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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
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Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.032
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 45  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1680-7316 - ISSN (Online) 1680-7324
Published by Copernicus Publications Homepage  [54 journals]
  • Long-term monitoring of cloud water chemistry at Whiteface Mountain: the
           emergence of a new chemical regime

    • Abstract: Long-term monitoring of cloud water chemistry at Whiteface Mountain: the emergence of a new chemical regime
      Christopher E. Lawrence, Paul Casson, Richard Brandt, James J. Schwab, James E. Dukett, Phil Snyder, Elizabeth Yerger, Daniel Kelting, Trevor C. VandenBoer, and Sara Lance
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1619–1639, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1619-2023, 2023
      Atmospheric aqueous chemistry can have profound effects on our environment, as illustrated by historical data from Whiteface Mountain (WFM) that were critical for uncovering the process of acid rain. The current study updates the long-term trends in cloud water composition at WFM for the period 1994 to 2021. We highlight the emergence of a new chemical regime at WFM dominated by organics and ammonium, quite different from the highly acidic regime observed in the past but not necessarily clean.
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T19:19:37+01:00
       
  • Comparing the ice nucleation properties of the kaolin minerals kaolinite
           and halloysite

    • Abstract: Comparing the ice nucleation properties of the kaolin minerals kaolinite and halloysite
      Kristian Klumpp, Claudia Marcolli, Ana Alonso-Hellweg, Christopher H. Dreimol, and Thomas Peter
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1579–1598, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1579-2023, 2023
      The prerequisites of a particle surface for efficient ice nucleation are still poorly understood. This study compares the ice nucleation activity of two chemically identical but morphologically different minerals (kaolinite and halloysite). We observe, on average, not only higher ice nucleation activities for halloysite than kaolinite but also higher diversity between individual samples. We identify the particle edges as being the most likely site for ice nucleation.
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T19:19:37+01:00
       
  • Hydroxyl airglow observations for investigating atmospheric dynamics:
           results and challenges

    • Abstract: Hydroxyl airglow observations for investigating atmospheric dynamics: results and challenges
      Sabine Wüst, Michael Bittner, Patrick J. Espy, W. John R. French, and Frank J. Mulligan
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1599–1618, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1599-2023, 2023
      Ground-based OH* airglow measurements have been carried out for almost 100 years. Advanced detector technology has greatly simplified the automatic operation of OH* airglow observing instruments and significantly improved the temporal and/or spatial resolution. Studies based on long-term measurements or including a network of instruments are reviewed, especially in the context of deriving gravity wave properties. Scientific and technical challenges for the next few years are described.
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T19:19:37+01:00
       
  • Modeling the influence of chain length on secondary organic aerosol (SOA)
           formation via multiphase reactions of alkanes

    • Abstract: Modeling the influence of chain length on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation via multiphase reactions of alkanes
      Azad Madhu, Myoseon Jang, and David Deacon
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1661–1675, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1661-2023, 2023
      SOA formation is simulated using the UNIPAR model for series of linear alkanes. The inclusion of autoxidation reactions within the explicit gas mechanisms of C9–C12 was found to significantly improve predictions. Available product distributions were extrapolated with an incremental volatility coefficient (IVC) to predict SOA formation of alkanes without explicit mechanisms. These product distributions were used to simulate SOA formation from C13 and C15 and had good agreement with chamber data.
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T19:19:37+01:00
       
  • How aerosol size matters in aerosol optical depth (AOD) assimilation and
           the optimization using the Ångström exponent

    • Abstract: How aerosol size matters in aerosol optical depth (AOD) assimilation and the optimization using the Ångström exponent
      Jianbing Jin, Bas Henzing, and Arjo Segers
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1641–1660, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1641-2023, 2023
      Aerosol models and satellite retrieval algorithms rely on different aerosol size assumptions. In practice, differences between simulations and observations do not always reflect the difference in aerosol amount. To avoid inconsistencies, we designed a hybrid assimilation approach. Different from a standard aerosol optical depth (AOD) assimilation that directly assimilates AODs, the hybrid one estimates aerosol size parameters by assimilating Ängström observations before assimilating the AODs.
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T19:19:37+01:00
       
  • Fates of secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere identified from
           compound-specific dual-carbon isotope analysis of oxalic acid

