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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 64)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Climate Change Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 187)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 205)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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Journal Cover
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.346
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0035-8711 - ISSN (Online) 1365-2966
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [425 journals]
  • The thesan project: connecting ionized bubble sizes to their local
           environments during the Epoch of Reionization

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      Pages: 2943 - 2957
      Abstract: ABSTRACTAn important characteristic of cosmic hydrogen reionization is the growth of ionized gas bubbles surrounding early luminous objects. Ionized bubble sizes are beginning to be probed using Lyman α emission from high-redshift galaxies, and will also be probed by upcoming 21 cm maps. We present results from a study of bubble sizes using the state-of-the-art thesan radiation-hydrodynamics simulation suite, which self-consistently models radiation transport and realistic galaxy formation. We employ the mean free path method and track the evolution of the effective ionized bubble size at each point (Reff) throughout the Epoch of Reionization. We show that there is a slow growth period for regions ionized early, but a rapid ‘flash ionization’ process for regions ionized later as they immediately enter a large, pre-existing bubble. We also find that bright sources are preferentially in larger bubbles, and find consistency with recent observational constraints at z ≳ 9, but tension with idealized Lyman α damping-wing models at z ≈ 7. We find that high-overdensity regions have larger characteristic bubble sizes, but the correlation decreases as reionization progresses, likely due to runaway formation of large percolated bubbles. Finally, we compare the redshift at which a region transitions from neutral to ionized (zreion) with the time it takes to reach a given bubble size and conclude that zreion is a reasonable local probe of small-scale bubble size statistics ($R_\text{eff} \lesssim 1\, \rm {cMpc}$). However, for larger bubbles, the correspondence between zreion and size statistics weakens due to the time delay between the onset of reionization and the expansion of large bubbles, particularly at high redshifts.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1325
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • The informativeness of [C ii] line-intensity mapping as a probe of the
           H i content and metallicity of galaxies at the end of reionization

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      Pages: 2958 - 2975
      Abstract: ABSTRACTLine-intensity mapping (LIM) experiments coming online now will survey fluctuations in aggregate emission in the [C ii] ionized carbon line from galaxies at the end of reionization. Experimental progress must be matched by theoretical reassessments of approaches to modelling and the information content of the signal. We present a new model for the halo–[C ii] connection, building upon results from the Feedback In Realistic Environments simulations suggesting that gas mass and metallicity most directly determine [C ii] luminosity. Applying our new model to an ensemble of peak-patch halo light-cones, we generate new predictions for the [C ii] LIM signal at z ≳ 6. We expect a baseline 4000-h LIM survey from the Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope facility to have the fundamental sensitivity to detect the [C ii] power spectrum at a significance of 5σ at z ∼ 6, with an extended or successor Stage 2 experiment improving significance to 48σ at z ∼ 6 and achieving 11σ at z ∼ 7.5. Cross-correlation through stacking, simulated against a mock narrow-band Lyman-break galaxy survey, would yield a strong detection of the radial profile of cosmological [C ii] emission surrounding star-forming galaxies. We also analyse the role of a few of our model’s parameters through the pointwise relative entropy (PRE) of the distribution of [C ii] intensities. While the PRE signature of different model parameters can become degenerate or diminished after factoring in observational distortions, various parameters do imprint themselves differently on the one-point statistics of the intrinsic signal. Further work can pave the way to access this information and distinguish different sources of non-Gaussianity in the [C ii] LIM observation.
      PubDate: Mon, 03 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1333
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Multiwavelength photometric study of RR lyrae variables in the globular
           cluster NGC 5272 (Messier 3)

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      Pages: 2976 - 2997
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe present a comprehensive photometric study of RR Lyrae stars in the M3 globular cluster, utilizing a vast data set of 3140 optical (UBVRI) CCD images spanning 35 yr from astronomical data archives. We have successfully identified previously known 238 RR Lyrae stars from the photometric data, comprising 178 RRab, 49 RRc, and 11 RRd stars. Multiband periodogram was used to significantly improve the long-term periods of 65 per cent of RR Lyrae stars in our sample, thanks to the unprecedentedly long temporal coverage of the observations. The light curve templates were used to obtain accurate and precise mean magnitudes and amplitudes of all RR Lyrae variables. We combined optical (UBVRI) and near-infrared (NIR, JHKs) photometry of RR Lyrae variables to investigate their location in the colour-magnitude diagrams as well as the pulsation properties such as period distributions, Bailey diagrams and amplitude ratios. The period–luminosity relations in R and I bands and Period–Wesenheit relations were derived after excluding outliers identified in CMDs. The Period–Wesenheit relations calibrated via the theoretically predicted relations were used to determine a distance modulus of $\mu = 15.04 \pm 0.04 \, {\rm (stats)} \pm 0.19 \, {\rm {(syst.)}}$ mag (using metal-independent WBV Wesenheit) and $\mu = 15.03 \pm 0.04 \, {\rm (stats)} \pm 0.17 \, {\rm {(syst.)}}$ mag (using metal-dependent WVI Wesenheit). Our distance measurements are in excellent agreement with published distances to M3 in the literature. We also employed an artificial neural network based comparison of theoretical and observed light curves to determine physical parameters (mass, luminosity, and effective temperature) for 79 non-Blazhko RRab stars that agree with limited literature measurements.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1334
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Ly α emission strength and stellar properties of faint galaxies from 5
           < z < 8.2

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      Pages: 2998 - 3010
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe present a study on stellar properties of Lyman-alpha (Ly α) emitters at 5 < z < 8.2. We use 247 photometrically selected, lensed, high-redshift, low-luminosity galaxy candidates with spectroscopic follow-up. Of these, 38 are confirmed spectroscopically to be between 5 < z < 8.2 via detection of Ly α. For each galaxy and candidate, we estimate stellar mass, star formation rate, specific star formation rate, and mass-weighted age with spectral energy distribution fitting. We also measure the UV β slope and luminosity using values from photometry. We find no strong correlation between Ly α equivalent width and any of these properties, as well as no significant difference between the physical properties of Ly α emitters and candidates without Ly α detected. This lack of expected trends may be explained by a combination of the evolving opacity of the intergalactic medium at these redshifts as well as the unique phase space probed by our lensed sample. Via tests on other galaxy samples which show varying strengths of correlations, we conclude that if there exist any relationships between Ly α equivalent width and physical properties in the underlying population of faint galaxies, they are weak correlations. We also present the results of a spectroscopic search for C iii] emission in confirmed Ly α emitters at z ∼ 7, finding no C iii] detections, but putting constraints on strong active galactic nuclei activity and extreme nebular emission.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1339
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • The MAGPI survey: using kinematic asymmetries in stars and gas to dissect
           drivers of galaxy dynamical evolution

