Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
Shanlax International Journal of Arts, Science and Humanities     Open Access  
SHS Web of Conferences     Open Access  
Si Somos Americanos     Open Access  
Signos : Investigación en Sistemas de Gestión     Open Access  
Simbiótica     Open Access  
SINTESA : Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Ilmu Politik     Open Access  
SN Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Social & Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Social Development Issues     Full-text available via subscription  
Social Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Social History Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Inquiry : Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access  
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social Landscape Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Social Research : An International Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Science & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 101)
Social Science Computer Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Science Protocols     Open Access  
Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Social Science Spectrum     Open Access  
Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Social Sciences & Humanities Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Sciences and Missions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Sciences in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Studies and the Young Learner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Studies of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Social Studies Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Social, Humanities, and Educational Studies (SHEs) : Conference Series     Open Access  
Socialiniai tyrimai     Open Access  
Socialium : Revista Cientifica de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift     Open Access  
Sociedad e Infancias     Open Access  
Sociedade e Cultura     Open Access  
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociétés & Représentations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Socio     Open Access  
Socio-analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Sociología y Tecnociencia     Open Access  
Sophia Austral     Open Access  
Soshum : Jurnal Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Sosio Didaktika : Social Science Education Journal     Open Access  
SosioHumanika: Jurnal Pendidikan Sains Sosial dan Kemanusiaan (Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Education)     Open Access  
Soundings : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South Asian Journal of Social Studies and Economics     Open Access  
Sozial Extra     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Sri Lanka Journal of Advanced Social Studies     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Studi Magrebini : North African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Studia Socialia Cracoviensia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Studies in Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Sultan Agung Fundamental Research Journal     Open Access  
Suma de Negocios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Suomen Sukututkimusseuran Vuosikirja     Open Access  
Survey Research Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Sustainability : Science, Practice, & Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Symmetry     Open Access  
Symposion : Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Søkelys på arbeidslivet (Norwegian Journal of Working Life Studies)     Open Access  
Tangent     Hybrid Journal  
Tapuya : Latin American Science, Technology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Technology transfer: innovative solutions in Social Sciences and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
TechTrends     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Teme : Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
Teoría y Praxis     Open Access  
Textos & Contextos (Porto Alegre)     Open Access  
The Batuk     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
The Equilibrium     Open Access  
The EXceptional Parent     Full-text available via subscription  
The New Yorker     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Winnower     Open Access  
The Women : Annual Research Journal of Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Thesis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tidsskrift for kjønnsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for samfunnsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tieteessä Tapahtuu     Open Access  
Tinkazos     Open Access  
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access  
Trama : Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades     Open Access  
Trans-pasando Fronteras     Open Access  
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Transtext(e)s Transcultures     Open Access  
Trayectorias Humanas Trascontinentales : TraHs     Open Access  
Trivium     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tulane Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Twentieth Century Communism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Twenty-First Century Society: Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
UC Merced Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access  
UC Riverside Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access  
UED Journal of Social Sciences, Humanities and Education     Open Access  
Ultima Década     Open Access  
Uluslararası Anadolu Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi / International Anatolian Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Umanistica Digitale     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Uni-pluriversidad     Open Access  
Universidad de La Habana     Open Access  
Universidad y Ciencia     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Universitas Científica     Open Access  
Universitas-XXI, Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
University of Mauritius Research Journal     Open Access  
Universum : Revista de Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
UNM Environmental Journals     Open Access  
Unoesc & Ciência - ACSA     Open Access  
VA Engage Journal     Open Access  
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
VFAST Transactions on Education and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Vilnius University Proceedings     Open Access  
Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Wani : Revista del Caribe Nicaragüense     Open Access  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Weather, Climate, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Workplace : A Journal for Academic Labor     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Social Science     Open Access  
World Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Zambia Social Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Medienwissenschaft     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Œconomia     Open Access  
Вісник ДонНУЕТ. Серія. Гуманітарні науки     Open Access  
Култура / Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

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Social Science Computer Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.229
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0894-4393 - ISSN (Online) 1552-8286
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Uncovering the Missing Pieces: Predictors of Nonresponse in a Mobile
           Experience Sampling Study on Media Effects Among Youth

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anne Reinhardt, Sophie Mayen, Claudia Wilhelm
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Mobile Experience Sampling (MES) is a promising tool for understanding youth digital media use and its effects. Unfortunately, the method suffers from high levels of missing data. Depending on whether the data is randomly or non-randomly missing, it can have severe effects on the validity of findings. For this reason, we investigated predictors of non-response in an MES study on displacement effects of digital media use on adolescents’ well-being and academic performance (N = 347). Multilevel binary logistic regression identified significant influencing factors of response odds, such as afternoon beeps and being outside. Importantly, adolescents with poorer school grades were more likely to miss beeps. Because this missingness was related to the outcome variable, modern missing data methods such as multiple imputation should be applied before analyzing the data. Understanding the reasons for non-response can be seen as the first step to preventing, minimizing, and handling missing data in MES studies, ultimately ensuring that the collected data is fully utilized to draw accurate conclusions.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2024-02-23T06:16:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393241235182
       
