Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1664 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (953 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (953 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Social Development Issues     Full-text available via subscription  
Social Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Social History Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Inquiry : Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access  
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Landscape Journal     Open Access  
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 116)
Social Research : An International Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Science & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
Social Science Computer Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Science Protocols     Open Access  
Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Social Science Spectrum     Open Access  
Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Social Sciences & Humanities Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Sciences and Missions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Sciences in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Studies and the Young Learner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Studies of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Social Studies Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal  
Social, Humanities, and Educational Studies (SHEs) : Conference Series     Open Access  
Socialiniai tyrimai     Open Access  
Socialium : Revista Cientifica de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift     Open Access  
Sociedad e Infancias     Open Access  
Sociedade e Cultura     Open Access  
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociétés & Représentations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Society     Open Access  
Socio     Open Access  
Socio-analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Sociología y Tecnociencia     Open Access  
Sophia Austral     Open Access  
Soshum : Jurnal Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Sosio Didaktika : Social Science Education Journal     Open Access  
SosioHumanika: Jurnal Pendidikan Sains Sosial dan Kemanusiaan (Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Education)     Open Access  
Soundings : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South Asian Journal of Social Studies and Economics     Open Access  
Sozial Extra     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Sri Lanka Journal of Advanced Social Studies     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Studi Magrebini : North African Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Studia Socialia Cracoviensia     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Studies in Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sultan Agung Fundamental Research Journal     Open Access  
Suma de Negocios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Suomen Sukututkimusseuran Vuosikirja     Open Access  
Survey Research Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Sustainability : Science, Practice, & Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Symmetry     Open Access  
Symposion : Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Søkelys på arbeidslivet (Norwegian Journal of Working Life Studies)     Open Access  
Tangent     Hybrid Journal  
Tapuya : Latin American Science, Technology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Technology transfer: innovative solutions in Social Sciences and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
TechTrends     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Teme : Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
Teoría y Praxis     Open Access  
Textos & Contextos (Porto Alegre)     Open Access  
The Batuk     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
The Equilibrium     Open Access  
The EXceptional Parent     Full-text available via subscription  
The New Yorker     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Winnower     Open Access  
The Women : Annual Research Journal of Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Thesis     Open Access  
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tidsskrift for kjønnsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for samfunnsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tieteessä Tapahtuu     Open Access  
Tinkazos     Open Access  
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access  
Trama : Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades     Open Access  
Trans-pasando Fronteras     Open Access  
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transtext(e)s Transcultures     Open Access  
Trayectorias Humanas Trascontinentales : TraHs     Open Access  
Trivium     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tulane Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Twentieth Century Communism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Twenty-First Century Society: Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
UC Merced Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access  
UC Riverside Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access  
UED Journal of Social Sciences, Humanities and Education     Open Access  
Ultima Década     Open Access  
Uluslararası Anadolu Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi / International Anatolian Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Umanistica Digitale     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Uni-pluriversidad     Open Access  
Universidad de La Habana     Open Access  
Universidad y Ciencia     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access  
Universitas Científica     Open Access  
Universitas-XXI, Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
University of Mauritius Research Journal     Open Access  
Universum : Revista de Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
UNM Environmental Journals     Open Access  
Unoesc & Ciência - ACSA     Open Access  
VA Engage Journal     Open Access  
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
VFAST Transactions on Education and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Vilnius University Proceedings     Open Access  
Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Wani : Revista del Caribe Nicaragüense     Open Access  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Weather, Climate, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Workplace : A Journal for Academic Labor     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Social Science     Open Access  
World Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Zambia Social Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Medienwissenschaft     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Œconomia     Open Access  
Вісник ДонНУЕТ. Серія. Гуманітарні науки     Open Access  
Култура / Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Social Studies of Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.516
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 33  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0306-3127 - ISSN (Online) 1460-3659
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • The history of seed banking and the hazards of backup

