Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1562 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (86 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (740 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (390 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (109 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (133 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (390 journals)                  1 2 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 397 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACI Open     Open Access  
Acta Bioquimica Clinica Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 22)
Adnan Menderes Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advanced Healthcare Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Medical Education and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Advances in Nursing Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Advances in Simulation     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Primary Health Care & Family Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
American Journal of Managed Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Analytical Methods     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Anthropologie et santé     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Applied Clinical Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Health Economics and Health Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archives of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Asian Journal of Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Australian Health Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Primary Health     Hybrid Journal  
Australian Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 350)
Avicenna     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bereavement Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
BJR     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMJ Leader     Hybrid Journal  
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
British Journal of Healthcare Assistants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
British Journal of Healthcare Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
British Journal of Hospital Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
British Journal of Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 297)
British Journal of School Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Bruce R Hopkins' Nonprofit Counsel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Building Better Healthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cardiac Electrophysiology Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Children and Schools     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Medical Record English Edition     Hybrid Journal  
CIN : Computers Informatics Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Audit     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinics and Practice     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Communication & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Community Based Medical Journal     Open Access  
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Contemporary Nurse : A Journal for the Australian Nursing Profession     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Critical Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Culture, Health & Sexuality: An International Journal for Research, Intervention and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Das Gesundheitswesen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Dental Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Disaster Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
DoctorConsult - The Journal. Wissen für Klinik und Praxis     Full-text available via subscription  
Droit, Déontologie & Soin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
E-Health Telecommunication Systems and Networks     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
East and Central African Journal of Surgery     Open Access  
Éducation thérapeutique du patient     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
eGEMs     Open Access  
Emergency Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Enfermería Clínica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Epidemiologic Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Escola Anna Nery     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
European Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
European Research in Telemedicine / La Recherche Européenne en Télémédecine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Evidence-Based Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Patents     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Family Practice Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Focus on Health Professional Education : A Multi-disciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Frontiers in Public Health Services and Systems Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Future Hospital Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Gastrointestinal Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Global & Regional Health Technology Assessment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Health Action     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Global Health Management Journal (GHMJ)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Health Research and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Global Journal of Hospital Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Public Health: An International Journal for Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Handbook of Practice Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health and Interprofessional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Health and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Care Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Health Expectations     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Health Facilities Management     Free   (Followers: 10)
Health Informatics Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Health Information : Jurnal Penelitian     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Health Information Science and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Health Policy and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health Policy and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Health Reform Observer : Observatoire des Réformes de Santé     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Health Science Journal of Indonesia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Services Research and Managerial Epidemiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Healthcare : The Journal of Delivery Science and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Healthcare in Low-resource Settings     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Healthcare Management Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Healthcare Policy / Politiques de Santé     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Healthcare Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Healthcare Risk Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
HealthcarePapers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hispanic Health Care International     Full-text available via subscription  
História, Ciências, Saúde - Manguinhos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hospital     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Hospital a Domicilio     Open Access  
Hospital Medicine Clinics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hospital Peer Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Hospital Pharmacy     Partially Free   (Followers: 18)
Hospital Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Hospital Practices and Research     Open Access  
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Human Factors : The Journal of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
ICU Director     Hybrid Journal  
Ids Practice Papers     Hybrid Journal  
IEEE Pulse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
IISE Transactions on Healthcare Systems Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Independent Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Index de Enfermeria     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Indian Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Informatics for Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
INQUIRY : The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Interface - Comunicação, Saúde, Educação     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Archives of Health Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
International Journal of Care Coordination     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Computers in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Electronic Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
International Journal of Health Administration and Education Congress (Sanitas Magisterium)     Open Access  
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Health Economics and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Health Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Journal of Health Planning and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Health Sciences Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health Services Research and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Healthcare     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Healthcare Technology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Hospital Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Palliative Nursing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Positive Behavioural Support     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
International Journal of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Privacy and Health Information Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Public and Private Healthcare Management and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Reliable and Quality E-Healthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Research in Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Telemedicine and Clinical Practices     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Telework and Telecommuting Technologies     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
International Journal of User-Driven Healthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal on Disability and Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Irish Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
JAAPA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Jaffna Medical Journal     Open Access  
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Advanced Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
Journal of Advances in Medical Education & Professionalism     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Ambulatory Care Management, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Applied Arts and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
INQUIRY : The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 0046-9580 - ISSN (Online) 1945-7243
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1144 journals]
  • Prevalence and Associated Factors of Anemia among Muslim Students, Nakhon
           Si Thammarat, Thailand: A Cross-Sectional Study

    • Authors: Chutima Rattanawan, Suraiya Cheloh, Asma Maimahad, Malatee Tayeh
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Anemia is a global public health problem. The prevalence of anemia among different ages, genders or ethnic groups must be clarified in order to solve problems. This study proposed to determine the prevalence and factors related to anemia among the Muslim school-age population in Nakhon Si Thammarat, Thailand. Socio-demographic and anthropometric data were collected by a structured questionnaire. Blood samples were collected from 200 school-age subjects. The thalassemia screening was performed with KKU-OF and KKU-DCIP reagents. The prevalence of anemia in this study was 36.5%, divided into males and females, 33.3% and 39.1%, respectively. The means of Hb, Hct, MCV, MCH, and MCHC in the anemic group were significantly lower. The positive results for KKU-OF or KKU-DCIP or both were 15.0%, 2.5%, and 1.0%, respectively. The result of positive OF test was a significantly independent factor for anemia. The number of family members was 5 to 7 and more than 7 persons are related factors for anemia in this study. In summary, the contribution of thalassemia and socio-economic factor are associated factors to anemia in this population. These findings should be addressed in public health strategies for the control of anemia of school-aged Muslims in the region.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-04-30T09:31:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211013476
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Exploring Factors Associated with Self-Management Compliance among Rural
           Elders with Diabetes

    • Authors: Ruoyan Lu, Yueping Li, Zhenquan Zheng, Zi Yan
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      The purpose of the study was to examine the social-ecological factors associated with diabetic self-management compliance among elders with diabetes in China. A total of 2,586 rural elderly residents who were 60-years-old or above participated in the survey. Socio-demographic factors, social support, healthcare accessibility and health risk factors were measured, along with self-reported medication and blood glucose monitoring data. Among the 117 individuals with diabetes, the medication compliance rate was 79.49%. The elderly who had high economic status were more likely to meet medication treatment compliance. Only 58.97% of study participants monitored blood glucose once a month. Younger age (
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-04-26T10:10:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211012491
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Partnership between Primary Health and Social Care Services in the
           Long-Term Care of Older People with Dementia: A Vignette Study