  • How do Teleworkers Relieve Negative Emotions to Improve Job Performance
           Through Enterprise Social Media' The Conservation of Resources Theory View
           

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      Authors: Xu Ren, Yali Hao, Jing Xu
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      The primary aim of this paper is to study the impact of teleworkers’ psychology on their job performance and how teleworkers relieve negative emotions to improve job performance through enterprise social media (ESM) from the conservation of resources theory perspective. An online survey was sent to 835 teleworkers from industries such as finance, automobile, IT, construction, and logistics from March to May 2022 in China. Useful data from 218 respondents were collected and analyzed to test the hypothesized relationships by partial least squares-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) method. The findings show that family-to-work conflict and social isolation positively influence employees’ emotional exhaustion and emotional exhaustion further negatively influences their job performance. The visibility affordance and association affordance of ESM can reduce family-to-work conflict and social isolation, thus reducing teleworkers’ emotional exhaustion. The employees’ psychological resilience negatively moderates the positive effects which family-to-work conflict and social isolation have on emotional exhaustion. This paper studies the relieving effects of ESM affordance on teleworkers’ emotional exhaustion and reveals their defending mechanism for avoiding entering into the negative psychological state. Furthermore, this paper supplies beneficial practical suggestions for managers and teleworkers to improve job performance when working from home.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T06:00:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393241235183
       
  • Analysis of Web Browsing Data: A Guide

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      Authors: Bernhard Clemm von Hohenberg, Sebastian Stier, Ana S. Cardenal, Andrew M. Guess, Ericka Menchen-Trevino, Magdalena Wojcieszak
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      The use of individual-level browsing data, that is, the records of a person’s visits to online content through a desktop or mobile browser, is of increasing importance for social scientists. Browsing data have characteristics that raise many questions for statistical analysis, yet to date, little hands-on guidance on how to handle them exists. Reviewing extant research, and exploring data sets collected by our four research teams spanning seven countries and several years, with over 14,000 participants and 360 million web visits, we derive recommendations along four steps: preprocessing the raw data; filtering out observations; classifying web visits; and modelling browsing behavior. The recommendations we formulate aim to foster best practices in the field, which so far has paid little attention to justifying the many decisions researchers need to take when analyzing web browsing data.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T01:26:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393241227868
       
  • Tell Me an Instagram Story: Ephemeral Communication and the 2018
           Gubernatorial Elections

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      Authors: Terri L. Towner, Caroline L. Muñoz
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Political campaigns are embracing the visual social media platform Instagram. One digital feature, the Story, has taken over feed sharing across social media. A Story is a sequence of images or videos uploaded to a profile that disappear after 24 hours. The Story is a novel feature relatively unexamined in political communications and marketing research. Specifically, it is unclear how Gubernatorial candidates employ the Instagram Story feature in campaigning. To address this gap, we content analyze 730 Instagram Stories drawn from 20 Gubernatorial candidate accounts one week before and after Election Day 2018. Results reveal that over half of the candidates employed the Story feature over the two-week period. The Story content primarily included indoor rallies and speeches rather than outdoor canvassing. Campaigns featured more static images than video in Stories and rarely used interactive features, such as animation, location tags, and emojis. Stories were also geared toward mobilization messages rather than voter support, behind-the-scenes looks, and attack ads. Last, some gender and political party differences were evident, as women and Democratic candidates utilized Instagram more.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T08:08:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393241227554
       
  • The Impact of Inequalities on Data Policies: Favelas Unified Dashboard
           Case Study

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      Authors: Elisa Maria Campos
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Data is the new asset of the current digital revolution. It is heralded as the “new oil” that will transform the world and function as a magic tool for development policies, with great potential to solve global health dilemmas. However, deep societal inequalities give datafication the risk of escalating disparities through data policies instead of solving them. The pandemic unmasked the price to pay for ignoring deep inequalities, helping this research to answer the question: “How did inequalities impact data policies for the Covid-19 pandemic in Brazil'” To investigate this link, the author develops a theoretical model linking the World-historical model of relational inequalities to the capability approach and data colonization theory. This model sustains the analysis of the data collected in 5 months of participant observation in the Covid-19 Favelas Unified Dashboard plus governmental data analysis and semi-structured interviews with data policymakers for Covid-19 in Brazil. As a result, the author demonstrates how inequalities worked as a trap for data policies and argues that data inequalities go beyond the digital divide. Data inequalities skyrocket vulnerability of the poor, increasing contamination rates, and inhibiting development.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T08:23:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231225526
       
  • How to Regulate Platforms Through a Non-Exploitative
           User-Generated-Content Levy

