Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1664 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (953 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (953 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
Social & Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Social Development Issues     Full-text available via subscription  
Social Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Social History Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Inquiry : Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access  
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Social Landscape Journal     Open Access  
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 126)
Social Research : An International Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Science & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Social Science Computer Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Science Protocols     Open Access  
Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Social Science Spectrum     Open Access  
Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Social Sciences & Humanities Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Sciences and Missions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Sciences in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Studies and the Young Learner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Studies of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Social Studies Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal  
Social, Humanities, and Educational Studies (SHEs) : Conference Series     Open Access  
Socialiniai tyrimai     Open Access  
Socialium : Revista Cientifica de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift     Open Access  
Sociedad e Infancias     Open Access  
Sociedade e Cultura     Open Access  
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociétés & Représentations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Society     Open Access  
Socio     Open Access  
Socio-analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Sociología y Tecnociencia     Open Access  
Sophia Austral     Open Access  
Soshum : Jurnal Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Sosio Didaktika : Social Science Education Journal     Open Access  
SosioHumanika: Jurnal Pendidikan Sains Sosial dan Kemanusiaan (Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Education)     Open Access  
Soundings : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South Asian Journal of Social Studies and Economics     Open Access  
Sozial Extra     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Sri Lanka Journal of Advanced Social Studies     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Studi Magrebini : North African Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Studia Socialia Cracoviensia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Studies in Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sultan Agung Fundamental Research Journal     Open Access  
Suma de Negocios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Suomen Sukututkimusseuran Vuosikirja     Open Access  
Survey Research Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Sustainability : Science, Practice, & Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Symmetry     Open Access  
Symposion : Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Søkelys på arbeidslivet (Norwegian Journal of Working Life Studies)     Open Access  
Tangent     Hybrid Journal  
Tapuya : Latin American Science, Technology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Technology transfer: innovative solutions in Social Sciences and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
TechTrends     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Teme : Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
Teoría y Praxis     Open Access  
Textos & Contextos (Porto Alegre)     Open Access  
The Batuk     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
The Equilibrium     Open Access  
The EXceptional Parent     Full-text available via subscription  
The New Yorker     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Winnower     Open Access  
The Women : Annual Research Journal of Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Thesis     Open Access  
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tidsskrift for kjønnsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for samfunnsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tieteessä Tapahtuu     Open Access  
Tinkazos     Open Access  
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access  
Trama : Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades     Open Access  
Trans-pasando Fronteras     Open Access  
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Transtext(e)s Transcultures     Open Access  
Trayectorias Humanas Trascontinentales : TraHs     Open Access  
Trivium     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tulane Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Twentieth Century Communism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Twenty-First Century Society: Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
UC Merced Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access  
UC Riverside Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access  
UED Journal of Social Sciences, Humanities and Education     Open Access  
Ultima Década     Open Access  
Uluslararası Anadolu Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi / International Anatolian Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Umanistica Digitale     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Uni-pluriversidad     Open Access  
Universidad de La Habana     Open Access  
Universidad y Ciencia     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access  
Universitas Científica     Open Access  
Universitas-XXI, Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
University of Mauritius Research Journal     Open Access  
Universum : Revista de Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
UNM Environmental Journals     Open Access  
Unoesc & Ciência - ACSA     Open Access  
VA Engage Journal     Open Access  
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
VFAST Transactions on Education and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Vilnius University Proceedings     Open Access  
Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Wani : Revista del Caribe Nicaragüense     Open Access  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Weather, Climate, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Workplace : A Journal for Academic Labor     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Social Science     Open Access  
World Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Zambia Social Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Medienwissenschaft     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Œconomia     Open Access  
Вісник ДонНУЕТ. Серія. Гуманітарні науки     Open Access  
Култура / Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

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Journal Cover
Socio-Ecological Practice Research
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2524-5279 - ISSN (Online) 2524-5287
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • How does co-produced research influence adaptive capacity' Lessons
           from a cross-case comparison

