Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1647 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (936 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (936 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
SN Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Social & Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Social Development Issues     Full-text available via subscription  
Social Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Social History Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Inquiry : Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access  
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Social Landscape Journal     Open Access  
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 133)
Social Research : An International Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Science & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 98)
Social Science Computer Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Science Protocols     Open Access  
Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Social Science Spectrum     Open Access  
Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Social Sciences & Humanities Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Sciences and Missions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Sciences in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Studies and the Young Learner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Studies of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Social Studies Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal  
Social, Humanities, and Educational Studies (SHEs) : Conference Series     Open Access  
Socialiniai tyrimai     Open Access  
Socialium : Revista Cientifica de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift     Open Access  
Sociedad e Infancias     Open Access  
Sociedade e Cultura     Open Access  
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociétés & Représentations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Society     Open Access  
Socio     Open Access  
Socio-analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Sociología y Tecnociencia     Open Access  
Sophia Austral     Open Access  
Soshum : Jurnal Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Sosio Didaktika : Social Science Education Journal     Open Access  
SosioHumanika: Jurnal Pendidikan Sains Sosial dan Kemanusiaan (Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Education)     Open Access  
Soundings : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South Asian Journal of Social Studies and Economics     Open Access  
Sozial Extra     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Sri Lanka Journal of Advanced Social Studies     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Studi Magrebini : North African Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Studia Socialia Cracoviensia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Studies in Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sultan Agung Fundamental Research Journal     Open Access  
Suma de Negocios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Suomen Sukututkimusseuran Vuosikirja     Open Access  
Survey Research Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Sustainability : Science, Practice, & Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Symmetry     Open Access  
Symposion : Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Søkelys på arbeidslivet (Norwegian Journal of Working Life Studies)     Open Access  
Tangent     Hybrid Journal  
Tapuya : Latin American Science, Technology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Technology transfer: innovative solutions in Social Sciences and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
TechTrends     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Teme : Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
Teoría y Praxis     Open Access  
Textos & Contextos (Porto Alegre)     Open Access  
The Batuk     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
The Equilibrium     Open Access  
The EXceptional Parent     Full-text available via subscription  
The New Yorker     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Winnower     Open Access  
The Women : Annual Research Journal of Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Thesis     Open Access  
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tidsskrift for kjønnsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for samfunnsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tieteessä Tapahtuu     Open Access  
Tinkazos     Open Access  
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access  
Trama : Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades     Open Access  
Trans-pasando Fronteras     Open Access  
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Transtext(e)s Transcultures     Open Access  
Trayectorias Humanas Trascontinentales : TraHs     Open Access  
Trivium     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tulane Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Twentieth Century Communism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Twenty-First Century Society: Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
UC Merced Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access  
UC Riverside Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access  
UED Journal of Social Sciences, Humanities and Education     Open Access  
Ultima Década     Open Access  
Uluslararası Anadolu Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi / International Anatolian Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Umanistica Digitale     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Uni-pluriversidad     Open Access  
Universidad de La Habana     Open Access  
Universidad y Ciencia     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access  
Universitas Científica     Open Access  
Universitas-XXI, Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
University of Mauritius Research Journal     Open Access  
Universum : Revista de Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
UNM Environmental Journals     Open Access  
Unoesc & Ciência - ACSA     Open Access  
VA Engage Journal     Open Access  
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
VFAST Transactions on Education and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Vilnius University Proceedings     Open Access  
Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Wani : Revista del Caribe Nicaragüense     Open Access  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Weather, Climate, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Workplace : A Journal for Academic Labor     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Social Science     Open Access  
World Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Zambia Social Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Medienwissenschaft     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Œconomia     Open Access  
Вісник ДонНУЕТ. Серія. Гуманітарні науки     Open Access  
Култура / Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Social Studies of Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.516
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 33  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0306-3127 - ISSN (Online) 1460-3659
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • The art of ignoring others’ work among academics: A guessing game model
           of scholarly information search