    • Authors: Ausrine Kontrimiene, Aurelija Blazeviciene, Ida Liseckiene, Gediminas Raila, Leonas Valius, Lina Jaruseviciene
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Dementia is considered to be a significant cause of disability and dependency for older people worldwide and it raises difficulties in providing adequate formal and informal assistance. Research on the experience of long-term care (LTC)services for older people with dementia is scarce in Eastern European countries. This study aimed to understand the system of care for older people with dementia from the perspective of health and social care workers providing LTC services in Lithuania. A total of 72 primary health care and social care professionals from public and private institutions in Kaunas city participated in this study. One-to-one interviews were conducted with family physicians, community nurses, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, and social workers. A vignette situation of 2 fictitious patients with dementia and their informal caregiver was discussed during the interviews. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis by induction approach. The data revealed 2 main themes: LTC provision trajectory, and three-dimensional relationship perception in realization of LTC activities. LTC provision trajectory reflected activities performed as a response to the described situation embracing formal procedures for the endorsement of LTC needs as well as the range of LTC services. The three-dimensional perception of relationships in LTC services’ implementation reflected the participants’ personal approach toward LTC, relationship with different specialists, and the informal caregiver. Our study revealed the potential of complex measures that could be instrumental for the refinement of the caregiving process. First, a change in the additional care requirements endorsement logic is needed, shifting focus from medical diagnosis to functional abilities assessment. Second, to establish clear procedures for formal cooperation between the health and social care sectors in the trajectory of LTC service provision. Finally, to find an adequate balance between LTC and institutional care by creating a more comprehensive range of LTC services. A more consistent and coordinated delivery of services by both health and social care sectors seems to be an untapped resource for the improvement of the LTC potential.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T11:58:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211011933
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Subjective Perception of Individuals with Physical Disabilities Regarding
           Exercise Equipment Use

    • Authors: Song Yi Lee, Jung Ah Lee, Hee Jung Chung, Hyun-Jin Kim, Yu Cheon Kim, Hogene Kim
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Rehabilitation exercise is effective for improving the health of persons with physical disabilities. However, there are limited studies on their perception of exercise equipment use. The purpose of this study was to investigate the subjectivity to understand the types of perceptions of individuals with physical disabilities regarding the use of exercise equipment in South Korea. This study used Q-methodology. A literature review and focus group interviews with individuals with physical disabilities were conducted to construct Q-Population. Q-statements were selected from the Q-population, after which Q-sorting was executed by P-sample. The results indicated 4 perception types: (1) “Independent user,” (2) “Practical user,” (3) “Motivational user,” and (4) “Convenience user.” Recommendations were provided for developing exercise equipment for use by individuals with physical disabilities. This study revealed 4 perception categories and the findings have strong potential to contribute to the development of proper services and the effective utilization of exercise equipment for individuals with physical disabilities.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-04-20T06:20:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211010429
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • A Comparison of the United States and Austrian Healthcare Needs and
           Systems

    • Authors: Margaret McAlister, Joey D. Helton
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Austria and the United States have very different healthcare systems with Austria following a social insurance model and the United States following an out of pocket model however;gross domestic product on healthcare expenditures. There is a current gap in literature on how the United States and Austrian healthcare systems comparatively impact patient outcomes, especially when considering the mediating effects of societal norms such as exercise and mental self-care habits. The information presented could benefit the United States healthcare system if they adopted Austria’s model, which expands access, and the Austrian healthcare system regulators could look to American standards of communication and care coordination to improve their healthcare system overall.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-04-19T12:14:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211000162
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Patient Perspectives on Removing Adult Tonsillectomy and Septoplasty from
           the Government Health Insurance Plan in a Publicly Funded Health Care
           System

    • Authors: Elysia Grose, Sarah Chiodo, Marc Levin, Antoine Eskander, Vincent Lin, Brad Hubbard, Albino Chiodo
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      In several publicly funded health care systems, including Ontario, Canada, adult tonsillectomies and septoplasties have been suggested to be removed or “delisted” from the government health insurance plan. Thus, the objective of this study was to explore patient perspectives regarding out of pocket (OOP) payment for these procedures. An anonymous survey was administered to patients consented to undergo a tonsillectomy or septoplasty at a community otolaryngology—head and neck surgery (OHNS) practice. The survey asked patients if they would pay the projected cost for their surgery OOP and the maximum amount of time they would wait for their surgery. The survey also contained questions on socioeconomic status and disease severity. Seventy-one patients were included. Overall, 21% of patients were willing to pay OOP for their surgery. Forty-nine percent of patients reported that the maximum amount of time they would be willing to wait for their surgery was 2 to 6 months. There was no significant correlation found between any of the demographic variables or disease severity and willingness to pay OOP for these surgeries. In this study, a small percentage of patients who met the clinical indications for a tonsillectomy or a septoplasty would pay for their surgery in the event that it was not covered by the government health insurance plan. These surgeries are common operations and delisting them could potentially decrease the provision of these services and have a significant impact on Canadian OHNS practices.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-04-19T12:14:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211005193
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • The Path Analysis of Family Doctor’s Gatekeeper Role in Shanghai, China:
           A Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) Approach

    • Authors: Jiaoling Huang, Luan Wang, Shanshan Liu, Tao Zhang, Chengjun Liu, Yimin Zhang
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Studies globally have provided substantial evidence that PHC could conduct doctor-visiting behaviors, control medical expense, and improve population health. This study aimed to map how family doctor (FD) in Shanghai achieved gate-keeper goals including health management, medical expense control, and conducting ordered doctor-visiting behavior. A total of 2754 and 1995 valid questionnaires were collected in 2013 and 2016 respectively in Shanghai. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Invariance analysis was also performed for 2 waves of data. We found that the coefficient of cognition on health management (β5 = 0.26, P 
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-04-19T12:13:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211009667
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Social Capital Mediates the Relationship between Social Distancing and
           COVID-19 Prevalence in Japan