    • Abstract: Fates of secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere identified from compound-specific dual-carbon isotope analysis of oxalic acid
      Buqing Xu, Jiao Tang, Tiangang Tang, Shizhen Zhao, Guangcai Zhong, Sanyuan Zhu, Jun Li, and Gan Zhang
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1565–1578, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1565-2023, 2023
      We analyzed compound-specific dual-carbon isotope signatures (Δ14C and δ13C) of dominant secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracer molecules (i.e., oxalic acid) to investigate the fates of SOAs in the atmosphere at five emission hotspots in China. The results indicated that SOA carbon sources and chemical processes producing SOAs vary spatially and seasonally, and these variations need to be included in Chinese climate projection models and air quality management practices.
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T19:19:37+01:00
       
  • Vertical profiles of volatile organic compounds and fine particles in
           atmospheric air by using aerial drone with miniaturized samplers and
           portable devices

    • Abstract: Vertical profiles of volatile organic compounds and fine particles in atmospheric air by using aerial drone with miniaturized samplers and portable devices
      Eka Dian Pusfitasari, Jose Ruiz-Jimenez, Aleksi Tiusanen, Markus Suuronen, Jesse Haataja, Juha Kangasluoma, Krista Luoma, Tuukka Petäjä, Matti Jussila, Kari Hartonen, and Marja-Liisa Riekkola
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2023-40,2023
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      A miniaturized air sampling-drone system was successfully applied for the collection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and for the measurement of black carbon (BC) and total particle number concentrations in atmospheric air. Here we report, for the first time, the vertical profiles of BC and aerosol number concentrations above the boreal forest in Hyytiälä (Finland) at high altitudes close to the boundary layer in autumn 2021. VOC composition with its distribution was studied as well.
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T19:19:37+01:00
       
  • Modeling of street-scale pollutant dispersion by coupled simulation of
           chemical reaction, aerosol dynamics, and CFD

    • Abstract: Modeling of street-scale pollutant dispersion by coupled simulation of chemical reaction, aerosol dynamics, and CFD
      Chao Lin, Yunyi Wang, Ryozo Ooka, Cédric Flageul, Youngseob Kim, Hideki Kikumoto, Zhizhao Wang, and Karine Sartelet
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1421–1436, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1421-2023, 2023
      In this study, SSH-aerosol, a modular box model that simulates the evolution of gas, primary, and secondary aerosols, is coupled with the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, OpenFOAM and Code_Saturne. The transient dispersion of pollutants emitted from traffic in a street canyon of Greater Paris is simulated. The coupled model achieved better agreement in NO2 and PM10 with measurement data than the conventional CFD simulation which regards pollutants as passive scalars.
      PubDate: 2023-01-26T00:49:09+01:00
       
  • Magnetic fraction of the atmospheric dust in Kraków – physicochemical
           characteristics and possible environmental impact

    • Abstract: Magnetic fraction of the atmospheric dust in Kraków – physicochemical characteristics and possible environmental impact
      Jan M. Michalik, Wanda Wilczyńska-Michalik, Łukasz Gondek, Waldemar Tokarz, Jan Żukrowski, Marta Gajewska, and Marek Michalik
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1449–1464, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1449-2023, 2023
      The magnetic fraction of the aerosols in Kraków was collected and analysed using scanning and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectrometry, and magnetometry. It contains metallic Fe or Fe-rich alloy and Fe oxides. The occurrence of nanometre-scale Fe3O4 particles (predominantly of anthropogenic origin) is shown. Our results can help to determine the sources and transport of pollutants, potential harmful effects, etc.
      PubDate: 2023-01-26T00:49:09+01:00
       
  • Using Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) column CO2 retrievals to
           rapidly detect and estimate biospheric surface carbon flux anomalies

    • Abstract: Using Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) column CO2 retrievals to rapidly detect and estimate biospheric surface carbon flux anomalies
      Andrew F. Feldman, Zhen Zhang, Yasuko Yoshida, Abhishek Chatterjee, and Benjamin Poulter
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1545–1563, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1545-2023, 2023
      We investigate the conditions under which satellite-retrieved column carbon dioxide concentrations directly hold information about surface carbon dioxide fluxes, without the use of inversion models. We show that OCO-2 column carbon dioxide retrievals, available at 1–3 month latency, can be used to directly detect and roughly estimate extreme biospheric CO2 fluxes. As such, these OCO-2 retrievals have value for rapidly monitoring extreme conditions in the terrestrial biosphere.
      PubDate: 2023-01-26T00:49:09+01:00
       
  • Summertime ozone pollution in China affected by stratospheric
           quasi-biennial oscillation