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      Authors: Mikhail Sokolov
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Why do scholars pay attention to some works, but not others' This article explores a theoretical model in which scholars search the literature to make sure that their findings are new to their immediate audience. Within the present model, individuals easily disregard literatures of which their audiences are probably unaware. Institutionally organized audiences thus serve as enforcers of the information search. Their members may tacitly collaborate in maintaining unawareness of intellectual developments outside of their common attention space. This model allows us to explain phenomena on which earlier models fail – for example why academics sometimes ignore apparently relevant sources of information or how groups of scholars turn into bubbles, censoring information about findings made in the outside world.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-01T10:01:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221119808
       
  • Anthropophagy, European enlightenment, science and technology studies, and
           responsible knowledge construction in Brazil

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      Authors: Ivan da Costa Marques
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Many parts of the world receive from abroad not only objects of technology, but also scientific discoveries, and organizing elements and practices as well. Since these entities materially comprehend a formidable part of their modes of existence, let us say that non-Western countries result from ontologies/epistemologies that in large part come from abroad. This manifested coloniality emerges in the feeling of contradiction between national realities and the ideological prestige of the Western imperial centers that serve as models to them. This configures a malaise that is deeply rooted in educated Brazilians. I discuss lines of flight from that malaise in an articulation that configures a philosophical and political novelty in Brazil. In examples concerning computing in Brazil, I juxtapose elements of STS, the metaphorical anthropophagic movement, and the European Enlightenment project, to enact a more symmetrical, dialogical, and inclusive world by constructing ‘respectful enough’ stories. In doing so, the anthropophagic movement, previously in practice restricted to the artistic realms, incorporates sciences and technologies. In each of these stories, the enlightened motto ‘daring to know’ is juxtaposed with the anthropophagic metaphorical motto ‘eat the stranger’ around modern Western scientific and technological issues in local situated ways.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-29T09:42:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221119112
       
  • The (un)making of electoral transparency through technology: The 2017
           Kenyan presidential election controversy

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      Authors: Cecilia Passanti, Marie-Emmanuelle Pommerolle
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Marked by the killing of a senior ICT professional working for the Electoral Commission and the invalidation of the presidential election by the Supreme Court, the 2017 Kenyan elections make for a good case through which to study how digital technologies shape contemporary electoral practice. This article examines the practice of electoral transparency through technology and argues that it can be conceived as a socio-technical device based both on distancing people from knowledge of the electoral infrastructure and on staging a simplified discourse on public access to the electoral infrastructure. Drawing on interviews with key actors in election technology implementation and ethnographic observations of public events around it, the article argues that digital technology has had three sets of implications for elections. First, it has shaped the electoral infrastructure and the nature of the final result (now a paper and digital hybrid). Second, it has shaped the distribution of knowledge among electoral professionals, giving a central role to ICT actors, objects, and knowledge in the definition of electoral transparency. Third, the centrality of ICTs in elections and the order of knowledge they bring are highly controversial and criticized by other electoral actors who demand for material proof for understanding the inner workings of elections.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-26T09:37:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221124007
       
  • The co-production of normal science: A social history of high-temperature
           superconductivity research in China (1987–2008)

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      Authors: Chao Gu
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity (HTS) was a momentous event. This article explores the social and institutional history of HTS research in China between 1987 and 2008. Desire for a Nobel Prize shaped the Chinese state’s initial push to establish the National Superconductivity Research Program. Yet, after the enthusiasm for HTS research cooled, and even after a Nobel Prize for HTS was awarded to non-Chinese scientists, financial and institutional support for the research continued. This process fostered the ‘to live’ ethos of science, which has replaced the Nobel Prize dream as a central mechanism of interaction between the state and science in China. Indeed, Chinese HTS research not only survived, but also produced an abundance of ‘normal science’ discoveries. This pattern continued after 2008, when Japanese scientists made the groundbreaking innovation of iron-based superconductivity and Chinese scientists quickly turned their attention to this sub-field. They published many papers pushing the field forward slightly, rather than making the largest scientific advances. The mutual interaction between the state and scientists underpinned this phenomenon: On the one hand, the productivity of normal science has helped to maintain state legitimacy. On the other hand, the evaluation and incentive systems, as well as deep-rooted cultural features such as officialism, utilitarianism, and the foregrounding of politics lead scientists to opportunistically pursue normal science. The state and scientists have co-produced a regime of normal science.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-16T12:13:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221119215
       
