Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)

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Social Studies Research and Practice
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 1933-5415
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • On teaching Holocaust geographies: supporting inquiry into space,
           persecution and civic action

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      Authors: Jeffrey C. Eargle, Michael Mewborne
      Abstract: In this article, the authors – a social studies methods professor and geography research associate – make the case for considering the integration of Holocaust geographies into the middle and secondary curriculum, potential challenges that teachers may have in teaching Holocaust geographies are addressed. Using an experience in delivering professional development on Holocaust geographies to teachers to frame the discourse within the article, the authors contend that a study of Holocaust geographies tests geography as a discipline, addresses current problems and supports student inquiry. Therefore, the inclusion of the Holocaust in the geography curriculum is both needed and valuable. Examining the Holocaust spatially using geographical skills moves students away from the potential limits of studying the Holocaust temporally using only historical skills. Thus, the distance between past and present, although not ignored, is narrowed through the inquiry into spatial patterns and characteristics, providing the potential to bring greater focus on present-day antisemitism, persecution, genocide and authoritarianism. Educators are encouraged to take up work that intersects the civic goals of both geography and Holocaust education, yet literature on these intersections is sparse. We call upon Holocaust education and geography education organizations to develop and provide support for teachers around Holocaust geographies.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-07-10
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-03-2024-0016
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Learning about place from Indigenous Elders: self-study in social studies
           education

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      Authors: Muffet Trout
      Abstract: This paper explores the effects of land education on the practice of a White social studies teacher educator who wanted to teach about the ecological crisis. The teacher educator used self-study methodology to analyze her experiences with local Indigenous leaders when she was a high school social studies teacher and currently as a social studies methods professor. Data sources included journals, field notes, course-related materials, and formal writings. Through experiences, Indigenous leaders helped the teacher educator identify contrasting cultural paradigms to broaden her understanding of where she lives. This learning enabled the teacher educator to use the two paradigms in her teaching about place and the ecological crisis. This research shows inner work that can position teacher educators to understand the value of Indigenous wisdom regarding place when teaching about the ecological crisis.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-07-04
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-01-2024-0005
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • “Nothing compares to actually listening”: experiences with sacrificial
           listening and place-based education

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      Authors: Amy Allen, Carey Stewart, Mason Engelhardt
      Abstract: Recent scholarship has called for researchers to recognize the urgency of place-based education as a critical component of social studies pedagogy. This study seeks to understand better the relationship between place-based education, sacrificial listening and difficult history. In this qualitative, arts-based research study, collaging is used to investigate how students use the theory of sacrificial listening while trying to make sense of difficult histories during a place-based history education experience. Students enrolled in a PBE experience received instruction about the theory of sacrificial listening at the beginning of a two-week course on the lasting impact of the civil rights movement. Students created a collage and responded to a reflection prompt about the course after engaging in course experiences, including travel to Oklahoma, Arkansas, Tennessee and Alabama. Findings in the study demonstrate how sacrificial listening appeared, both explicitly and implicitly, in the ways students processed difficult history during a place-based education experience. Ultimately, the study found, though students organized their thoughts in distinct ways, they all leaned on the theory of sacrificial listening to make sense of what they learned. Few studies have applied the theory of sacrificial listening as a pedagogical framework. Future research should build on this work, further investigating the theory as a pedagogical framework in conjunction with both place-based history education as well as other instructional settings.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-05-30
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-01-2024-0007
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Developing core practices of social studies preservice teachers through
           critical historical inquiry

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      Authors: Mathew Baker, Michael Lee Joseph
      Abstract: Examine how social studies preservice teachers conceptualize and enact critical historical inquiry. Critical qualitative case study. Differing conceptual understandings and had trouble infusing their practice with the critical theory learned in the university. Examine how a core practice is bolstering the practice-theory connection in teacher education.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-05-21
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-03-2024-0012
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • “Only memories:” place-based holocaust education in
           contemporary Poland

