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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 65)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 208)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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Theoretical and Applied Climatology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.867
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1434-4483 - ISSN (Online) 0177-798X
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Variation of the gale process over the South China Sea from 1979 to 2021
           and its response to East Pacific Sea surface temperature

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      Abstract: Abstract By using ERA5 reanalysis data, this paper combined existing research definitions of gale processes to analyze the variation characteristics of gale processes occurring in the South China Sea region, and to study the response of the gale process to East Pacific sea surface temperature. The results indicate that the gale process shows the significant annual variation and the most frequent in winter and least frequent in summer. While there is no significant trend in the frequency of gale processes in each season. There is a significant negative correlation between the frequency of gale process and the East Pacific sea surface temperature in spring, autumn, and winter. When the sea surface temperature in the eastern Pacific rises abnormally, the frequency of gale processes in the South China Sea decreases. When abnormally high, the frequency of gale process in the South China Sea increases. In summer, this relationship is the opposite. When sea surface temperature is abnormal, the anomalous anticyclone triggered in the western Pacific, and has a weakening effect on the prevailing winds in the South China Sea, leading to a reduction in high wind speed and gale events, thereby reducing the frequency of gale process.
      PubDate: 2024-07-19
       
  • Near-term efficient predictability of dry and wet years during West
           African monsoon season

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      Abstract: Abstract The near-term performance efficiency in predicting the dry and wet years in the West African monsoon (WAM) season (May to October) has been studied from 1979 to 2050 using the CRU observational rainfall, NCEP RII atmospheric circulation fields, and CORDEX-Africa outputs in the historical and RCP 8.5 experiments. The dry and wet years from the 6-month SPI at the Western Sudano Sahel (WSS), Eastern Sudano Sahel (ESS), and Guinea Coast (GC) rainfall regions, respectively, have shown consistency in the associated features during such WAM season extremes. The ensemble mean of the historical outputs (1979 to 2005) shows varying simulations of the WAM season; non-significant correlation in rainfall in GC and its overestimation at the three regions, the underestimating (overestimating) of Moisture Flux Convergence (MFC) in the Sahel (GC), and the “non-reasonable” performance by the Kling-Gupta efficiency in simulating the zonal moisture flux in GC and meridional moisture flux in ESS. The bias-correction of the RCP 8.5 outputs has shown improved performance efficiency of the models simulations from 2006 to 2021, however, with the attendant limitations in the technique. The bias-corrected rainfall showed underestimation at all regions although indicating negative significant correlation at the GC (r = -0.33, at 99.9% Confidence level from t-test) whereas the MFC has shown reasonable performance in the GC (KGE = -0.39). However, the ensemble mean of the models presents greater efficiency in projecting the WAM dry and wet years although there are yet huge uncertainties in the projections indicated by the MBE values. The 6-month SPI projections from the improved RCP 8.5 simulation present 2048 to be dry and 2035, 2042 and 2047 to be wet years during the WAM from 2022 to 2050. Noteworthy is the impact of MFC on rainfall being consistent in both the historical and the bias-corrected models’ outputs, having a greater impact by 2050.
      PubDate: 2024-07-18
       
  • Geospatial identification of possible rainwater harvesting locations
           within a high-altitude Gilgit River basin, Pakistan

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      Abstract: Abstract The management of water resources is no longer an option but a necessity especially in countries with a high rate of population growth like Pakistan. Pakistan has a high-water scarcity, an extremely varying topography, and is also one of the countries encountering the problem of climate change. Therefore, prudent utilization of available water resources is a matter in the plains of Pakistan as in its high-altitude regions. Instead of wasting water which is a valuable resource, rainwater harvesting is a way of saving rainwater as an alternative source of fresh water for better use. The aim of this study was to search for potential rainwater-harvesting areas in a high-altitude Gilgit River basin. This research employed the SCS-CN technique in estimating surface runoff in the GIS environment. The geospatial study used four input parameters: slope of the land, land covers, surface runoff and drainage density. The research concluded that some lands, especially those that are deserted in dry area and agricultural lands, can serve as the sites of rainwater harvesting, with only 4% of area that was highly suitable for the purpose. Nevertheless, 37% of the investigated area was shown as totally unviable for rainwater collection installations because of steep slopes and substantial volume of snow. Simultaneously, the rainwater storage design solutions suggested were check dam, percolation tank, and agricultural ponds with the area of 3.5%, 1%, and 0.75% of the given land area, respectively, for rainwater harvesting. The locations of potential catchment and planned rainwater harvesting structures would assist the local authorities and the policy makers to provide plans and design on the construction of water storages and also the optimization of water use.
      PubDate: 2024-07-18
       