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      Authors: Weijie Huang, Xi Chen
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      The democratization of technology to re-create content and make that content publicly available has spurred a wave of user-generated content (UGC), which has produced remarkable social and economic benefits. However, under current copyright law, UGC creators face the dilemma of being deterred from creating UGC because of the risk of copyright infringement, copyright owners can rarely obtain remuneration from UGC, and UGC platforms profit from UGC without being held liable for copyright infringement. Recent proposals to extend fair use and compulsory licenses to UGC creators and impose direct liability on UGC platforms cannot solve the UGC dilemma due to the inadequate or unreasonable regulation of UGC platforms. This study aims to solve the UGC dilemma by proposing a non-exploitative UGC levy on UGC platforms. We demonstrate the necessity of the non-exploitative UGC levy by conducting a comparative study of existing proposals and illustrate the feasibility of the non-exploitative UGC levy through an institutional analysis of its framework and enforcement mechanisms. Justification of the proposed levy and responses to possible criticism are also provided. The levy scheme also provides inspiration for how copyright law can address burgeoning artificial intelligence-generated content (AIGC).
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T09:08:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393241227662
       
  • Prediction of Recidivism and Detection of Risk Factors Under Different
           Time Windows Using Machine Learning Techniques

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      Authors: Di Mu, Simai Zhang, Ting Zhu, Yong Zhou, Wei Zhang
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Following a comprehensive analysis of the initial three generations of prisoner risk assessment tools, the field has observed a notable prominence in the integration of fourth-generation tools and machine learning techniques. However, limited efforts have been made to address the explainability of data-driven prediction models and their connection with treatment recommendations. Our primary objective was to develop predictive models for assessing the likelihood of recidivism among prisoners released from their index incarceration within 1-year, 2-year, and 5-year timeframes. We aimed to enhance interpretability using SHapley Additive exPlanations (SHAP). We collected data from 20,457 in-prison records from February 10, 2005, to August 25, 2021, sourced from a Southwestern China prison’s data management system. Recidivism records were officially determined through data mining from an official website and combined identification data from neighboring prisons. We employed five machine learning algorithms, considering sociodemographic, physical health, psychological assessments, criminological characteristics, crime history, social support, and in-prison behaviors as factors. For interpretability, SHAP was applied to reveal feature contributions. Findings indicated that young prisoners accused of larceny, previous convictions, lower fines, and limited family support faced higher reoffending risk. Conversely, middle-aged and senior prisoners with no prior convictions, lower monthly supermarket expenses, and positive psychological test results had lower reoffending risk. We also explored interactions between significant predictive features, such as prisoner age at incarceration initiation and primary accusation, and the duration of current incarceration and cumulative prior incarcerations. Notably, our models consistently exhibited high performance, as shown by AUC on the test dataset across time windows. Interpretability results provided insights into evolving risk factors over time, valuable for intervention with high-risk individuals. These insights, with additional validation, could offer dynamic prisoner information for stakeholders. Moreover, interpretability results can be seamlessly integrated into prison and court management systems as a valuable risk assessment tool.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-13T01:57:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393241226607
       
  • Measuring Smartphone Use: Survey Versus Digital Behavioral Data

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      Authors: Alexander Wenz, Florian Keusch, Ruben L. Bach
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      While digital technology use and skills have typically been measured with surveys, digital behavioral data that are passively collected from individuals’ digital devices have recently emerged as an alternative method of measuring technology usage patterns in a more unobtrusive and detailed way. In this paper, we evaluate how passively collected smartphone usage data compare to self-reported measures of smartphone use, considering the three usage dimensions amount of use, variety of use, and activities of use. Based on a sample of smartphone users in Germany who completed a survey and had a tracking app installed on their smartphone, we find that the alignment between the survey and digital behavioral data varies by dimension of smartphone use. Whereas amount of use is considerably overreported in the survey data, variety of use aligns more closely across the two data sources. For activities of use, the alignment differs by type of activity. The results also show that the alignment between survey and digital behavioral data is systematically related to individuals’ sociodemographic characteristics, including age, gender, and educational attainment. Finally, latent class analyses conducted separately for the survey and digital behavioral data suggest similar typologies of smartphone use, although the overlap between the typologies on the individual level is rather small.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-11T08:03:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231224540
       
  • How Peer Privacy Concerns Affect Active and Passive Uses of Social
           Networking Sites: A Dual Peer Privacy Calculus Model

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      Authors: Tin Trung Nguyen, Van Thi Thanh Tran, Minh Tu Tran Hoang
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Social networking sites (SNSs) have emerged as parallel societies, providing individuals with a platform to interact with peers and construct their desired self-identities. However, maintaining a positive image and safeguarding oneself from social judgment often necessitate self-censorship in self-identity expression. Drawing upon the privacy calculus theory, this study investigates how SNS users engage in a rational cost–benefit analysis between peer privacy concerns and self-presentation when deciding whether to actively or passively use SNSs. Findings from a variance-based analysis—partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM)—to a sample of 394 Facebook users revealed that active use was primarily driven by perceived benefits, while passive use was triggered by perceived privacy costs. However, employing a case-based analysis—fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA), the present study uncovered that while some SNS users do not conform to the privacy calculus, many others do, thereby confirming the proposed dual privacy calculus model for SNS use. These findings resolve the contradictory findings from previous research on the privacy calculus model. This study extends the literature on the privacy calculus theory by developing a dual peer privacy calculus model to understand SNS users’ passive and active uses and validate the significance of peer privacy concerns on these behavioral patterns. This study underscores critical factors influencing SNS usage patterns, empowering platform developers to provide users with effective tools to combat privacy violations by peers, thereby promoting increased active engagement.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T12:33:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231224539
       