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      Abstract: Abstract Co-production of knowledge (through project design or research) is viewed as an effective approach to solving environmental problems, which may also increase community adaptive capacity in the face of climate change. However, the reality is that little is known about long-term impacts of co-production on researchers, communities, and outputs. We qualitatively analyzed case studies to understand co-production processes and related adaptive capacity outcomes. These 13 case studies were developed to identify impacts of the United States Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture water (2001–2013) and climate (2010–2015) portfolios, which funded projects focused on research, education, and extension related to climate and water issues on working lands. Case study data included interviews, survey responses, and analysis of reports and publications related to a single project. We found that projects which were responsive to specific needs and assets of stakeholders had strong connections to adaptive capacity outcomes, but that these projects did not necessarily entail highly interactive practices of co-production of knowledge (e.g., stakeholder-driven research with continuous interactions between academic and non-academic partners). Our research provides evidence to suggest that, in some contexts, engagement approaches that are less time- and resource-intensive for stakeholders may be as effective at building adaptive capacity as highly interactive co-production efforts.
      PubDate: 2022-08-08
       
  • The potential of nature-based solutions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions
           from US agriculture

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      Abstract: Abstract Climate change is the main environmental challenge of the twenty-first century. The United States is the world’s second-largest producer of annual greenhouse gases (GHGs), and agriculture contributes about 10% of the USA’s emissions. This study evaluates the literature and potential of nature-based solutions to reduce GHG emissions from US agriculture, which has been characterized as “industrial agriculture.” The US experience has global relevance. Nature-based solutions in US agriculture include: (1) changing the crops and livestock that farmers produce; (2) changing how farmers grow food by using regenerative or climate-smart agriculture practices, such as soil and water conservation and improved manure and fertilizer management to build up soil carbon and enhance productivity; (3) changing where food is grown; (4) enabling the sale of carbon offset credits from farmland owners to GHG emitters; and (5) enabling the sale of development rights by farmland owners to “preserve” farmland for agricultural uses and avoid the conversion of farmland to residential and commercial development. The potential reductions in GHG emissions from nature-based solutions appear to be 40–50%. So, nature-based solutions will not eliminate all GHGs from US agriculture. But the reduction in methane and nitrous oxide are especially important. The global challenge is how to profitably produce more food to feed a growing population while sustainably reducing GHGs and improving soil carbon health within a changing climate.
      PubDate: 2022-08-04
       
  • In sharing and explaining the history of socio-ecological practice, we
           must act as intergenerational mediators between the past and present
           historymakers

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      PubDate: 2022-07-22
       
  • A critical assessment of participation in stakeholder engagement in
           agrifood system research

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      Abstract: Abstract The importance of stakeholder engagement and a range of challenges with inclusion in stakeholder engagement has been well articulated in previous research. However, there has been less focus on how participation is shaped by factors such as race, ethnicity and gender. Previous research suggests that agrifood systems are often framed as a space dominated by white men. In this paper, we utilize the framing of social exclusion theory and an intersectional approach to analyze reporting and representation of gender and race of stakeholders in agrifood system studies archived in the Web of Science between 2000 and 2021. We also evaluate reporting and representation by type of research approach, discipline, and over time. Findings show that there is a lack of attention paid to reporting of demographics in empirical research utilizing stakeholder engagement and that women and racial and ethnic minorities are underrepresented. Our results also show that participatory action studies are less likely to report gender and race demographics, that the lack of reporting and representation is persistent across disciplines, and that reporting and representation have somewhat improved over the past five years. We urge researchers to be more specific about whose voices they publish and encourage the inclusion of women and racial and ethnic minorities that are often overlooked as stakeholders in agricultural working landscapes.
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • Using researcher and stakeholder perspectives to develop promising
           practices to improve stakeholder engagement in the solutions-driven
           research process

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      Abstract: Abstract Translational approaches to science have the potential to produce research that better meets the needs of community stakeholders and advances scientific understanding. Researchers involved in translational research make committed efforts to increased engagement and communication with stakeholders throughout the research process, from planning through implementation and evaluation. Referred to as solutions-driven research within the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research Development, this approach is being piloted on Cape Cod (Barnstable County), Massachusetts. EPA researchers are working in close coordination with community partners on the Cape to better understand and address challenges with managing nonpoint source nitrogen. The pilot also aims to assess the usefulness of solutions-driven research approaches for application in future EPA research efforts. Using semi-structured interviews with researchers and other stakeholders, we examined researchers’ and stakeholders’ perspectives on the impacts of intentional and intensive stakeholder engagement on research efforts to improve coastal water quality. This study provides a reflexive assessment of the perceived benefits and drawbacks for researchers and other stakeholders when there is an institutional expectation of an increased focus on engagement. We found that engagement has been truly intertwined with research in the pilot, participants perceived an improvement in research usefulness through developing valuable collaborative relationships, and that these relationships required significant time commitments to maintain. We also identified a need for an efficient infrastructure for developing and distributing communication materials for continued engagement with diverse stakeholders throughout the research process. The paper provides transferable practices for researchers seeking to use a solutions-driven research approach based on lessons learned thus far in how to support researchers and research planning in simultaneously prioritizing effective engagement and sound collaborative environmental science research to address a localized environmental challenge. This is an innovative approach in that interviews occurred as the implementation phase of the project began, with the goal of implementing the lessons learned outlined here in the ongoing project.
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • Land, ethics, justice, and Aldo Leopold