  • Climatology, trends, and variability of planetary boundary layer height
           over India using high-resolution Indian reanalysis

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      Abstract: Abstract This work investigates the spatio-temporal variability of planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) characteristics by leveraging multi-decadal (1980–2019) data from India’s first high-resolution regional atmospheric reanalysis–IMDAA, in conjunction with ERA5 and MERRA-2. The spatial variability in the seasonal and annual climatological mean PBLH obtained from IMDAA agrees well with ERA5 and MERRA-2, albeit with some differences. The IMDAA and ERA5 PBLH exhibit a high correlation (> 0.6) over the entire India and also show a significant positive (negative) correlation with MERRA-2 over northwest and central (southern and eastern) Indian regions. However, IMDAA tends to overestimate ERA5 PBLH ( ~ < 500 m) and underestimate MERRA-2 PBLH ( ~ > 500 m) during all seasons. Despite these discrepancies, IMDAA successfully captures the diurnal changes in PBLH similar to ERA5 and MERRA-2. Furthermore, the evaluation of IMDAA PBLH in conjunction with other meteorological factors suggests that PBLH exhibits a negative correlation with relative humidity (RH), indicating a decrease in PBLH as RH increases. On the other hand, PBLH shows positive correlations with surface temperature and surface zonal winds. Surface sensible and latent heat flux exhibit positive and negative correlations with PBLH, respectively, over Indian sub-regions throughout all seasons. Moreover, IMDAA realistically represents the declining trend of PBLH (-1.1 to -76.2 m decade− 1) compared to ERA5 in India during all seasons. The results from IMDAA, in concurrence with other reanalyses, demonstrate that the decreasing trend in PBLH over India is associated with rising surface temperatures and weakening surface zonal winds. This trend is also attributed to increasing latent heat flux and decreasing sensible heat flux. The changes in surface fluxes over India are attributed to the intensification of Indian monsoon rainfall in the last three decades. Moreover, El Niño appears to be an important control on PBLH variability over India during different seasons, which is realistically represented by IMDAA as in ERA5 and MERRA-2.
      PubDate: 2024-07-17
       
  • Unraveling the spatiotemporal dynamics of relative humidity in major Saudi
           Arabian cities: A synergy of climate modeling, regression analysis, and
           wavelet coherence

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      Abstract: Abstract In the rapidly changing climate of arid desert regions, evaluating the comprehensive characteristics of humidity levels is crucial for agricultural, urban, and infrastructural planning, as well as for minimizing potential public health impacts. We investigated variability and trends of humidity levels in major Saudi Arabian cities during 1982–2022, focusing on the influence of meteorological factors such as average, maximum and minimum temperature, rainfall, and windspeed. Employing the Probability Density Function and descriptive statistics, variability of climatic factors was analyzed. The Mann–Kendall Test (MKT) and Innovative Trend Analysis (ITA) were employed to identify monthly and annual trends. The magnitude and changing patterns were determined by calculating Sen’s Slope and ITA slope. Findings of the MKT and ITA showed similar trends in humidity levels across all the cities. ITA result revealed that humidity in Riyadh and Taif decreased at a rate of 0.012% and 0.016% per year, respectively, while increased in Jeddah, Makkah, and Madinah at a 0.05 confidence level. The influence of climatic factors on humidity was assessed using Pearson’s correlation coefficients, multiple regression model, and wavelet transform coherence (WTC) for each city, pinpointing temperature as the key driver of humidity variability. The dominance of temperature features was corroborated by strong power spectrums in the WTC across various time periods and scales. The in-depth analysis of humidity dynamics in this study provides critical insights for the development of climate-resilient infrastructure and formulation of public health strategies in Saudi Arabian cities.
      PubDate: 2024-07-17
       
  • Assessing framework of rainfall-induced landslide hazard considering
           spatiotemporal asymmetry in extreme precipitation indices under climate
           change