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      Authors: Anna Marisa Yonas
      Abstract: The purpose of this self-study is to analyze my experiences learning in Poland, the country where Nazis imprisoned and murdered my family. I share findings from multiple museum locations, including implications for history teachers, teacher educators and visitors to Holocaust museums. I participated in a ten-day professional development seminar designed for American teachers to visit Poland. To allow for self-study after the trip, I maintained a reflexive journal and photographic records of each day I was in Poland. I analyze these data in conjunction with publicly available data from the museums and historical sites I visited in Poland. The findings suggest that teachers can face many challenges when learning in a land of traumatic absences. Many challenges stem from the absences of buildings and survivors, as those may be integral to place-based learning. Testimonies and first-person accounts may ameliorate these challenges for teachers engaging in place-based learning. Additionally, teachers may use these accounts to bring a pedagogy of remembrance from Poland to their classrooms. This study is not under review with another journal.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-05-21
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-10-2023-0057
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Promoting historical empathy with a local history research project about
           the pandemic

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      Authors: Katherine Perrotta, Katlynn Cross
      Abstract: We examined how high school students demonstrated historical empathy through conducting local history place-based research to create an exhibit and companion book about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their community. The majority of existing historical empathy scholarship focuses on classroom-based inquiry of historical events, people and time periods. We contend that broader examination of how historical empathy can be promoted beyond school-based instruction can contribute to the field by examining how student analyses of historical contexts and perspectives, and making affective connections to historical topics of study are needed when engaging in placed-based local history projects. Qualitative case study methodology was implemented for this study. A Likert-scale survey with a questionnaire was distributed to 30 high school study participants. Thirteen students gave follow-up interviews. Students’ responses on the surveys, interviews and questionnaires were organized into three categories that aligned to the theoretical framework – identification of historical contexts of the sources that students collected, analysis of how contexts shaped the perspectives expressed in the collected sources and expression of reasoned connections between the students’ emotions and experiences during the pandemic. A rubric was used to examine how students’ writing samples and reflections reflected demonstration of historical empathy. Students responded that their local history research about the pandemic contributed to their displays of historical empathy. Students displayed weaker evidence of historical empathy while examining archival resources to explain the historical contexts of the pandemic. Student demonstration of historical empathy was stronger when analyzing community-sourced documents for perspectives and making reasoned affective connections to what they learned about the historical significance of the pandemic. The place-based aspects of this project were strongly connected to the students’ engagement in historical empathy because the sources they analyzed were relevant to their experiences and identities as citizens in their community. Documenting the diverse human experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic is crucial to preserving the history of this extraordinary time. Every person around the globe experienced the pandemic differently, hence riding out the same storm in different boats. At some point, the pandemic will appear in historical narratives of the social studies curriculum. Therefore, now is an opportune time to ascertain whether place-based local history research about the contexts, perspectives and experiences of community members and children themselves, during the pandemic can foster historical empathy.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-05-14
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-10-2023-0060
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Bootstraps, redlines and wage-theft: using Monopoly to critically examine
           American wealth inequality