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      Abstract: Abstract The legacy of racism, inequity, and injustice in the history of conservation and the contemporary environmental movement is being scrutinized as never before. The American ecologist, conservationist, and author Aldo Leopold (1887–1948) is among the influential historical figures whose attitudes and actions have been sharply criticized. Especially because Leopold was devoted to protecting wildlands and expressed concern about the impacts of human population growth, detractors have characterized him as callously misanthropic at best, racist and fascistic at worst. These representations can be weighed against Leopold’s personal and professional record, and his views on such themes as the Native American experience, the eugenics movement of the early twentieth century, cultural diversity, and the rise of fascism. In his late years, and in the final formulation of his influential essay “The Land Ethic,” Leopold was increasingly explicit in framing his value system as one grounded in a commitment to just human relations. Moreover, the ethic he expressed was not static and could not be exclusionary. It expanded the purview of ethical consideration in the conservation movement and provided new foundations for the expansion of environmental awareness in the mainstream of American society. Viewed in this way, Leopold may be regarded not as an apotheosis of conservation thinking, but as an essential transitional figure within a still broader, ongoing movement, informed by an ever-evolving ethic of care.
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • Assessing green infrastructure spatial plans in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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      Abstract: Abstract Green infrastructure (GI) is a strategically planned network of natural and seminatural areas designed and managed to deliver ecosystem services. This paper aims to improve knowledge about how spatial plans address GI in Ethiopia. Document review and content analysis were used to identify and analyze key principles of GI planning and green space plans. The paper uses two evaluation criteria: an assessment of GI integration into the strategic planning of urban regions and criterions developed to evaluate the green plan in towns and cities to measure their integration into urban spatial and green space plans. The results indicate that green infrastructure has been at the initial stage of planning and there are gaps in the way spatial planning incorporates GI concepts, components, functions, and principles. Reviewing and analyzing whether planning documents incorporate GI principles and green plans is relevant to explaining the role of spatial plans in delivering GI. The plan evaluation in this research can be implemented at any planning scale in Ethiopia and other African urban areas. Applying these UGI principles in the plan can guide for future development of UGI planning efforts.
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-022-00115-9
       
  • Going with the flow' The role of intention in riparian zone management

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      Abstract: Abstract In future efforts to manage nonpoint source pollutants contributing to water quality impairments in the Great Lakes Basin, revegetating riparian zones will be a key management technique for promoting climate resiliency. Social science research on adoption of conservation management practices currently provides little insight regarding the role of intentionality in management decisions, with the result that we know little about the extent to which familiarity with historic landscape conditions on one’s property inform landowner decisions to restore or maintain riparian zones. The present study addresses this empirical gap, using data from a survey of property owners in the Pigeon River watershed of western Michigan to examine the extent to which riparian zone management decisions are informed by intentional conservation management, or by a desire to maintain a landscape consistent with the historic appearances of the property. This research identifies a substantial implementation gap between residential and agricultural landowners, with agricultural landowners in this study more likely to report using riparian buffers and describing their choices as intentional actions. Landowners who were not using riparian buffers were more likely to report a desire to maintain consistency with their memory of what has been “normal” on their property, suggesting that the ways in which riparian areas are managed over time has substantial bearing on future implementation decisions.
      PubDate: 2022-05-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-022-00114-w
       
  • On the writing of “How spaces become places: place makers tell their
           stories”

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      Abstract: Abstract This essay describes the background research and theorizing—developing a critical pragmatism—that has led the author to collect and analyze 7 prior books of “practice-focused oral histories”. The most recent of these collections of practice stories focuses on the work of place making in three parts: first, traditional if innovative architectural and urban design and public dispute mediation practices; second, place making that deals directly with issues of racial and multi-ethnic tension in communities and cities; and third, place making centered on leveraging and enhancing the arts.
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-022-00113-x
       