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      Authors: Helen Anne Curry
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Seeds and other plant materials in seed and gene bank collections are rarely considered adequately conserved today unless genetically identical duplicate samples have been created and safely stored elsewhere. This paper explores the history of seed banking to understand how, why and with what consequences copying collections came to occupy this central place. It highlights a shift in the guiding metaphor for long-term preservation of seed collections, from banking to backup. To understand the causes and consequences of this shift in metaphor, the paper traces the intertwined histories of the central long-term seed storage facility of the United States (opened in 1958) and the international seed conservation system into which that facility was integrated in the 1970s. This account reveals how changing conceptions of security, linked to changing economic, political and technological circumstances, transformed both the guiding metaphors and the practices of seed conservation in these institutions. Early instantiations of long-term cold storage facilities vested security in robust infrastructures and the capacities of professional staff; between the 1960s and 1990s, this configuration gave way to one in which security was situated in copies rather than capacities. This observation ultimately raises questions about the security promised and achieved through present-day infrastructures for crop genetic resources conservation.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T11:46:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221106728
       
  • Sedimentary legacy and the disturbing recurrence of the human in long-term
           ecological research

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      Authors: Shana Lee Hirsch, David Ribes, Sarah Inman
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Even as new elements of a research infrastructure are added, older parts continue to exert persistent and consequential influence. We introduce the concept of sedimentary legacy to describe the relationship between infrastructure and research objects. Contrary to common accounts of legacy infrastructure that underscore lock-in, static, or constraining outcomes, sedimentary legacy emphasizes how researchers adapt infrastructure to support the investigation of new research objects, even while operating under constraining legacies. To illustrate the implications of sedimentary legacy, we track shifting objects of investigation across the history of the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network, focusing especially on recurrent ecological investigations of ‘human disturbance’ as researchers shift to study socioecological objects. We examine the relationship between scientific objects and the resources collected and preserved to render such objects tractable to scientific investigations, and show how the resources of a long-term research infrastructure support the assembly of certain objects of investigation, even while foreclosing others.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T09:21:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221101171
       
  • Imaginaries of omniscience: Automating intelligence in the US Department
           of Defense

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      Authors: Lucy Suchman
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      The current reanimation of artificial intelligence includes a resurgence of investment in automating military intelligence on the part of the US Department of Defense. A series of programs set forth a technopolitical imaginary of fully integrated, comprehensive and real-time ‘situational awareness’ across US theaters of operation. Locating this imaginary within the history of ‘closed world’ discourse, I offer a critical reading of dominant scholarship within military circles that sets out the military’s cybernetic model of situational awareness in the form of the widely referenced Observe, Orient, Decide, Act or OODA Loop. I argue that the loop’s promise of dynamic homeostasis is held in place by the enduring premise of objectivist knowledge, enabled through a war apparatus that treats the contingencies and ambiguities of relations on the ground as noise from which a stable and unambiguous signal can be extracted. In contrast, recent challenges to the closed-world imaginary, based on critical scholarship and investigative journalism, suggest that the aspiration to closure is an engine for the continued destructiveness of US interventions and the associated regeneration of enmity. To challenge these technopolitics of violence we need a radically different kind of situational awareness, one that recognizes the place of ignorance in perpetuating the project of militarism. Only that kind of awareness can inform the public debate required to re-envision a future place for the US in the world, founded in alternative investments in demilitarization and commitments to our collective security.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T10:15:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221104938
       
  • Environmental Malthusianism and demography

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      Authors: Emily Klancher Merchant
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      As anthropogenic climate change threatens human existence on Earth, historians have begun to explore the scientific antecedents of environmental Malthusianism, the idea that human population growth is a major driver of ecosystem degradation and that environmental protection requires a reduction in human numbers. These accounts, however, neglect the antagonistic relationship between environmental Malthusianism and demography, thereby creating an illusion of scientific consensus. This article details the entwined histories of environmental Malthusianism and demography, revealing points of disagreement – initially over methods of analyzing and predicting population growth and later over the role of population growth in ecosystem degradation – and moments of strategic collaboration that benefited both groups of scientists. It contends that the image of scientific consensus in existing histories has lent support to ongoing calls for population control, detracting attention from more proximate causes of environmental devastation, such as polluting modes of production, extractive business practices and government subsidies for fossil fuel development.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T10:13:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221104929
       