    • Authors: Keisuke Kokubun, Yoshinori Yamakawa
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      The threat of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is increasing. Regarding the differences in the infection rate observed in each region, additionally to studies investigating the causes of differences in population density as a proxy for social distancing, an increasing trend of studies investigating the causes of differences in social capital has also been seen (ie, value sharing, acceptance of norms, unity, and trust through reciprocity). However, studies investigating whether social capital that controls the effects of population density also influences the infection rate are limited. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the relationship between infection rate, population density, and social capital using statistical data of Japan’s every prefecture. Statistical analysis showed that social capital not only negatively correlates with infection rates and population densities, but also negatively correlates with infection rates controlling for the effects of population density. Additionally, controlling the relationship between the variables by mean age showed that social capital had a greater correlation with infection rate than population density. In other words, social capital mediates the relationship between population density and infection rates, indicating that social distancing alone is not enough to deter coronavirus disease; social capital needs to be recharged.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-04-16T05:29:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211005189
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Impacts of Pharmacists-Managed Oncology Outpatient Clinic on Resolving
           Drug-Related Problems in Ambulatory Neoplasm Patients: A Prospective Study
           in China

    • Authors: Xincai Zhao, Rong Xu, Yonggang Wang, Wanhu Zhu, Haiyan Hu, Zan Shen, Cheng Guo, Jianping Zhang
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Pharmacists are health care professionals who are actively involved in identifying and solving drug-related problems (DRPs) in neoplasm patients. However, the effectiveness of pharmaceutical services at outpatient clinic for neoplasm patients have not been reported in China. This study aims to describe and investigate the impacts of pharmacists-managed oncology outpatient clinic on ambulatory neoplasm patients. We performed a descriptive, prospective study from June 6, 2018 to June 6, 2020. Firstly, we established a pharmacists-managed oncology outpatient clinic and a Pharmacists Work System of Medication Therapy Management (MTM) software with the cooperation of oncologists, pharmacists and software engineers in 2018. Subjects were neoplasm patients who visited the pharmacists-managed outpatient clinic. The pharmacists performed a comprehensive assessment of the patient’s medication and made planned interventions based on the DRPs identified. A total of 215 eligible patients with 707 visits were enrolled and recorded in the MTM software. A total of 316 DRPs (1.47 per patient) were identified. Adverse reactions, non-adherence, untreated indication, and drug interactions were the leading DRPs. 261 (82.6%) of the identified DRPs had been confirmed as resolved and 104 (78.2%) of adverse reactions were improved following pharmacist interventions and 2 to 3 course follow-up. Of the 382 planned interventions, 345 (90.3%) were accepted by patients or physicians. This is the first pharmacists-managed oncology outpatient clinic to describe the type of DRPs in neoplasm patients and evaluate the effectiveness of pharmacist interventions in China. Pharmacist interventions were efficacious in resolving DRPs and improving adverse reactions. We confirmed that pharmacists have an important role in ambulatory neoplasm patients care.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T09:57:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211009662
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • The Impact of Patient Satisfaction on Patient Loyalty with the Mediating
           Effect of Patient Trust

    • Authors: Sha Liu, Genqiang Li, Nan Liu, Wu Hongwei
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      This research is primarily focused on the issues of customer loyalty in the healthcare industry, particularly from the perspective of public hospitals in China. The research developed a theoretical model to test the relationship between patient satisfaction (PS), patient trust (PT), and patient loyalty (PL). The empirical data were collected from 1696 patients through the survey questionnaires from the public hospitals in Henan province. This research is an explanatory study, and adopts quantitative method. The measurement scales used in the survey were assessed and refined and the data analysis was performed using AMOS 19.0 to test the theoretical model and hypotheses developed. In addition, an exploratory factor analysis was used to identify the dimensions of PS, PT, and PL. Their reliability and validity were established through confirmatory factor analysis, and the structural equation modeling (SEM) was used in the related hypotheses. The findings indicate that PT is an important antecedent of PL, and PS has no direct relationship with PL. It is worth noting that PS can lead to PL with PT as the mediating variable. The survey results will help public hospital managers to formulate effective strategies and provide a basis for studying PL. The research will prompt hospital managers to pay attention to the factors which contribute to PS, PT, and PL, and maintain the loyalty of patients to medical institutions. This study is one of the few studies on the relationship between PS, PT, and PL in Chinese public hospitals, and it also explores the direct and indirect effects of PT on PL. The results have practical implications for the Chinese healthcare industry.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-04-09T10:43:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211007221
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Socioeconomic Factors and Health Status Disparities Associated with
           Difficulty in ADLs and IADLs among Long-Lived Populations in Brazil: A
           Cross-Sectional Study

    • Authors: Júlia Cristina Leite Nóbrega, Juliana Barbosa Medeiros, Tácila Thamires de Melo Santos, Saionara Açucena Vieira Alves, Javanna Lacerda Gomes da Silva Freitas, Jaíza M.M. Silva, Raisa Fernandes Mariz Simões, Allisson de Lima Brito, Mathias Weller, Jair Lício de Ferreira Santos, Tarciana Nobre Menezes, Yeda Aparecida de Oliveira Duarte, Mayana Zatz, David Matheson, Silvana Santos
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Objective:To evaluate the association between socioeconomic factors, health status, and Functional Capacity (FC) in the oldest senior citizens in a metropolis and a poor rural region of Brazil.Method:Cross-sectional study of 417 seniors aged ≥80 years, data collected through Brazil’s Health, Well-being and Aging survey. FC assessed by self-reporting of difficulties in Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs). Chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed using “R” statistical software.Results:Socioeconomic and demographic inequalities in Brazil can influence FC in seniors aged 80 years and older. Comparatively, urban long-lived people had a higher prevalence of difficulties for ADLs and rural ones showed more difficulties for IADLs. Among urban oldest seniors, female gender and lower-income were correlated with difficulties for IADLs. Among rural oldest seniors, female gender, stroke, joint disease, and inadequate weight independently were correlated with difficulties for ADLs, while the number of chronic diseases was associated with difficulties for IADLs.Conclusion:Financial constraints may favor the development of functional limitations among older seniors in large urban centers. In poor rural areas, inadequate nutritional status and chronic diseases may increase their susceptibility to functional decline.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-04-09T10:41:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211007264
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • The Effect of Perceived Value, Trust, and Commitment on Patient Loyalty in
           Taiwan