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      Authors: Matt Dingler
      Abstract: Scholarship on America’s K-12 economics curriculum reveals an inattention to many harmful economic realities, specifically wealth inequality. Critics of the present curriculum posit that its emphasis on out-dated concepts and models ignores crucial elements of reality that impact economic interaction and identities. In response to the dominant economic paradigm and methods, this practitioner-focused paper discusses an economically pluralist, pedagogically critical approach to interrogating destructive economic realities. It details how three social studies classroom simulations based on the board game Monopoly may be integrated with certain informational texts to explore economic factors that contribute to America’s unique form of wealth inequality. This paper describes wealth inequality in America and rationalizes the need to make this social problem a focus of study in the secondary social studies classroom. First, I survey the present curricular apparatus of K-12 economics education and then argue for a pluralist approach that expands the curriculum’s dominant neoclassical paradigm. Connecting economic pluralism to critical citizen education, I draw upon emerging critical economic citizen education scholarship to explain attendant pedagogical and instructional approaches. The described lesson builds upon a tradition of Monopoly simulations, is rooted in critical citizen education pedagogy and aligns with Soroko’s (2023) critical economic literacy framework. This paper progresses the curricular movement of economic pluralism through its critique of America’s current K-12 economics curriculum that does not focus on immediate, lived social problems. It further defines critical economics, citizenship and pedagogy, then details an instructional practice that employs critical disciplinary tools to investigate contributing factors of American wealth inequality. This paper contributes to the growing field of pluralist economic perspectives and pedagogies. Specifically, it enriches understanding of critical economics citizenship education by further defining attendant pedagogy and explaining Monopoly as an instructional tool for critical economics citizen education. Previous works have discussed Monopoly’s utility for teaching various concepts within the social studies disciplines. This simulation lesson is unique in its instructional approach that merges simulation experiences with certain informational texts to cultivate critical economic knowledge of American wealth inequality and critical economic skills for critiquing and transforming oppressive economic realities.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-05-03
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-10-2023-0058
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Queer representation in children’s books beyond two moms or two dads

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      Authors: Peter C. Olson
      Abstract: This article aims to help educators provide a holistic view of the LGBTQ community by highlighting children’s books that include non-parental LGBTQ characters. The author selected over 80 children’s books honored by the American Library Association’s Rainbow Book List. Twenty-two books were analyzed that contain examples of LGBTQ adults existing beyond the homonormative nuclear family, e.g. two same-sex parents raising children. The author discusses various ways of living represented in these books, such as chosen families, extended families, romantic partnerships and singlehood. With the increased number of high-quality LGBTQ-inclusive children’s books published in the past decade, this study provides the foundation for educators to select various texts that reveal diverse representations of LGBTQ individuals.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-05-02
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-12-2023-0070
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Between villainification and heroification: toward a theory of nuanced
           ethical judgments

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      Authors: Paul J. Yoder
      Abstract: The purpose of this conceptual article is to examine the role of villainification and heroification in social studies through critically analyzing the author’s place-based encounters with three civil war narratives. The article describes the author’s critical reflections on three narratives involving confederate figures and examines theoretical and pedagogical implications. The article introduces a spectrum of ethical judgments which plots villainification and heroification on opposing ends. The author advocates for more nuanced ethical judgments that contextualize decisions as understandable or defensible based on evidence. The term understandable reflects a concept of being able to explain (i.e. demonstrate understanding) why a curricular figure made certain choices without agreeing with or supporting those choices. The term defensible denotes the existence of evidence that provides a rationale for a choice such that the person making the ethical judgment would feel comfortable making (i.e. defending) the same choice. The article introduces a theory of nuanced ethical judgments in social studies that maps onto existing literature on heroification, villainification and place-based education. Pedagogical implications for social studies education are also identified.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-04-24
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-12-2023-0071
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Making the virtual historical using primary sources

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      Authors: Nicole C. Miller, Rebecca L. Kellum
      Abstract: This paper seeks to demonstrate the pedagogical potential of incorporating virtual reality (VR) and primary sources in social studies education. It seeks to highlight how VR can enhance student engagement, foster critical thinking and provide immersive contextualization for historical events. Despite acknowledging challenges, this paper advocates for the purposeful adoption of VR technology in the classroom to enrich the teaching and learning of history. This paper explores the integration of virtual reality and primary sources in social studies education by providing a detailed lesson plan that could be used as a model for this type of teaching, as well as other resources and opportunities to do so. It highlights the potential of VR to enhance engagement, historical thinking and historical empathy. Integrating virtual reality and primary sources can support student engagement, critical thinking and historical empathy. There are also challenges that can be mitigated through careful planning. This paper provides teachers with a pedagogical model and resources for integrating VR and primary sources, along with challenges and methods for mitigating those, in their secondary social studies classroom. This paper offers a unique model for combining virtual reality and primary sources for secondary social studies educators. It provides an example lesson plan exemplifying its application and emphasizing VR’s potential to support teaching and learning.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-04-09
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-12-2023-0077
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • “I got knocked down”: factors impacting a novice
           teacher’s decision making