    • Abstract: Summertime ozone pollution in China affected by stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation
      Mengyun Li, Yang Yang, Hailong Wang, Huimin Li, Pinya Wang, and Hong Liao
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1533–1544, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1533-2023, 2023
      Using the GEOS-Chem model, the impact of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) on summertime tropospheric O3 in China is investigated. In the warm phases of sea surface temperature anomalies over the eastern tropical Pacific, the QBO has a significant positive correlation with near-surface O3 concentrations over central China. The QBO impacts on O3 pollution in China are mainly a result of changing vertical transport of O3.
      PubDate: 2023-01-26T00:49:09+01:00
       
  • Declining, seasonal-varying emissions of sulfur hexafluoride from the
           United States

    • Abstract: Declining, seasonal-varying emissions of sulfur hexafluoride from the United States
      Lei Hu, Deborah Ottinger, Stephanie Bogle, Stephen A. Montzka, Philip L. DeCola, Ed Dlugokencky, Arlyn Andrews, Kirk Thoning, Colm Sweeney, Geoff Dutton, Lauren Aepli, and Andrew Crotwell
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1437–1448, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1437-2023, 2023
      Effective mitigation of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions relies on an accurate understanding of emissions. Here we demonstrate the added value of using inventory- and atmosphere-based approaches for estimating US emissions of SF6, the most potent GHG known. The results suggest a large decline in US SF6 emissions, shed light on the possible processes causing the differences between the independent estimates, and identify opportunities for substantial additional emission reductions.
      PubDate: 2023-01-26T00:49:09+01:00
       
  • Ground-level gaseous pollutants (NO2, SO2, and CO) in China: daily
           seamless mapping and spatiotemporal variations

    • Abstract: Ground-level gaseous pollutants (NO2, SO2, and CO) in China: daily seamless mapping and spatiotemporal variations
      Jing Wei, Zhanqing Li, Jun Wang, Can Li, Pawan Gupta, and Maureen Cribb
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1511–1532, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1511-2023, 2023
      This study estimated the daily seamless 10 km ambient gaseous pollutants (NO2, SO2, and CO) across China using machine learning with extensive input variables measured on monitors, satellites, and models. Our dataset yields a high data quality via cross-validation at varying spatiotemporal scales and outperforms most previous related studies, making it most helpful to future (especially short-term) air pollution and environmental health-related studies.
      PubDate: 2023-01-26T00:49:09+01:00
       
  • Flaring efficiencies and NOx emission ratios measured for offshore oil and
           gas facilities in the North Sea

    • Abstract: Flaring efficiencies and NOx emission ratios measured for offshore oil and gas facilities in the North Sea
      Jacob T. Shaw, Amy Foulds, Shona Wilde, Patrick Barker, Freya A. Squires, James Lee, Ruth Purvis, Ralph Burton, Ioana Colfescu, Stephen Mobbs, Samuel Cliff, Stéphane J.-B. Bauguitte, Stuart Young, Stefan Schwietzke, and Grant Allen
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1491–1509, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1491-2023, 2023
      Flaring is used by the oil and gas sector to dispose of unwanted natural gas or for safety. However, few studies have assessed the efficiency with which the gas is combusted. We sampled flaring emissions from offshore facilities in the North Sea. Average measured flaring efficiencies were ~ 98 % but with a skewed distribution, including many flares of lower efficiency. NOx and ethane emissions were also measured. Inefficient flaring practices could be a target for mitigating carbon emissions.
      PubDate: 2023-01-26T00:49:09+01:00
       
  • Measurement report: Aerosol vertical profiles over the western North
           Atlantic Ocean during the North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems
           Study (NAAMES)

    • Abstract: Measurement report: Aerosol vertical profiles over the western North Atlantic Ocean during the North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems Study (NAAMES)
      Francesca Gallo, Kevin J. Sanchez, Bruce E. Anderson, Ryan Bennett, Matthew D. Brown, Ewan C. Crosbie, Chris Hostetler, Carolyn Jordan, Melissa Yang Martin, Claire E. Robinson, Lynn M. Russell, Taylor J. Shingler, Michael A. Shook, Kenneth L. Thornhill, Elizabeth B. Wiggins, Edward L. Winstead, Armin Wisthaler, Luke D. Ziemba, and Richard H. Moore
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1465–1490, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1465-2023, 2023
      We integrate in situ ship- and aircraft-based measurements of aerosol, trace gases, and meteorological parameters collected during the NASA North Atlantic Aerosols and Marine Ecosystems Study (NAAMES) field campaigns in the western North Atlantic Ocean region. A comprehensive characterization of the vertical profiles of aerosol properties under different seasonal regimes is provided for improving the understanding of aerosol key processes and aerosol–cloud interactions in marine regions.
      PubDate: 2023-01-26T00:49:09+01:00
       