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      Abstract: Abstract Landslides triggered by extreme rainfall events often cause losses of life, property damage, and environmental alterations. While past studies have assessed landslide hazards using various indices, how to select rainfall indices in rainfall-induced landslide hazard assessment is still a challenge due to the spatiotemporal asymmetry of rainfall indices. In this study, we employed three machine-learning models, namely the Random forest (RF), Support vector machine (SVM), and logistics regression models, and developed an extreme rainfall index-based model to evaluate rainfall-induced landslide hazards. To eliminate the effect of spatiotemporal asymmetry in indices, we selected six extreme rainfall indices that are highly correlated with rainfall-induced landslides and tested 63 combinations. Over the past four decades, extreme rainfall events have become more frequent and intense. Both the number and type of rainfall indices affected the assessment results of landslides in the study area. The RF model showed a better accuracy in landslide hazard assessments than did the other two models. To better predict rainfall-induced landslide hazards, an optimal model based on three extreme rainfall indices, i.e., PSSPTOT, R25mm, and Rx5day, was proposed for the study area. With climate change, the study area may encounter more intense rainfall events and experience high levels of rainfall-induced landslide hazards. Compared to the baseline, landslide hazards in the study area are projected to increase by 9.9% and 11.9% in the 2030s (2021–2050). Areas with high- and very high- levels of landslide hazards will account for more than 50% of the study area and will be mainly distributed in the central and eastern parts of the study area. This study suggested an optimal combination of extreme precipitation indicies and provided scientific information about rainfall-induced landslide hazard management under climate change.
      PubDate: 2024-07-17
       
  • Prediction of agricultural drought behavior using the Long Short-Term
           Memory Network (LSTM) in the central area of the Gulf of Mexico

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      Abstract: Abstract Drought is a slowly evolving and highly complex phenomenon that significantly affects human activities. Innovative approaches are being proposed to predict their future patterns, including using artificial intelligence. In particular, this rapidly growing field addresses issues such as high computational costs and the intricacies involved in managing techniques related to general circulation models. Therefore, our objective was to develop a short-term early detection methodology for agricultural drought based on the Normalized Difference Drought Index (NDDI) and the Long Short-Term Memory Network (LSTM) in the central region of the Gulf of Mexico. The methodology entailed calculating the NDDI values from Landsat 8-9 multispectral images for the period spanning from 2013 to 2024 and subsequently comparing the predictions through seven performance measures. In the case of the LSTM configuration, the Bayesian optimizer was employed to identify the optimal architecture and hyperparameters. The final structure consisted of an input layer, three LSTM layers, three dropout layers, a fully connected layer, and a regression output layer. Furthermore, the LSTM network was trained in four test scenarios (10, 30, 50, and 100 epochs) compared with the Gated Recurrent Unit (GRU) neural network. Finally, the efficacy of the proposed methodology was evaluated using seven distinct metrics. The results show that the LSTM network can predict agricultural drought behavior with the lowest error rates in the evaluation metrics RMSE (0.12 to 0.26), MAE (0.08 to 0.21), and \(d_j\) (0.59 to 0.91).
      PubDate: 2024-07-16
       
  • Correction to: Impacts of climate change on spatial drought distribution
           in the Mediterranean Basin (Turkey): different climate models and
           downscaling methods

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      PubDate: 2024-07-15
       
  • Analysing spatiotemporal drought patterns in Punjab Province, Pakistan,
           utilizing SPI and SPEI

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      Abstract: Abstract Drought is an extreme phenomenon which occurs due to a prolonged duration of peculiarly low precipitation in a region. This can affect various sectors like agriculture, livestock, and human health among others. Countries like Pakistan which have agriculture-based economy can have severe consequences due to drought. In this study, Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) are applied to examine drought features at different time scales over Punjab Province which is the food basket for Pakistan. The drought occurrence was examined through drought frequency, concentrating on spatial and temporal scales and considering different geomorphologies. A modified Mann-Kendall test and multiple linear regression are used to examine monthly data from 12 weather stations collected between 1980 and 2020. Stations at high elevations have very variable precipitation, which can lead to periodic droughts. Surprisingly, SPEI shows more drought sensitivity than SPI. The severity of the drought has decreased recently, especially after the 1998–2002 peak period. Correlation analysis demonstrates a substantial link between SPI and SPEI at high elevation stations, with Murree displaying the strongest correlation (0.9334) on a one-month time frame, and Bahawalpur exhibiting a comparably lower correlation (0.6824). Positive trends in SPI and SPEI values are revealed by Mann-Kendall trend tests, which are most prominent at higher elevations and on the northern Punjab. On a one-month time scale, the Mianwali station has the strongest trend in SPEI (0.1497), whereas Bahawalnagar has negligible trends in both SPI (0.0214) and SPEI (0.0459). At high elevation sites, the frequency of drought is constantly high, and SPEI routinely detects greater drought at low elevations. Similar drought frequencies are shown by both indices for the northern region of Punjab. The results of a multiple linear regression model demonstrate the significant impact of meteorological variables on monthly mean precipitation, which advances our knowledge of Punjab’s spatiotemporal drought dynamics and provides important information for planning for resilience and water resource management.
      PubDate: 2024-07-15
       
