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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 49)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 63)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 69)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 133)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 145)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Weather     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.032
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 43  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1680-7316 - ISSN (Online) 1680-7324
Published by Copernicus Publications Homepage  [54 journals]
  • New particle formation in coastal New Zealand with a focus on open-ocean
           air masses

    • Abstract: New particle formation in coastal New Zealand with a focus on open-ocean air masses
      Maija Peltola, Clémence Rose, Jonathan V. Trueblood, Sally Gray, Mike Harvey, and Karine Sellegri
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6231–6254, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6231-2022, 2022
      Despite the importance of marine aerosol measurements for constraining climate models, these measurements are scarce. We measured the aerosol particle number size distribution in coastal New Zealand over a total period of 10 months. This paper analyses the aerosol properties at the site, with a special focus on new particle formation and marine air masses. New particle formation was observed frequently, but in marine air masses it did not follow traditional event criteria.
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T23:27:50+02:00
       
  • Measurement report: Source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosol using
           dual-carbon isotopes (13C and 14C) and levoglucosan in three northern
           Chinese cities during 2018–2019

    • Abstract: Measurement report: Source apportionment of carbonaceous aerosol using dual-carbon isotopes (13C and 14C) and levoglucosan in three northern Chinese cities during 2018–2019
      Huiyizhe Zhao, Zhenchuan Niu, Weijian Zhou, Sen Wang, Xue Feng, Shugang Wu, Xuefeng Lu, and Hua Du
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6255–6274, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6255-2022, 2022
      In this study, we investigated the characteristics and changes in the sources of carbonaceous aerosols in northern Chinese cities using dual-carbon isotopes (13C and 14C) and levoglucosan during 2018 to 2019 and compared them with the research in previous decades. The results show that the contribution of fossil sources has decreased (6–16%) significantly, and non-fossil sources have become the main part of carbonaceous aerosols, which verified the effectiveness of air quality management.
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T23:27:50+02:00
       
  • Measurement report: Vertical profiling of particle size distributions over
           Lhasa, Tibet – tethered balloon-based in situ measurements and source
           apportionment

    • Abstract: Measurement report: Vertical profiling of particle size distributions over Lhasa, Tibet – tethered balloon-based in situ measurements and source apportionment
      Liang Ran, Zhaoze Deng, Yunfei Wu, Jiwei Li, Zhixuan Bai, Ye Lu, Deqing Zhuoga, and Jianchun Bian
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6217–6229, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6217-2022, 2022
      The Tibetan Plateau (TP), the highest plateau in the world, plays a crucial role in regional and global climate. To examine the fingerprint left by human activities on the originally remote atmosphere, size distributions of particles from the ground to about 800 m were measured for the first time in summer 2020 in Lhasa, one of a few urbanized cities on TP. Potential sources of particles at different heights were explored. The contribution of emissions from religious activities was highlighted.
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T23:27:50+02:00
       
  • Emission factors and evolution of SO2 measured from biomass burning in
           wild and agricultural fires

    • Abstract: Emission factors and evolution of SO2 measured from biomass burning in wild and agricultural fires
      Pamela Rickly, Hongyu Guo, Pedro Campuzano-Jost, Jose L. Jimenez, Glenn M. Wolfe, Ryan Bennett, Ilann Bourgeois, John D. Crounse, Jack E. Dibb, Joshua P. DiGangi, Glenn S. Diskin, Maximilian Dollner, Emily M. Gargulinski, Samuel R. Hall, Hannah S. Halliday, Thomas F. Hanisco, Reem A. Hannun, Jin Liao, Richard Moore, Benjamin A. Nault, John B. Nowak, Claire E. Robinson, Thomas Ryerson, Kevin J. Sanchez, Manuel Schöberl, Amber J. Soja, Jason M. St. Clair, Kenneth L. Thornhill, Kirk Ullmann, Paul O. Wennberg, Bernadett Weinzierl, Elizabeth B. Wiggins, Edward L. Winstead, and Andrew W. Rollins
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-309,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Biomass burning sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission factors range from 0.27–1.1 g kg-1 C. Biomass burning SO2 can quickly form sulfate and organosulfur, but these pathways are dependent on liquid water content and pH. Hydroxymethanesulfonate (HMS) appears to be directly emitted from some fire sources, but is not the sole contributor to the organosulfur signal. It is shown that HMS and organosulfur chemistry may be an important S(IV) reservoir with the fate dependent on the surrounding conditions.
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T23:27:50+02:00
       
