results

    • Abstract: Cluster-based characterization of multi-dimensional tropospheric ozone variability in coastal regions: an analysis of lidar measurements and model results
      Claudia Bernier, Yuxuan Wang, Guillaume Gronoff, Timothy Berkoff, K. Emma Knowland, John T. Sullivan, Ruben Delgado, Vanessa Caicedo, and Brian Carroll
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15313–15331, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15313-2022, 2022
      Coastal regions are susceptible to variable and high ozone which is difficult to simulate. We developed a method to characterize large datasets of multi-dimensional measurements from lidar instruments taken in coastal regions. Using the clustered ozone groups, we evaluated model performance in simulating the coastal ozone variability vertically and diurnally. The approach allowed us to pinpoint areas where the models succeed in simulating coastal ozone and areas where there are still gaps.
      PubDate: 2022-12-02T00:39:40+01:00
       
  • Analysis of new particle nucleation events and comparisons to simulations
           of particle number concentrations based on GEOS-Chem/APM in Beijing, China
           

    • Abstract: Analysis of new particle nucleation events and comparisons to simulations of particle number concentrations based on GEOS-Chem/APM in Beijing, China
      Kun Wang, Xiaoyan Ma, Rong Tian, and Fangqun Yu
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-797,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      During March 12th to April 6th, 2016 in Beijing, there were 11 typical new particle formation days, 13 non-event days and 2 undefined days. We first analyzed the favorable background of new particle formation in Beijing, and then obtained the quantitative meteorological and solar radiation conditions of new particle formation. In addition, we conducted the simulations using four nucleation schemes based on a global chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem) to understand the nucleation mechanism.
      PubDate: 2022-12-02T00:39:40+01:00
       
  • Towards monitoring the CO2 source–sink distribution over India via
           inverse modelling: quantifying the fine-scale spatiotemporal variability
           in the atmospheric CO2 mole fraction

    • Abstract: Towards monitoring the CO2 source–sink distribution over India via inverse modelling: quantifying the fine-scale spatiotemporal variability in the atmospheric CO2 mole fraction
      Vishnu Thilakan, Dhanyalekshmi Pillai, Christoph Gerbig, Michal Galkowski, Aparnna Ravi, and Thara Anna Mathew
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15287–15312, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15287-2022, 2022
      This paper demonstrates how we can use atmospheric observations to improve the CO2 flux estimates in India. This is achieved by improving the representation of terrain, mesoscale transport, and flux variations. We quantify the impact of the unresolved variations in the current models on optimally estimated fluxes via inverse modelling and quantify the associated flux uncertainty. We illustrate how a parameterization scheme captures this variability in the coarse models.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T00:39:40+01:00
       
  • Atmospheric particle abundance and sea salt aerosol observations in the
           springtime Arctic: a focus on blowing snow and leads

    • Abstract: Atmospheric particle abundance and sea salt aerosol observations in the springtime Arctic: a focus on blowing snow and leads
      Qianjie Chen, Jessica A. Mirrielees, Sham Thanekar, Nicole A. Loeb, Rachel M. Kirpes, Lucia M. Upchurch, Anna J. Barget, Nurun Nahar Lata, Angela R. W. Raso, Stephen M. McNamara, Swarup China, Patricia K. Quinn, Andrew P. Ault, Aaron Kennedy, Paul B. Shepson, Jose D. Fuentes, and Kerri A. Pratt
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15263–15285, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15263-2022, 2022
      During a spring field campaign in the coastal Arctic, ultrafine particles were enhanced during high wind speeds, and coarse-mode particles were reduced during blowing snow. Calculated periods blowing snow were overpredicted compared to observations. Sea spray aerosols produced by sea ice leads affected the composition of aerosols and snowpack. An improved understanding of aerosol emissions from leads and blowing snow is critical for predicting the future climate of the rapidly warming Arctic.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T00:39:40+01:00
       
  • High-resolution regional emission inventory contributes to the evaluation
           of policy effectiveness: A case study in Jiangsu province, China

    • Abstract: High-resolution regional emission inventory contributes to the evaluation of policy effectiveness: A case study in Jiangsu province, China
      Chen Gu, Lei Zhang, Zidie Xu, Sijia Xia, Yutong Wang, Li Li, Zeren Wang, Qiuyue Zhao, Hanying Wang, and Yu Zhao
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-734,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      We demonstrated the development of high-resolution emission inventory and its application on evaluating the effectiveness of emission control actions, by incorporating the improved methodology, the best available data, and air quality modeling. We show that substantial efforts on emission controls indeed played an important role on air quality improvement even with worsened meteorological conditions, and that the contributions of individual measures to emission reduction were greatly changing.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T00:39:40+01:00
       