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      Authors: Colleen Fitzpatrick, Adam Friedman
      Abstract: This study explores how one novice teacher navigated his first-year teaching sixth-grade social studies. One-sixth grade novice teacher was observed during his unit on the Islamic Empire. The teacher was interviewed before the unit began to understand his approach to combating Islamophobia and interviewed again after the unit so he could reflect on the unit and discuss if he believed he had accomplished his original goal. Classroom artifacts (handouts, slide decks, etc.) were collected. The findings highlight the various forces that impacted the decisions the teacher made in the classroom. Lack of support from administration and various colleagues left the teacher feeling overwhelmed and unable to accomplish his goals. While the teacher started the unit with a clear purpose for teaching against Islamophobia, he ultimately taught a unit where students memorized discrete pieces of information. This study adds to previous research on the need for providing administrative support for novice teachers to be able to teach in ambitious ways by highlighting the numerous shortcomings.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-03-26
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-09-2023-0049
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • “They will at least do no harm”: LGBTQ social studies teacher
           education

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      Authors: Cathy A.R. Brant
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the self-efficacy of social studies teacher education working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) preservice teachers, teaching LGBTQ content in their methods courses, and helping the preservice teachers they teach in those classes reduce their bias and prejudice against LGBTQ individuals. This study, framed by self-efficacy theory, employs a mixed methods approach, qualitative semistructured interviews (n = 6) and quantitative (Likert-scale) survey questions (n = 174). Participants reported high self-efficacy in working with LGBTQ students but showed decreased efficacy in teaching about LGBTQ content and helping reduce preservice teacher LGBTQ bias. Participants suggested that time in the curriculum, lack of knowledge about LGBTQ topics/issues, and the lack of institutional support are some of the leading barriers to LGBTQ inclusion in the social studies teacher preparation curriculum. This is the only work conducted at this scale to examine social studies teacher educators' self-efficacy in LGBTQ-inclusion in methods courses. It has implications for increasing this self-efficacy to help make P-16 social studies education LGBTQ-inclusive.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-03-25
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-12-2023-0069
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Preservice teachers and the patriotism of the 1619
           and 1776 history narratives

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      Authors: Benjamin R. Wellenreiter, Xiaoying Zhao, Thomas Lucey
      Abstract: Preservice teachers (n = 39) described their definitions of patriotism and to what extent they believed statements from The 1619 Project (2019) and The 1776 Commission Report (2021) were patriotic. This study employed a mixed-method survey including open-ended prompts requesting participants’ descriptions of patriotism and Likert scale prompts asking participants to agree/disagree with deidentified statements from The 1619 Project and the 1776 Commission Report. In vivo words reflecting emotional responses to patriotism and the statements informed the categorization process in a second round of coding. Four categories of patriotism definition were identified. Identified were relationships between groups’ conceptualizations of patriotism and whether statements from history narratives were viewed as patriotic. This article contributes to the field by exploring the intersectionality of the concept of patriotism with competing narratives regarding the foundation and growth of the United States.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-03-25
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-12-2023-0073
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Developing notions of place in an undergraduate elementary social studies
           methods course

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      Authors: Ariel Cornett, Erin Piedmont
      Abstract: Place-based, social studies teaching and learning has the potential to foster engaged citizens connected and committed to improving their communities. This study explored the research question, “In what ways do classroom and field-based experiences prepare teacher candidates (TCs) to make connections between place-based education and elementary social studies education'” This qualitative case study examined how elementary TCs learned about, researched, curated and created place-based social studies educational resources related to community sites. Data collection included TCs’ Pre- and Post-Course Reflections as well as Self-Evaluations, which were analyzed using an inductive approach and multiple rounds of concept coding. Several themes emerged through data analysis. The authors organized their findings around three themes: connections (i.e. place becomes personal), immersion (i.e. learning about place to learning in place) and bridge building (i.e. local as classroom). The classroom and field-based experiences in the elementary social studies methods course informed the ways in which TCs learned about and connected to the concept of place, experienced place in a specific place (i.e. downtown Statesboro, Georgia), and reflected upon the myriad ways that they could utilize place in their future elementary social studies classrooms. TCs (as well as in-service teachers and teacher educators) must become more informed, connected and committed to places within their local communities in order to consider them as resources for elementary social studies teaching and learning.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-03-12
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-10-2023-0056
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • The power(s) of to learn about the Cold War