  • Energy efficiency: The evolution of a motherhood concept

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      Authors: Tessa Dunlop
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Energy efficiency is a popular policy strategy to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. The concept of energy efficiency is relatively simple – to use less energy for the same level of output. However, complexities emerge when applying efficiency concepts to real world processes and practices of energy consumption: subjective judgments when defining, measuring and applying energy efficiency principles, how efficiency is conceptualized and applied in policy, and how policy is designed and implemented, given social and environmental tradeoffs. This article traces the evolution of EU energy efficiency policy over seven decades to better understand underlying values and tradeoffs from a sociological perspective. Using insights from critical policy studies, the article reveals how certain values are reflected in how energy efficiency is defined and measured over time. It highlights how the conceptualization of energy efficiency has been used as an effective rhetorical device – and how some potentially relevant concepts and issues get sidelined in favor of others. The analysis illustrates how narrow conceptualizations of energy efficiency has put blinders on wider environmental and social issues. This points to the need for a more nuanced policy approach that takes into account the complexities and uncertainties of societal and policy challenges. The findings point to the need for energy efficiency policy that pays closer attention to citizens’ views and collective solutions in order to formulate more effective policy to reduce energy consumption.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T05:34:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221096171
       
  • Rise and fall of the (social) group

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      Authors: David Armstrong
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      This article maps the rise and fall of the idea of a (social) group across medicine in the context of contemporary analyses in psychology and sociology. This history shows the early 20th century emergence and growth of group medicine, group therapy and group comparisons. In recent decades, however, the idea that groups constituted the basic units of society has been replaced with the emergence of populations and systems that offer a more virtual and abstract context for individual relationships. This has implications for explanation itself as the demise of groups has changed the epistemological ground-rules for understanding identity formation and social change.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-30T05:08:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221096389
       
  • Thinking differently with Chinese medicine: ‘Explanations’ and case
           studies for a postcolonial STS

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      Authors: Wen-yuan Lin, John Law
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      In Mandarin, the English word ‘nature’ translates as ‘ziran’ (自然zìrán) in science, biomedicine and everyday life. At the same time, ziran indexes a second older set of meanings that make little immediate sense in English. Current in many Chinese medical practices as well as in classical Chinese philosophy, these include ‘what is spontaneously so’ or ‘let the character of the self unfold’. In this article we explore how these two families of meaning are related by particular Taiwanese Chinese medical practitioners as they describe how they negotiate the relations between biomedicine and Chinese medicine in daily professional practice. At the same time, inspired by related logic-shifting writing in anthropology, postcolonial studies and postcolonial STS, we draw on the ‘art of patterning’ (辨證 biàn zhèng) to understand how ziran-nature relations are specified in those accounts. Patterning is the art of specifying the shifting arrangements and misalignments that lead to ill health. Treating this as a way of thinking about ziran-related overlaps between biomedicine and Chinese medicine, we show that patterning attends not to objects ‘out there’ but to appearances (象xiang, xiàng). Put into use as an STS term of art it therefore shifts the epistemological basis of inquiry because case-stories no longer reveal underlying mechanisms, but instead narrate patterned appearances. One implication of this is that any particular pattern diagnosis lies alongside a galaxy of alternatives that might be equally good to think with. Within the limits set by referential academic conventions, we thus attempt a postcolonial shi (勢)-inflected STS in this paper by resisting the use of a single analytical framework, instead setting different forms of patterning alongside one another.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-21T10:10:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221092180
       
  • The trickle-down of political and economic control: On the organizational
           suppression of environmental scientists in government science

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      Authors: Sampsa Saikkonen, Esa Väliverronen
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      In many countries, attempts to suppress scientists as public experts have become more prevalent. In democratic countries, environmental scientists have been a particular focus of control. This article looks at structures and mechanisms of suppression of government researchers. It is based on a qualitative analysis of ten in-depth interviews with environmental researchers being employed or engaged in government science. The analysis is influenced by a power-theoretical perspective on the suppression of science. By analyzing the interviewees’ accounts, it scrutinizes the different ways in which political and economic control can trickle down in research organizations such as state research institutes and come to affect individual researchers. The focus is especially on the interlinking of political and economic influence of external actors with different forms and practices of control at the organizational level. Three forms of such trickle-down are identified and discussed: internalization of political and economic control, external influencing and bureaucratic control, and economic/interest group influence in research organizations. We argue that these forms of control function as a filtering layer of suppression between political and economic control and individual scientists out of the public eye regarding government science.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T07:16:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221093397
       