  • Ice crystal characterization in cirrus clouds III: retrieval of ice
           crystal shape and roughness from observations of halo displays

    • Abstract: Ice crystal characterization in cirrus clouds III: retrieval of ice crystal shape and roughness from observations of halo displays
      Linda Forster and Bernhard Mayer
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15179–15205, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15179-2022, 2022
      We present a novel retrieval using ground-based imaging observations of halo displays together with radiative transfer simulations to help improve our understanding of ice crystal properties representative of cirrus clouds. Analysis of 4400 calibrated HaloCam images featuring a 22° halo revealed aggregates of hexagonal columns of 20 µm effective radius with a mixture of about 37 % smooth and 63% severely roughened surfaces as the best match in general.
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T00:39:40+01:00
       
  • The unexpected high frequency of nocturnal surface ozone enhancement
           events over China: characteristics and mechanisms

    • Abstract: The unexpected high frequency of nocturnal surface ozone enhancement events over China: characteristics and mechanisms
      Cheng He, Xiao Lu, Haolin Wang, Haichao Wang, Yan Li, Guowen He, Yuanping He, Yurun Wang, Youlang Zhang, Yiming Liu, Qi Fan, and Shaojia Fan
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15243–15261, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15243-2022, 2022
      We report that nocturnal ozone enhancement (NOE) events are observed at a high annual frequency of 41 % over 800 sites in China in 2014–2019 (about 50 % higher than that over Europe or the US). High daytime ozone provides a rich ozone source in the nighttime residual layer, determining the overall high frequency of NOE events in China, and enhanced atmospheric mixing then triggers NOE events by allowing the ozone-rich air in the residual layer to be mixed into the nighttime boundary layer.
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T00:39:40+01:00
       
  • Measurement report: Increasing trend of atmospheric ion concentrations in
           the boreal forest

    • Abstract: Measurement report: Increasing trend of atmospheric ion concentrations in the boreal forest
      Juha Sulo, Janne Lampilahti, Xuemeng Chen, Jenni Kontkanen, Tuomo Nieminen, Veli-Matti Kerminen, Tuukka Petäjä, Markku Kulmala, and Katrianne Lehtipalo
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15223–15242, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15223-2022, 2022
      We measured atmospheric ion concentrations continuously in a boreal forest between 2005 and 2021 and observed an increasing interannual trend. The increase in cluster ion concentrations can be largely explained by an overall decreasing level of anthropogenic aerosols in the boreal forest. This suggests that the role of ions in atmospheric new particle formation may be more important in the future.
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T00:39:40+01:00
       
  • Aerosol–cloud interaction in the atmospheric chemistry model
           GRAPES_Meso5.1/CUACE and its impacts on mesoscale numerical weather
           prediction under haze pollution conditions in Jing–Jin–Ji in China

    • Abstract: Aerosol–cloud interaction in the atmospheric chemistry model GRAPES_Meso5.1/CUACE and its impacts on mesoscale numerical weather prediction under haze pollution conditions in Jing–Jin–Ji in China
      Wenjie Zhang, Hong Wang, Xiaoye Zhang, Liping Huang, Yue Peng, Zhaodong Liu, Xiao Zhang, and Huizheng Che
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15207–15221, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15207-2022, 2022
      Aerosol–cloud interaction (ACI) is first implemented in the atmospheric chemistry system GRAPES_Meso5.1/CUACE. ACI can improve the simulated cloud, temperature, and precipitation under haze pollution conditions in Jing-Jin-Ji in China. This paper demonstrates the critical role of ACI in current numerical weather prediction over the severely polluted region.
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T00:39:40+01:00
       
  • Sources of concentric gravity waves generated by a moving mesoscale
           convective system in southern Brazil

    • Abstract: Sources of concentric gravity waves generated by a moving mesoscale convective system in southern Brazil
      Prosper K. Nyassor, Cristiano M. Wrasse, Igo Paulino, Eliah F. M. T. São Sabbas, José V. Bageston, Kleber P. Naccarato, Delano Gobbi, Cosme A. O. B. Figueiredo, Toyese T. Ayorinde, Hisao Takahashi, and Diego Barros
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15153–15177, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15153-2022, 2022
      This work investigates the sources of concentric gravity waves (CGWs) excited by a moving system of clouds with several overshooting regions on 1–2 October 2019 at São Martinho da Serra. The parameters of these waves were estimated using 2D spectral analysis and their source locations identified using backward ray tracing. Furthermore, the sources of these waves were properly identified by tracking the individual overshooting regions in space and time since the system of clouds was moving.
      PubDate: 2022-11-29T00:37:19+01:00
       