  • How can the USA and China cooperate and learn from each other to reduce
           greenhouse gas emissions'

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      Abstract: Abstract China and the USA are the two leading emitters of greenhouse gases which are driving climate change. This paper explores how the two nations can cooperate and learn from each other in two key areas: transportation and renewable energy sources for electricity. Although each country has its own political, economic, cultural, and energy resource situation, many opportunities exist for moving away from fossil fuels. Cooperation could occur in a joint clean energy research institute to work on new and improved technologies, such as storage batteries, electric vehicle batteries, solar panels, green buildings, and carbon capture and storage. Avoiding trade restrictions such as tariffs on Chinese solar panels and other renewable components would be a strong sign of cooperation on climate mitigation. Cooperation on international climate agreements as happened at COP 26 will continue to be important. Exchange programs could be arranged to share experiences and ideas at the state/province and local government levels and involving think tanks, NGOs, and companies financing and developing clean energy. These exchanges can spur discussion and learning about new regulations, infrastructure, urban design, financial incentives, and technologies and how to adapt them to one’s own country. The fate of the planet may depend on cooperation between the two countries.
      PubDate: 2022-05-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-022-00112-y
       
  • When the natural pendulum swings between drought and flood, a bifunctional
           natural drainage system safeguards a mountain village’s water security
           incessantly for centuries

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      Abstract: Abstract This article showcases a long-standing water-secure village in a mountain area in China and its water safeguard system. For centuries, the village has been shielded from the adverse impacts of drought and flood and continues to be a water-secure oasis amid the water-insecure environs. The safeguard for its enduring water security is a one-of-a-kind bifunctional natural drainage system (NDS) of green infrastructures that prevents flood and harvests stormwater simultaneously during storm events and releases the stored water for subsequent, year-round use. Built by the villagers upon two ecologically wise (i.e., ecophronetic) ideas—working with the duality of stormwater and building with nature, the NDS is characterized by double highs and triple lows—high effectiveness, high robustness, low tech, low maintenance, and low impact. This extraordinary feat of socio-ecological practice is as such a strong candidate for the recognition as a time-honored example of nature-based solutions.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-022-00109-7
       
  • Reconsidering the role of place in health and welfare services: lessons
           from the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and Canada

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      Abstract: Abstract Places—the meaningful locations of daily life—have been central to the wellbeing of humans since they first formed social groups, providing a stable base for individuals, families, and communities. In the United States and Canada, as elsewhere, place also plays a foundational role in the provision of critical social and health services and resources. Yet the globally destabilizing events of the COVID-19 pandemic have dramatically challenged the concept, experience, and meaning of place. Place-centered public health measures such as lockdowns and stay-at-home orders have disrupted and transformed homes, neighborhoods, workplaces, and schools. These measures stressed families and communities, particularly among marginalized groups, and made the delivery of vital resources and services more difficult. At the same time, the pandemic has stimulated a range of creative and resilient responses. Building from an overview of these effects and drawing conceptually on theories of people–place relationships, this paper argues for critical attention to reconsidering and re-envisioning prevailing assumptions about place-centric policies, services, and practices. Such reappraisal is vital to ensuring that, going forward, scholars, policymakers, and practitioners can effectively design and deliver services capable of maintaining social connections, safety, and wellbeing in contexts of uncertainty, inequality, and flux.
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-022-00111-z
       
  • Enacting boundaries or building bridges' Language and engagement in
           food-energy-water systems science

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      Abstract: Abstract Scientific study of issues at the nexus of food–energy–water systems (FEWS) requires grappling with multifaceted, “wicked” problems. FEWS involve interactions occurring directly and indirectly across complex and overlapping spatial and temporal scales; they are also imbued with diverse and sometimes conflicting meanings for the human and more-than-human beings that live within them. In this paper, we consider the role of language in the dynamics of boundary work, recognizing that the language often used in stakeholder and community engagement intended to address FEWS science and decision-making constructs boundaries and limits diverse and inclusive participation. In contrast, some language systems provide opportunities to build bridges rather than boundaries in engagement. Based on our experiences with engagement in FEWS science and with Indigenous knowledges and languages, we consider examples of the role of language in reflecting worldviews, values, practices, and interactions in FEWS science and engagement. We particularly focus on Indigenous knowledges from Anishinaabe and the language of Anishinaabemowin, contrasting languages of boundaries and bridges through concrete examples. These examples are used to unpack the argument of this work, which is that scientific research aiming to engage FEWS issues in working landscapes requires grappling with embedded, practical understandings. This perspective demonstrates the importance of grappling with the role of language in creating boundaries or bridges, while recognizing that training in engagement may not critically reflect on the role of language in limiting diversity and inclusivity in engagement efforts. Leaving this reflexive consideration of language unexamined may unknowingly perpetuate boundaries rather than building bridges, thus limiting the effectiveness of engagement that is intended to address wicked problems in working landscapes.
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-022-00110-0
       