    • Authors: Ing-Chung Huang, Pey-Lan Du, Long-Sheng Lin, Ting-Yu Liu, Tsai-Fei Lin, Wei-Chang Huang
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Increasing patient loyalty through improved health care quality and patient–provider relationships becomes the key factor in medical providers’ successes. This study explored the mediated relationship of patients’ perceived value, patient commitment, and patient loyalty and the moderating effect of patient trust on the mediated relationship. A cross-sectional research design was adopted. Mediation and moderated mediation were tested using the PROCESS macro v3.5 for the SPSS supplement. Convenience sampling was used for the distribution of questionnaires to members of the public with experience of seeking medical attention in Taiwan. Among the 254 valid questionnaires recovered, 59.4% of the respondents were male, 38.6% were married, 90.2% were in the 20 to 49 year age range, and 54.7% had a bachelor’s degree or above. This study indicated a significant mediated relationship among patients’ perceived value of medical services, commitment to the patient–provider relationship, and patient loyalty. Furthermore, when the patient demonstrated higher levels of trust in a healthcare provider, the relationship of perceived value, commitment, and patient loyalty was also enhanced. This study discussed and demonstrated the effect of perceived value, trust, and commitment on patient loyalty. The research suggests that improving patient loyalty benefits sustainable operation of medical providers and the treatment effects for patients.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-04-02T09:36:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211007217
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Instruments for Detecting Moral Distress in Clinical Nurses: A Systematic
           Review

    • Authors: Xu Tian, Yanfei Jin, Hui Chen, María F. Jiménez-Herrera
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Moral distress (MD) has become a seriously negative problem experienced by healthcare professionals, especially clinical nurses. Early and accurate detection of MD by the validated and reliable instrument is critically important to further develop an effective intervention strategy. We performed the current systematic review to comprehensively summarize the evidence of instruments for the detection of MD in clinical nurses. The research design was a systematic literature review. We assigned 2 investigators to independently search potential studies in PubMed, EMBASE, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) from their inception to June 2020. We used data extraction table extracting essential information, and the modified critical appraisal tool evaluating the reliability and validity of eligible instruments. Finally, we qualitatively summarized results of all included instruments. No ethical approval was required because this systematic review was performed based on published studies. We included 16 eligible studies covering 10 original and 6 revised or modified instruments for the final analysis. The overall quality of all instruments was moderate because test-retest reliability was inadequately examined in most instruments. Of 16 instruments, MDS-revised (MDS-R) was broadly validated and employed in different working or cultural settings. Meanwhile, it also extensively expands to specifically detect MD. Moreover, other instruments including moral distress risk scale (MDSR) and moral distress thermometer (MDT) should be further validated and utilized because it covered the gap missed by most instruments. Although several instruments have been made available for clinical nurses, some of them have inadequate psychometric properties test, especially test-retest reliability evaluation. Meanwhile, most of them have not be validated and employed in other working or cultural settings. We therefore suggested further studies to validate the psychometric properties of existing instruments and then employed instruments with high reliability and validity to detect MD in clinical nurses.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-03-27T06:18:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021996499
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Influence of Striving for Work–Life Balance and Sense of Coherence on
           Intention to Leave Among Nurses: A 6-Month Prospective Survey

    • Authors: Maki Matsuo, Eiko Suzuki, Yuko Takayama, Shigeko Shibata, Kyoko Sato
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      The increase in the elderly population in need of healthcare services has led to a serious shortage in the nursing workforce. To retain a large nursing workforce, a strong work–life balance among nurses is needed along with a healthy work environment. This prospective study investigates the influence of work–life balance and sense of coherence on intention to leave among hospital nurses. A questionnaire survey was conducted with 2239 nurses as a baseline. The explanatory variables included striving for work–life balance behavior, a sense of coherence in terms of personal resources, and work-, organizational-, and individual-related factors. Using a cohort of 1368 valid responses, we measured intention to leave among 975 nurses with whom we were able to follow up 6 months after the baseline survey. We then performed multiple regression analysis. The behavior striving for work–life balance was shown to influence nurses’ intention to leave. Nurses who exhibited less striving for work–life balance behavior showed higher intentions to leave. The sense of coherence was not identified as a factor affecting intention to leave. Securing a comfortable work–life balance would reduce the nurses’ desire to quit the hospital. To reduce nurse turnover, nurse managers should develop support programs that can help nurses achieve a better work–life balance.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-03-26T11:48:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211005192
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Challenges to Admitting Residents: Perspectives from Rural Nursing Home
           Administrators and Staff

    • Authors: Carrie Henning-Smith, Dori Cross, Adrita Rahman
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Rural residents are older, on average, than urban residents, with more underlying health conditions and higher rates of disability. Rural nursing homes face unique challenges admitting medically-complex patients and meeting their needs throughout their stay. These challenges may be amplified for certain health conditions. Greater geographic distances also strain transitional care coordination practices with health system referral hubs in urban areas. In this study, we assess perceptions of difficulty rural nursing homes encounter in admitting and serving individuals with dementia, obesity, mental and behavioral health conditions, and medically complex conditions. Using a survey of nursing home administrators located in non-metropolitan counties across the U.S. (n = 209), we assessed the self-reported degree of difficulty identified in serving each of the 4 type of conditions, coupled with qualitative analysis of open-ended questions identifying specific challenges. Rural nursing homes have capacity constraints owing to lower population density, limited financial resources, and unique challenges recruiting and retaining workforce to rural areas. Nursing home administrators reported the most challenges to providing high-quality care to residents with mental and behavioral health challenges, followed by obesity. For specific challenges, administrators focused primarily on staffing concerns, as well as space and equipment needs. Rural nursing home administrators identified challenges related to specific conditions and capacity constraints. To ensure appropriate and high-quality nursing home placement for rural residents, and to minimize the disruption of transitions into nursing home settings, more attention is needed on addressing the constraints identified by rural nursing home administrators in this study.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-03-26T11:46:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211005191
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Federal Nutrition Programs after the Pandemic: Learning from P-EBT and
           SNAP to Create the Next Generation of Food Safety Net Programs

