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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 157)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 149)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 70)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 63)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.032
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 43  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1680-7316 - ISSN (Online) 1680-7324
Published by Copernicus Publications Homepage  [54 journals]
  • Characterising the dynamic movement of thunderstorms using very low- and
           low-frequency (VLF/LF) total lightning data over the Pearl River Delta
           region

    • Abstract: Characterising the dynamic movement of thunderstorms using very low- and low-frequency (VLF/LF) total lightning data over the Pearl River Delta region
      Si Cheng, Jianguo Wang, Li Cai, Mi Zhou, Rui Su, Yijun Huang, and Quanxin Li
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 10045–10059, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-10045-2022, 2022
      This paper helps to improve the recognition of severe thunderstorms in advance by giving a general understanding of how long the storm lasts, how fast the cluster moves and how much area the storm affects via information about the kinematic features of thunderstorms, which are the duration, valid area, the velocity, the direction and the farthest distance, and ideally to establish a foundation for future research that may contribute to the development of a new or improved prediction paradigm.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T18:15:56+02:00
       
  • Sulfuric acid in the Amazon basin: measurements and evaluation of existing
           sulfuric acid proxies

    • Abstract: Sulfuric acid in the Amazon basin: measurements and evaluation of existing sulfuric acid proxies
      Deanna C. Myers, Saewung Kim, Steven Sjostedt, Alex B. Guenther, Roger Seco, Oscar Vega Bustillos, Julio Tota, Rodrigo A. F. Souza, and James N. Smith
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 10061–10076, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-10061-2022, 2022
      We present the first measurements of gas-phase sulfuric acid from the Amazon basin and evaluate the efficacy of existing sulfuric acid parameterizations in this understudied region. Sulfuric acid is produced during the daytime and nighttime, though current proxies underestimate nighttime production. These results illustrate the need for better parameterizations of sulfuric acid and its precursors that are informed by measurements across a broad range of locations.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T18:15:56+02:00
       
  • Seasonal variation in oxygenated organic molecules in urban Beijing and
           their contribution to secondary organic aerosol

    • Abstract: Seasonal variation in oxygenated organic molecules in urban Beijing and their contribution to secondary organic aerosol
      Yishuo Guo, Chao Yan, Yuliang Liu, Xiaohui Qiao, Feixue Zheng, Ying Zhang, Ying Zhou, Chang Li, Xiaolong Fan, Zhuohui Lin, Zemin Feng, Yusheng Zhang, Penggang Zheng, Linhui Tian, Wei Nie, Zhe Wang, Dandan Huang, Kaspar R. Daellenbach, Lei Yao, Lubna Dada, Federico Bianchi, Jingkun Jiang, Yongchun Liu, Veli-Matti Kerminen, and Markku Kulmala
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 10077–10097, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-10077-2022, 2022
      Gaseous oxygenated organic molecules (OOMs) are able to form atmospheric aerosols, which will impact on human health and climate change. Here, we find that OOMs in urban Beijing are dominated by anthropogenic sources, i.e. aromatic (29 %–41 %) and aliphatic (26 %–41 %) OOMs. They are also the main contributors to the condensational growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Therefore, the restriction on anthropogenic VOCs is crucial for the reduction of SOAs and haze formation.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T18:15:56+02:00
       
  • Monitoring sudden stratospheric warmings under climate change based on
           reanalysis data verified by radio occultation

    • Abstract: Monitoring sudden stratospheric warmings under climate change based on reanalysis data verified by radio occultation
      Ying Li, Gottfried Kirchengast, Marc Schwaerz, and Yunbin Yuan
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-497,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      We develop a new approach to monitor Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW) events since 1980 and develop a 42 years’ SSW events climatology. Detection and evaluation results suggest that the new method is robust for SSW monitoring. We also found an increase in the duration of SSW main-phase warmings by about 4 days over the three decades from the 1980s to the 2010s, raising the average duration from about 10 days to 14 days and the warming strength is also found increased.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T18:15:56+02:00
       
  • Interactive Stratospheric Aerosol models response to different amount and
           altitude of SO2 injections during the 1991 Pinatubo eruption

    • Abstract: Interactive Stratospheric Aerosol models response to different amount and altitude of SO2 injections during the 1991 Pinatubo eruption
      Ilaria Quaglia, Claudia Timmreck, Ulrike Niemeier, Daniele Visioni, Giovanni Pitari, Christoph Brühl, Sandip Dhomse, Henning Franke, Anton Laakso, Graham Mann, Eugene Rozanov, and Timofei Sukhodolov
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-514,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      The last very large explosive volcanic eruption we have measurements for is the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991. It is therefore often used as a benchmark for climate models ability to reproduce these kind of events. Here, we compare available measurements with the results from multiple experiments conducted with climate models interactively simulating the aerosol cloud formation.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T18:15:56+02:00
       