  • Quantifying particle-to-particle heterogeneity in aerosol hygroscopicity

    • Abstract: Quantifying particle-to-particle heterogeneity in aerosol hygroscopicity
      Liang Yuan and Chunsheng Zhao
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-787,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Chemical compositions variy between and within particles due to the complex sources and aging processes, causing particle-to-particle heterogeneity in aerosol hygroscopicity, which is of great importance to aerosol climatic and environmental effects. This study proposes an algorithm to quantify the heterogeneity from in-situ measurements, providing a framework for merging observation into numerical model to investigate how the heterogeneity influences aerosol impacts on climate and environment.
      PubDate: 2022-11-29T00:37:19+01:00
       
  • Enhanced sulfur in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in spring
           2020

    • Abstract: Enhanced sulfur in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in spring 2020
      Laura Tomsche, Andreas Marsing, Tina Jurkat-Witschas, Johannes Lucke, Stefan Kaufmann, Katharina Kaiser, Johannes Schneider, Monika Scheibe, Hans Schlager, Lenard Röder, Horst Fischer, Florian Obersteiner, Andreas Zahn, Martin Zöger, Jos Lelieveld, and Christiane Voigt
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15135–15151, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15135-2022, 2022
      The detection of sulfur compounds in the upper troposphere (UT) and lower stratosphere (LS) is a challenge. In-flight measurements of SO2 and sulfate aerosol were performed during the BLUESKY mission in spring 2020 under exceptional atmospheric conditions. Reduced sinks in the dry UTLS and lower but still significant air traffic influenced the enhanced SO2 in the UT, and aged volcanic plumes enhanced the LS sulfate aerosol impacting the atmospheric radiation budget and global climate.
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T00:37:19+01:00
       
  • Intermittency of gravity wave potential energies and absolute momentum
           fluxes derived from infrared limb sounding satellite observations

    • Abstract: Intermittency of gravity wave potential energies and absolute momentum fluxes derived from infrared limb sounding satellite observations
      Manfred Ern, Peter Preusse, and Martin Riese
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15093–15133, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15093-2022, 2022
      Based on data from the HIRDLS and SABER infrared limb sounding satellite instruments, we investigate the intermittency of global distributions of gravity wave (GW) potential energies and GW momentum fluxes in the stratosphere and mesosphere using probability distribution functions (PDFs) and Gini coefficients. We compare GW intermittency in different regions, seasons, and altitudes. These results can help to improve GW parameterizations and the distributions of GWs resolved in models.
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T00:37:19+01:00
       
  • A Profile-based Estimated Inversion Strength

    • Abstract: A Profile-based Estimated Inversion Strength
      Zhenquan Wang, Jian Yuan, Robert Wood, Yifan Chen, and Tiancheng Tong
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-731,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      This study develops a novel profile-based algorithm based on the ERA5 to better estimate the inversion strength in the planetary boundary layer than the previous inversion index, which is a key low-cloud controlling factor. This improved measure is more effective at representing the meteorological influence on low cloud variations. It can better constrain the meteorological influence on low clouds, to better isolate cloud responses to aerosols or estimate low cloud feedbacks in climate models.
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T00:37:19+01:00
       
  • Source apportionment study on particulate air pollution in two
           high-altitude Bolivian cities: La Paz and El Alto

    • Abstract: Source apportionment study on particulate air pollution in two high-altitude Bolivian cities: La Paz and El Alto
      Valeria Mardoñez, Marco Pandolfi, Lucille Joanna S. Borlaza, Jean-Luc Jaffrezo, Andrés Alastuey, Jean-Luc Besombes, Isabel Moreno R., Noemi Perez, Griša Močnik, Patrick Ginot, Radovan Krejci, Vladislav Chrastny, Alfred Wiedensohler, Paolo Laj, Marcos Andrade, and Gaëlle Uzu
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-780,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      La Paz and El Alto are two fast-growing high-altitude Bolivian cities forming the second-largest metropolitan area in the country. The sources of particulate matter (PM) in this conurbation were not previously investigated. This study identified 11 main sources of PM, out of which dust and vehicular emissions stand out as the main ones. The influence of regional biomass combustion and local waste combustion was also observed, with the latter being a major source of hazardous compounds.
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T00:37:19+01:00
       