    • Authors: Lilanthi Balasuriya, Seth A. Berkowitz, Hilary K. Seligman
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      It is thought that childhood food insecurity rates increased to 18 million impacted children in 2020. In response, innovative policy solutions from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer (P-EBT) were swiftly implemented. These innovations must serve as catalysts to create the next generation of food safety net programs. These include the removal of administrative barriers to enrollment, the use of streamlined procedures to access food, the expansion of P-EBT to daycare and childcare centers, and the uncoupling of receipt of benefits from physical presence in schools. Critical gaps also remain. SNAP benefit amounts are often too low, leaving many families ineligible. More realistic benefit amounts are needed, such as those used in the USDA’s Moderate Cost Food Plan. Eligibility cut-offs exclude many food insecure families. Better alignment of SNAP eligibility with income levels that substantially increase food insecurity risk are critical. Lastly, creating slower phase-out periods for benefits as incomes rise is essential. Additionally, food insecurity continues to disproportionately impact racial and ethnic minority populations and low-income households. These deeply rooted inequalities in access to nutrition play an important role in driving health disparities, including obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and other chronic comorbidities and must be further examined. Changes to SNAP and the P-EBT program illustrate how innovative, broad-scale policy solutions can expeditiously support the nutritional needs of families with children. While pandemic-inspired innovation offers critical lessons for designing the next generation of nutrition assistance, there remain gaps that can perpetuate disparities in access to food and health. As a community of medical providers, we must advocate for broader, more inclusive policies to support those facing food insecurity. The future depends on it.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-03-26T11:44:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211005190
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Advancing Pharmacy Practice in Tanzania: A Descriptive Report of Pharmacy
           Education and Practice Models in 3 Institutions

    • Authors: Christian Mbilinyi, Deus Buma, Solobi Ngasa, Rose Maingu, Betty Maganda, Wellu Kaali, Mtoke Uledi, Bryceson Mkinga, Bruno Njonjo, Jumanne Amiri, Autumn D. Zuckerman
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Understanding models of pharmacy education and practice in low-to-middle income countries (LMIC) can drive best practices and resource utilization. However, there is a paucity of literature in this setting. The purpose of this report is to describe the length and breadth of pharmacy education and training in Tanzania as well as pharmacy practice models at 3 institutions. Lessons learned and implications for global pharmacy practice described herein aim to advance the profession and pharmacists’ impact in LMIC settings. The Muhimbili campus is located in Dar es Salaam, the largest city in Tanzania, a LMIC in East Africa, and is comprised of 3 institutes and a health professions school. Despite variance in patient populations, all Muhimbili institutions have developed pharmacy services in outpatient and inpatient pharmacies, central pharmacy stores, intensive care units, and operating theaters. Unique pharmacy practice areas result from a variance in patient populations serviced and include services in pharmacovigilence/drug information, compounding, oncology, nephrology, and emergency departments. Medication availability and the complexity and time commitment of patient billing are consistent challenges, and multidisciplinary collaboration a common strength across the 3 institutions. Pharmacists at Muhimbili perform innovative and critical functions to support optimal patient care tailored to specific patient populations. The detailed review of these services can serve as a model for pharmacy practice at other health systems in LMIC and beyond.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-03-24T12:50:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021999934
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Self-medication Practice and Associated Factors among Private Health
           Sciences Students in Gondar Town, North West Ethiopia. A Cross-sectional
           Study

    • Authors: Zemene Demelash Kifle, Abebe Basazn Mekuria, Demssie Ayalew Anteneh, Engidaw Fentahun Enyew
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Self-medication is the most common practice worldwide and it may lead to irrational use of drugs. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of self-medication practice and its associated factors among health science students. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 600 health science students in Gondar town. The data regarding self-medication practice and its associated factors were collected using a face-to-face interview on a structured questionnaire. SPSS −24 was used for data analysis and explained with univariate, and multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine the factors associated with self-medication practice (sex, age, religion, marital status, residence, department, year of study, monthly income, access to pharmacy, and peer/family pressure). A total of 554 students responded to the questionnaire with a response rate of 92.3%. Out of 554 respondents, 78.2% were practiced self-medication. Headache/fever 37.88% (n = 164) was reported as the most common complaint to practice self-medication. Among the reasons for self-medication practice, similarity of symptoms with past illness 33.49% (n = 145) was the most frequently reported. In current study, Females (AOR = 3.11, 95% CI = 1.55, 6.25), Muslim followers (AOR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.30, 5.91), Protestant followers (AOR = 4.25, 95% CI = 1.38, 13.07), pharmacy students (AOR = 3.72, 95% CI = 1.97, 9.30), clinical nursing students (AOR = 2.88, 95% CI = 1.87, 14.48), monthly income (>500ETB) (AOR = 2.49, 95% CI = 1.12, 5.56), distance of health institution (
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-03-24T12:48:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00469580211005188
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Co-infection and Risk Factors Associated with STIs among Pregnant Women in
           Rural Health Facilities in Nigeria: A Retrospective Study

    • Authors: MaryJoy Umoke, Peter Sage, Tor Bjoernsen, Prince Christian Ifeanachor Umoke, Christian Ezeugworie, Daniel Ejiofor, Ogbonna Agha, Chioma Adaora Nwalieji, Rosemary N. Onwe, Ifeanyi Emmanuel Nwafor, Obinna Jude Chukwu
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Globally, sexually transmitted infections are recognized as a public and reproductive health challenge. The study determined the prevalence, co-infection, and risk factors associated with HBV, HCV, HIV, and Syphilis infections among pregnant women receiving antenatal care in rural health facilities in Ebonyi State, Nigeria. A retrospective study was conducted from January to December 2018 in 8 primary healthcare facilities using antenatal records of all the 4657 pregnant women who attended ANC within the period. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics with IBM SPSS statistics version 20 and hypotheses tested at P  .05) was observed. Also, prevalence was more among the younger mothers (
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-03-19T07:10:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021992912
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Challenges for Non-COVID Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in
           Bangladesh: An Observation during Coronavirus Disease Pandemic