  • Survival probabilities of atmospheric particles: comparison based on
           theory, cluster population simulations, and observations in Beijing

    • Abstract: Survival probabilities of atmospheric particles: comparison based on theory, cluster population simulations, and observations in Beijing
      Santeri Tuovinen, Runlong Cai, Veli-Matti Kerminen, Markku Kulmala, Jingkun Jiang, Chao Yan, and Jenni Kontkanen
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-484,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      We compare observed survival probabilities of atmospheric particles from Beijing, China to survival probabilities based on analytical formulae and model simulations. We find observed survival probabilities under polluted conditions at smaller sizes to be higher, while at larger sizes they are lower or similar, than theoretical survival probabilities. Uncertainties in condensation sink and growth rate are found unlikely to explain higher-than-predicted survival probabilities at smaller sizes.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T18:15:56+02:00
       
  • Measurement report: Intensive biomass burning emissions and rapid nitrate
           formation drive severe haze formation in Sichuan basin, China: insights
           from aerosol mass spectrometry

    • Abstract: Measurement report: Intensive biomass burning emissions and rapid nitrate formation drive severe haze formation in Sichuan basin, China: insights from aerosol mass spectrometry
      Zhier Bao, Xinyi Zhang, Qing Li, Jiawei Zhou, Guangming Shi, Li Zhou, Fumo Yang, Shaodong Xie, Dan Zhang, Chongzhi Zhai, Zhenliang Li, Chao Peng, and Yang Chen
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-477,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      We characterised no-refractory fine particulate matter (PM2.5) during winter in Sichuan Basin (SCB), southwest China. The factors driving severe aerosol pollution were revealed, highlighting the importance of rapid nitrate formation and intensive biomass burning. Nitrate was primarily formed through gas-phase oxidation during daytime and aqueous-phase oxidation during nighttime. Controlling nitrate and biomass burning will benefit the mitigation of haze formation in SCB.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T18:15:56+02:00
       
  • Important role of stratospheric injection height for the distribution and
           radiative forcing of smoke aerosol from the 2019–2020 Australian
           wildfires

    • Abstract: Important role of stratospheric injection height for the distribution and radiative forcing of smoke aerosol from the 2019–2020 Australian wildfires
      Bernd Heinold, Holger Baars, Boris Barja, Matthew Christensen, Anne Kubin, Kevin Ohneiser, Kerstin Schepanski, Nick Schutgens, Fabian Senf, Roland Schrödner, Diego Villanueva, and Ina Tegen
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 9969–9985, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-9969-2022, 2022
      The extreme 2019–2020 Australian wildfires produced massive smoke plumes lofted into the lower stratosphere by pyrocumulonimbus convection. Most climate models do not adequately simulate the injection height of such intense fires. By combining aerosol-climate modeling with prescribed pyroconvective smoke injection and lidar observations, this study shows the importance of the representation of the most extreme wildfire events for estimating the atmospheric energy budget.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T00:04:44+02:00
       
  • PM10 variation, composition, and source analysis in Tuscany (Italy)
           following the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions

    • Abstract: PM10 variation, composition, and source analysis in Tuscany (Italy) following the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions
      Fabio Giardi, Silvia Nava, Giulia Calzolai, Giulia Pazzi, Massimo Chiari, Andrea Faggi, Bianca Patrizia Andreini, Chiara Collaveri, Elena Franchi, Guido Nincheri, Alessandra Amore, Silvia Becagli, Mirko Severi, Rita Traversi, and Franco Lucarelli
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 9987–10005, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-9987-2022, 2022
      The restriction measures adopted to contain the COVID-19 virus offered a unique opportunity to study urban particulate emissions in the near absence of traffic, which is one of the main emission sources in the urban environment. However, the drastic decrease in this source of particulate matter during the months of national lockdown did not lead to an equal decrease in the total particulate load. This is due to the inverse behavior shown by different sources, especially secondary sources.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T00:04:44+02:00
       
  • Vertical aerosol particle exchange in the marine boundary layer estimated
           from helicopter-borne measurements in the Azores region

    • Abstract: Vertical aerosol particle exchange in the marine boundary layer estimated from helicopter-borne measurements in the Azores region
      Janine Lückerath, Andreas Held, Holger Siebert, Michel Michalkow, and Birgit Wehner
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 10007–10021, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-10007-2022, 2022
      Three different methods were applied to estimate the vertical aerosol particle flux in the marine boundary layer (MBL) and between the MBL and free troposphere. For the first time, aerosol fluxes derived from these three methods were estimated and compared using airborne aerosol measurements using data from the ACORES field campaign in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean in July 2017. The amount of fluxes was small and directed up and down for different cases, but the methods were applicable.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T00:04:44+02:00
       