  • Caring for robots: How care comes to matter in human-machine interfacing

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      Authors: Benjamin Lipp
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Care robots promise to assist older people in an ageing society. This article investigates the socio-material conditions of care with robots by focusing on the usually invisible practices of human-machine interfacing. I define human-machine interfacing as the activities by roboticists and others to render interaction between robots and people possible in the first place. This includes, efforts to render prototypical arrangements of care ‘robot-friendly’. In my video-assisted ethnography of human-robot interaction (HRI) experiments. I identify four types of interfacing practices, where care comes to matter: integrating the ephemeral entity that is ‘a robot’, helping it by way of mundane courtesies, making users ‘fit’ for interacting with it, and establishing corridors of interaction between the robot and people’s bodies. I show that robots do not so much care for (older) people but rather, the other way around – people need to care for robots. Hence, care robots are not simply agents of care but also objects of care, rendering necessary a symmetrical analysis of human-machine interfacing. Furthermore, these practices do not merely reflect the prototypical state of the art in robotics. Rather, they indicate a more general mode of how robots and people interface. I argue that care with robots requires us to re-consider the exclusive focus on the human and at least complement it with care for the non-human and, incidentally, the robotic, too.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-07T07:17:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221081446
       
  • Biometric imaginaries: Formatting voice, body, identity to data

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      Authors: Edward B Kang
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the sociotechnical imaginary within which contemporary biometric listening or VIA (voice identification and analysis) technologies are being developed. Starting from an examination of a key article on Voiceprint identification written in the 1940s, I interrogate the conceptual link between voice, body, and identity, which was central to these early attempts at technologizing voice identification. By surveying patents that delineate systems for voice identification, collection methods for voice data, and voice analysis, I find that the VIA industry is dependent on the conceptual affixion of voice to identity based on a reduction of voice that sees it as a fixed, extractable, and measurable ‘sound object’ located within the body. This informs the thinking of developers in the VIA industry, resulting in a reframing of the technological shortcomings of voice identification under the rubric of big data. Ultimately, this reframing rationalizes the implementation of audio surveillance systems into existing telecommunications infrastructures through which voice data is acquired on a massive scale.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T11:53:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221079599
       
  • A new Editor-in-Chief

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      Authors: Sergio Sismondo
      First page: 327
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T11:49:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221095117
       
  • Low-carbon cows: From microbial metabolism to the symbiotic planet

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      Authors: Andreas Folkers, Sven Opitz
      First page: 330
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on two projects – one at a large chemical company and the other at a small start-up – to intervene in the relations between cows and ruminal microbes to reduce bovine methane emissions. It describes these interventions as ‘symbiotic engineering’: a biopolitical technique targeting holobionts and becoming effective by working on interlaced sets of living things. Based on the analysis of these cases, the article elucidates a planetary symbiopolitics (Helmreich) that connects ‘molecular biopolitics’ (Rose) and ‘microbiopolitics’ (Paxson) to ‘bovine biopolitics’ (Lorimer, Driessen) and the politics of climate change. We critically investigate the spatial imaginaries of symbiotic engineering practices that single out the microbial realm as an Archimedean point to address planetary problems. This technoscientific vision resonates with the notion of the ‘symbiotic planet’ advanced by Lynn Margulis that depicts the Earth System, or Gaia, as a vast set of relations among living things down to the tiniest microbes. Margulis’ concept, as well as the ‘symbiotic view of life’ (Gilbert, Scott, Sapp) has been embraced in recent debates in STS as a way to think of multispecies worldings. The article contributes critically to these debates by showing what happens when the topology of the symbiotic Earth becomes the operating space for symbiotic engineering practices.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T11:46:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221077987
       