    • Authors: Saif Al Amin, Sharon D. Morrison, Maheen Kabir, Md. Refat Uz-Zaman Sajib
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      The coronavirus disease pandemic has created a crisis for patients with chronic kidney disease, as far as getting treatment facilities are concerned. The crisis is more intense in developing countries where the health system is more vulnerable due to poor infrastructures and insufficient health professionals. Bangladesh, being a developing nation, is also facing similar challenges to provide sufficient services to patients with chronic kidney disease. In this short report, we have discussed the challenges and barriers non-COVID chronic kidney disease patients are facing in terms of healthcare access along with getting proper medical interventions and suggested probable strategies to minimize the suffering.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-03-08T06:18:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021997337
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • The Effect of Staggered Shift Scheduling Mode on Nurses in the COVID-19
           Isolation Ward- A Cross Sectional Study

    • Authors: Huang Lishan, Tang Li, Yu Lingna, Wu Yuelin, Huang Zixiang, Tian Xiaobo
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      In order to explore the rational use of nursing resources in the epidemic situation of COVID-19, we optimized the shift arrangement in COVID-19 isolation area and constructed a reasonable nursing schedule under the condition of limited human resources. Seventy-eight nurses were arranged in COVID-19 isolation area to work for 1 week according to 3 different shifts: 4 + 4 h, 6 h and 6 h (overlapping by 1 h). Through the form of questionnaire, the comprehensive job satisfaction of 3 different models were compared, and the nursing quality and the consumption of protective equipment under 3 different modes were analyzed. The results showed that the comprehensive job satisfaction and nursing quality of nurses in 6 h (overlapping by 1 h) shift mode were better than those in other shift modes, and the consumption of protective equipment was lower.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-03-08T06:15:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021997223
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • The Association between Hospital-Physician Vertical Integration and
           Outpatient Physician Prices Paid by Commercial Insurers: New Evidence

    • Authors: James Godwin, Daniel R. Arnold, Brent D. Fulton, Richard M. Scheffler
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      This study assessed the relationship between hospital ownership of physician organizations (known as hospital-physician vertical integration) and facility fees billed to commercial insurers and physician service prices. Healthcare claims came from the IBM® MarketScan® Commercial Database (2012-2016, N = 30,716,800 office visit claims [CPT codes 99211-99215]), and hospital-physician vertical integration measures were from SK&A Office Based Physicians Database provided by IQVIA. Multi-variate, fixed-effect models were used to regress prices on market-level hospital-physician vertical integration; models included geographic market and year fixed effects, claim-level variables, and time-varying market-level variables. Analyses did not find that market-level hospital-physician vertical integration was associated with the billing of facility fees for office visits. However, vertical integration was associated with office visit physician prices for some specialties. A 10-percentage-point increase in vertical integration was associated with a 1.0% price increase for primary care, a 0.6% increase for orthopedics, and a 0.5% increase for cardiology; no such association was found for obstetrics/gynecology or oncology. When comparing metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in the bottom quartile of changes in vertical integration from 2012 to 2016 to MSAs in the top quartile, we found the following relative price increases based on predicted values for claims in the top quartile: $1.64 (1.9% of mean 2012 predicted price) for primary care to $2.30 (3.1%) for orthopedics to $3.13 (3.4%) for cardiology. Differences in predicted price accounted for an estimated $45.8 million in additional expenditure on primary care office visits in the top quartile of MSAs in 2016. In summary, market-level hospital-physician vertical integration was positively associated with physician prices for select specialties, but was not associated with changes in the use of facility-fee billing. More evidence on the quality effects of hospital-physician vertical integration is needed, as price increases that are not accompanied by measurable quality improvements should be part of any regulatory review.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-03-06T10:56:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021991276
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Reasons Behind Generation Z Nursing Students’ Intentions to Leave their
           Profession: A Cross-Sectional Study

    • Authors: Jaseon Kim, Duckhee Chae, Jae Yong Yoo
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      This study aims to identify predictors of turnover intention within 2 years of employment among 3rd and 4th grade Generation Z nursing students. Turnover intention is a multi-stage process ranging from mere desire, to serious thoughts, decision-making, and actual planning. Previous studies have focused on identifying the factors affecting turnover intention among practicing nurses. However, undergraduate nursing students also contemplate their decision to stay or leave the nursing profession after graduation. This cross-sectional descriptive study recruited 210 nursing students from 3 colleges in South Korea. A self-administered survey was conducted using the Career Preparation Behavior Scale, the Calling and Vocational Questionnaire, the Social Responsibility Scale, and the Revised Self-Leadership Questionnaire. Four questions were used to explore participants’ turnover intention, their motivation for studying nursing, their major satisfaction, and their clinical experience satisfaction. Descriptive and multiple logistic regression statistics were obtained using SPSS. Of the participants, 17.6% had turnover intention within 2 years of employment. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicates that clinical experience satisfaction is the only significant predictor. In the univariate analysis, nursing students who had turnover intentions were less likely to practice career preparation behaviors and had lower levels of vocational consciousness and social responsibility. To keep a proficient nursing workforce in the profession, professional commitments from universities and hospital institutions are needed to provide quality clinical learning experiences for nursing students. Further prospective study is needed to observe how Generation Z undergraduate students’ turnover intentions change and what factors influence this process.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-03-04T11:09:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021999928
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Who Is More Satisfied with Health Services' A Cross-Sectional Study in
           China

    • Authors: Shangren Qin, Ye Ding
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      This cross-sectional study aims to assess the Chinese population’s satisfaction with health service and identify 2 types of variables, Andersen’s behavioral model related variables and social environment variables associated with high satisfaction. Data were derived from the 2013 Chinese General Social Survey (CGSS). Using exploratory factor analysis, the original questionnaire’s 10 health services were grouped into 2 dimensions, including “health management service” and “public health service.” Then, the satisfaction was described. The associations between satisfaction and factors were assessed using a multivariable logistic regression model. As a result, a total of 5283 subjects were enrolled. The satisfaction was 56.74% for “health management service” and 54.48% for “public health service.” Those with older age, lower education level, positive social environment factors (ie, higher perceived social class, higher perceived social trust, and perceived social equity), and having pension were more likely to report high satisfaction. Moreover, compared to the east region (the most prosperous region), the individuals from the central region or the north-east region (both regional economic levels were medium) had lower odds of reporting high satisfaction. In comparison, those from the west region (the least developed region) had higher odds. In conclusion, actionable measures to increase satisfaction should be proposed by the Chinese government, including increasing pension insurance coverage, increasing investment in health services, creating an excellent social environment, etc.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-02-27T11:11:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021999926
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Primary Care Practice Characteristics and
           Healthcare Professionals’ Behavioral Responses to Change