  • Estimating hourly air temperature in an Amazon-Cerrado transitional forest
           in Brazil using Machine Learning regression models

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      Abstract: Abstract Air temperature holds significant importance in microclimate and environmental health studies, playing a crucial role in weather regulation. There is a need to develop a reliable model capable of accurately capturing air temperature variations. In this study, we focused on the Amazon-Cerrado transitional forest, constructing a robust predictive model for hourly temperature fluctuations. This forest, situated approximately 50 km northwest of Sinop, Mato Grosso, Brazil, is a transitional area, making it important to investigate its climatic behavior and ecosystems. We estimated air temperature using machine learning techniques such as Random Forest, Gradient Boosting, Multilayer Perceptron, and Support Vector Regressor, aiming to evaluate the most effective models based on relevant metrics. Performance assessments were conducted during both dry and rainy seasons to verify their adaptability. The top-performing Random Forest model demonstrated Willmott and Spearman indexes above 0.97. The air relative humidity, solar radiation, and volumetric soil water content were identified as the most important features, evaluated with Willmott and Spearman indexes above 0.95 in a model with such dimensionality reduction. These results underscore the efficacy of machine learning techniques in accurately estimating air temperature.
      PubDate: 2024-07-13
       
  • Evaluation of precipitation products in a Brazilian watershed:
           Tocantins-Araguaia watershed case study

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      Abstract: Abstract Precipitation plays a vital role in various fields, including hydroclimatic modeling, climate change studies, agricultural optimization, and water resources management. Precipitation data can be obtained through observational measurements using the rain gauge approach or as Gridded precipitation products (GPP) derived from satellites or atmospheric models. GPPs provide optimized global estimates of climate data without spatial or temporal gaps, making them a valuable solution for areas with sparse or nonexistent rain gauges. However, it is essential to assess their reliability and limitations across different time scales and regions before usage. This study aims to evaluate the accuracy of two specific GPP datasets, ERA5 and MERRA-2, in comparison with two observational datasets, focusing on the Tocantins-Araguaia watershed and Pará river estuary in Brazil. The results show that both GPPs, ERA5 and MERRA-2, captured the overall precipitation regime for the analyzed period. However, discrepancies emerged, particularly at the daily and annual scales, with better agreement observed at monthly and climatology scales when compared to observational datasets. ERA5 demonstrated a higher number of acceptable stations compared to MERRA-2. Although both reanalysis products showed good agreement in climatological analysis, a more detailed evaluation revealed shortcomings in simulating precipitation during the dry season. While GPPs offer consistent time series with higher temporal and spatial resolutions, the observational precipitation data is deemed the most suitable input for hydrological-hydrodynamic modeling in the Tocantins-Araguaia watershed. Its widespread coverage, numerous rain gauges, and accurate representation of reality make it an ideal choice for hydrological modeling in the region.
      PubDate: 2024-07-13
       
  • Diurnal cycle of precipitation in Brazil

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      Abstract: Abstract The diurnal cycle is an important mode of climatic variability associated with different aspects of micro, meso and large scale meteorological phenomena. Thus, we performed a study of the space-time variability of the diurnal cycle of precipitation with hourly sampling and covering all regions of Brazil. The dataset was collected during the period of 13-year, from 1st January 2008 to 31th December 2020. We used data from 411 rain gauges installed in automatic weather stations. To evaluate regional aspects, we conducted a cluster analysis with different configurations (4, 5 and 6 groups). We identified a considerable heterogeneity in the hour of maximum precipitation in Brazil and three main types of diurnal cycle were observed: (i) maximum precipitation at mid- to late afternoon associated with strong local convection activity; (ii) diurnal cycle with intense precipitation during nighttime at the Amazon basin, the coast of Northeast Brazil and the Southern region; (iii) semidiurnal cycles with low precipitation rate at the Northeast Brazil.
      PubDate: 2024-07-11
       