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      Pages: 3011 - 3022
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe present a study of kinematic asymmetries from the integral field spectroscopic surveys MAGPI and SAMI. By comparing the asymmetries in the ionized gas and stars, we aim to disentangle the physical processes that contribute to kinematic disturbances. We normalize deviations from circular motion by S05, allowing us to study kinematic asymmetries in the stars and gas, regardless of kinematic temperature. We find a similar distribution of stellar asymmetries in galaxies where we do and do not detect ionized gas, suggesting that whatever is driving the stellar asymmetries does not always lead to gas removal. In both MAGPI and SAMI, we find an anticorrelation between stellar asymmetry and stellar mass, that is absent in the gas asymmetries. After stellar mass and mean-stellar-age matching distributions, we find that at all stellar masses, MAGPI galaxies display larger stellar asymmetry compared to SAMI galaxies. In both MAGPI and SAMI galaxies, we find that star-forming galaxies with old mean-stellar-ages typically have larger asymmetries in their gas compared to their stars, whereas galaxies with young mean-stellar-ages have larger asymmetries in their stars compared to their gas. We suggest that this results from continuous, clumpy accretion of gas.
      PubDate: Mon, 03 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1341
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Full spectroscopic model and trihybrid
           experimental-perturbative-variational line list for NH

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      Pages: 3023 - 3033
      Abstract: ABSTRACTImidogen (NH) is a reactive molecule whose presence in astrochemical environments is of interest due to its role in the formation of nitrogen-containing molecules and as a potential probe of nitrogen abundance. Spectroscopic NH monitoring is useful for Earth-based combustion and photolysis processes of ammonia and other nitrogen-containing species. NH is also relevant to ultracold molecular physics and plasma studies. To enable these diverse applications, high-quality molecular spectroscopic data are required. Here, a new line list with significant advantages over existing data is presented. Most notably, this line list models isotopologue spectroscopy and forbidden transitions (important for NH visible absorption), alongside some overall improvements to accuracy and completeness. This approach takes advantage of existing experimental data (from a previous MARVEL compilation) and perturbative line lists together with new MRCI ab initio electronic data. These are used to produce a novel variational spectroscopic model and trihybrid line list for the main 14N1H isotopologue, as well as isotopologue-extrapolated hybrid line lists for the 14N2H, 15N1H, and 15N2H isotopologues. The new 14N1H ExoMol-style trihybrid line list, kNigHt, comprises 4076 energy levels (1078 experimental) and 327 014 transitions up to 47 500 cm−1 (211 nm) between five low-lying electronic states (X 3Σ−, a 1Δ, b 1Σ+, A 3Π, and c 1Π). For most anticipated applications aside from far-infrared studies, this line list will be of sufficient quality; any improvements should focus on the b 1Σ+ energies, and the a 1Δ – A 3Π and b 1Σ+ – A 3Π spin–orbit couplings.
      PubDate: Tue, 28 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1340
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • A sub-solar Fe/O, log (T/K) ∼ 7.5 gas component permeating the
           Milky Way’s CGM

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      Pages: 3034 - 3041
      Abstract: ABSTRACTOur study focuses on characterizing the highly ionized gas within the Milky Way’s (MW) Circumgalactic Medium (CGM) that gives rise to ionic transitions in the X-ray band 2–25 Å. Utilizing stacked Chandra/ACIS-S MEG and LETG spectra toward Quasar (QSO) sightlines, we employ the self-consistent hybrid ionization code phase to model our data. The stacked spectra are optimally described by three distinct gas phase components: warm [log (T/K) ∼ 5.5], warm-hot [log (T/K) ∼6], and hot [log (T/K) ∼ 7.5] components. These findings confirm the presence of the hot component in the MW’s CGM indicating its coexistence with warm and warm-hot gas phases. We find this hot component to be homogeneous in temperature but inhomogeneous in column density. The gas in the hot component requires overabundances relative to solar to be consistent with the Dispersion Measure (DM) from the Galactic halo reported in the literature. For the hot phase we estimated a DM = $55.1^{+29.9}_{-23.7}$ pc cm−3. We conclude that this phase is either enriched in Oxygen, Silicon, and Sulfur, or has metallicity over 6 times solar value, or a combination of both. We do not detect Fe L-shell absorption lines, implying O/Fe ≥ 4. The non-solar abundance ratios found in the supervirial gas component in the Galactic halo suggest that this phase arises from Galactic feedback.
      PubDate: Mon, 03 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1051
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Quantitative modelling of type Ia supernovae spectral time series:
           constraining the explosion physics

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      Pages: 3042 - 3068
      Abstract: ABSTRACTMultiple explosion mechanisms have been proposed to explain type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Empirical modelling tools have also been developed that allow for fast, customized modelling of individual SNe and direct comparisons between observations and explosion model predictions. Such tools have provided useful insights, but the subjective nature with which empirical modelling is performed makes it difficult to obtain robust constraints on the explosion physics or expand studies to large populations of objects. Machine learning accelerated tools have therefore begun to gain traction. In this paper, we present riddler, a framework for automated fitting of SNe Ia spectral sequences up to shortly after maximum light. We train a series of neural networks on realistic ejecta profiles predicted by the W7 and N100 explosion models to emulate full radiative transfer simulations and apply nested sampling to determine the best-fitting model parameters for multiple spectra of a given SN simultaneously. We show that riddler is able to accurately recover the parameters of input spectra and use it to fit observations of two well-studied SNe Ia. We also investigate the impact of different weighting schemes when performing quantitative spectral fitting and show that best-fitting models and parameters are highly dependent on the assumed weighting schemes and priors. As spectroscopic samples of SNe Ia continue to grow, automated spectral fitting tools such as riddler will become increasingly important to maximise the physical constraints that can be gained in a quantitative and consistent manner.
      PubDate: Fri, 10 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1233
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Measurements of the z > 5 Lyman-α forest flux autocorrelation
           functions from the extended XQR-30 data set

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      Pages: 3069 - 3087
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe present the first observational measurements of the Lyman-α (Ly α) forest flux autocorrelation functions in ten redshift bins from 5.1 ≤ z ≤ 6.0. We use a sample of 35 quasar sightlines at z > 5.7 from the extended XQR-30 data set; these data have signal-to-noise ratios of >20 per spectral pixel. We carefully account for systematic errors in continuum reconstruction, instrumentation, and contamination by damped Ly α systems. With these measurements, we introduce software tools to generate autocorrelation function measurements from any simulation. Our measurements of the smallest bin of the autocorrelation function increase with redshift when normalizing by the mean flux, 〈F〉. This increase may come from decreasing 〈F〉 or increasing mean free path of hydrogen-ionizing photons, λmfp. Recent work has shown that the autocorrelation function from simulations at z > 5 is sensitive to λmfp, a quantity that contains vital information on the ending of reionization. For an initial comparison, we show our autocorrelation measurements with simulation models for recently measured λmfp values and find good agreements. Further work in modelling and understanding the covariance matrices of the data is necessary to get robust measurements of λmfp from this data.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1293
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Radiative transfer of 21-cm line through ionized cavities in an expanding
           universe

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      Pages: 3088 - 3102
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe optical depth parameterization is typically used to study the 21-cm signals associated with the properties of the neutral hydrogen (H i) gas and the ionization morphology during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR), without solving the radiative transfer equation. To assess the uncertainties resulting from this simplification, we conduct explicit radiative transfer calculations using the cosmological 21-cm line radiative transfer (C21LRT) code and examine the imprints of ionization structures on the 21-cm spectrum. We consider a globally averaged reionization history and implement fully ionized cavities (H ii bubbles) of diameters d ranging from 0.01 to 10 Mpc at epochs within the emission and the absorption regimes of the 21-cm global signal. The single-ray C21LRT calculations show that the shape of the imprinted spectral features are primarily determined by d and the 21-cm line profile, which is parametrized by the turbulent velocity of the H i gas. It reveals the spectral features tied to the transition from ionized to neutral regions that calculations based on the optical depth parametrization were unable to capture. We also present analytical approximations of the calculated spectral features of the H ii bubbles. The multiple-ray calculations show that the apparent shape of an H ii bubble (of d = 5 Mpc at z = 8), because of the finite speed of light, differs depending on whether the bubble’s ionization front is stationary or expanding. Our study shows the necessity of properly accounting for the effects of line-continuum interaction, line broadening, and cosmological expansion to correctly predict the EoR 21-cm signals.
      PubDate: Tue, 21 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1311
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • From stellar nurseries to old stellar populations: a multiwavelength case
           of NGC 1055