  • Branding the Earth: Selling Earth system science in the United States,
           1983-1988

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      Authors: Jenifer Barton
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      As part of its efforts to find new relevance in the early 1980s, NASA formed the Earth System Sciences Committee (ESSC) to develop a large-scale Earth science research program that would use satellites and computer modeling to study the planet as an integrated system with interconnections between the land, air, water, and biota. Called Earth system science (ESS), the project was conceived on the scale of the U.S. moon missions. Like the Apollo program, it would need enormous government funding to implement. Yet, the project was proposed just as government science funding was contracting. Conscious of the changing political economy of science, the ESSC attempted to build scientific, political, and public support for its project by using promotional techniques akin to the branding efforts more commonly identified in corporate marketing that were themselves changing in scope and importance in the 1980s. These techniques formed part of the ESSC’s broader management strategy to promote ESS. The ESS brand was developed around the ideals of an interconnected ‘Earth system’, the significance of interdisciplinary research, and environmental concern. Though ESS failed to gain widespread traction, an unintended consequence of this branding was the communication and entrenchment of the concept of the ‘Earth system’. Today, this concept provides crucial theoretical scaffolding that unifies interdisciplinary Earth science research, including climate change science.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-13T06:12:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221122436
       
  • Privacy engineering and the techno-regulatory imaginary

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      Authors: Kjetil Rommetveit, Niels van Dijk
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), in force since 2018, has introduced design-based approaches to data protection and the governance of privacy. In this article we describe the emergence of the professional field of privacy engineering to enact this shift in digital governance. We argue that privacy engineering forms part of a broader techno-regulatory imaginary through which (fundamental) rights protections become increasingly future-oriented and anticipatory. The techno-regulatory imaginary is described in terms of three distinct privacy articulations, implemented in technologies, organizations, and standardizations. We pose two interrelated questions: What happens to rights as they become implemented and enacted in new sites, through new instruments and professional practices' And, focusing on shifts to the nature of boundary work, we ask: What forms of legitimation can be discerned as privacy engineering is mobilized for the making of future digital markets and infrastructures'
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-24T11:21:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221119424
       
  • The sense of meaninglessness in bureaucratized science

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      Authors: Mariusz Finkielsztein, Izabela Wagner
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Looking at scientists (in the life sciences), we focus on the sense of meaninglessness associated with bureaucratization. We define the sense of meaninglessness as a perception of meaning deficit or meaning conflict in particular situations that can be associated with frustration, irritation, and/or boredom. We show that it can be caused by identity disturbance – particularly the incongruence between the ideal self as a researcher and the imposed self as a bureaucrat. We claim that the sense of meaninglessness is more likely to emerge in those activities that are further from an individual’s core identity, and more identity work is needed to make them meaningful. We also claim that processes of rationalization imposed by external agendas, particularly transitions from substantive to formal rationality (predictability, control and calculability, efficiency) contribute to the proliferation of meaninglessness in academia. The sense of meaninglessness is, therefore, ignited by the external forces colonizing academic life and constitutes an instance of the ‘irrationality of rationality’. It is an outcome or side effect of the collision between two incompatible logics of practice: bureaucratic and scientific. To show the incongruence of those competing logics, we analyze the data derived from a mixed-method study conducted between 2013 and 2014 among beneficiaries of an international research grant project. As a supplementary source of reference, we use our research on academic boredom and laboratory scientists’ work and careers.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-24T11:20:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221117227
       
  • Speculative sewing: Researching, reconstructing, and re-imagining wearable
           technoscience

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      Authors: Kat Jungnickel
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      This article contributes to Science and Technology Studies (STS) literatures on ‘making and doing’ by describing and analysing the practice of researching, reconstructing, and reimagining archival clothing patent data. It combines feminist speculation and reconstruction practices into what I term ‘speculative sewing’. This involves stitching data, theory and fabric into inventions described in patents and analysing them as three-dimensional arguments. In the case here, of 1890s British women’s convertible cycle wear, I examine how inventors used new forms of clothing to challenge socio-political restrictions on women’s bodies in public space and help them make alternate claims to rights and entitlements. I argue that translating text and images into wearable data renders lesser-known technoscience stories visible and (more) knowable and transforms clothing (back) into material matters of public concern.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T11:04:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221119213
       