  • Cryptography as information control

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      Authors: Sarah Myers West
      First page: 353
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      In 1976, two researchers declared a revolution in cryptography: With the invention of public key encryption, cryptography could be used not only to share secret messages, but to secure and authenticate communications networks, and, eventually, to enable radically new kinds of social relationships facilitated by networked communication technology. This article explores a series of transformations in the meaning of cryptography in the 1960s and 1970s that led to the declaration of a revolution. Drawing on archival materials, the article considers how public key cryptography was the product of an emerging consensus among cryptographers of the importance of privacy in the wake of abuses of surveillance powers by government agencies. Shaped by a changing technological and political environment, it situates cryptography at the center of a focused effort to assert control over information in an era of sociopolitical upheaval, concluding that the invention of public key encryption both marked a change in the imaginary surrounding cryptography and offered a technical solution that foreclosed other approaches to addressing the problem of surveillance.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T10:31:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221078314
       
  • Writing good economics: How texts ‘on the move’ perform the lab and
           discipline of experimental economics

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      Authors: Kristin Asdal, Béatrice Cointe
      First page: 376
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      How is objectivity accomplished in laboratory economic experiments' To address this question, this paper focuses on a modest and mundane thing: the written instructions that guide experimental subjects in the lab. In a material-semiotic perspective, these instructions can be understood as text-devices. We follow text-devices ‘on the move’ from their very writing, through the lab, the review process and out into the journal article. To do so, we analyse ‘text-author ensembles’, which are journal articles together with practice-oriented interviews with their authors. We show that instructions act not simply as texts, but as experimental instruments that also perform the procedure of experimental economics. They draw together the procedural, material and rhetorical dimensions of experimental work in economics, and link the lab setting to collective validation procedures within the discipline of economics. To achieve this, experimental economists rely on qualitative writing skills refined in collective writing and reviewing practices. These text-devices ‘on the move’ alert us not only to the role of writing and writing skills in the production of scientific knowledge, but to the role of texts as material and semiotic objects that can produce facts as well as labs and disciplines, and that are key to the accomplishment of objectivity in experimental economics.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-03T09:38:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221079600
       
  • When craft kicks back: Embryo culture as knowledge production in the
           context of the transnational fertility industry

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      Authors: Elina Helosvuori, Riikka Homanen
      First page: 425
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      The multibillion-dollar fertility industry promotes standardization in in vitro fertilization laboratories. Transnational pharmaceutical and biotechnological giants distribute a wide range of fertility products, from embryo culture mediums and incubator technologies to add-ons such as time-lapse embryo monitoring. These technologies are designed to standardize and automate knowledge production regarding embryonic viability. More effective knowledge production enables the more effective selection of embryos for transfer, which in turn leads to more future babies and enables economic scaling-up. Drawing on two multi-sited ethnographic studies at eight fertility clinics in Finland during 2013–2020, this article discusses how knowledge about embryos is produced in the processes and practices of embryo culture. We argue that automation and standardization in clinical practice are not always perceived as economically desirable. Sometimes standard technologies do not replace hands-on knowledge production, although they may transform it. The technologies are also perceived as modifying the object of knowledge itself in undesired or unnecessary ways. In such cases, concerns are raised regarding the best interests of patients, embryos and future babies, who might be better served by masterful laboratory craftwork. We conclude that embryo culture is not only a site of knowledge production – one that aims to make babies and parents through standard and craftwork knowledge practices – but also a site of multiple bio-economies of assisted reproduction, some of which resist automation and standardization.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T12:39:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221083869
       
  • Making particularity travel: Trust and citizen science data in Swedish
           environmental governance

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      Authors: Dick Kasperowski, Niclas Hagen
      First page: 447
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper focuses on how particularities are performed and made to travel through the creation of trust. The Swedish Species Observation System (Artportalen) is one of the largest inscription and calculation centers for citizen data in the world, used extensively by public authorities in Sweden. Observations by members of the public become actionable through environmental governance laws in Sweden. These observations are made through networks of things and humans in which trust is created but unevenly distributed. Important for them to be trusted and to travel are such things as computer software to filter and map observations, red lists, GIS-tools to determine time and place, and validation committees. However, trust is more concentrated in a core set of actors, and there depends on interpersonal relations – though these relations are facilitated by other parts of the epistemic system.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T11:25:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221085241
       