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      Pages: 3103 - 3117
      Abstract: ABSTRACTGiven the complex nature of galaxies’ interstellar medium (ISM), multiwavelength data are required to probe the interplay among gas, dust, and stellar populations. Spiral galaxies are ideal laboratories for such a goal as they are rich in gas and dust. Using carbon monoxide (CO) along with GALEX far-ultraviolet (FUV) and Spitzer near-infrared (NIR) data we probe the correlations amongst the properties of stellar populations, gas, and dust over the disc of the spiral galaxy NGC 1055 at multiple angular resolutions, that is, 2, 4, and 17 arcsec corresponding to a linear size of 144, 288, and 1.2 kpc, respectively. Our results indicate an asymmetry in the physical conditions along the galaxy’s disc, that is, the gas is slightly more extended and brighter, and molecular gas mass is higher on the disc’s eastern side than the western side. All physical properties (i.e. molecular gas mass, CO line ratios, stellar mass, and NIR emission) decrease from the centre going outwards in the disc with some exceptions (i.e. the extinction, FUV radiation, and the [3.6]−[4.5] colour). Our analysis indicates that the colour gets bluer (metallicity increases) halfway through the disc, then redder (metallicity decreases) going outwards further in the disc.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1330
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Absence of nebular He ii λ4686 constrains the UV emission from the
           ultraluminous X-ray pulsar NGC 1313 X-2

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      Pages: 3118 - 3135
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWhile much has been learned in recent decades about the X-ray emission of the extragalactic ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs), their radiative output in the ultraviolet (UV) band remains poorly constrained. Understanding of the full ULX spectral energy distribution (SED) is imperative to constrain the accretion flow geometry powering them, as well as their radiative power. Here we present constraints on the UV emission of the pulsating ULX (PULX) NGC 1313 X-2 based on the absence of nebular He ii λ4686 emission in its immediate environment. To this end, we first perform multiband spectroscopy of the ULX to derive three realistic extrapolations of the SED into the inaccessible UV, each predicting varying levels of UV luminosity. We then perform photoionization modelling of the bubble nebula and predict the He ii λ4686 fluxes that should have been observed based on each of the derived SEDs. We then compare these predictions with the derived upper limit on He ii λ4686 from the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer data, which allows us to infer a UV luminosity LUV ≲ 1 × 1039 erg s−1 in the PULX NGC 1313 X-2. Comparing the UV luminosity inferred with other ULXs, our work suggests there may be an intrinsic difference between hard and soft ULXs, either related to different mass-transfer rates and/or the nature of the accretor. However, a statistical sample of ULXs with inferred UV luminosities is needed to fully determine the distinguishing features between hard and soft ULXs. Finally, we discuss ULXs ionizing role in the context of the nebular He ii λ4686 line observed in star-forming metal-poor galaxies.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1336
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Revisiting flares in Sagittarius A* based on general relativistic
           magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of black hole accretion

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      Pages: 3136 - 3150
      Abstract: ABSTRACTHigh-resolution observations with GRAVITY-Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) instrument have provided abundant information about the flares in Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole in our Galactic centre, including the time-dependent location of the centroid (a ‘hotspot’), the light curve, and polarization. Yuan et al. (2009) proposed a ‘coronal mass ejection’ model to explain the flares and their association with the plasma ejection. The key idea is that magnetic reconnection in the accretion flow produces the flares and results in the formation and ejection of flux ropes. The dynamical process proposed in the model has been confirmed by three-dimensional general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations in a later work. Based on this scenario, in our previous works the radiation of the flux rope has been calculated analytically and compared to the observations. In the present paper, we develop the model by directly using numerical simulation data to interpret observations. We first identify flux ropes formed due to reconnection from the data. By assuming that electrons are accelerated in the reconnection current sheet and flow into the flux rope and emit their radiation there, we have calculated the time-dependent energy distribution of electrons after phenomenologically considering their injection due to reconnection acceleration, radiative and adiabatic cooling. The radiation of these electrons is calculated using the ray-tracing approach. The trajectory of the hotspot, the radiation light curve during the flare, and the polarization are calculated. These results are compared with the GRAVITY observations and good consistencies are found.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1357
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Laboratory detection and astronomical search of N-ethynylmethanimine,
           H2CNCCH

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      Pages: 3151 - 3158
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe presence in the interstellar medium of several imines suggests that other molecules of the same family could be present as well. The propargylimine molecule (HCCCHNH), which arises from CCH substitution on the C atom of methanimine (H2CNH), the simplest imine, has been recently detected in space. Therefore, the analogous CCH derivative substituted on the N atom, known as N-ethynylmethanimine (H2CNCCH), is a good candidate to be observed as well. To allow for its astronomical detection we have investigated its laboratory rotational spectra. The species has been produced by an electric discharge of acetonitrile (CH3CN) and acetylene (HCCH) in argon, and its rotational spectrum between 9 and 40 GHz has been characterized using a Balle–Flygare narrow band-type Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. The spectral analysis allowed us to derive accurate spectroscopic parameters to obtain reliable frequency predictions for astronomical searches in different sources. We searched for H2CNCCH in several molecular clouds, G+0.693−0.027, L483, and TMC-1, but did not detect it. The upper limits to its abundance derived are consistent with a preference of the CCH substitution of H2CNH on the C atom rather than on the N atom, in line with quantum chemical calculations on the reaction between CCH and H2CNH.
      PubDate: Wed, 29 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1358
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Horizontal sodium density variations for laser guide star tip-tilt
           measurements

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      Pages: 3159 - 3167
      Abstract: ABSTRACTAdaptive optics, particularly with laser guide stars, has revolutionized ground-based astronomy. However, one known limitation is the requirement of a natural guide star to retrieve tip-tilt information. This is the limiting factor in the overall achievable sky coverage with adaptive optics systems as natural guide stars are not available for all science targets. There have been numerous different techniques proposed to overcome this limitation; however, many are restricted by current technology. This work investigates the use of density perturbations in the sodium layer to retrieve the tip-tilt information. In this work, we identify atmospheric gravity waves as a mechanism that could cause perturbations in the sodium layer density. Archival hydroxyl airglow data was analysed to assess whether the density perturbations caused by atmospheric gravity waves are on the correct scales and have enough contrast to be used for laser guide star tip-tilt retrieval. This data showed a median contrast of 1.9 per cent for a laser guide star with a full width half-maximum of 25 arcsec. Then to determine if these perturbations would be visible with a laser guide star at a high enough signal-to-noise ratio, the Mathematica package LGSBloch was utilized. The CaNaPy laser guide star R&D facility was chosen to model as it has a state-of-the-art 70 W sodium laser. Promising results were found when modelling this method with the CaNaPy facility as a framework. This demonstrates that if these same perturbations were present in the sodium layer, sodium density variations are a potential mechanism to retrieve tip-tilt using laser guide stars.
      PubDate: Mon, 03 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1366
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Dust–dust collisions in cometary comas: applications to comet
           67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko

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      Pages: 3168 - 3186
      Abstract: ABSTRACTSilica has emerged as a crucial component within inner comet comas. This work investigates silica dust aggregates and their interactions within cometary comas. We study the probability that aggregates in the size range 1–100 µm collide with each other in the coma and analyse the outcomes of such collisions by using the ‘Collision of Porous Aggregates’ (cpa) Software, which incorporates mass, size, and porosity evolution of the dust population. Beginning with assumed initial distributions and physical properties for silica aggregates at the comet nucleus, we compute their collisional evolution from when they depart the nucleus until they traverse the coma. Using data of dust particles observed in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, we demonstrate that dust–dust collisions in cometary comas cannot be neglected. Our analysis yields final distributions in terms of mass, size, and porosity. To validate our findings, we compare them with in situ measurements of 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko collected by the COSIMA (COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser) instrument of the Rosetta mission. Our investigation reveals a notable agreement between our derived size distributions and the data acquired by COSIMA within the same size range. This study may be applied to any comet that presents a similar dust production as it approaches the Sun. The insights of this work may contribute to estimating other dust properties such as strength, absorption, reflectivity, and thermal conductivity and highlight the importance of considering dust–dust collisions when studying cometary comas and their evolution.
      PubDate: Mon, 22 Apr 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1078
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • The origin of large emission line widths in massive galaxies at redshifts
           z ∼ 3–4

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      Pages: 3187 - 3202
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe present a sample of 22 massive galaxies with stellar masses >1010 M⊙ at 3 < z < 4 with deep H and K-band high resolution spectra (R = 3500–3000) from Keck/MOSFIRE and VLT/KMOS near-infrared spectrographs. We find a large fraction have strong [O iii] 5007 and Hβ emission lines with large line widths (σ 100–450 km s−1). We measure the sizes of our galaxies from Hubble Space Telescope images and consider the potential kinematic scaling relations of our sample, and rule out an explanation for these broad lines in terms of galaxy-wide kinematics. Based on consideration of the [O iii] 5007/Hβ flux ratios, their location in the mass–excitation diagram, and the derived bolometric luminosities, we conclude that active galactic nuclei (AGN) and their narrow-line regions most likely give rise to this emission. At redshifts 3 < z < 4, we find significantly high AGN fractions in massive galaxies, ranging from 60–70 per cent for the mass range 10 < log (M⋆/M⊙) < 11, with a lower limit 30 per cent for all galaxies within that redshift range when we apply our most stringent AGN criteria. We also find a considerably lower AGN fraction in massive quiescent galaxies, ranging from 20–30 per cent. These fractions of AGN point to the period between 3 < z < 4 being a time of heightened activity for the development of supermassive black holes in the massive end of the galaxy population and provide evidence for their role in the emergence of the first massive quenched galaxies at this epoch.
      PubDate: Fri, 31 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1335
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Numerical study on the interaction of AGN winds and interstellar medium

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      Pages: 3203 - 3214
      Abstract: ABSTRACTAccretion disc winds can leave active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and interact with the interstellar medium (ISM) of their host galaxies. We perform two-dimensional numerical simulations to investigate the interaction of AGN winds and ISM. We study the properties of outflows in the 1–1000 pc region under different gravitational potentials and ISM gas densities, and compare these ionized outflows with the observed warm absorbers (WAs). We find that AGN winds drag the ISM and transfer their momentum/energy to the ISM. The properties of winds depend on the gas density of the initial ISM. The higher the initial ISM density, the lower the wind speed, and the narrower the opening angle of the winds. For the case of ρ0 = 10−25 g cm−3, the winds have the strongest intensity at the outer boundary. They can blow the ISM gas, giving feedback on star formation and galaxy evolution. We also find that the interaction of AGN winds and ISM can generate WAs in certain conditions and AGN winds play some roles in generating WAs.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1337
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Searching for gamma-ray emission from stellar flares

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      Pages: 3215 - 3221
      Abstract: ABSTRACTFlares from magnetically active dwarf stars should produce relativistic particles capable of creating γ-rays. So far, the only isolated main-sequence star besides the Sun to have been detected in γ-rays is TVLM 513−46546. Detecting γ-ray flares from more dwarf stars can improve our understanding of their magnetospheric properties, and could also indicate a diminished likelihood of their planets’ habitability. In this work, we stack data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during a large number of events identified from optical and X-ray flare surveys. We report an upper limit of γ-ray emission from the population of flare stars. Stacking results towards control positions are consistent with a non-detection. We compare these results to observed solar γ-ray flares and against a model of emission from neutral pion decay. The upper limit is consistent with solar flares when scaled to the flare energies and distances of the target stars. As with solar flares, the neutral pion decay mechanism for γ-ray production is also consistent with these results.
      PubDate: Sat, 25 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1347
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • The ALPINE-ALMA [C ii] survey: characterization of spatial offsets in
           main-sequence galaxies at z ∼ 4–6

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      Pages: 3222 - 3241
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe morphology of galaxies is shaped by stellar activity, feedback, gas and dust properties, and interactions with surroundings, and can therefore provide insight into these processes. In this paper, we study the spatial offsets between stellar and interstellar medium emission in a sample of 54 main-sequence star-forming galaxies at z ∼ 4–6 observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), and drawn from the ALMA Large Program to INvestigate C+ at Early times (ALPINE). We find no significant spatial offset for the majority (∼70 per cent) of galaxies in the sample among any combination of [C ii], far-infrared continuum, optical, and ultraviolet emission. However, a fraction of the sample (∼30 per cent) shows offsets larger than the median by more than 3σ significance (compared to the uncertainty on the offsets), especially between [C ii] and ultraviolet emission. We find that these significant offsets are of the order of ∼0.5–0.7 arcsec, corresponding to ∼3.5–4.5 kiloparsecs. The offsets could be caused by a complex dust geometry, strong feedback from stars and active galactic nuclei, large-scale gas inflow and outflow, or a combination of these phenomena. However, our current analysis does not definitively constrain the origin. Future, higher resolution ALMA and JWST observations may help resolve the ambiguity. Regardless, since there exist at least some galaxies that display such large offsets, galaxy models and spectral energy distribution fitting codes cannot assume co-spatial emission in all main-sequence galaxies, and must take into account that the observed emission across wavelengths may be spatially segregated.
      PubDate: Fri, 31 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1371
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Measuring the dust attenuation law of galaxies using photometric data