  • Reflexive expectations in innovation financing: An analysis of venture
           capital as a mode of valuation

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      Authors: Kean Birch
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Social studies of expectations are premised on the notion that the future is brought into the present, and thereby expectations about the future come to shape our actions, decisions, and practices in ways that performatively bring about the imagined future. In this article, I examine how social actors themselves understand, construct, and deploy future expectations in innovation financing, focusing specifically on the venture capital industry financing of the life sciences sector. I do so to analyse how these reflexive efforts configure the valuation and investment decisions of these social actors and others. I build on analytical perspectives in STS and adjacent fields such as organization studies and economic sociology that analyse the role of expectations – manifested as stories, narratives, and accounts – in social action. To do so, I unpack how reflexivity comes to configure valuation and investment decisions, and the goals (e.g. exits) they rationalize.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T06:17:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221118372
       
  • Adequate trials: How the search for a cure shaped leukemia diagnosis

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      Authors: Moran Levy
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the relationship between diagnosis and therapy, focusing on the case of leukemia and cancer chemotherapy in the 1960s. This case, I argue, reinforces the need to study diagnoses from a social-science perspective, because the persistent controversy around leukemia classification was resolved by institutional restructuring introduced through clinical experimentation, rather than by techno-scientific advances. In an attempt to prove that chemical cancer therapy was possible, oncologists replaced the question ‘Is this drug working'’ with the question ‘How can we make this drug work'’ To create the conditions and criteria under which drugs could work, oncologists undertook the reclassification of cancers and patients, producing a new diagnostic style that reversed the roles of diagnosis and therapy. Experts gained and secured the power to classify not by solving existing problems, but by redefining what counts as a problem and what qualifies as a solution. Similarly, therapies can become transformative not only when they ‘work’, but when they work just well enough to mobilize resources and support. Theorizing these displacements, I develop the concept of ‘adequate trials’ in order to capture modes of innovation in which a deep commitment to give new technologies a ‘fair chance’ to succeed (i.e. an ‘adequate trial’) leads experts to redefine the tasks and goals of their field. To further our theoretical understanding of how rigid drug testing becomes malleable and conducive to normative change, I analyze the organizational, scientific, and jurisdictional conditions that gave rise to oncologists’ practical orientations.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T06:53:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221110137
       
  • On the persistence of race: Unique skulls and average tissue depths in the
           practice of forensic craniofacial depiction

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      Authors: Lisette Jong
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      The (re-)surfacing of race in forensic practices has received plenty of attention from STS scholars, especially in connection with modern forensic genetic technologies. In this article, I describe the making of facial depictions based on the skulls of unknown deceased individuals. Based on ethnographic research in the field of craniofacial identification and forensic art, I present a material-semiotic analysis of how race comes to matter in the face-making process. The analysis sheds light on how race as a translation device enables oscillation between the individual skull and population data, and allows for slippage between categories that otherwise do not neatly map on to one another. The subsuming logic of race is ingrained – in that it sits at the bases of standard choices and tools – in methods and technologies. However, the skull does not easily let itself be reduced to a racial type. Moreover, the careful efforts of practitioners to articulate the individual characteristics of each skull provide clues for how similarities and differences can be done without the effect of producing race. Such methods value the skull itself as an object of interest, rather than treat it as a vehicle for practicing race science. I argue that efforts to undo the persistence of race in forensic anthropology should focus critical attention on the socio-material configuration of methods and technologies, including data practices and reference standards.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T12:03:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221112073
       
  • Latina/o/e technoscience: Labor, race, and gender in cybernetics and
           computing