  • Secondary aerosol formation in marine Arctic environments: a model
           measurement comparison at Ny-Ålesund

    • Abstract: Secondary aerosol formation in marine Arctic environments: a model measurement comparison at Ny-Ålesund
      Carlton Xavier, Metin Baykara, Robin Wollesen de Jonge, Barbara Altstädter, Petri Clusius, Ville Vakkari, Roseline Thakur, Lisa Beck, Silvia Becagli, Mirko Severi, Rita Traversi, Radovan Krejci, Peter Tunved, Mauro Mazzola, Birgit Wehner, Mikko Sipilä, Markku Kulmala, Michael Boy, and Pontus Roldin
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 10023–10043, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-10023-2022, 2022
      The focus of this work is to study and improve our understanding of processes involved in the formation and growth of new particles in a remote Arctic marine environment. We run the 1D model ADCHEM along air mass trajectories arriving at Ny-Ålesund in May 2018. The model finds that ion-mediated H2SO4–NH3 nucleation can explain the observed new particle formation at Ny-Ålesund. The growth of particles is driven via H2SO4 condensation and formation of methane sulfonic acid in the aqueous phase.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T00:04:44+02:00
       
  • Using OCO-2 column CO2 retrievals to rapidly detect and estimate
           biospheric surface carbon flux anomalies

    • Abstract: Using OCO-2 column CO2 retrievals to rapidly detect and estimate biospheric surface carbon flux anomalies
      Andrew F. Feldman, Zhen Zhang, Yasuko Yoshida, Abhishek Chatterjee, and Benjamin Poulter
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-506,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      We investigate the conditions under which satellite-retrieved column carbon dioxide concentrations directly hold information about surface carbon dioxide fluxes, without the use of inversion models. We show that OCO-2 column carbon dioxide retrievals, available with 1–3 month latency, can be used to directly detect and roughly estimate surface carbon dioxide fluxes in the biosphere. As such, these OCO-2 retrievals have value for rapidly monitoring extreme conditions in the terrestrial biosphere.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T00:04:44+02:00
       
  • A global climatology of ice nucleating particles at cirrus conditions
           derived from model simulations with EMAC-MADE3

    • Abstract: A global climatology of ice nucleating particles at cirrus conditions derived from model simulations with EMAC-MADE3
      Christof Gerhard Beer, Johannes Hendricks, and Mattia Righi
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-529,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Ice nucleating aerosol particles (INPs) have important influences on cirrus clouds and the climate system. However, their global atmospheric distribution in the cirrus regime is still very uncertain. We present a global climatology of INPs at cirrus conditions derived from model simulations, considering the INP-types mineral dust, soot, crystalline ammonium sulfate and glassy organics. The comparison of respective INP concentrations indicates a large importance of ammonium sulfate particles.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T00:04:44+02:00
       
  • Arctic spring and summertime aerosol optical depth baseline from long-term
           observations and model reanalyses – Part 1: Climatology and trend

    • Abstract: Arctic spring and summertime aerosol optical depth baseline from long-term observations and model reanalyses – Part 1: Climatology and trend
      Peng Xian, Jianglong Zhang, Norm T. O'Neill, Travis D. Toth, Blake Sorenson, Peter R. Colarco, Zak Kipling, Edward J. Hyer, James R. Campbell, Jeffrey S. Reid, and Keyvan Ranjbar
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 9915–9947, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-9915-2022, 2022
      The study provides baseline Arctic spring and summertime aerosol optical depth climatology, trend, and extreme event statistics from 2003 to 2019 using a combination of aerosol reanalyses, remote sensing, and ground observations. Biomass burning smoke has an overwhelming contribution to black carbon (an efficient climate forcer) compared to anthropogenic sources. Burning's large interannual variability and increasing summer trend have important implications for the Arctic climate.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T00:04:44+02:00
       
  • How can Brewer–Dobson circulation trends be estimated from changes in
           stratospheric water vapour and methane'

    • Abstract: How can Brewer–Dobson circulation trends be estimated from changes in stratospheric water vapour and methane'
      Liubov Poshyvailo-Strube, Rolf Müller, Stephan Fueglistaler, Michaela I. Hegglin, Johannes C. Laube, C. Michael Volk, and Felix Ploeger
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 9895–9914, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-9895-2022, 2022
      Brewer–Dobson circulation (BDC) controls the composition of the stratosphere, which in turn affects radiation and climate. As the BDC cannot be measured directly, it is necessary to infer its strength and trends indirectly. In this study, we test in the model world different methods for estimating the mean age of air trends based on a combination of stratospheric water vapour and methane data. We also provide simple practical advice of a more reliable estimation of the mean age of air trends.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T00:04:44+02:00
       