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      Pages: 3242 - 3255
      Abstract: ABSTRACTFitting model spectral energy distributions (SEDs) to galaxy photometric data is a widely used method to recover galaxy parameters from galaxy surveys. However, the parameter space used to describe galaxies is wide and interdependent, and distinctions between real and spurious correlations that are found between these parameters can be difficult to discern. In this work, we use the SED fitting code bagpipes (Bayesian Analysis of Galaxies for Physical Inference and Parameter EStimation) to investigate degeneracies between galaxy parameters and the effect of the choice of different sets of photometric bands. In particular, we focus on optical to infrared wavelength coverage, and on two parameters describing the galaxies’ dust attenuation law: AV and δ, which characterize dust column density and the slope of a flexible dust attenuation law, respectively. We demonstrate that (1) a degeneracy between the residual (the difference between truth and recovered values) AV and star formation rate exists, but this is lifted when Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer bands are included, and (2) bagpipes is able to accurately recover the input AV and δ distributions and relations (differences in slope of less than 1.7σ for a flat relation and less than 1.2σ for an observationally motivated relation) and is not introducing spurious correlations between these parameters. Our findings suggest that the information needed to constrain AV and δ well enough individually exists in the data, especially when infrared is added. This indicates that recent works finding a correlation between AV and δ are not being misled by fitting degeneracies from their SED fitting code.
      PubDate: Fri, 31 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1373
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • SPIRou spectropolarimetry of the T Tauri star TW Hydrae: magnetic fields,
           accretion, and planets

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      Pages: 3256 - 3278
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIn this paper, we report near-infrared observations of the classical T Tauri star TW Hya with the SPIRou high-resolution spectropolarimeter and velocimeter at the 3.6-m Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope in 2019, 2020, 2021, and 2022. By applying Least-Squares Deconvolution (LSD) to our circularly polarized spectra, we derived longitudinal fields that vary from year to year from –200 to +100 G, and exhibit low-level modulation on the 3.6 d rotation period of TW Hya, despite the star being viewed almost pole-on. We then used Zeeman–Doppler Imaging to invert our sets of unpolarized and circularly polarized LSD profiles into brightness and magnetic maps of TW Hya in all four seasons, and obtain that the large-scale field of this T Tauri star mainly consists of a 1.0–1.2 kG dipole tilted at about 20° to the rotation axis, whereas the small-scale field reaches strengths of up to 3–4 kG. We find that the large-scale field is strong enough to allow TW Hya to accrete material from the disc on the polar regions at the stellar surface in a more or less geometrically stable accretion pattern, but not to succeed in spinning down the star. We also report the discovery of a radial velocity signal of semi-amplitude $11.1^{+3.3}_{-2.6}$ m s−1 (detected at 4.3σ) at a period of 8.3 d in the spectrum of TW Hya, whose origin may be attributed to either a non-axisymmetric density structure in the inner accretion disc, or to a $0.55^{+0.17}_{-0.13}$MꝜ candidate close-in planet (if orbiting in the disc plane), at an orbital distance of 0.075 ± 0.001 au.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1227
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Non-thermal emission from mildly relativistic dynamical ejecta of neutron
           star mergers: spectrum and sky image

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      Pages: 3279 - 3286
      Abstract: ABSTRACTBinary neutron star mergers are expected to produce fast dynamical ejecta, with mildly relativistic velocities extending to β = v/c > 0.6. In a preceding paper, we derived an analytic description of the time-dependent radio to X-ray synchrotron flux produced by collision-less shocks driven by such fast ejecta into the interstellar medium, for spherical ejecta with broken power-law mass (or energy) distributions, M(> γβ)∝(γβ)−s with s = sKN at γβ < γ0β0 and s = sft at γβ > γ0β0 (where γ is the Lorentz factor). Here, we extend our analysis and provide analytic expressions for the self-absorption frequency, the cooling frequency, and the observed angular size of the emitting region (which appears as a ring in the sky). For parameter values characteristic of merger calculation results – a ‘shallow’ mass distribution, 1 < sKN < 3, for the bulk of the ejecta (at γβ ≈ 0.2), and a steep, sft > 5, ‘fast tail’ mass distribution – the analytic results reproduce well (to tens of per cent accuracy) the results of detailed numeric calculations, a significant improvement over earlier order-of-magnitude estimates (based on extrapolations of results valid for γβ ≪ 1).
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1286
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • The origin of supermassive black holes at cosmic dawn

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      Pages: 3287 - 3296
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe investigate the steady spherically symmetric accretion in the combined potential of a central black hole and a dark matter halo. For the halo, we consider a Hernquist and an NFW potential and calculate the critical points of the flow. We find that the trans-sonic solution to the centre is not possible without a black hole, whereas two types of trans-sonic solutions are possible in its presence. We also derive the mass accretion rate for a black hole at the centre of a dark matter halo. Our results indicate two phases of accretion. The first is an initial phase with a low accretion rate that depends on the black hole mass, followed by a second phase with a high accretion rate that depends on the halo mass. In the second phase, the black hole mass increases rapidly to supermassive scales, which explains the existence of quasars at redshift z ≥ 6 and also the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) recently detected by the JWST. Further, we calculate the evolution of the Eddington ratio for growing black holes. The accretion is mostly sub-Eddington except for a short super-Eddington episode when the mass accretion rate transitions from low to high. However, during that episode, the black hole mass is likely inadequate to hinder accretion through radiative feedback.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Apr 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1007
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Magnetars as powering sources of gamma-ray burst associated supernovae,
           and unsupervized clustering of cosmic explosions

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      Pages: 3297 - 3309
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe present the semi-analytical light curve modelling of 13 supernovae associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRB-SNe) along with two relativistic broad-lined (Ic-BL) SNe without GRB association (SNe 2009bb and 2012ap), considering millisecond magnetars as central-engine-based power sources for these events. The bolometric light curves of all 15 SNe in our sample are well-regenerated utilizing a χ2-minimization code, MINIM, and numerous parameters are constrained. The median values of ejecta mass (Mej), magnetar’s initial spin period (Pi), and magnetic field (B) for GRB-SNe are determined to be ≈5.2 M⊙, 20.5 ms, and 20.1 × 1014 G, respectively. We leverage machine learning (ML) algorithms to comprehensively compare the three-dimensional parameter space encompassing Mej, Pi, and B for GRB-SNe determined herein to those of H-deficient superluminous SNe (SLSNe-I), fast blue optical transients (FBOTs), long GRBs (LGRBs), and short GRBs (SGRBs) obtained from the literature. The application of unsupervized ML clustering algorithms on the parameters Mej, Pi, and B for GRB-SNe, SLSNe-I, and FBOTs yields a classification accuracy of ∼95 per cent. Extending these methods to classify GRB-SNe, SLSNe-I, LGRBs, and SGRBs based on Pi and B values results in an accuracy of ∼84 per cent. Our investigations show that GRB-SNe and relativistic Ic-BL SNe presented in this study occupy different parameter spaces for Mej, Pi, and B than those of SLSNe-I, FBOTs, LGRBs, and SGRBs. This indicates that magnetars with different Pi and B can give birth to distinct types of transients.
      PubDate: Sat, 08 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae901
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Dust reverberation mapping of 0.3 ≤ z ≤ 0.8 AGN with UltraVISTA:
           lessons for future large surveys

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      Pages: 3310 - 3325
      Abstract: ABSTRACTIn this work we used a sample of 20 variable active galactic nuclei at 0.3 < z < 0.8 from the Ultra-VISTA survey to test whether their emission in the near-infrared (NIR) is consistent with emission from the dusty torus or the accretion disc, and whether the radius–luminosity relation found for local sources, is also seen when we consider sources from our sample. We carried out a spectral energy distribution analysis and conclude that 14 of the 20 sources have a variable component dominated by the dusty torus, and four have a variable component dominated by the accretion disc and two sources give uncertain results. Correcting for the disc contamination in the observed-frame Ks band, however, allowed us to determine dust lags for 13 sources after performing cross-correlation analysis. Special care was taken to consider lags that were not biased by seasonal gaps. Our determined lags are systematically found below the radius–luminosity relationship determined for local sources. Following previous works, we introduce an empirical relation that corrects lags by the rest-frame wavelength of the band that samples the dust emission, as shorter wavelengths arise from hotter regions of the torus. When the correction is introduced, our results are consistent with previous findings. We finally discuss whether other intrinsic parameters might also contribute to this effect and how these corrections will impact future large optical and NIR surveys.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1095
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Modelling the BAO feature in bispectrum

