A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

              [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 148)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 144)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 69)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 63)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 57)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  

              [Sort alphabetically]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.346
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0035-8711 - ISSN (Online) 1365-2966
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • Apostle–Auriga: effects of different subgrid models on the baryon cycle
           around Milky Way-mass galaxies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kelly A; Jenkins A, Deason A, et al.
      Pages: 3113 - 3138
      Abstract: ABSTRACTModern hydrodynamical simulations reproduce many properties of the real Universe. These simulations model various physical processes, but many of these are included using ‘subgrid models’ due to resolution limits. Although different subgrid models have been successful in modelling the effects of supernovae (SNe) and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) feedback on galactic properties, it remains unclear if, and by how much, these differing implementations affect observable halo gas properties. In this work, we use ‘zoom-in’ cosmological initial conditions of two volumes selected to resemble the Local Group (LG) evolved with both the Auriga and Apostle galaxy formation models. While the subgrid physics models in both simulations reproduce realistic stellar components of L⋆ galaxies, they exhibit different gas properties. Namely, Auriga predicts that the Milky Way is almost baryonically closed, whereas Apostle suggests that only half of the expected baryons reside within the halo. Furthermore, Apostle predicts that this baryon deficiency extends to the LG (r ≤ 1 Mpc). Some of the baryon deficiency in Apostle is due to SNe feedback at high redshift, which generates halo-wide outflows, with high covering fractions and radial velocities, which both eject baryons and significantly impede cosmic gas accretion. Conversely, in Auriga, gas accretion into the halo appears to be almost unaffected by feedback. These differences appear to result from the different energy injection methods from feedback (both SNe and AGNs) to gas. Our results suggest that both quasar absorption lines and fast radio burst dispersion measures could constrain these two regimes with future observations.
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stac1019
      Issue No: Vol. 514, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Multiphase turbulence in galactic haloes: effect of the driving

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mohapatra R; Federrath C, Sharma P.
      Pages: 3139 - 3159
      Abstract: ABSTRACTSupernova explosions, active galactic nuclei jets, galaxy–galaxy interactions, and cluster mergers can drive turbulence in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) and the intracluster medium (ICM). However, the exact nature of turbulence forced by these sources and its impact on the different statistical properties of the CGM/ICM and their global thermodynamics is still unclear. To investigate the effects of different types of forcing, we conduct high-resolution (10083 resolution elements) idealized hydrodynamic simulations with purely solenoidal (divergence-free) forcing, purely compressive (curl-free) forcing, and natural mixture forcing (equal fractions of the two components). The simulations also include radiative cooling. We study the impact of the three different forcing modes (sol, comp, and mix) on the morphology of the gas, its temperature and density distributions, sources and sinks of enstrophy, i.e. solenoidal motions, as well as the kinematics of hot (∼107 K) X-ray emitting and cold (∼104 K) H α emitting gas. We find that compressive forcing leads to stronger variations in density and temperature of the gas as compared to solenoidal forcing. The cold phase gas forms large-scale filamentary structures for compressive forcing and misty, small-scale clouds for solenoidal forcing. The cold phase gas has stronger large-scale velocities for compressive forcing. The natural mixture forcing shows kinematics and gas distributions intermediate between the two extremes, the cold-phase gas occurs as both large-scale filaments and small-scale misty clouds.
      PubDate: Tue, 14 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stac1610
      Issue No: Vol. 514, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The first hard X-ray spectral catalogue of Blazars observed by NuSTAR

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Middei R; Giommi P, Perri M, et al.
      Pages: 3179 - 3190
      Abstract: ABSTRACTBlazars are a peculiar class of active galactic nuclei that enlighten the sky at all wavelengths. The electromagnetic emission of these sources is jet-dominated, resulting in a spectral energy distribution (SED) that has a typical double-humped shape. X-ray photons provide a wealth of information on the physics of each source as in the X-ray band, we can observe the tail of SED first peak, the rise of the second one or the transition between the two. NuSTAR, thanks to its capability of focusing X-rays up to 79 keV provides broad-band data particularly suitable to compute SEDs in a still poorly explored part of the spectrum. In the context of the Open Universe initiative, we developed a dedicated pipeline, NuSTAR_Spectra, a shell-script that automatically downloads data from the archive, generates scientific products and carries out a complete spectral analysis. The script homogeneously extracts high level scientific products for both NuSTAR’s telescopes and the spectral characterization is performed testing two phenomenological models. The corresponding X-ray properties are derived from the data best fit, and the SEDs are also computed. The systematic processing of all blazar observations of the NuSTAR public archive allowed us to release the first hard X-ray spectroscopic catalogue of blazars (NuBlazar). The catalogue, updated to 2021 September 30, includes 253 observations of 126 distinct blazars, 30 of which have been multiply observed.
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stac1185
      Issue No: Vol. 514, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Improving the solar wind density model used in processing of spacecraft
           ranging observations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Aksim D; Pavlov D.
      Pages: 3191 - 3201
      Abstract: ABSTRACTSolar wind plasma as a cause of radio signal delay plays an important role in solar and planetary science. Early experiments studying the distribution of electrons near the Sun from spacecraft ranging measurements were designed so that the radio signal was passing close to the Sun. At present, processing of spacecraft tracking observations serves a different goal: precise (at metre level) determination of orbits of planets, most importantly Mars. The solar wind adds a time-varying delay to those observations, which is, in this case, unwanted and must be subtracted prior to putting the data into the planetary solution. Present planetary ephemerides calculate the delay assuming a symmetric stationary power-law model for the solar wind density. The present work, based on a custom variant of the EPM lunar–planetary ephemeris, questions the accuracy and correctness of that assumption and examines alternative models based on in situ solar wind density data provided by OMNI and on the ENLIL numerical model of the solar wind.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stac1229
      Issue No: Vol. 514, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Radio pulsar beam geometry at lower frequencies: bright sources outside
           the Arecibo sky