  • South Atlantic convergence zone and ENSO occurrence in the 2000–2021
           period

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      Abstract: Abstract In this study we defined the association of SACZ episodes with ENOS phases during the 2000–2021 summer seasons, considering November to March months, and the circulation associated patterns. Each SACZ episode was classified when OLR values were below 220 W m− 2 and precipitable water values above 45 kg m− 2 for more than three consecutive days. The association between ONI and the annual number of days with SACZ and the number of SACZ episodes shows linear correlation of -0.44 and − 0.34, respectively, showing the prevalence of SACZ episodes during the La Niña phase. Analysis of the entire series shows a linear annual mean increase of ~ 16 days with SACZ episodes from 2000 up to 2021. Sea level pressure anomalies between El Niño and La Niña periods present meridional dipole patterns between northern and southern South Atlantic, including the southamerican continent. OLR anomalies fields present negative (positive) values during LN (EN) periods over the northern South America extending to SACZ areas, helping to explain the higher number of SACZ episodes in LN (63 episodes) than in EN (29 episodes) periods. Both SLP and OLR anomalous patterns are associated with higher moisture convergence in the SACZ area in LN than in EN periods. Analysis of very dry (2014–2015) and very rainy (2020–2021) summer seasons over southeastern South America, illustrating El Niño and La Niña periods, respectively, shows strengthened upward movement over southwestern South America and weakened upward movement over northeastern in the former summer season and the opposite signals in the second one. These patterns were associated with typical circulation at low and high tropospheric levels: the upper level cyclonic vortex and the subtropical South Atlantic high pressure displacement to continental areas during the very dry period, 2014–2015, and the displacement of both systems, in upper and low levels, to the ocean during the very rainy period, 2020–2021.
      PubDate: 2024-07-11
       
  • Assessing the climate change impacts on Coffee arabica cultivation regions
           in China

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      Abstract: Abstract Coffea arabica, a vital cash crop in Yunnan Province’s plateaus(YN), comprises 98% of China’s total coffee output in both cultivation area and yield. In this study, the average annual temperature (Tyear), the average temperature of the coldest month(Tcoldest), annual precipitation (Ryear) and precipitation from February to March (R2–3) were used to assess the climatic suitability of Coffea arabica cultivation in YN, to understand the possible expansion of the crop in future scenarios The simulated outputs of the regional climate model RegCM4 driven by three global climate models (HadGEM2-ES, MPI-ESM-MR and NorESM1-M) were used, and the ensemble average method was applied to obtain the ensemble model results. The suitability of Coffea arabica cultivation in YN for the base period (1981–2010) and three future periods (2021–2030, 2031–2040, 2041–2050) under three emission scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP8.5) was analyzed. The results showed that the suitable planting area of small-grain coffee in YN increased significantly under the three models and the aggregate model, it expanded to the north and east, and the unsuitable planting area decreased sharply. The optimum areas of the northern part of southwestern YN and of the western, eastern, and central parts of southeastern YN were enlarged, while the suitability grade of the southern part was improved. In most parts of southeastern YN in particular, the areas that were not suitable or were less suitable for small-grain coffee cultivation became suitable or even the most suitable, and the suitability grade improvement and area expansion were considerable. Among the three models, the largest increase was obtained with the MPI-ESM-MR model, the smallest increase with the HadGEM2-ES model, and the largest decrease with the MPI-ESM-MR model from 2041 to 2050 (55.2%) under the RCP8.5. The largest increases in the most suitable area were 65.5% and 64.5%, which were obtained under the RCP8.5 with the NorESM1-M and MPI-ESM-MR models, respectively, from 2041 to 2050. Under RCP2.6 and RCP4.5, the change is similar to that of RCP8.5, but the increase is lower than that of RCP8.5.
      PubDate: 2024-07-09
       
  • A hybrid prediction framework combining deep neural network and modified
           optimization algorithm for water vapor prediction