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      Pages: 3326 - 3335
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe investigate how well a simple leading order perturbation theory model of the bispectrum can fit the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the measured bispectrum monopole of galaxies. Previous works showed that perturbative models of the galaxy bispectrum start failing at the wavenumbers of k ∼ 0.1 h Mpc−1. We show that when the BAO feature in the bispectrum is separated, it can be successfully modelled up to much higher wavenumbers. We validate our modelling on GLAM simulations that were run with and without the BAO feature in the initial conditions. We also quantify the amount of systematic error due to BAO template being offset from the true cosmology. We find that the systematic errors do not exceed 0.3 per cent for reasonable deviations of up to 3 per cent from the true value of the sound horizon.
      PubDate: Wed, 22 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1161
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • SUNBIRD: a simulation-based model for full-shape density-split clustering

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      Pages: 3336 - 3356
      Abstract: ABSTRACTCombining galaxy clustering information from regions of different environmental densities can help break cosmological parameter degeneracies and access non-Gaussian information from the density field that is not readily captured by the standard two-point correlation function (2PCF) analyses. However, modelling these density-dependent statistics down to the non-linear regime has so far remained challenging. We present a simulation-based model that is able to capture the cosmological dependence of the full shape of the density-split clustering (DSC) statistics down to intra-halo scales. Our models are based on neural-network emulators that are trained on high-fidelity mock galaxy catalogues within an extended-ΛCDM framework, incorporating the effects of redshift-space, Alcock–Paczynski distortions, and models of the halo–galaxy connection. Our models reach sub-per cent level accuracy down to $1 \, h^{-1}\text{Mpc}$ and are robust against different choices of galaxy–halo connection modelling. When combined with the galaxy 2PCF, DSC can tighten the constraints on ωcdm, σ8, and ns by factors of 2.9, 1.9, and 2.1, respectively, compared to a 2PCF-only analysis. DSC additionally puts strong constraints on environment-based assembly bias parameters.
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1234
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • MeerKAT discovery of a double radio relic and odd radio circle: connecting
           cluster and galaxy merger shocks

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      Pages: 3357 - 3372
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe present the serendipitous discovery of (1) a large double radio relic associated with the galaxy cluster PSZ2 G277.93 + 12.34 and (2) a new odd radio circle, ORC J1027–4422, both found in the same deep MeerKAT 1.3 GHz wide-band radio continuum image. The angular separation of the two arc-shaped cluster relics is ∼16 arcmin or ∼2.6 Mpc for a cluster redshift of z ≈ 0.158. The thin southern relic, which shows several ridges/shocks including one possibly moving inwards, has a linear extent of ∼1.64 Mpc. In contrast, the northern relic is about twice as wide, twice as bright, but only has a largest linear size of ∼0.66 Mpc. Complementary SRG/eROSITA X-ray images reveal extended emission from hot intracluster gas between the two relics and around the narrow-angle tail (NAT) radio galaxy PMN J1033–4335 (z ≈ 0.153) located just east of the northern relic. The radio morphologies of the NAT galaxy and the northern relic, which are also detected with the Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) at 888 MHz, suggest both are moving in the same outward direction. The discovery of ORC J1027–4422 in a different part of the same MeerKAT image makes it the fourth known single ORC. It has a diameter of ∼90 arcsec corresponding to 400 kpc at a tentative redshift of z ≈ 0.3 and remains undetected in X-ray emission. Supported by simulations, we discuss similarities between outward moving galaxy and cluster merger shocks as the formation mechanisms for ORCs and radio relics, respectively.
      PubDate: Tue, 14 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1254
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • From cores to stars: searching for a universal rule for star formation

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      Pages: 3373 - 3385
      Abstract: ABSTRACTStar formation is generally considered to be ‘universal’, meaning that it is statistically the same everywhere (and at all times). We investigate whether it is possible to find a simple rule for the conversion of molecular cores into bound stellar systems, along with the resulting secular decay and dynamical destruction of these systems, which can match the field initial mass functions (IMFs) and multiplicity statistics. We find that extreme cases, in which the core fragmentation is self-similar or has a strong dependence on initial core mass, cannot reproduce the observations of the field. However, a model in which core fragmentation is fairly weakly dependent on core mass has some success, if we include the effects of secular decay on the multiplicity statistics. This model both fits the IMF well and has an overabundance of low-mass binary systems over the field that matches local star-forming regions. However, it is unclear whether this overabundance could be dynamically processed to match the field.
      PubDate: Fri, 31 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1364
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Low-luminosity accretion of Be/X-ray pulsar MAXI J1409−619

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      Pages: 3386 - 3390
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThis paper used Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observations to examine the temporal and spectral features of the Be/X-ray binary pulsar MAXI J1409−619. The timing analysis of the light curve finds the pulsation of the source at $(501.23\,\,\pm \,\,0.01)$ s. The pulse profile of the source in various energy bands was analysed and showed weak dependence on energy exhibiting asymmetric character and generally suggests a source accretion in the subcritical regime. The variation of pulse fraction with photon energy in general shows an increasing trend. Assuming a distance of 14.5 kpc, we calculated the 3–30 keV source luminosity to be $\sim 6.13\,\,\times \,\,10^{34}\,\,$ erg s$^{-1}$. The long-term spin evolution of the source was carried out, where the source underwent torque reversal.
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1369
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Driving asymmetric red supergiant winds with binary interactions

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      Pages: 3391 - 3405
      Abstract: ABSTRACTMassive stars in the red supergiant (RSG) phase are known to undergo strong mass-loss through winds and observations indicate that a substantial part of this mass-loss could be driven by localized and episodic outflows. Various mechanisms have been considered to explain this type of mass-loss in RSGs, but these models often focus on single-star evolution. However, massive stars commonly evolve in binary systems, potentially interacting with their companions. Motivated by observations of the highly asymmetric circumstellar ejecta around the RSG VY CMa, we investigate a scenario where a companion on an eccentric orbit grazes the surface of an RSG at periastron. The companion ejects part of the outer RSG envelope, which radiatively cools, reaching the proper conditions for dust condensation and eventually giving rise to dust-driven winds. Using simple treatments for radiative cooling and dust-driven winds, we perform three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of this scenario with a $20\, {\rm M}_\odot$ RSG and a $2\, {\rm M}_\odot$ companion. We follow the evolution of the binary throughout a total of 14 orbits and observe that the orbit tightens after each interaction, in turn enhancing the mass-loss of subsequent interactions. We show that one such grazing interaction yields outflows of $3\times 10^{-4}\, {\rm M}_\odot$, which later results in wide asymmetric dusty ejecta, carrying a total mass of $0.185\, {\rm M}_\odot$ by the end of simulations. We discuss the implications for the evolution of the binary, potential observational signatures, as well as future improvements of the model required to provide sensible predictions for the evolution of massive binaries.
      PubDate: Fri, 31 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1379
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • SPICE: the connection between cosmic reionization and stellar feedback in
           the first galaxies