  • Technical note: Identification and quantification of gaseous and
           particulate organic compounds from cooking fumes by comprehensive
           two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    • Abstract: Technical note: Identification and quantification of gaseous and particulate organic compounds from cooking fumes by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry
      Yuanzheng Gong, Kai Song, Song Guo, Daqi Lv, Yuan Zhang, Zichao Wan, Wenfei Zhu, Hui Wang, Ying Yu, Rui Tan, Ruizhe Shen, Sihua Lu, Shuangde Li, and Yunfa Chen
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-326,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Herein we applied thermal desorption comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TD-GCxGC-MS) for synchronous analysis of gaseous and particulate organics emitted from cooking fumes. With a systematic 4-step qualitative procedure and precise quantitative and semi-quantitative method, 170 and 352 compounds from C2 (acetic acids) – C30 (squalene) occupying 95 % and 90 % of the total ion current for gaseous and particulate samples were identified and quantified.
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T23:27:50+02:00
       
  • The effect of ash, water vapor, and heterogeneous chemistry on the
           evolution of a Pinatubo-size volcanic cloud

    • Abstract: The effect of ash, water vapor, and heterogeneous chemistry on the evolution of a Pinatubo-size volcanic cloud
      Mohamed Abdelkader, Georgiy Stenchikov, Andrea Pozzer, Holger Tost, and Jos Lelieveld
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-177,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      We study the effect of injected volcanic ash, water vapor, and SO2 on the development of the volcanic cloud and the stratospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD). Both are sensitive to the initial injection height and to the aging of the volcanic ash shaped by heterogeneous chemistry coupled with the ozone cycle. The manuscript explains the large differences in AOD for different injection scenarios which could improve the estimate of the radiative forcing of volcanic eruptions.
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T23:27:50+02:00
       
  • Inverse modeling of Chinese NOx emissions using deep learning: Integrating
           in situ observations with a satellite-based chemical reanalysis

    • Abstract: Inverse modeling of Chinese NOx emissions using deep learning: Integrating in situ observations with a satellite-based chemical reanalysis
      Tai-Long He, Dylan B. A. Jones, Kazuyuki Miyazaki, Kevin W. Bowman, Zhe Jiang, Xiaokang Chen, Rui Li, Yuxiang Zhang, and Kunna Li
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-251,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      We use a deep learning (DL) model to estimate Chinese NOx emissions by combining satellite analysis and in situ measuremements. Our results are consistent with conventional analyses of Chinese NOx emissions. Comparison with mobility data shows that the DL model has a better capability to capture changes in NOx. We analyze Chinese NOx emissions during the COVID-19 pandemic period. Our results illustrate the potential utility of DL as a complementary tool for conventional air quality studies.
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T20:32:43+02:00
       
  • Source Apportionment and Evolution of N-containing Aerosols at a Rural
           Cloud Forest in Taiwan by Isotope Analysis

    • Abstract: Source Apportionment and Evolution of N-containing Aerosols at a Rural Cloud Forest in Taiwan by Isotope Analysis
      Ting-Yu Chen, Chia-Li Chen, Yi-Chi Chen, Charles C.-K. Chou, Haojia Ren, and Hui-Ming Hung
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-30,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      The anthropogenic influence on aerosol composition in a downstream river-valley forest was investigated using FT-IR and isotope analysis. A higher N-containing species concentration during daytime fog events indicates that a stronger inversion leads to higher pollutant concentrations, and the fog enhances the aqueous-phase chemical processes. Moreover, the observed size-dependent oxygen isotope suggests the contribution of organic peroxyl radicals to local nitrate formation for small particles.
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T20:32:43+02:00
       
  • On the global relationship between polarimetric radio occultation
           observable ΔΦ and ice water content

    • Abstract: On the global relationship between polarimetric radio occultation observable ΔΦ and ice water content
      Ramon Padullés, Estel Cardellach, and F. Joseph Turk
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-300,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      The results of comparing the polarimetric radio occultation observable ΔΦ and the ice water content derived from the Cloudsat radar, in a global and statistical way, show a strong correlation between the geographical patterns of both quantities for a wide range of heights. This implies that horizontally oriented hydrometeors are systematically present through the whole globe and through all vertical levels, which could provide insights on the physical processes leading to precipitation.
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T20:32:43+02:00
       
  • Seasonal Significance of New Particle Formation Impacts on Cloud
           Condensation Nuclei at a Mountaintop Location