  • Ghosts, brands, and influencers: Emergent trends in scientific authorship

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      Authors: Mario Biagioli
      First page: 463
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      This essay is about the unique role of proper nouns at the intersection of knowledge and property, both tangible and intangible. Nouns are central to any form of property and credit, from a person’s name listed on a property deed or copyright registration, to the name of an artist to whom a work is attributed, or that of a scientist after whom a discovery or theory is named. And names can also be found on the other end of the property spectrum, not as the names of authors and owners but as objects of property, as in the case of brand names. Here I trace some of the functions of these names as they move across different scenarios of knowledge-making and property-making, focusing on some of the effects those trajectories are having in the contemporary technosciences as they bring together the function of the author and that of the brand.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T09:38:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127221095046
       
  • The face as folded object: Race and the problems with ‘progress’ in
           forensic DNA phenotyping

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      Authors: Roos Hopman
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Forensic DNA phenotyping (FDP) encompasses a set of technologies aimed at predicting phenotypic characteristics from genotypes. Advocates of FDP present it as the future of forensics, with an ultimate goal of producing complete, individualised facial composites based on DNA. With a focus on individuals and promised advances in technology comes the assumption that modern methods are steadily moving away from racial science. Yet in the quantification of physical differences, FDP builds upon some nineteenth- and twentieth-century scientific practices that measured and categorised human variation in terms of race. In this article I complicate the linear temporal approach to scientific progress by building on the notion of the folded object. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in various genetic laboratories, I show how nineteenth- and early twentieth-century anthropological measuring and data-collection practices and statistical averaging techniques are folded into the ordering of measurements of skin color data taken with a spectrophotometer, the analysis of facial shape based on computational landmarks and the collection of iris photographs. Attending to the historicity of FDP facial renderings, I bring into focus how race comes about as a consequence of temporal folds.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-02T11:10:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127211035562
       
  • Turning crowds into communities: The collectives of online citizen science

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      Authors: Jérôme Baudry, Élise Tancoigne, Bruno J Strasser
      First page: 399
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Over the past two decades, a number of digital platforms have been developed with the aim of engaging citizens in scientific research projects. The success of these platforms depends in no small part on their ability to attract and retain participants, turning diffuse crowds of users into active and productive communities. This article investigates how the collectives of online citizen science are formed and governed, and identifies two ideal-types of government, either based on self-interest or on universal norms of science. Based on an ethnography of three citizen science platforms and a series of interviews with their managers, we show how different technologies – rhetorical, of the self, social, and ontological – can be diversely combined to configure these collectives. We suggest that the shift from individual projects to platforms is a defining moment for online citizen science, during which the technologies that sustain the collectives are standardized and automatized in ways that make the crowd appear to be a natural community.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2021-11-17T10:57:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03063127211058791
       
  • Forensic DNA phenotyping and its politics of legitimation and
           contestation: Views of forensic geneticists in Europe

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      Authors: Rafaela Granja, Helena Machado
      Abstract: Social Studies of Science, Ahead of Print.
      Forensic DNA Phenotyping (FDP) is a set of techniques that aim to infer externally visible characteristics in humans – such as eye, hair and skin color – and biogeographical ancestry of an unknown person, based on biological material. FDP has been applied in various jurisdictions in a limited number of high-profile cases to provide intelligence for criminal investigations. There are on-going controversies about the reliability and validity of FDP, which come together with debates about the ethical challenges emerging from the use of this technology in the criminal justice system. Our study explores how, in the context of complex politics of legitimation of and contestation over the use of FDP, forensic geneticists in Europe perceive this technology’s potential applications, utility and risks. Forensic geneticists perform several forms of discursive boundary work, making distinctions between science and the criminal justice system, experts and non-experts, and good and bad science. Such forms of boundary work reconstruct the complex positioning vis-à-vis legal and scientific realities. In particular, while mobilizing interest in FDP, forensic geneticists simultaneously carve out notions of risk, accountability and scientific conduct that perform distance from FDP’ implications in the criminal justice system.
      Citation: Social Studies of Science
      PubDate: 2020-07-30T09:50:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0306312720945033
       
 
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