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      Pages: 3406 - 3430
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe present SPICE, a new suite of radiation-hydrodynamic, cosmological simulations targeting the epoch of reionization. The goal of these simulations is to systematically probe a variety of stellar feedback models, including ‘bursty’ and ‘smooth’ forms of supernova energy injection, as well as poorly explored physical scenarios such as hypernova explosions and radiation pressure on dust. We show that even subtle differences in the behaviour of supernova feedback drive profound differences in reionization histories, with burstier forms of feedback causing earlier reionization. However, we also find that some global galaxy properties, such as the dust-attenuated luminosity functions and star formation main sequence, remain degenerate between models. In particular, we show that stellar feedback and its strength determine the morphological mix of galaxies emerging by $z \, = \, 5$ and that the reionization history is inextricably connected to intrinsic properties such as galaxy kinematics and morphology. While star-forming, massive discs are prevalent if supernova feedback is ‘smooth’, ‘bursty’ feedback preferentially generates dispersion-dominated systems. Different modes of feedback produce different strengths of outflows, altering the interstellar/circumgalactic medium in different ways, and in turn strongly affecting the escape of Lyman continuum (LyC) photons. We establish a correlation between galaxy morphology and LyC escape fraction, revealing that dispersion-dominated systems have escape fractions 10–50 times higher than their rotation-dominated counterparts at all redshifts. At the same intrinsic luminosity, dispersion-dominated systems should thus preferentially generate large H ii regions as compared to their rotation-dominated counterparts. Since dispersion-dominated systems are more prevalent if stellar feedback is more explosive, reionization occurs earlier in our simulation with burstier feedback. We argue that statistical samples of post-reionization galaxy morphologies (using both stellar and gaseous components) probed with telescopes such as JWST, ALMA, and MUSE can constrain stellar feedback at z > 5 and models of cosmic reionization.
      PubDate: Thu, 25 Apr 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1125
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • General multipoles and their implications for dark matter inference

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      Pages: 3431 - 3443
      Abstract: ABSTRACTThe flux ratios of strongly lensed quasars have previously been used to infer the properties of dark matter. In these analyses, it is crucial to separate the effect of the main lensing galaxy and the low-mass dark matter halo population. In this work, we investigate flux-ratio perturbations resulting from general third- and fourth-order multipole perturbations to the main lensing galaxy’s mass profile. We simulate four lens systems, each with a different lensing configuration, without multipoles. The simulated flux ratios are perturbed by 10–40 per cent by a population of low-mass haloes consistent with cold dark matter and, in one case, also a satellite galaxy. This level of perturbation is comparable to the magnitude of flux-ratio anomalies in real data that has been previously analysed. We then attempt to fit the simulated systems using multipoles instead of low-mass haloes. We find that multipoles with amplitudes of 0.01 or less can produce flux-ratio perturbations in excess of 40 per cent. In all cases, third- or fourth-order multipoles can individually reduce the magnitude of, if not eliminate, flux-ratio anomalies. When both multipole orders are jointly included, all simulated flux ratios can be fit to within the observational uncertainty. Our results indicate that low-mass haloes and multipoles are highly degenerate when modelling quadruply imaged quasars based just on image positions and flux ratios. In the presence of this degeneracy, flux-ratio anomalies in lensed quasars alone cannot be used to place strong constraints on the properties of dark matter without additional information that can inform our priors.
      PubDate: Fri, 10 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1228
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Correction to: 3D simulations of photochemical hazes in the atmosphere of
           hot Jupiter HD 189733b

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      Pages: 3444 - 3444
      Abstract: errata, addendahydrodynamicsmethods: numericalplanets and satellites: atmospheresplanets and satellites: gaseous planetsplanets and satellites: individual: HD 189733b
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1305
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Ram pressure stripping in clusters: gravity can bind the ISM but not the
           CGM

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      Pages: 3445 - 3467
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe explore the survival of a galaxy’s circumgalactic medium (CGM) as it experiences ram pressure stripping (RPS) moving through the intracluster medium (ICM). For a satellite galaxy, the CGM is often assumed to be entirely stripped/evaporated, an assumption that may not always be justified. We carry out 3D-hydrodynamic simulations of the interstellar and circumgalactic media (ISM + CGM) of a galaxy like JO201 moving through the ICM. The CGM can survive long at cluster outskirts ($\gtrsim 2 \rm \ Gyr$) but at smaller clustercentric distances, 90 per cent of the CGM mass is lost within ∼500 Myr. The gravitational restoring force on the CGM is mostly negligible and the CGM–ICM interaction is analogous to ‘cloud–wind interaction’. The CGM stripping time-scale does not depend on the ram pressure but on the CGM to ICM density contrast χ. Two distinct regimes emerge for CGM stripping: the χ > 1 regime, which is the well-known ‘cloud crushing’ problem, and the χ < 1 regime, which we refer to as the (relatively unexplored) ‘bubble drag’ problem. The first pericentric passage near the cluster core can rapidly – over a crossing time tdrag ∼ R/vrel – strip the CGM in the bubble drag regime. The ISM stripping criterion unlike the CGM criterion, still depends on the ram pressure $\rho _{\rm ICM} v_{\rm rel}^2$. The stripped tails of satellites contain contributions from both the disc and the CGM. The X-ray plume in M89 in the Virgo cluster and a lack of it in the nearby M90 might be attributed to their orbital histories. M90 has likely undergone stripping in the bubble drag regime due to a pericentric passage close to the cluster centre.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1345
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Determination method for binary fractions using the integrated spectrum

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      Pages: 3468 - 3478
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe need to resolve the individual stars for binary-fraction determinations of stellar systems. Therefore, it is not possible to obtain the binary fractions for dense or distant stellar systems. We propose a method to determine the binary fraction of a dense or distant stellar system: this method is first to determine the binary-fraction variation for any two adjacent regions and then to add up those binary-fraction variations along the radial direction to obtain the binary fraction for a stellar system. The binary-fraction variation is derived using 10 binary-fraction-sensitive spectral absorption feature indices (SAFIs) and the binary-fraction variation calibrations in terms of these SAFIs. Using this method, we first present the binary-fraction variations for 21 Galactic globular clusters (GCs). By comparison, we find that they agree well with the binary fractions based on the main-sequence fiducial line method from previous studies. This verifies that the above-mentioned method is feasible. Next, we present the binary-fraction variations of 13 Galactic GCs. We give the relationships between the binary fraction and various parameters, and find that the binary fraction is negatively correlated with NHB and NRR, the binary fraction of some studies is not strongly correlated with NBS, and the number of GCs with large binary fraction is greater for the extreme blue horizontal branch population ratio. Finally, if we want to obtain a more accurate binary fraction, we suggest that spectroscopic and photometric observations are conducted at an appropriate area interval for a stellar system.
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1346
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Constraining the LVK AGN channel with black hole spins