  • Social Live-Streaming Use and Well-Being: Examining Participation,
           Financial Commitment, Social Capital, and Psychological Well-Being on
           Twitch.tv

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      Authors: Grace H. Wolff, Cuihua Shen
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines how active participation, financial commitment, and passive participation in the leading social live-streaming service, Twitch.tv, relate to individuals’ psychological well-being. The three dimensions of social capital—structural, relational, and cognitive—as well as parasocial relationship are explored as mediators. Cross-sectional survey data from 396 respondents was analyzed by comparing two fully saturated structural equation models. Findings indicate actively participating in a favorite streamers’ Chat is positively associated with increased well-being. Structural social capital, or having more social interaction ties, positively mediates the relationship between active participation and well-being, as well as financial commitment and well-being. Greater cognitive social capital, or shared values and goals with a favorite streamer, is related to decreased well-being. Parasocial relationship does not significantly mediate the relationship between use and well-being. Our results demonstrate the importance of tangible social ties over the perceived relationships or identification with a favorite streamer.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-02T11:38:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231224543
       
  • Quantifying Americanization: Coverage of American Topics in Different
           Wikipedias

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      Authors: Piotr Konieczny, Włodzimierz Lewoniewski
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      As one of the most popular sources of information in the world, Wikipedia is edited by a large, global community of contributors. User-generated nature of this online encyclopedia ensures that the information reflects a wide range of topics. Hovewer, Wikipedia articles are created and edited independently in each language version. Therefore, some topics may be presented with varying degrees of completeness depending on their importance in a particular language community. In this paper, we quantified the concept of Americanization on a global scale through comparative analysis of the coverage of American topics in different language versions of Wikipedia. For this purpose, we analyzed over 90 million Wikidata items and 40 million Wikipedia articles in 58 languages. We discussed whether Americanization is more or less dominant in different languages, regions, and cultures. We showed that the interest in American topics is not universal. Western, developed countries are more Americanized (more interested in topics related to America) than the rest of the world. This is the first global, quantitative confirmation of issues often hypothesized, or assumed, in the literature on Americanization and related phenomena. This study shows that Wikipedia and Wikidata can allow quantification of social science concepts that previously were considered not realistically measurable. Finally, the presented research is also relevant to the discourses on the biases of Wikipedia.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-02T11:12:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231220165
       
  • Likes vs. Loves (and Other Emoji Reactions): Facebook, Women, and the
           Gender Emoji Gap in US Election Campaigns

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      Authors: Justin Bonest Phillips
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      In 2017, Facebook’s news feed algorithm began weighting emoji reactions (e.g., love and angry) as five times more valuable than the like button. Such a change is theoretically intriguing because existing research largely suggests that women tend to use emojis more than men on social media. Within the context of political campaigns, prior work has revealed a host of other “gender gaps,” from documenting men’s and women’s differing tolerance for negative campaigns, to examining variations in online political participation and—more broadly—charting gendered imbalances in party demographic support. To date, however, no study has looked to investigate this potential gender emoji gap within the online political environment. This paper explores just such a gap, combining data across three US election cycles (2016–2020), over thirty million individual observations, and thousands of (federal and state) candidates. The data shows that women exhibited a greater preference for emoji reactions than men in response to posts from the 2016 presidential election candidates. Party, and candidate negativity, also appeared to moderate this effect. Likely due to this (moderated) gender gap, Democratic candidates continued to see a much higher proportion of emoji reactions to their posts, than Republicans in 2018, and 2020. In turn, the results offer clear evidence of a persistent emoji gender gap in US political campaigns on Facebook. Such findings strengthen our theoretical understanding of political communication and behavior online, and prompt important questions going forward for future research.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2024-01-02T11:03:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231224535
       
  • We are What We Consume: Predicting Independent Voters’ Voting Preference
           From Their Media Diet Color

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      Authors: Chingching Chang, Yu-Chuan Hung, Morris Hsieh
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Party identification is an important predictor of voting preference, but because a growing percentage of voters do not express any party identification, alternative ways to anticipate voting preferences are required. Partisan slants in voters’ media consumption might offer a relevant proxy. With method triangulation, the current study explores whether media consumption prior to elections can predict voting preferences among independents. Depending on the media outlets adopted by voters and their partisan skew, as detected by Bert machine learning models, the authors calculate an overall partisan slant for each voter’s political information consumption. Data from a nationwide panel survey conducted in Taiwan affirm that their media diet “color” in 2019 can predict independent voters' choices in 2020.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-28T12:41:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231214027
       