  • Functionality-based formation of secondary organic aerosol from m-xylene
           photooxidation

    • Abstract: Functionality-based formation of secondary organic aerosol from m-xylene photooxidation
      Yixin Li, Jiayun Zhao, Mario Gomez-Hernandez, Michael Lavallee, Natalie M. Johnson, and Renyi Zhang
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 9843–9857, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-9843-2022, 2022
      Here we elucidate the production of COOs and their roles in SOA and brown carbon formation from m-xylene oxidation by simultaneously monitoring the evolution of gas-phase products and aerosol properties in an environmental chamber. A kinetic framework is developed to predict SOA production from the concentrations and uptake coefficients for COOs. This functionality-based approach reproduces SOA formation from m-xylene oxidation well and is applicable to VOC oxidation for other species.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T00:04:44+02:00
       
  • Vertical structure of biomass burning aerosol transported over the
           southeast Atlantic Ocean

    • Abstract: Vertical structure of biomass burning aerosol transported over the southeast Atlantic Ocean
      Harshvardhan Harshvardhan, Richard Ferrare, Sharon Burton, Johnathan Hair, Chris Hostetler, David Harper, Anthony Cook, Marta Fenn, Amy Jo Scarino, Eduard Chemyakin, and Detlef Müller
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 9859–9876, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-9859-2022, 2022
      The evolution of aerosol in biomass burning smoke plumes that travel over marine clouds off the Atlantic coast of central Africa was studied using measurements made by a lidar deployed on a high-altitude aircraft. The main finding was that the physical properties of aerosol do not change appreciably once the plume has left land and travels over the ocean over a timescale of 1 to 2 d. Almost all particles in the plume are of radius less than 1 micrometer and spherical in shape.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T00:04:44+02:00
       
  • Emissions of organic compounds from western US wildfires and their
           near-fire transformations

    • Abstract: Emissions of organic compounds from western US wildfires and their near-fire transformations
      Yutong Liang, Christos Stamatis, Edward C. Fortner, Rebecca A. Wernis, Paul Van Rooy, Francesca Majluf, Tara I. Yacovitch, Conner Daube, Scott C. Herndon, Nathan M. Kreisberg, Kelley C. Barsanti, and Allen H. Goldstein
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 9877–9893, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-9877-2022, 2022
      This article reports the measurements of organic compounds emitted from western US wildfires. We identified and quantified 240 particle-phase compounds and 72 gas-phase compounds emitted in wildfire and related the emissions to the modified combustion efficiency. Higher emissions of diterpenoids and monoterpenes were observed, likely due to distillation from unburned heated vegetation. Our results can benefit future source apportionment and modeling studies as well as exposure assessments.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T00:04:44+02:00
       
  • Arctic spring and summertime aerosol optical depth baseline from long-term
           observations and model reanalyses – Part 2: Statistics of extreme AOD
           events, and implications for the impact of regional biomass burning
           processes

    • Abstract: Arctic spring and summertime aerosol optical depth baseline from long-term observations and model reanalyses – Part 2: Statistics of extreme AOD events, and implications for the impact of regional biomass burning processes
      Peng Xian, Jianglong Zhang, Norm T. O'Neill, Jeffrey S. Reid, Travis D. Toth, Blake Sorenson, Edward J. Hyer, James R. Campbell, and Keyvan Ranjbar
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 9949–9967, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-9949-2022, 2022
      The study provides a baseline Arctic spring and summertime aerosol optical depth climatology, trend, and extreme event statistics from 2003 to 2019 using a combination of aerosol reanalyses, remote sensing, and ground observations. Biomass burning smoke has an overwhelming contribution to black carbon (an efficient climate forcer) compared to anthropogenic sources. Burning's large interannual variability and increasing summer trend have important implications for the Arctic climate.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T00:04:44+02:00
       
  • Chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol particles formed from
           mixtures of anthropogenic and biogenic precursors

    • Abstract: Chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol particles formed from mixtures of anthropogenic and biogenic precursors
      Yunqi Shao, Aristeidis Voliotis, Mao Du, Yu Wang, Kelly Pereira, Jacqueline Hamilton, M. Rami Alfarra, and Gordon McFiggans
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 9799–9826, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-9799-2022, 2022
      This study explored the chemical properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) that formed from photo-oxidation of single and mixed biogenic and anthropogenic precursors. We showed that SOA chemical properties in a mixed vapour system are mainly affected by the higher-yield precursor's oxidation products and products from cross-product formation. This study also identifies potential tracer compounds in a mixed vapour system that might be used in SOA source attribution in future ambient studies.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T00:04:44+02:00
       
 
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