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      Pages: 3479 - 3485
      Abstract: ABSTRACTMerging black holes (BHs) are expected to produce remnants with large dimensionless spin parameters (aspin ∼ 0.7). However, gravitational wave (GW) observations with LIGO–Virgo–Kagra (LVK) suggest that merging BHs are consistent with modestly positive but not high spin (aspin ∼ 0.2), causing tension with models suggesting that high-mass mergers are produced by hierarchical merger channels. Some BHs also show evidence for strong in-plane spin components. Here, we point out that spin-down of BHs due to eccentric prograde post-merger orbits within the gas of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) disc can yield BHs with masses in the upper mass gap, but only modestly positive aspin, and thus observations of BHs with low spin do not rule out hierarchical models. We also point out that the fraction of binary black hole (BBH) mergers with significant in-plane spin components is a strong test of interactions between disc BBHs and nuclear spheroid orbiters. Spin magnitude and spin tilt constraints from LVK observations of BBHs are an excellent test of dynamics of BHs in AGN discs, disc properties, and the nuclear clusters interacting with AGNs.
      PubDate: Sat, 25 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1351
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • H i galaxy signatures in the SARAO MeerKAT galactic plane survey −
           III. Unveiling the obscured part of the Vela Supercluster

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      Pages: 3486 - 3508
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe conducted a search for $\textrm {H}\, \scriptstyle \mathrm{I}$ emission of the gas-rich galaxies in the Vela region (260° ≤ ℓ ≤ 290°, −2° ≤ b ≤ 1°) to explore the Vela Supercluster (VSCL) at Vhel ∼ 18 000 $\rm km\, s^{-1}$, largely obscured by Galactic dust. Within the mostly Radio Frequency Interference-free band (250 < Vhel < 25 000 $\rm km\, s^{-1}$) of MeerKAT, the analysis focuses on 157 hexagonally distributed pointings extracted from the South African Radio Astronomy Observatory MeerKAT Galactic Plane Survey located in the Vela region (Vela−SMGPS). These were combined into 10 contiguous mosaics, covering an ∼90 square degrees area. Among the 843 $\textrm {H}\, \scriptstyle \mathrm{I}$ detected sources, 39 were previously discovered in the H i Parkes Zone of Avoidance survey (Vhel < 12 000 $\rm km\, s^{-1}$; rms ∼ 6 $\rm mJy\, beam^{-1}$). With the improved rms level of the Vela−SMGPS, i.e. 0.29–0.56 $\rm mJy\, beam^{-1}$, our study unveils nearly 12 times more detections (471 candidates) in that same velocity range. We furthermore could identify 187 galaxy candidates with an $\textrm {H}\, \scriptstyle \mathrm{I}$ mass limit reaching $\log (M_{\rm HI}/\rm {\rm M}_{\odot }) = 9.44$ in the VSCL velocity range Vhel ∼ 19 500 ± 3500 $\rm km\, s^{-1}$. We find indications of two wall-like overdensities that confirm the original suspicion that these walls intersect at low latitudes around longitudes of ℓ ∼ 272°–278°. We also find a strong signature most likely associated with the Hydra/Antlia extension and evidence of a previously unknown narrow filament at Vhel ∼ 12 000 $\rm km\, s^{-1}$. This paper demonstrates the efficiency of systematic $\textrm {H}\, \scriptstyle \mathrm{I}$ surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) precursor MeerKAT, even in the most obscured part of the Zone of Avoidance.
      PubDate: Sat, 25 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1354
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Detecting strongly lensed type Ia supernovae with LSST

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      Pages: 3509 - 3523
      Abstract: ABSTRACTStrongly lensed supernovae are rare and valuable probes of cosmology and astrophysics. Upcoming wide-field time-domain surveys, such as the Vera C. Rubin Observatory’s Legacy Survey of Space and Time (LSST), are expected to discover an order-of-magnitude more lensed supernovae than have previously been observed. In this work, we investigate the cosmological prospects of lensed type Ia supernovae (SNIa) in LSST by quantifying the expected annual number of detections, the impact of stellar microlensing, follow-up feasibility, and how to best separate lensed and unlensed SNIa. We simulate SNIa lensed by galaxies, using the current LSST baseline v3.0 cadence, and find an expected number of 44 lensed SNIa detections per year. Microlensing effects by stars in the lensing galaxy are predicted to lower the lensed SNIa detections by ∼8 per cent. The lensed events can be separated from the unlensed ones by jointly considering their colours and peak magnitudes. We define a ‘gold sample’ of ∼10 lensed SNIa per year with time delay >10 d, >5 detections before light curve peak, and sufficiently bright (mi < 22.5 mag) for follow-up observations. In 3 yr of LSST operations, such a sample is expected to yield a 1.5 per cent measurement of the Hubble constant.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1356
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • The radial variation of the LMC-induced reflex motion of the Milky Way
           disc observed in the stellar halo

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 3524 - 3538
      Abstract: ABSTRACTWe measure the kinematic signature arising from the Milky Way (MW) disc moving with respect to the outer stellar halo, which is observed as a dipole signal in the kinematics of stellar halo tracers. We quantify how the reflex motion varies as a function of Galactocentric distance, finding that (i) the amplitude of the dipole signal increases as a function of radius, and (ii) the direction moves across the sky. We compare the reflex motion signal against a compilation of published models that follow the MW–LMC interaction. These models show a similar trend of increasing amplitude of the reflex motion as a function of distance, but they do not reproduce the direction of the disc motion with respect to the stellar halo well. We also report mean motions for the stellar halo as a function of distance, finding radial compression in the outer halo and non-zero prograde rotation at all radii. The observed compression signal is also present in MW–LMC models, but the rotation is not, which suggests that the latter is not induced by the LMC. We extensively validate our technique to measure reflex motion against idealized tests. We discuss prospects for directly constraining the mass and orbital history of the LMC through the impact on the motion of the MW stellar disc, and how the modelling of the reflex motion can be improved as more and better data become available.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1363
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
  • Imputation of missing photometric data and photometric redshift estimation
           for CSST

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      Pages: 3539 - 3550
      Abstract: ABSTRACTAccurate photometric redshift (photo-z) estimation requires support from multiband observational data. However, in the actual process of astronomical observations and data processing, some sources may have missing observational data in certain bands for various reasons. This could greatly affect the accuracy and reliability of photo-z estimation for these sources, and even render some estimation methods unusable. The same situation may exist for the upcoming Chinese Space Station Telescope (CSST). In this study, we employ a deep learning method called generative adversarial imputation networks (GAIN) to impute the missing photometric data in CSST, aiming to reduce the impact of data missing on photo-z estimation and improve estimation accuracy. Our results demonstrate that using the GAIN technique can effectively fill in the missing photometric data in CSST. Particularly, when the data missing rate is below 30 per cent, the imputation of photometric data exhibits high accuracy, with higher accuracy in the g, r, i, z, and y bands compared to the NUV and u bands. After filling in the missing values, the quality of photo-z estimation obtained by the widely used easy and accurate Zphot from Yale (eazy) software is notably enhanced. Evaluation metrics for assessing the quality of photo-z estimation, including the catastrophic outlier fraction (fout), the normalized median absolute deviation ($\rm {\sigma _{NMAD}}$), and the bias of photometric redshift (bias), all show some degree of improvement. Our research will help maximize the utilization of observational data and provide a new method for handling sample missing values for applications that require complete photometry data to produce results.
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stae1397
      Issue No: Vol. 531, No. 3 (2024)
       
 
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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 106 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 64)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate and Energy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Climate Change Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Climate Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate Resilience and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 187)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Climate Change and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 205)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Nīvār     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Oxford Open Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)

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