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      Authors: Iván Chaar López
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      The history of cybernetics has often displaced non-white actors and women from its accounts. Recentering them offers an opportunity to rearticulate the history of computing through its entanglements with labor and race/gender as network formations. In paying attention to these actors and the silences in the STS literature, this article offers an analysis of networked asymmetries, non-essential knowledge and disposability. In doing so, it redraws the boundaries of STS with race/gender integral to the field. It proposes hemispheric approaches that trouble national bounds and move us beyond the dominant sites of Europe and the United States, and that interrogate US empire. The article follows closely the role of Arturo Rosenblueth in the development of cybernetics and of Mexican women workers in computer semiconductor assembly. These stories of technoscience show the invisible work of Latina/o/es as unacknowledged and unaccounted entities in the infrastructural assemblage of cybernetics and computing.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T11:04:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221108515
       
  • Imaginaries of omniscience: Automating intelligence in the US Department
           of Defense

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      Authors: Lucy Suchman
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      The current reanimation of artificial intelligence includes a resurgence of investment in automating military intelligence on the part of the US Department of Defense. A series of programs set forth a technopolitical imaginary of fully integrated, comprehensive and real-time ‘situational awareness’ across US theaters of operation. Locating this imaginary within the history of ‘closed world’ discourse, I offer a critical reading of dominant scholarship within military circles that sets out the military’s cybernetic model of situational awareness in the form of the widely referenced Observe, Orient, Decide, Act or OODA Loop. I argue that the loop’s promise of dynamic homeostasis is held in place by the enduring premise of objectivist knowledge, enabled through a war apparatus that treats the contingencies and ambiguities of relations on the ground as noise from which a stable and unambiguous signal can be extracted. In contrast, recent challenges to the closed-world imaginary, based on critical scholarship and investigative journalism, suggest that the aspiration to closure is an engine for the continued destructiveness of US interventions and the associated regeneration of enmity. To challenge these technopolitics of violence we need a radically different kind of situational awareness, one that recognizes the place of ignorance in perpetuating the project of militarism. Only that kind of awareness can inform the public debate required to re-envision a future place for the US in the world, founded in alternative investments in demilitarization and commitments to our collective security.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T10:15:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221104938
       
  • Caring for robots: How care comes to matter in human-machine interfacing

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      Authors: Benjamin Lipp
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Care robots promise to assist older people in an ageing society. This article investigates the socio-material conditions of care with robots by focusing on the usually invisible practices of human-machine interfacing. I define human-machine interfacing as the activities by roboticists and others to render interaction between robots and people possible in the first place. This includes, efforts to render prototypical arrangements of care ‘robot-friendly’. In my video-assisted ethnography of human-robot interaction (HRI) experiments. I identify four types of interfacing practices, where care comes to matter: integrating the ephemeral entity that is ‘a robot’, helping it by way of mundane courtesies, making users ‘fit’ for interacting with it, and establishing corridors of interaction between the robot and people’s bodies. I show that robots do not so much care for (older) people but rather, the other way around – people need to care for robots. Hence, care robots are not simply agents of care but also objects of care, rendering necessary a symmetrical analysis of human-machine interfacing. Furthermore, these practices do not merely reflect the prototypical state of the art in robotics. Rather, they indicate a more general mode of how robots and people interface. I argue that care with robots requires us to re-consider the exclusive focus on the human and at least complement it with care for the non-human and, incidentally, the robotic, too.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-07T07:17:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221081446
       
  • How sanitary pads came to save the world: Knowing inclusive innovation
           through science and the marketplace