  • Preference for Smartphone-Based Internet Applications and Smartphone
           Addiction Among Young Adult Addicts: Gender Difference in Psychological
           Network

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      Authors: Xin-Yi Wei, Han-Yu Liang, Ting Gao, Ling-Feng Gao, Guo-Hua Zhang, Xiao-Yuan Chu, Hong-Xia Wang, Jing-Yu Geng, Ke Liu, Jia Nie, Pan Zeng, Lei Ren, Chang Liu, Huai-Bin Jiang, Li Lei
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Young adults are a high-risk population for developing smartphone addiction (SA), which bring about social issues. One theoretically and empirically supported proximal risk factor of SA is preference for smartphone-based internet applications (PSIA). However, most previous studies ignore gender difference and symptomatic heterogeneity of SA. Besides, many previous data analyses contain non-addicts, and the results derived might not be applicable to smartphone addicts. To bridging the gap, we used a symptom-level network analysis to assess gender differences in the links between preferences for 8 smartphone-based internet applications and 4 SA symptoms among young adults with high-level phone addiction (619 women and 415 men). The results showed that: (1) The relationship between the preference for video and the “loss of control” symptom was more pronounced in female addicts compared to their male counterparts. (2) Shopping app had stronger bridge centrality in women’s smartphone applications-SA network, which was positively linked with more SA symptoms. (3) Our research identified marginal gender differences in smartphone addicts' psychological networks, with female addicts showing stronger links between social media/eBook preferences and withdrawal symptoms, and male addicts displaying a stronger connection between gaming/eBook and other smartphone activities. The study provides a visualized network association and network metrics for understanding the relationship between PSIA and SA. We propose adopting a selective processing hypothesis and an evolutionary psychology perspective to aid in understanding these gender differences.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-19T10:50:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231222680
       
  • Fixing Fieldnotes: Developing and Testing a Digital Tool for the
           Collection, Processing, and Analysis of Ethnographic Data

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      Authors: Sofie L. Astrupgaard, August Lohse, Emilie M. Gregersen, Jonathan H. Salka, Kristoffer Albris, Morten A. Pedersen
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Ethnographic fieldnotes can contain richer and more thorough descriptions of social phenomena compared to other data sources. Their open-ended and flexible character makes them especially useful in explorative research. However, fieldnotes are typically highly unstructured and personalized by individual researchers, which make them harder to use as a method for data collection in collaborative and mixed methods research. More precisely, the unstructured nature of ethnographic fieldnotes presents three distinct challenges: 1) Organizability—it can be difficult to search and sort fieldnotes and thus to get an overview of them, 2) Integrability—it is difficult to meaningfully integrate fieldnotes with other more quantitative data types such as more such as surveys or geospatial data, and 3) Computational Processability—it is hard to process and analyze fieldnotes with computational methods such as topic models and network analysis. To solve these three challenges, we present a new digital tool, for the systematic collection, processing, and analysis of ethnographic fieldnotes. The tool is developed and tested as part of an interdisciplinary mixed methods pilot study on attention dynamics at a political festival in Denmark. Through case examples from this study, we show how adopting this new digital tool allowed our team to overcome the three aforementioned challenges of fieldnotes, while retaining the flexible and explorative character of ethnographic research, which is a key strength of ethnographic fieldwork.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-18T12:08:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231220488
       
  • A National RDD Smartphone Web Survey: Comparison With a Large-Scale CAPI
           Survey

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      Authors: Sunwoong Kim, Mick P. Couper
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      The most important national surveys of the general population for creating official statistics or public policymaking in many countries, including South Korea, are still conducted using face-to-face interviews with household members. Recently face-to-face surveys have faced threats to data quality from decreasing response rates and rising costs of in-person visits. The COVID-19 pandemic and associated lockdown exacerbated the situation for face-to-face surveys. Survey organizations suspended fieldwork or began to explore alternate means of collecting data. One alternative was a shift to telephone surveys; however, telephone interviews have encountered similar difficulties with declining response rates and increasing costs. Could a self-administered web survey be a viable alternative to interviewer-administered modes such as telephone interviews (CATI) or face-to-face interviews (CAPI)' Smartphones may offer opportunities not offered by other modes. We conducted a smartphone web survey using SMS invitations where a sample of cell phone numbers was selected by random digit dialing (RDD) and compared it with a large-scale national face-to-face survey (CAPI) where a sample of households was selected by stratified cluster sampling. The two surveys were conducted during the COVID pandemic in the second half of 2020. The coverage and sample representation of the smartphone web survey were comparable to that of the face-to-face survey. Despite the relatively small number of respondents, the quality of the smartphone web survey was sufficient to provide accurate data and compared favorably with the CAPI survey. The smartphone web survey yielded more reports of socially undesirable attitudes and behavior than the CAPI survey. The findings will guide researchers to explore new opportunities in establishing a web survey methodology that obtains data more conveniently, efficiently, accurately, and with less cost.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-18T03:02:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231222675
       