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rankin J.
      Pages: 3202 - 3211
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe present pulsar emission beam analyses and models in an effort to examine pulsar geometry and physics at the lowest frequencies scattering permits. We consider two populations of well-studied pulsars that lie outside the Arecibo sky, the first drawing on the Jodrell Bank Gould & Lyne survey down to –35° declination and a second using Parkes surveys in the far south. These assemble the full sky population of 487 pulsars known before the late 1990s which conveniently all have ‘B’ names. We make full use of the core/double-cone emission beam model to assess its efficacy at lower frequencies, and we outline how different pair plasma sources probably underlie its validity. The analysis shows that with a very few exceptions pulsar radio emission beams can be modeled quantitatively with two concentric conal beams and a core beam of regular angular dimensions at 1 GHz. Further, the beamforms at lower frequencies change progressively in size but not in configuration. Pulsar emission-beam properties divide strongly depending on whether the plasma excitation is central within the polar fluxtube producing a core beam or peripheral along the edges generating conal beams, and this seems largely determined by whether their spin-down energy is greater or less than about 1032.5 ergs s−1. Core emission dominated pulsars tend concentrate closely along the Galactic plane and in the direction of the Galactic center; whereas conal pulsars are somewhat more uniformly distributed both in Galactic longitude and latitude. Core dominated pulsars also tend to be more distant and particularly so in the inner Galaxy region.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stac1302
      Issue No: Vol. 514, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Three-dimensional simulations of the jet feedback mechanism in common
           envelope jets supernovae

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hillel S; Schreier R, Soker N.
      Pages: 3212 - 3221
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe conduct three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of common envelope jets supernova (CEJSN) events where we assume that a neutron star (NS) launches jets as it orbits inside the outer zones of a red supergiant (RSG) envelope, and find the negative jet feedback coefficient to be ≃ 0.1–0.2. This coefficient is the factor by which the jets reduce the mass accretion rate on to the NS as they remove mass from the envelope and inflate bubbles (cocoons). Our results suggest that in most CEJSN events the NS-RSG binary system experiences the grazing envelope evolution before it enters a full common envelope evolution (CEE). We also find that the jets induce upward and downward flows in the RSG envelope. These flows together with the strong convection of RSG stars might imply that energy transport by convection in CEJSNe is very important. Because of limited numerical resources we do not include in the simulations the gravity of the NS, nor the accretion process, nor the jets launching process, and nor the gravity of the deformed envelope. Future numerical simulations of CEE with a NS/BH companion should include the accretion process on to the NS (and vary the jets’ power accordingly), the full gravitational interaction of the NS with the RSG, and energy transport by the strong convection.
      PubDate: Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stac1341
      Issue No: Vol. 514, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • LyMAS reloaded: improving the predictions of the large-scale Lyman-α
           forest statistics from dark matter density and velocity fields

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Peirani S; Prunet S, Colombi S, et al.
      Pages: 3222 - 3245
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe present LyMAS2, an improved version of the ‘Lyman-α Mass Association Scheme’ aiming at predicting the large-scale 3D clustering statistics of the Lyman-α forest (Ly α) from moderate-resolution simulations of the dark matter (DM) distribution, with prior calibrations from high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of smaller volumes. In this study, calibrations are derived from the Horizon-AGN suite simulations, (100 Mpc h)−3 comoving volume, using Wiener filtering, combining information from DM density and velocity fields (i.e. velocity dispersion, vorticity, line-of-sight 1D-divergence and 3D-divergence). All new predictions have been done at z = 2.5 in redshift space, while considering the spectral resolution of the SDSS-III BOSS Survey and different DM smoothing (0.3, 0.5, and 1.0 Mpc h−1 comoving). We have tried different combinations of DM fields and found that LyMAS2, applied to the Horizon-noAGN DM fields, significantly improves the predictions of the Ly α 3D clustering statistics, especially when the DM overdensity is associated with the velocity dispersion or the vorticity fields. Compared to the hydrodynamical simulation trends, the two-point correlation functions of pseudo-spectra generated with LyMAS2 can be recovered with relative differences of ∼5 per cent even for high angles, the flux 1D power spectrum (along the light of sight) with ∼2 per cent and the flux 1D probability distribution function exactly. Finally, we have produced several large mock BOSS spectra (1.0 and 1.5 Gpc h−1) expected to lead to much more reliable and accurate theoretical predictions.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stac1344
      Issue No: Vol. 514, No. 3 (2022)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 18.232.177.219
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-