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      Abstract: Abstract As a global issue, water shortage has attracted much attention from the society. Artificial rain enhancement (ARE) is an effective way to exploit cloud water resources and solve water shortage, but the timing of operation is always a key problem that ARE is facing. The fluctuating properties of water vapor content (WVC) are intricately tied to the choice of operational timing, so accurately predicting the evolution of WVC holds paramount importance when determining the optimal operational timing. However, most of the proposed forecasting methods are limited to simple time series forecasting, and do not pay attention to the complex characteristics of the original data and the shortcomings of a single model prediction. Therefore, the prediction accuracy is difficult to meet the requirements of increasingly refined meteorological services. To tackle this challenge, a new hybrid prediction model, including data reconstruction strategy, benchmark model and improved multi-objective optimization algorithm, is proposed in our research by combining advanced theoretical research of artificial intelligence and data preprocessing ideas. The microwave radiometer WVC observation data at high altitude of Qilian Mountains in China is taken as a case study. By comparing 12 mainstream models, it can be concluded that: The model developed in this study achieves the highest prediction accuracy, and the mean MAPE of the three data sets at 2, 4, 6 and 8 prediction steps is 1.23%, 1.33%, 1.37% and 1.52%, respectively. This result verifies the superiority and practical value of the proposed model in predicting WVC under complex terrain conditions, and provides an excellent solution for accurate prediction of WVC.
      PubDate: 2024-07-09
       
  • Climatology and trends of atmospheric water vapour transport in New
           Zealand

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      Abstract: Abstract Atmospheric moisture transport is crucial for understanding New Zealand’s climate dynamics, particularly with respect to extreme precipitation events. While the majority of previous studies have focussed on Atmospheric Rivers (ARs), this study examines the entire spectrum of water vapour transport and its link to extreme precipitation using 40 years (1981–2020) of Integrated Water Vapour Transport (IVT) data over the region. Although ARs are important drivers of extreme precipitation, they are infrequent as they account for less than 10% of total moisture transport at most coastal locations. Extreme water vapour transport (defined by the 90th percentile IVT threshold) corresponds more closely with precipitation extremes than ARs alone, even using an expanded AR detection range. Here, IVT is classified into strength categories from weak to strong. Over the study period, all but the weakest category of IVT has increased in frequency of occurrence over most of the South Island, while decreasing in northern North Island. Similarly, monthly IVT anomaly trends show a positive trend in the South Island and negative trend in the northern North Island during warmer months. Separate analysis of moisture weighted wind speeds (UV) and total column water vapour (TCWV) revealed that even though the dynamic component of IVT has decreased in many locations, the increase in TCWV across New Zealand is the driving factor underpinning the IVT trends. Correspondingly, these findings indicate the importance of analysis both dynamic and thermodynamic factors in seeking to understand hydrometeorological variation and when investigating the responses to climate change.
      PubDate: 2024-07-08
       
  • Assessment and prediction of land surface temperature effects on human
           thermal comfort in the city of Oran, Algeria

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      Abstract: Abstract Urban expansion has made thermal conditions a significant concern in the city of Oran. The daily dynamics of transportation and industrial activities can result in high temperatures, which can cause stress for residents, particularly during the summer. In this study, Landsat 8 data were used to extract Land Surface Temperature (LST) for July 18, 2015, and July 15, 2020. Anthropogenic, microclimatic, and atmospheric pollutant variables and a Random Forest (RF) model were employed to predict temperatures for 2025. The results revealed that 26% of the study area is characterized by low temperatures that do not exceed 33 °C; this area consists mainly of forests and water surfaces. 25% exhibit extreme temperatures exceeding 42 °C, with the industrial zone and port of Oran being the main heat sources. Additionally, with 48% of the study area, built-up areas and bare land are characterized by mean temperatures ranging between 33.87 °C and 42.28 °C. With a mean temperature of 37.27 °C, the simulation for 2025 shows that temperatures are expected to decrease by 0.53 °C, with forests and water surfaces being the main classes. Our findings provide valuable information on the future thermal balance of cities and can assist planners in designing more effective medium and long-term policies from both environmental and tourism perspectives.
      PubDate: 2024-07-08
       
  • Evaluation of evaporation methods for modelling rainfall interception in a
           dry tropical forest