  • Explicating Trust-building Factors Impacting the Use of e-government
           Services

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      Authors: Suha AlAwadhi, Husain Alansari, Ahmad R. Alsaber
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the users’ perception of trust-building factors influencing the use of e-government services and information, by integrating constructs identified in the technology acceptance model (TAM) with information systems (IS) success and trust models. Data was collected using a questionnaire targeted towards users of e-government services in Kuwait. The partial least squares structural equation modeling method was used to analyze 717 valid questionnaire responses. The results indicate that information quality and design (IQD) and perceived ease of use (PEU) influence individuals’ trust in e-government (TEG), thereby affecting their behavioral intentions (BI). Furthermore, the results indicate an average level of the users’ satisfaction and significant differences in how gender and nationality are associated with the overall satisfaction of e-government services users. The proposed framework contributes to extending models by integrating IQD (a modified construct of the IS model) and PEU (a construct of the TAM) as trust-related factors that provide better insights into the driving forces of BI and should be considered when designing and developing e-government services. Additionally, the study provides a deeper understanding of the challenges that could hinder the use of e-government systems.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-18T01:32:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231220757
       
  • Sex Sells Terrorism: How Sexual Appeals in Fringe Online Communities
           Contribute to Self-Radicalization

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      Authors: Brian C. Britt
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      The past several years have seen rising hate crimes, terrorist attacks, and broader extremist movements, with news reports often noting that these movements can be traced back to fringe online communities. Yet the question remains why such online groups appear more likely to foster radicalization than those in other contexts. This netnographic case study demonstrates how sexual appeals in fringe online communities facilitate the development of extremist ideologies. Specifically, the cognitive effects of sexual arousal combined with the social norms of such communities contribute to the acceptance of hate speech and fringe ideologies while reducing the extent to which audiences evaluate rational arguments and competing points of view. Thus, sexual appeals paired with messaging or imagery that promotes fringe points of view, which can be more freely expressed in small online groups than in other contexts, are more likely to result in intended attitudinal and behavioral changes—in other words, extremism.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-07T06:02:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231220490
       
  • Performing an Inductive Thematic Analysis of Semi-Structured Interviews
           With a Large Language Model: An Exploration and Provocation on the Limits
           of the Approach

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      Authors: Stefano De Paoli
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Large Language Models (LLMs) have emerged as powerful generative Artificial Intelligence solutions. This paper presents results and reflections of an experiment done with the LLM GPT 3.5-Turbo to perform an inductive Thematic Analysis (TA). Previous research has worked on conducting deductive analysis. Thematic Analysis is a qualitative method for analysis commonly used in social sciences and it is based on interpretations by the human analyst(s) and the identification of explicit and latent meanings in qualitative data. The paper presents the motivations for attempting this analysis; it reflects on how the six phases to a TA proposed by Braun and Clarke can partially be reproduced with the LLM and it reflects on what are the model’s outputs. The paper uses two datasets of open access semi-structured interviews, previously analysed by other researchers. The first dataset contains interviews with videogame players, and the second is a dataset of interviews with lecturers teaching data science in a University. This paper used the analyses previously conducted on these datasets to compare with the results produced by the LLM. The results show that the model can infer most of the main themes from previous research. This shows that using LLMs to perform an inductive TA is viable and offers a good degree of validity. The discussion offers some recommendations for working with LLMs in qualitative analysis.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-07T04:49:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231220483
       
  • A Two-Step Method for Classifying Political Partisanship Using Deep
           Learning Models

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      Authors: Lingshu Hu
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Political partisanship constitutes a pivotal group identity that significantly influences individuals’ voting behaviors and shapes their ideological and cultural perspectives. While traditional surveys and experimental studies can directly capture political identity by asking the participants, this task has become intricate when employing digital trace data sourced from social media. Previous classification methods, attempting to infer political identity from users’ networks or textual content, suffered from limited efficiency or generalizability. In response, this study introduces a two-step method that utilizes deep learning models to enhance classification efficiency, generalizability, and interpretability. In the first step, two deep learning models, trained on 2.5 million tweets from 825 Congressional politicians in the U.S., achieved accuracy rates of 87.71% and 89.54%, respectively, in detecting politicians’ partisanships based on their individual tweets. Subsequently, in the second step, by employing a simple machine learning model that leverages the aggregated predicted values derived from the first-step models, accuracy rates of 94.92% and 96.61% were attained for identifying non-politician users’ political identities based off their 50 and 200 tweets, respectively. In addition, an attention mechanism was integrated into the deep learning model to assess the contribution of each word in the classification process.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-06T08:06:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231219685
       
  • Social Grooming on Social Media and Older Adults’ Life Satisfaction:
           Testing a Moderated Mediation Model