  • Diagnosing ozone–NOx–VOC sensitivity and revealing causes of ozone
           increases in China based on 2013–2021 satellite retrievals

    • Abstract: Diagnosing ozone–NOx–VOC sensitivity and revealing causes of ozone increases in China based on 2013–2021 satellite retrievals
      Jie Ren, Fangfang Guo, and Shaodong Xie
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15035–15047, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15035-2022, 2022
      O3–NOx–VOC sensitivity in China is diagnosed by deriving regional satellite HCHO / NO2 thresholds between O3 production regimes. VOC-limited regimes are found widely over megacity clusters and developed cities. VOCs and NOx emissions are tracked with satellite HCHO and NO2 to evaluate O3 responses to precursors changes. The significant reduction in NOx emissions without effective VOC control since the Clean Air Action Plan in 2013 is responsible for the increase in O3 concentrations in China.
      PubDate: 2022-11-25T22:28:01+01:00
       
  • Global seasonal distribution of CH2Br2 and CHBr3 in the upper troposphere
           and lower stratosphere

    • Abstract: Global seasonal distribution of CH2Br2 and CHBr3 in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere
      Markus Jesswein, Rafael P. Fernandez, Lucas Berná, Alfonso Saiz-Lopez, Jens-Uwe Grooß, Ryan Hossaini, Eric C. Apel, Rebecca S. Hornbrook, Elliot L. Atlas, Donald R. Blake, Stephen Montzka, Timo Keber, Tanja Schuck, Thomas Wagenhäuser, and Andreas Engel
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15049–15070, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15049-2022, 2022
      This study presents the global and seasonal distribution of the two major brominated short-lived substances CH2Br2 and CHBr3 in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere based on observations from several aircraft campaigns. They show similar seasonality for both hemispheres, except in the respective hemispheric autumn lower stratosphere. A comparison with the TOMCAT and CAM-Chem models shows good agreement in the annual mean but larger differences in the seasonal consideration.
      PubDate: 2022-11-25T22:28:01+01:00
       
  • Survival probabilities of atmospheric particles: comparison based on
           theory, cluster population simulations, and observations in Beijing

    • Abstract: Survival probabilities of atmospheric particles: comparison based on theory, cluster population simulations, and observations in Beijing
      Santeri Tuovinen, Runlong Cai, Veli-Matti Kerminen, Jingkun Jiang, Chao Yan, Markku Kulmala, and Jenni Kontkanen
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 15071–15091, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-15071-2022, 2022
      We compare observed survival probabilities of atmospheric particles from Beijing, China, with survival probabilities based on analytical formulae and model simulations. We find observed survival probabilities under polluted conditions at smaller sizes to be higher, while at larger sizes they are lower than or similar to theoretical survival probabilities. Uncertainties in condensation sink and growth rate are unlikely to explain higher-than-predicted survival probabilities at smaller sizes.
      PubDate: 2022-11-25T22:28:01+01:00
       
  • Satellite Observations of Smoke-Cloud-Radiation Interactions Over the
           Amazon Rainforest

    • Abstract: Satellite Observations of Smoke-Cloud-Radiation Interactions Over the Amazon Rainforest
      Ross Herbert and Philip Stier
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-796,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      We provide robust evidence from multiple sources that show smoke from fires in the Amazon rainforest significantly modify the diurnal cycle of convection and cool the climate. Low-to-moderate amounts of smoke increase deep convective clouds and rain, whilst beyond a threshold amount the smoke starts to suppress the convection and rain. We are currently at this threshold, suggesting increases in fires from agricultural practices or droughts will reduce cloudiness and rain over the region.
      PubDate: 2022-11-25T22:28:01+01:00
       
  • Source attribution of near-surface ozone trends in the United States
           during 1995–2019

    • Abstract: Source attribution of near-surface ozone trends in the United States during 1995–2019
      Pengwei Li, Yang Yang, Hailong Wang, Su Li, Ke Li, Pinya Wang, Baojie Li, and Hong Liao
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-678,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      We use a novel technique that can attribute O3 to precursors to investigate O3 changes in the United States during 1995–2019. We found that the U.S. domestic energy and surface transportation emission reductions are primarily responsible for the O3 decrease in summer. In winter, factors such as nitrogen oxides emissions reduction in the context of its inhibition of ozone production, increased aviation and shipping activities, and large-scale circulation changes contribute to the O3 increases.
      PubDate: 2022-11-25T22:28:01+01:00
       
 
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