    • Abstract: Seasonal Significance of New Particle Formation Impacts on Cloud Condensation Nuclei at a Mountaintop Location
      Noah S. Hirshorn, Lauren M. Zuromski, Christopher Rapp, Ian McCubbin, Fangqun Yu, and A. Gannet Hallar
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-338,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      New particle formation (NPF) is a source of atmospheric aerosol number concentration that can impact climate by growing to larger sizes and under proper conditions, forming cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Using novel methods, we find that at Storm Peak Laboratory, a remote mountaintop site in Colorado, NPF is observed to enhance CCN concentrations in the spring by a factor of 1.54 and in the winter by a factor of 1.36 which can occur on a regional scale having important climate implications.
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T20:32:43+02:00
       
  • Long- and short-term temporal variability in cloud condensation nuclei
           spectra over a wide supersaturation range in the Southern Great Plains
           site

    • Abstract: Long- and short-term temporal variability in cloud condensation nuclei spectra over a wide supersaturation range in the Southern Great Plains site
      Russell J. Perkins, Peter J. Marinescu, Ezra J. T. Levin, Don R. Collins, and Sonia M. Kreidenweis
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6197–6215, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6197-2022, 2022
      We used 5 years (2009–2013) of aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) data from a total of seven instruments housed at the Southern Great Plains site, which were merged into a quality-controlled, continuous dataset of CCN spectra at ~45 min resolution. The data cover all seasons, are representative of a rural, agricultural mid-continental site, and are useful for model initialization and validation. Our analysis of this dataset focuses on seasonal and hourly variability.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T20:32:43+02:00
       
  • Tropospheric ozone production and chemical regime analysis during the
           COVID-19 lockdown over Europe

    • Abstract: Tropospheric ozone production and chemical regime analysis during the COVID-19 lockdown over Europe
      Clara M. Nussbaumer, Andrea Pozzer, Ivan Tadic, Lenard Röder, Florian Obersteiner, Hartwig Harder, Jos Lelieveld, and Horst Fischer
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6151–6165, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6151-2022, 2022
      The European COVID-19 lockdowns have significantly reduced the emission of primary pollutants such as NOx, which impacts the tropospheric photochemical processes and the abundance of O3. In this study, we present how the lockdowns have affected tropospheric trace gases and ozone production based on in situ observations and modeling simulations. We additionally show that the chemical regime shifted from a transition point to a NOx limitation in the upper troposphere.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T20:32:43+02:00
       
  • Estimation of mechanistic parameters in the gas-phase reactions of ozone
           with alkenes for use in automated mechanism construction

    • Abstract: Estimation of mechanistic parameters in the gas-phase reactions of ozone with alkenes for use in automated mechanism construction
      Mike J. Newland, Camille Mouchel-Vallon, Richard Valorso, Bernard Aumont, Luc Vereecken, Michael E. Jenkin, and Andrew R. Rickard
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6167–6195, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6167-2022, 2022
      Alkene ozonolysis produces Criegee intermediates, which can act as oxidants or decompose to give a range of closed-shell and radical products, including OH. Therefore it is essential to accurately represent the chemistry of Criegee intermediates in atmospheric models in order to understand their impacts on atmospheric composition. Here we provide a mechanism construction protocol by which the central features of alkene ozonolysis chemistry can be included in an automatic mechanism generator.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T20:32:43+02:00
       
  • Unexpected high frequency of nocturnal surface ozone enhancement events
           over China: Characteristics and mechanisms

    • Abstract: Unexpected high frequency of nocturnal surface ozone enhancement events over China: Characteristics and mechanisms
      Cheng He, Xiao Lu, Haolin Wang, Haichao Wang, Yan Li, Guowen He, Yuanping He, Yurun Wang, Youlang Zhang, Yiming Liu, Qi Fan, and Shaojia Fan
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-310,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      We report that nocturnal ozone enhancement (NOE) events are observed at a high annual frequency of 41 % over 800 sites over China in 2014–2019, about 50 % larger than that over Europe and US. High daytime ozone provides rich ozone source in the nighttime residual layer, determining the overall high frequency of NOE events in China, and then the enhanced atmospheric mixing triggers NOE events by allowing the ozone-rich air in the residual layer to be mixed into the nighttime boundary layer.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T20:32:43+02:00
       
  • Aerosol characterization in the Subtropical Eastern North Atlantic region
           derived from long-term AERONET measurements

    • Abstract: Aerosol characterization in the Subtropical Eastern North Atlantic region derived from long-term AERONET measurements
      África Barreto, Rosa D. García, Carmen Guirado-Fuentes, Emilio Cuevas, A. Fernando Almansa, Celia Milford, Carlos Toledano, Francisco J. Expósito, Juan P. Díaz, and Sergio F. León-Luis
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-231,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      A comprehensive characterization of atmospheric aerosols in the Subtropical Eastern North Atlantic has been carried out in this paper using long-term ground- AERONET photometric observations from a unique network made up of four stations strategically located from the sea level to 3555 m height on the island of Tenerife over the period 2005–2020. This is a region that can be considered a key location to study the seasonal dependence in the dust transport from the Sahel-Sahara.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T20:32:43+02:00
       