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      Authors: Piper Liping Liu, Tien Ee Dominic Yeo
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the growing prevalence of social media usage among older adults, the impact for their well-being remains unclear. This study investigates the impact of social grooming on social media (SGSM) on the life satisfaction of a representative sample (N = 591) of older adults (aged 55 and above) in Taiwan. Using an indirect effects paradigm, the study examines the mediation mechanisms of bridging social capital and perceived social support in the relationship between SGSM and life satisfaction. Additionally, the moderating effect of social network size (SNS) is assessed. The results indicate that bridging social capital and social support fully and sequentially mediate the influence of SGSM on older adults’ life satisfaction. Furthermore, SNS is identified as a significant moderator in this sequential mediating effect. These findings contribute to the existing literature on social media use and highlight the importance of understanding the impact of SGSM on life satisfaction and other psychological outcomes for older adults. The results also emphasize the need to consider the unique characteristics and specific needs of older adults, and to promote and assist them in effectively using social media to expand their social networks and acquire social support, which are crucial for their life satisfaction.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-12-06T08:01:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231220487
       
  • Quantifying the Systematic Bias in the Accessibility and Inaccessibility
           of Web Scraping Content From URL-Logged Web-Browsing Digital Trace Data

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      Authors: Ross Dahlke, Deepak Kumar, Zakir Durumeric, Jeffrey T. Hancock
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Social scientists and computer scientists are increasingly using observational digital trace data and analyzing these data post hoc to understand the content people are exposed to online. However, these content collection efforts may be systematically biased when the entirety of the data cannot be captured retroactively. We call this often unstated assumption the problematic assumption of accessibility. To examine the extent to which this assumption may be problematic, we identify 107k hard news and misinformation web pages visited by a representative panel of 1,238 American adults and record the degree to which the web pages individuals visited were accessible via successful web scrapes or inaccessible via unsuccessful scrapes. While we find that the URLs collected are largely accessible and with unrestricted content, we find there are systematic biases in which URLs are restricted, return an error, or are inaccessible. For example, conservative misinformation URLs are more likely to be inaccessible than other types of misinformation. We suggest how social scientists should capture and report digital trace and web scraping data.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-29T12:04:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231218214
       
  • Your Smiling Face is Impolite to Me: A Study of the Smiling Face Emoji in
           Chinese Computer-Mediated Communication

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      Authors: Kun Yang, Shuang Qian
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores whether and in what situation the smiling face emoji will influence the interpretation of an utterance in a virtual context. The researchers drew examples from daily WeChat communication and posted them to participants in the experiment. Experimental studies found that the smiling face emoji decreases the politeness of an utterance but does not mitigate the illocutionary force of an impolite utterance. Further studies demonstrate that the interpretation is related to two features of WeChat: the interactant’s identity (age) and the situation of communication. For one thing, utterances with smiling face emoji may be interpreted as disrespectful by younger Chinese rather than the older. For another, the smiling face emoji is always interpreted as impolite when the utterances are related to the interactants’ feelings. We also infer from the findings that older people might respect the feelings of the addresser more than younger people in WeChat communication. This paper will help avoid miscommunication and contribute to understanding the socio-cultural features of interpersonal interaction in a virtual context.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-29T07:04:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231219481
       
  • Interpersonal and Computer-Mediated Competence for Prejudice Reduction:
           Learning to Interact Digitally and Physically During the Pandemic

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      Authors: B. C. Bouchillon
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      As racial and ethnic diversity have increased in America, prejudice too has expanded. Citizens are more wary of immigrants, with attitudes toward Asian immigrants in particular worsening during COVID-19. Yet less is known about the prejudice directed at other immigrant groups during this period, with research suggesting that feeling capable of interacting with new people could reduce misgivings about diversity. A web survey was conducted in April of 2020 to test the potential for digital and physical social competence to improve attitudes toward Mexican immigrants, as the largest immigrant group in the United States (N = 665). Interpersonal competence was inversely associated with prejudice toward Mexican immigrants, with interpersonal skills such as attentiveness, expressiveness, and mindfulness being especially valuable for prejudice reduction. Computer-mediated communication competence was indirectly associated with feeling less prejudiced, through interpersonal competence, and social presence also moderated the conversion of CMC competence into interpersonal competence, diminishing prejudice even further. Digital social capabilities encourage admiration and sympathy for immigrants by making users feel more capable of interacting with them locally. Networked settings now have the potential to train dissimilar users to interact together in person, as a way of reducing prejudice.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-29T05:07:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231219192
       
  • “We Found Love”: Romantic Video Game Involvement and Desire for
           Real-Life Romantic Relationships Among Female Gamers