    • Authors: Victoria M. Grady, Tulay G. Soylu, Debora G. Goldberg, Panagiota Kitsantas, James D. Grady
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      The recent decade brought major changes to primary care practices. Previous research on change has focused on change processes, and change implementations rather than studying employee’s feelings, perceptions, and attitudes toward change. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between healthcare professionals’ behavioral responses to change and practice characteristics. Our study, which builds upon Conner’s theory, addresses an extensive coverage of individual behaviors, feelings, and attitudes toward change. We analyzed survey responses of healthcare professionals (n = 1279) from 154 primary care practices in Virginia. Healthcare professionals included physicians, advanced practice clinicians, clinical support staff, and administrative staff. The Change Diagnostic Index© (CDI) was used to measure behavioral responses in 7 domains: anxiety, frustration, delayed development, rejection of environment, refusal to participate, withdrawal, and global reaction. We used descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analysis. Our findings indicate that professionals had a significantly lower aptitude for change if they work in larger practices (≥16 clinicians) compared to solo practices (P 
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-02-27T11:09:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021996518
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Family Members of Adults with Intellectual Disability Living in
           Residential Settings: Roles and Collaboration with Professionals. A Review
           of the Literature

    • Authors: Natalie Zambrino, Ingeborg Hedderich
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      The aim of this article is to review the literature concerning the role of family members of adults with an intellectual disability living in diverse residential settings and their collaboration with residential staff. Whenever the scarce literature on the subject allowed, the focus was laid on family members of persons with additional challenging behavior. Electronic databases, reference screening, and hand search of selected journals was employed to collate literature using key terms such as family members, intellectual disability, and residential setting. By extracting relevant data of the eighteen articles that fulfilled all inclusion criteria, the following 3 main themes with each subthemes were identified inductively: roles of family members after the transition, the effects of the transition on family members, and the collaboration between the family members and professional care staff. This review presents the different roles family members partake and highlights the importance of regular open two-sided communication for collaboration with professional staff to be successful. Practical implementations are discussed and the need for further research in the field is indicated.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-02-26T06:31:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021991301
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Lacking Communication Would Increase General Symptom Index Scores of
           Medical Team Members During COVID-19 Pandemic in China: A Retrospective
           Cohort Study

    • Authors: Jinlong Zhang, Yunyun Fang, Zhaohui Lu, Xia Chen, Na Hong, Cheng Wang
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      There are few studies on the psychological status of medical staff during the COVID-19 outbreak. Our study addresses whether lack of communication affects the psychological status of medical team members supporting Wuhan during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. We used general symptom index (GSI) scores of the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) to evaluate participants’ psychological status. We adopted a stratified sampling method and selected the fourth team, with a total of 137 members, as participants. In total 76.6% and 69.7% of female and male participants, respectively, had bachelor’s degrees; 41.6% and 21.2% of female and male participants, respectively, were unmarried. Regarding communication, 14.29% and 6.06% of female and male participants, respectively, reported a lack of communication with the team (LCWT). Additionally, 13.0% and 6.1% of female and male participants, respectively, experienced fear of being infected (FoBI). LCWT and FoBI were positively correlated with GSI score (estimated change = 0.2, 95% CI [0.1-0.3]). When adjusted for gender, age, and FoBI, LCWT was positively correlated with GSI score (P 
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-02-23T06:05:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021997344
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Knowledge, Perceptions, and Prevention Practices among Palestinian
           University Students during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Questionnaire-Based
           Survey

    • Authors: Basma Salameh, Sami Basha, Walid Basha, Jihad Abdallah
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      The purpose of this study is to offer a timely understanding of university students’ knowledge, perception, and preventative practices related to COVID-19 in Palestine and to determine affecting factors (gender, region, and type of locality). A cross-sectional design was used and data was collected over 2 weeks in April 2020 through an online survey. A total of 484 surveys were collected from students from different Palestinian universities. Participants showed high levels of knowledge across multiple topics (symptoms and characteristics of COVID-19, prevention practices, and at-risk groups), although respondents were less likely to indicate mask wearing as an effective prevention practice compared to other practices, and almost one-third reported incorrectly that taking antibiotics is effective in preventing COVID-19 infection. Respondents reported the most trust in the Ministry of Health as a source of information, and the least trust in social media. A generally high level of acceptance of government regulations related to the COVID-19 pandemic was found. Given the current global situation and the second wave of infections in Palestine, plans should be in place to disseminate correct information and combat newly-emerging rumors and misinformation through channels that are trusted by the university student population.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-02-23T06:03:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021993944
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Heat Stress-Related Symptoms among Bakery Workers in Lebanon: A National
           Cross-Sectional Study

    • Authors: Rima R. Habib, Nataly W. El-Haddad, Dana A. Halwani, Kareem Elzein, Safa Hojeij
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Heat exposure is linked to a range of heat-related illnesses and injuries. This study assessed the association between workers’ perceptions of the work environment and reports of heat stress-related health symptoms in bakery workers in Lebanon. A national cross-sectional survey of workers was carried out in 504 bakeries in Lebanon. One worker in each bakery was interviewed using questions relating to the workplace environment and heat stress-related health symptoms. Heat and humidity measurements were recorded in bakeries. Descriptive analyses were performed, and logistic regression assessed relationships between the workplace environment, worker perceptions, and reports of heat stress-related health symptoms. In total, 47.2% of workers experienced heat stress-related symptoms, 83% perceived workplace temperatures as hot, and 48% perceived these temperatures as affecting their health. Humidex readings showed that 49% of bakeries had conditions unsafe for routine work tasks. Working under pressure (AOR = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.12-2.43), job dissatisfaction (AOR = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.12-2.79), and perceptions that high temperatures negatively affected health (AOR = 2.73; 95% CI = 1.87-3.99) were all significantly correlated to reports of heat stress-related symptoms. Females were more likely to experience heat stress-related symptoms (AOR = 1.96; 95% CI = 1.13-3.39). Workers who reported low levels of water consumption at work were also more likely to experience heat stress-related health symptoms. We conclude that heat exposure potentially impacts workers’ health in Lebanese bakeries. Improvements in workplace conditions, adequate infrastructure, and workers’ training are key interventions for maintaining workers’ health.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-02-15T09:27:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021990517
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Vision 2030 and Sustainable Development: State Capacity to Revitalize the
           Healthcare System in Saudi Arabia