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      Authors: Alan S. Marcus, Katherine A. Griffith, Francis Gary Powers Jr
      Abstract: In this article, we use the film Bridge of Spies – which depicts the case of U-2 spy pilot Francis Gary Powers – and relevant primary sources, particularly Powers' letters from prison, to provide teachers with a case that can engage students with the complexity of the Cold War. Understanding USA–Russia relations is as important today as ever as we watch the tragedy unfold in Ukraine. Using primary sources to reflect on the Cold War can help secondary students understand the historical context of the war in Ukraine as well as how to evaluate and critique sources of information about the war. The film and personal letters provide insights often not available or obvious when we focus on the political or military history of an event or time period. The Cold War is frequently defined by the rhetoric of the USA and Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) governments – but everyday people and citizens had a wider range of views and experiences. The film and letters bring out the humanity of the Cold War. This article supports secondary teachers in incorporating film and primary sources as teaching tools to study the Cold War while more broadly thinking about these sources as ways to understand the past. The letters used, including those from U-2 spy pilot Francis Gary Powers, help us understand his time in a Soviet prison as well as the behind-the-scenes work to free him as part of a prisoner exchange. The U-2 Incident and other events of the Cold War provide important context for understanding the Cold War-like tensions between the USA and Russia today. The distrust between these countries has a long history. However, documents like the film and letters discussed here show that there is much more to the bluster of political leaders and the military chess game. There is an important human element to these events and an impact on individuals who are much more than pawns in international diplomacy.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-27
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-03-2023-0015
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Being l'Autre: French-Canadian immigrants in contemporary children's
           literature

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      Authors: Danielle E. Sachdeva
      Abstract: Immigration-themed children’s literature can be an important resource in the classroom, especially because some U.S. immigrant groups, including French-Canadians, have received limited curricular representation. Using the qualitative method of critical content analysis, this study aims to examine depictions of French-Canadian immigrants to the United States in contemporary children’s books. Postcolonialism is employed as an analytical lens with special attention given to the ways immigrant characters are constructed as different from the dominant group (i.e., othering), how dominant group values are imposed on immigrant characters, and how immigrant characters resist othering and domination. Three books comprise the sample: “Charlotte Bakeman Has Her Say” by Mary Finger and illustrated by Kimberly Batti, “Other Bells for Us to Ring” by Robert Cormier, and “Red River Girl” by Norma Sommerdorf. The findings reveal multiple instances in which French-Canadian immigrants are constructed as Other and few instances in which these characters resist this positioning, and these books reflect the real ways French-Canadians were perceived as subalterns during the mass migration from Québec to the United States between the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This study is significant because it examines portrayals of a substantial immigrant group that has been overlooked in the immigration history curriculum. This sample of children’s books may be used to teach children the complexities of immigration history and provide a more nuanced understanding of immigration during the 19th and 20th centuries.
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-15
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-10-2023-0054
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Themed editorial: Social studies research and practice special issue:
           effective use of films in the social studies classroom

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      Authors: Scott L. Roberts, Starlynn Nance, Nancy Sardone, Sarah Jane Kaka
      Abstract: Themed editorial: Social studies research and practice special issue: effective use of films in the social studies classroom
      Citation: Social Studies Research and Practice
      PubDate: 2024-07-01
      DOI: 10.1108/SSRP-05-2024-087
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 1 (2024)
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)

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