  • When more people throw firewood into a bonfire, the flames rise higher: an
           appreciation letter to our 2021 reviewers and guest editors

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      PubDate: 2022-03-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-022-00105-x
       
  • Aldo Leopold’s “Odyssey” and the development of the
           ecosystem concept and approach

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      Abstract: Abstract Aldo Leopold's essay, “Odyssey”, may have contributed to the development of the ecosystem concept and approach.
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-022-00107-9
       
  • “Odyssey” complements “A Biotic View of Land” to bolster the case
           for a more prominent place for Leopold

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      Abstract: Abstract In “A Biotic View of Land” Aldo Leopold may have anticipated the concept of enegy flow in ecosystem ecology. As Gene Likens notes, in “Odyssey” he may also have anticipated the concept of nutrient cycles in ecosystem ecology.
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-022-00108-8
       
  • Fifty years after the wicked-problems conception: its practical and
           theoretical impacts on planning and design

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-03-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-022-00106-w
       
  • An introduction and précis of the topical collection: “transforming
           ‘space’ to ‘place’ in high-density urban areas: what roles can
           landscape and urban planning play'”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2022-02-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-022-00104-y
       
  • Complex adaptive governance systems: a framework to understand
           institutions, organizations, and people in socio-ecological systems

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      Abstract: Abstract Governance is the reason for and solution to complex problems in socio-ecological systems (SESs). Governance refers to the institutions, organizations, and people involved in and affected by socio-ecological practices (SEPs), such as research, planning, design, construction, restoration, conservation, and management. The complexity of SESs requires the ability to understand and identify how the social world produces differential opportunities, constraints, and resources across multiple levels and scales of governance systems and as a consequence undesirable SEP outcomes for social equity, human well-being, and environmental integrity. This paper presents a complex adaptive governance systems framework (CAGS-F) designed to provide guidance, organization, and basic conceptualizations of social scientific concepts and terms for diagnostic, descriptive, and prescriptive inquiry into SEPs for the purpose of improving justice and sustainability. CAGS-F is unique for synthesizing the panarchy heuristic’s focus on socio-ecological interdependence, cross-scalar, multi-causal, non-linear complexity, and change with compatible social scientific theories of multi-level institutions, organizations, and human practices. The framework works from a critical realist orientation to reveal how power and privilege embedded in institutions, organizations, and human practices produce inequitable and/or undesirable SEP outcomes. The structure of the framework employs analytic dualism to provide a way to identify where, at what level and scale, who is included and/or adversely affected, and at which point in discrete adaptive cycles across institutional, organizational, and human practices opportunities, barriers, and leverage points exist so as to optimize design, planning, programming, and implementation of SEPs or evaluate unintended and unforeseen, less than successful, inequitable, and/or undesirable outcomes.
      PubDate: 2022-01-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-021-00101-7
       
  • Three project ideas to fill research gaps in Aldo-Leopold scholarship

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      Abstract: Abstract Several important research questions in Aldo-Leopold scholarship await answers. These are (i) Did Leopold’s arresting image of a “fountain of energy” stimulate the first published energy-flow study in ecosystem ecology by Raymond Lindeman' (ii) By “beauty” in Leopold’s oft-quoted phrase “integrity, stability, and beauty,” does Leopold refer to ecosystem functionality' and (iii) Should Leopold’s forestry junket to Germany in 1935 raise concerns about Leopold’s possible sympathies with the racial and nationalist doctrines of the German National Socialist party, led by Adolph Hitler, who came to power in 1933' Answers to these questions will contribute to our further understanding and greater appreciation of Aldo Leopold’s scientific and philosophical legacy.
      PubDate: 2022-01-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s42532-021-00102-6
       
 
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