    • Authors: Redwanur Rahman, Ameerah Qattan
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Vision 2030 is a social and economic strategic program by the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) aimed at diversifying the nation’s economy and stimulating numerous changes in its social and economic sectors, including in healthcare. Sustainable Development (SD) 2030 is a global consensual agreement among nation-states to build a sustainable, desirable and progressively interrelated world. The Saudi government highlighted Vision 2030 to improve population health and the world body reiterated that SD 2030 will contribute to “healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages.” This article analyzes the state capacity in revitalizing the healthcare system in Saudi Arabia with the context of Vision 2030 and SD 2030. Scoping reviews and thematic data analysis techniques were used as a method of this study. The realization of Vision 2030 is essential for the fulfilment of the SD Goals 2030. The government has realigned its national programs, plans and strategies with global development targets, indicators, and goals to achieve the SD Goals. Achieving SD 2030 is seen as the main component of development for health. Prudent reforms should be taken to accommodate the goals and objectives of Vision 2030 and SD 2030. These measures will help strengthen governance and state capacity so as to ultimately revitalize the Saudi healthcare system and improve population health. Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030 encourages the state to play a renewed role in development in light of the UN’s declaration of the “right to development.” While pursuing SD Goals, the state must create the necessary environment for sustaining capacity, need to improve service delivery by building cooperation and coordination among providers and interactions among groups to realize constructive roles and functions in maintaining state affairs, which ultimately enhances state capacity to revitalize healthcare system of Saudi Arabia.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-02-11T07:26:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958020984682
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Medicaid Expansion and Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Access to Health
           Care: Applying the National Academy of Medicine Definition of Health Care
           Disparities

    • Authors: Hyunjung Lee, Dominic Hodgkin, Michael P. Johnson, Frank W. Porell
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      Since 2014, 32 states implemented Medicaid expansion by removing the categorical criteria for childless adults and by expanding income eligibility to 138% of the federal poverty level (FPL) for all non-elderly adults. Previous studies found that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion improved rates of being insured, unmet needs for care due to cost, number of physician visits, and health status among low-income adults. However, a few recent studies focused on the expansion’s effect on racial/ethnic disparities and used the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) disparity approach with a limited set of access measures. This quasi-experimental study examined the effect of Medicaid expansion on racial/ethnic disparities in access to health care for U.S. citizens aged 19 to 64 with income below 138% of the federal poverty line. The difference-in-differences model compared changes over time in 2 measures of insurance coverage and 8 measures of access to health care, using National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data from 2010 to 2016. Analyses used the NAM definition of disparities. Medicaid expansion was associated with significant decreases in uninsured rates and increases in Medicaid coverage among all racial/ethnic groups. There were differences across racial/ethnic groups regarding which specific access measures improved. For delayed care and unmet need for care, decreases in racial/ethnic disparities were observed. After the ACA Medicaid expansion, most access outcomes improved for disadvantaged groups, but also for others, with the result that disparities were not significantly reduced.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-02-10T10:38:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021991293
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • A Mixed-Methods Study to Explore the Impact of Hospital Accreditation

    • Authors: Khamis Al-alawy, Immanuel Azaad Moonesar, Hanan Ali Mubarak Obaid, Reem Gaafar, Ehab Ismail Al-Abed Bawadi
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      There are several hospital accreditors globally but there is limited understanding of how accreditation impacts on hospital performance and the health system objectives. The objective of the study were to explore the impact of hospital accreditation and inform policy decision-making. We adopted a mixed-methods approach to include an online survey and 3 focus groups. We report 27 of 36 private hospitals who responded to the survey. Key reasons for accreditation were to improve quality (n = 23), implement evidence-based practice (n = 17), continuity of accreditation (n = 15), and popularity (n = 11). Reported improvements include quality of care (27), patient care (26), organizational processes (21), and patient satisfaction (19) among others. Average stakeholder satisfaction rate was 74%. Participants from the 3 focus group discussions felt that staff hours and stress levels were high during the accreditation process, and some standards were useful while others were deemed non-essential. There was support for a local accreditation body with an emphasis on best practice. The findings from the study suggest accreditation to have an impact on structure and process measures, but the gains in key areas were short-lived. There is a need to strengthen governance and develop performance measures to evidence outcome improvement, assure alignment with regulation and the health system objectives.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-02-02T06:40:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958020981463
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
  • Simulating the Fiscal Impact of Anti-Obesity Medications as an Obesity
           Reduction Strategy

    • Authors: Mina Kabiri, Alison Sexton Ward, Abhilasha Ramasamy, Rebecca Kee, Rahul Ganguly, Brian Gabriel Smolarz, Tracy Zvenyach, James R. Baumgardner, Dana P. Goldman
      Abstract: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing, Volume 58, Issue , January-December 2021.
      While substantial public health investment in anti-smoking initiatives has had demonstrated benefits on health and fiscal outcomes, similar investment in reducing obesity has not been undertaken, despite the substantial burden obesity places on society. Anti-obesity medications (AOMs) are poorly prescribed despite evidence that weight loss is not sustained using other strategies alone.We used a simulation model to estimate the potential impact of 100% uptake of AOMs on Medicare and Medicaid spending, disability payments, and taxes collected relative to status quo with negligible AOM use. Relative to status quo, AOM use simulation would result in Medicare and Medicaid savings of $231.5 billion and $188.8 billion respectively over 75 years. Government tax revenues would increase by $452.8 billion. Overall, the net benefit would be $746.6 billion. Anti-smoking efforts have had substantial benefits for society. A similar investment in obesity reduction, including broad use of AOMs, should be considered.
      Citation: INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing
      PubDate: 2021-01-29T11:29:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0046958021990516
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2021)
       
 
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