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      Authors: Shobita Parthasarathy
      First page: 637
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      International development institutions, governments, and social entrepreneurs have become increasingly enthusiastic about ‘inclusive innovation’ which, to solve problems in low- and middle-income countries, focuses on the development of technologies for and by the poor. Inclusive innovation differs from previous development efforts by focusing on devices instead of infrastructure, claiming to be based on scientific evidence, and relying on market logics to achieve humanitarian ends. Proponents argue that, informed by grassroots efforts, these interventions have enormous potential to catalyze economic, social, and political change. How are the market and technological imperatives of inclusive innovation shaping the international development agenda' What do inclusion and innovation mean in this context' What can inclusive innovation tell us about the proliferation of initiatives that promote technology for public good, from responsible innovation to public interest technology' This article examines these questions through a case study of menstrual hygiene management (MHM) innovation in India. Rather than providing solutions to self-evident development problems, inclusive innovation shapes both development problems and solutions simultaneously, in areas where scientific and market ways of knowing converge. These ways of knowing claim to be legitimate because they are rooted in local knowledge and expertise. MHM in India became a problem, and low-cost disposable sanitary pads an inclusive innovative solution, because of the involvement of Indian researchers and innovators, and Indian girls and women as consumers and producers. However, in the process they reinforced narrow understandings of both inclusion and innovation in international development. Inclusion efforts may be wrapped up in political economies that shape and limit their transformational power by prioritizing scientific, technical, and market expertise.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-09T08:43:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221122457
       
  • The history of seed banking and the hazards of backup

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      Authors: Helen Anne Curry
      First page: 664
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Seeds and other plant materials in seed and gene bank collections are rarely considered adequately conserved today unless genetically identical duplicate samples have been created and safely stored elsewhere. This paper explores the history of seed banking to understand how, why and with what consequences copying collections came to occupy this central place. It highlights a shift in the guiding metaphor for long-term preservation of seed collections, from banking to backup. To understand the causes and consequences of this shift in metaphor, the paper traces the intertwined histories of the central long-term seed storage facility of the United States (opened in 1958) and the international seed conservation system into which that facility was integrated in the 1970s. This account reveals how changing conceptions of security, linked to changing economic, political and technological circumstances, transformed both the guiding metaphors and the practices of seed conservation in these institutions. Early instantiations of long-term cold storage facilities vested security in robust infrastructures and the capacities of professional staff; between the 1960s and 1990s, this configuration gave way to one in which security was situated in copies rather than capacities. This observation ultimately raises questions about the security promised and achieved through present-day infrastructures for crop genetic resources conservation.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T11:46:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221106728
       
  • Grid-scale batteries and the politics of storage

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      Authors: Caroline White-Nockleby
      First page: 689
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      From Tesla’s experimental ‘Virtual Power Plants’ to the US’s Energy Storage Grand Challenge, grid-scale batteries – which attach to the electricity grid to buffer supply and demand – are sites of intensifying research, speculation and legislation. They are increasingly positioned as a transformative means to mitigate and adapt to climate change. Indeed, batteries are not the only form of storage in the spotlight: A variety of stored forms, including seed banks, metals stockpiles, and sequestered carbon dioxide have become central in generating, and ameliorating, anxieties about environmental futures. ‘Storage’ offers a potent analytic to analogize phenomena across scales and contexts, in part because of the increasingly visible status of its emic instantiations. As a means to store electricity, a uniquely ephemeral commodity, batteries, like other stored forms, both mediate power and capital and can defuse political potency. Though batteries can smooth the integration of renewable energy into the grid by disciplining the unruly schedules of sun and wind, their potentials (and proponents) extend to the fossil fuel industry as well: They are ‘fuel-neutral’, allowing all kinds of electrons to become more cost-efficient. In these multivalent contexts, I suggest, securing the status and value of a battery’s stored electricity, or trading on its ambiguity, can signal and effect political agendas, even as such arbitrations can recast politics in a techno-juridical domain.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T10:33:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221109605
       
  • Energy efficiency: The evolution of a motherhood concept

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      Authors: Tessa Dunlop
      First page: 710
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Energy efficiency is a popular policy strategy to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. The concept of energy efficiency is relatively simple – to use less energy for the same level of output. However, complexities emerge when applying efficiency concepts to real world processes and practices of energy consumption: subjective judgments when defining, measuring and applying energy efficiency principles, how efficiency is conceptualized and applied in policy, and how policy is designed and implemented, given social and environmental tradeoffs. This article traces the evolution of EU energy efficiency policy over seven decades to better understand underlying values and tradeoffs from a sociological perspective. Using insights from critical policy studies, the article reveals how certain values are reflected in how energy efficiency is defined and measured over time. It highlights how the conceptualization of energy efficiency has been used as an effective rhetorical device – and how some potentially relevant concepts and issues get sidelined in favor of others. The analysis illustrates how narrow conceptualizations of energy efficiency has put blinders on wider environmental and social issues. This points to the need for a more nuanced policy approach that takes into account the complexities and uncertainties of societal and policy challenges. The findings point to the need for energy efficiency policy that pays closer attention to citizens’ views and collective solutions in order to formulate more effective policy to reduce energy consumption.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T05:34:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221096171
       