  • Impact of cooking style and oil on semi-volatile and intermediate
           volatility organic compound emissions from Chinese domestic cooking

    • Abstract: Impact of cooking style and oil on semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compound emissions from Chinese domestic cooking
      Kai Song, Song Guo, Yuanzheng Gong, Daqi Lv, Yuan Zhang, Zichao Wan, Tianyu Li, Wenfei Zhu, Hui Wang, Ying Yu, Rui Tan, Ruizhe Shen, Sihua Lu, Shuangde Li, Yunfa Chen, and Min Hu
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-320,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Emissions from 4 typical Chinese dishes and fried chicken cooked with 4 oils were investigated to illustrate the impact of cooking style and material. 10.2 % - 32.0 % of the estimated SOA could be explained by S/IVOCs oxidation. Multiway principal component analysis (MPCA) emphasizes the importance of the unsaturated fatty acid-alkadienal-volatile products mechanism (oil autooxidation) accelerated by the cooking and heating procedure.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T20:32:43+02:00
       
  • Observing short timescale cloud development to constrain aerosol-cloud
           interactions

    • Abstract: Observing short timescale cloud development to constrain aerosol-cloud interactions
      Edward Gryspeerdt, Franziska Glassmeier, Graham Feingold, Fabian Hoffmann, and Rebecca J. Murray-Watson
      Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-2022-335,2022
      Preprint under review for ACP (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      The response of clouds to changes in aerosol remains a big uncertainty in our understanding of the climate. Studies typically look at aerosol and cloud processes in snapshot images, measuring all properties at the same time. Here we use multiple images to characterise how cloud temporal development responds to aerosol. We find a reduction in liquid water path with increasing aerosol, party due to feedbacks. This suggests the aerosol impact on cloud water may be weaker than in previous studies.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T20:32:43+02:00
       
  • Molecular-level nucleation mechanism of iodic acid and methanesulfonic
           acid

    • Abstract: Molecular-level nucleation mechanism of iodic acid and methanesulfonic acid
      An Ning, Ling Liu, Lin Ji, and Xiuhui Zhang
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6103–6114, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6103-2022, 2022
      Iodic acid (IA) and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) were previously proved to be significant nucleation precursors in marine areas. However, the nucleation process involved in IA and MSA remains unclear. We show the enhancement of MSA on IA cluster formation and reveal the IAM-SA nucleating mechanism using a theoretical approach. This study helps to understand the clustering process in which marine sulfur- and iodine-containing species are jointly involved and its impact on new particle formation.
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T20:32:43+02:00
       
  • Refining an ensemble of volcanic ash forecasts using satellite retrievals:
           Raikoke 2019

    • Abstract: Refining an ensemble of volcanic ash forecasts using satellite retrievals: Raikoke 2019
      Antonio Capponi, Natalie J. Harvey, Helen F. Dacre, Keith Beven, Cameron Saint, Cathie Wells, and Mike R. James
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6115–6134, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6115-2022, 2022
      Forecasts of the dispersal of volcanic ash in the atmosphere are hampered by uncertainties in parameters describing the characteristics of volcanic plumes. Uncertainty quantification is vital for making robust flight-planning decisions. We present a method using satellite data to refine a series of volcanic ash dispersion forecasts and quantify these uncertainties. We show how we can improve forecast accuracy and potentially reduce the regions of high risk of volcanic ash relevant to aviation.
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T20:32:43+02:00
       
  • Assessing the consequences of including aerosol absorption in potential
           stratospheric aerosol injection climate intervention strategies

    • Abstract: Assessing the consequences of including aerosol absorption in potential stratospheric aerosol injection climate intervention strategies
      Jim M. Haywood, Andy Jones, Ben T. Johnson, and William McFarlane Smith
      Atmos. Chem. Phys., 22, 6135–6150, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-22-6135-2022, 2022
      Simulations are presented investigating the influence of moderately absorbing aerosol in the stratosphere to combat the impacts of climate change. A number of detrimental impacts are noted compared to sulfate aerosol, including (i) reduced cooling efficiency, (ii) increased deficits in global precipitation, (iii) delays in the recovery of the stratospheric ozone hole, and (iv) disruption of the stratospheric circulation and the wintertime storm tracks that impact European precipitation.
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T20:32:43+02:00
       
 
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