  • Automated detection and monitoring of methane super-emitters using
           satellite data

    • Abstract: Automated detection and monitoring of methane super-emitters using satellite data
      Berend J. Schuit, Joannes D. Maasakkers, Pieter Bijl, Gourav Mahapatra, Anne-Wil Van den Berg, Sudhanshu Pandey, Alba Lorente, Tobias Borsdorff, Sander Houweling, Daniel J. Varon, Jason McKeever, Dylan Jervis, Marianne Girard, Itziar Irakulis-Loitxate, Javier Gorroño, Luis Guanter, Daniel H. Cusworth, and Ilse Aben
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-862,2023
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Using two machine learning models, which were trained on TROPOMI methane satellite data, we detect 2974 methane plumes, so-called ‘super-emitters’, in 2021. We detect methane emissions globally related to urban areas/landfills, coal mining and oil and gas production. Using our monitoring system we identify 94 regions with frequent emissions. For 12 locations we target high-resolution satellite instruments to zoom-in and identify the exact infrastructure responsible for the emissions.
      PubDate: 2023-01-26T00:49:09+01:00
       
  • Microphysical, macrophysical, and radiative responses of subtropical
           marine clouds to aerosol injections

    • Abstract: Microphysical, macrophysical, and radiative responses of subtropical marine clouds to aerosol injections
      Je-Yun Chun, Robert Wood, Peter Blossey, and Sarah J. Doherty
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1345–1368, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1345-2023, 2023
      We investigate the impact of injected aerosol on subtropical low marine clouds under a variety of meteorological conditions using high-resolution model simulations. This study illustrates processes perturbed by aerosol injections and their impact on cloud properties (e.g., cloud number concentration, thickness, and cover). We show that those responses are highly sensitive to background meteorological conditions, such as precipitation, and background cloud properties.
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:49:09+01:00
       
  • Airborne glyoxal measurements in the marine and continental atmosphere:
           comparison with TROPOMI observations and EMAC simulations

    • Abstract: Airborne glyoxal measurements in the marine and continental atmosphere: comparison with TROPOMI observations and EMAC simulations
      Flora Kluge, Tilman Hüneke, Christophe Lerot, Simon Rosanka, Meike K. Rotermund, Domenico Taraborrelli, Benjamin Weyland, and Klaus Pfeilsticker
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1369–1401, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1369-2023, 2023
      Using airborne glyoxal concentration and vertical column density measurements, vertical profiles are inferred for eight global regions in aged biomass burning plumes and the tropical marine boundary layer. Using TROPOMI observations, an analysis of space- and airborne measurements is performed. A comparison to EMAC simulations shows a general glyoxal underprediction, which points to various missing sources and precursors from anthropogenic activities, biomass burning, and the sea surface.
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:49:09+01:00
       
  • Characteristics of fine particle matter at the top of Shanghai Tower

    • Abstract: Characteristics of fine particle matter at the top of Shanghai Tower
      Changqin Yin, Jianming Xu, Wei Gao, Liang Pan, Yixuan Gu, Qingyan Fu, and Fan Yang
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1329–1343, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1329-2023, 2023
      The particle matter (PM2.5) at the top of the 632 m high Shanghai Tower was found to be higher than the surface from June to October due to unexpected larger PM2.5 levels during early to middle afternoon at Shanghai Tower. We suppose the significant chemical production of secondary species existed in the mid-upper planetary boundary layer. We found a high nitrate concentration at the tower site for both daytime and nighttime in winter, implying efficient gas-phase and heterogeneous formation.
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:49:09+01:00
       
  • Measurement report: Abundance and fractional solubilities of aerosol
           metals in urban Hong Kong – insights into factors that control aerosol
           metal dissolution in an urban site in South China

    • Abstract: Measurement report: Abundance and fractional solubilities of aerosol metals in urban Hong Kong – insights into factors that control aerosol metal dissolution in an urban site in South China
      Junwei Yang, Lan Ma, Xiao He, Wing Chi Au, Yanhao Miao, Wen-Xiong Wang, and Theodora Nah
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 23, 1403–1419, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-23-1403-2023, 2023
      Water-soluble metals play key roles in human health and atmospheric processes. We report the seasonal abundance and fractional solubilities of different metals in aerosols collected in urban Hong Kong as well as the key factors that modulated solubilities of the various metals in fine aerosols. Our results highlight the dual roles (i.e., acidifying the aerosol particle and providing a liquid reaction medium) that sulfate plays in the acid dissolution of metals in fine aerosols in Hong Kong.
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T00:49:09+01:00
       
 
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