  • The architecture of the hybrid lab: Spacing graphene research

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      Authors: Albena Yaneva
      First page: 733
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Building on and renewing a long line of STS research of lab materialities, this article sheds light on a type of architecture organized around the ‘heroic agency’ of a new nanomaterial, graphene. It examines how design responds to the dynamic and multi-applicational ambitions of contemporary science. An ethnographic study of the National Graphene Institute in Manchester allows us to see how the building’s design has epistemic and social effects, how different spatial arrangements facilitate the shaping of research habits and mediate various rhythms of lab work. Key features of this hybrid lab are: first, a shifting balance between public and private places, with a prevalence of collective activities; second, its capacity to reinforce epistemically and socially the conditions of visibility, by emphasizing the work of making research practice visible; third, its distinctive way to speed up research, often by slowing down the circulation of people and things. All these features make the hybrid lab a unique spatial articulation of a new cultural order of innovation.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-06T07:20:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221114721
       
  • Changing publication practices and the typification of the journal article
           in science and technology studies

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      Authors: Wolfgang Kaltenbrunner, Kean Birch, Thed van Leeuwen, Maria Amuchastegui
      First page: 758
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we study the development of the STS journal article format since the 1980s. Our analysis is based on quantitative data that suggest that the diversity of various journal publication types has diminished over the past four decades, while the format of research articles has become increasingly typified. We contextualize these historical shifts in qualitative terms, drawing on a set of 76 interviews with STS scholars and other stakeholders in scholarly publishing. Here, we first portray the STS publication culture of the 1980s and early 1990s. We then contrast this with an analysis of publishing practices today, which are characterized by a much more structured research process that is largely organized around the production of typified journal articles. Whereas earlier studies have often emphasized the importance of rhetorical persuasion strategies as drivers in the development of scholarly communication formats, our analysis highlights a complementary and historically novel set of shaping factors, namely, increasingly quantified research (self-)assessment practices in the context of a projectification of academic life. We argue that reliance on a highly structured publication format is a distinct strategy for making STS scholarship ‘doable’ in the sense of facilitating the planning ability and daily conduct of research across a variety of levels – including the writing process, collaboration with peers, attracting funding, and interaction with journals. We conclude by reflecting on the advantages and downsides of the typification of journal articles for STS.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T05:56:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221110623
       
  • Anticipation and modal power: Opening up and closing down the momentum of
           sociotechnical systems

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      Authors: Sergio Urueña
      First page: 783
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Within STS, there are three approaches to the creation and mobilization of futures: descriptive, normative, and interventive. Visions, expectations, and imaginaries are currently seen as anticipatory artifacts that close down the momentum of sociotechnical systems and, as such, are objects of critical scrutiny. At the same time, interventive techniques engaging with future representations are considered to be useful anticipatory instruments for opening up ranges of envisaged alternatives. This article reviews STS advances concerning the performativity of both de facto and interventive anticipatory practices in shaping the momentum of sociotechnical systems in light of the phenomenon of modal power: the modulation dynamics of what actors deem to be (im)plausible and/or (un)desirable. The diverse attempts of STS scholars and practitioners to understand, critique, and engage with the politics of opening up and closing down the momentum of sociotechnical systems require engaging with the creation, mobilization, and execution of modal power. The heuristics presented here are intended to be useful in framing and recognizing the political-epistemic radicality that the creation and mobilization of sociotechnical futures holds in the constitution of our sociotechnical orders as well as the role that the attribution of (im)plausibility or (un)desirability plays in such processes.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-06T07:19:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221111469
       
 
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