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      Abstract: Abstract The simulation of rainfall interception by vegetation is essential to water resource management, considering both changing land use and climate change effects. In the rainfall interception models, the evaporation rate is frequently estimated by means of the Penman-Monteith method, but the Priestley-Taylor equation appears as a promising approach with fewer input requirements. In this study these both formulations were evaluated with the sparse Gash model with variable parametrization for estimating rainfall interception by four tree species in a Brazilian dry tropical forest. The Penman-Monteith equation was used with the canopy resistance set to zero, and the momentum method was applied for estimating the aerodynamic resistance. The Priestley-Taylor formulation was tested with the proportional coefficients (α) of 1.26 and 1.34. The results of rainfall predictions were compared with the measurements by statistical indicators, which pointed slightly favorable to Penman-Monteith method. The Priestley-Taylor with α = 1.26 resulted in predictions better than with α = 1.34. Most of the simulations were classified as good (CMRE varying from 5.5 − 9.3%). The Priestley-Taylor method can be used for estimating the evaporation rate in simulations based on the sparse Gash model with variable parametrization in the studied dry tropical forest, under situations with restrictions of micrometeorological measurements or minimal processing time requirement.
      PubDate: 2024-07-06
       
  • Variations of summer precipitation in Tarim Basin and their linkages with
           the westerly, Asian monsoons and extratropical circulation

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      Abstract: Abstract Precipitation plays an important role in the water resources system in Tarim Basin (TB), the most arid region in China. However, the source of water vapor for precipitation and its linkages with climate circulations still keep mysterious. Based on the observed precipitation of 21 stations from 1961 to 2020 in TB and the NCAR/NCEP reanalysis data, the temporal and spatial variations of summer precipitation in TB and their linkages with the westerly, Asian summer monsoons and extratropical circulation are investigated. The results show that: (a) the summer precipitation in TB changes consistently at all 21 stations, and exhibits an increasing trend (4.1 mm/decade) from 1961 to 2020 with large interannual fluctuations; (b) although the water vapor in TB mainly comes from the westerly circulation, the water vapor from the edges of Asians summer monsoons also plays an important role. It is unexpectedly found that the summer precipitation in TB is negatively correlated with the Westerly Index (WI). When the upstream westerly wind weakens, the northeast wind from the eastern boundary and the southwest wind from the southern boundary strengthen, which bring more water vapor from the edges of East Asian and South Asian summer monsoons respectively, leading to abundant precipitation in TB; (c) when the Eastern Atlantic/Western Russian pattern (EA/WR) is in extreme negative phase, there is an anticyclone anomaly near 55°N, 55°E, which weakens the upstream westerly wind and reduces the water vapor input of western boundary into TB. However, the water vapor input from the edges of the Eastern and Southern Asian summer monsoon strengthens, facilitating abundant precipitation in TB. This study provides a new insight into the joint influence of westerly, monsoons and extratropical circulation on summer precipitation in TB, which is meaningful for understanding the mechanism of change in summer precipitation and the trend projection of future water resources.
      PubDate: 2024-07-05
       
  • Temperature and precipitation changes under CMIP6 projections in the Mujib
           Basin, Jordan

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      Abstract: Abstract A comprehensive analysis of regional climate changes is essential in arid and semi-arid regions to optimize water resources management. This research aims to evaluate the changes in temperature and precipitation across the Mujib Basin in Jordan, using the most recent Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6) model. Firstly, the performance of six CMIP6 general circulation models (GCMs) to reproduce historical temperature and precipitation from 1985 to 2014 was evaluated using observed climate data. The most suitable GCM was then bias-corrected using the linear scaling approach. The findings demonstrate that the EC-Earth3–Veg model could reasonably simulate the historical climate pattern of the Mujib Basin, with coefficient of determination (R2) values of 0.90, 0.83, and 0.65 for monthly Tmin, Tmax, and precipitation, respectively. Under both the SSP2-4.5 and SSP5-8.5 scenarios, Tmax is projected to increase by 1.4 to 3.9 °C and 1.6 to 6.8 °C, respectively, whereas Tmin increases from 1.4 to 3.4 °C and 1.6 to 6.4 °C. Furthermore, precipitation is projected to decrease by 4.61–23.2% at the end of the 21st century. These findings could help policymakers in formulating better adaptation strategies to reduce the impact of climate change in Jordan This is a crucial step toward becoming a climate-resilient nation.
      PubDate: 2024-07-05
       
 
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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 65)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 208)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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