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      Authors: Yuehua Wu, Weijia Cai, Sandra Asantewaa Mensah
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the increasing popularity of female-oriented romantic video games (RVGs, also known as otome games) in Asia, research on this topic is scarce. Drawing upon social exchange theory and social cognitive theory, the current study examined the association of RVG involvement and desire for real-life romantic relationships (RLRRs), and tested a SEM path model delineating the possible pathways linking RVG involvement to RLRR desire. A survey method was adopted to collect data from female RVG players on an online otome games forum in China. Results from a valid sample of 353 respondents (aged 18 or older) showed the direct, indirect, and total effects of RVG involvement on players’ interest in real-life dating and marriage relationships were all negatively significant. It was found that gamers’ avatar identification and parasocial relationships with romantic targets significantly mediated the relationship between RVG involvement and RLRR desire. Adding to a comparatively under-explored line of inquiry on the role of computer games in shaping real-life romance, this study contributes to both game effects and romantic media consumption literature.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-23T10:43:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231217940
       
  • How Does Facebook Retain Segregated Friendship' An Agent-Based Model
           Approach

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      Authors: Firman M. Firmansyah
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Facebook, the largest social networking site in the world, has overcome the structural barriers that historically constrain individuals to reach out to different others. Through the platform, people from all walks of life and virtually any location can develop diverse friendships online. However, friendships on Facebook have been as segregated as friendships in real life. This research sought to understand why the leading social networking site intended to “bring the world closer together” retains segregated friendship. In doing so, I employed a series of agent-based simulations based on the Framework for Intergroup Relations and Multiple Affiliations Networks (FIRMAN). As demonstrated, Facebook has primarily enhanced users’ capacity to maintain a larger number of friendships (tie capacity), but it has done little to empower users’ ability to accept diversity and befriend different others (tie outreachability). Facebook must focus on the latter should they truly wish to contribute to the development of a more inclusive society. While in this study I focus on ethnically segregated friendship on Facebook, I argue that the same explanation might also hold for racially and ideologically segregated friendships on other bidirectional social networking sites.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-22T11:31:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231213960
       
  • The Long Road to Municipality 2.0: Mobile City Apps as Catalyst for
           Change'

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      Authors: Iris Steenhout, Lior Volinz, Kristel Beyens, Lucas Melgaço
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      In recent decades, the public sector has been looking for ways to accommodate increasingly critical citizens by striving towards a less bureaucratic and more efficient organization, as well as more direct forms of communication. Government institutions try to respond more quickly to citizens’ concerns and want to ensure that citizens can contact them more easily and find relevant and accurate information promptly. To achieve this, they often turn to technological aids. This article focuses on how municipalities analyze and follow up minor violations and street nuisances. We used semi-structured interviews with key informants from the relevant services of the municipality of Schaerbeek, a district of Brussels (Belgium), to examine how the technological innovations implemented within the municipality transform the relations between local authorities and their citizens, as well as the internal relations between the different municipal services. Although the respondents were unanimous about the added value of these technological solutions, our analysis shows four clearly recurrent issues : (1) the “functional reduction” associated with technological innovations leaves little room for the complex context of social nuisance; (2) government services are currently flooded by a “tsunami” of communication flows; (3) so-called “innovative” technological solutions often mimic old bureaucratic processes; (4) new communication tools are not equally integrated into all levels of local administration.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-21T12:14:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231184533
       
  • Text Messages to Incentivise Response in a Web-First Sequential Mixed-Mode
           Survey

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      Authors: Pablo Cabrera-Álvarez, Peter Lynn
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      This article reports research exploring the benefits of adding text messages to the contact strategy in the context of a sequential mixed-mode design where telephone interviewer administration follows a web phase. In a web-first mixed-mode survey, supplementing the contact strategy with text messages can help increase the response rate at the web phase and, consequently, reduce fieldwork efforts at the interviewer-administered phase. We present results from a survey experiment embedded in wave 11 of Understanding Society in which the usual contact strategy of emails and letters was supplemented with text messages. Effects of the text messages on survey response and fieldwork efforts were assessed. In addition, we also investigated the impact of SMS on the device selected to complete the survey, time to response, and sample balance. The results show a weak effect of the SMS reminders on response during the web fieldwork. However, this positive effect did not significantly reduce fieldwork effort.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-21T12:13:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231213315
       
  • Conflicting Norms—How Norms of Disconnection and Availability Correlate
           With Digital Media Use Across Generations

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      Authors: Sarah Geber, Minh Hao Nguyen, Moritz Büchi
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Digital disconnection has emerged as a response to constant connectivity and the perceived harms to well-being that technology overuse may cause in a digital society. Despite the apparent conflict with expectations of constant availability, there has been limited research on the role of social norms in individuals’ regulation of their digital media use. The present study applied a nuanced conceptualization of social norms—by differentiating referent groups (i.e., family, friends, and everyday contacts) as well as injunctive and descriptive norms—and examined the associations of disconnection and availability norms with disconnection behavior across two generations of digital media users. Drawing on an online survey based on a stratified population sample (N = 1163), we found perceptions of injunctive disconnection norms to differ across generations, with younger digital media users perceiving digital disconnection but also availability to be more important to their social environment. This conflict of contradictory norms was also reflected in an interactional effect on own disconnection behavior in this group, where positive correlations between disconnections norms and behavior were countered by availability norms. Overall, our findings demonstrate the social complexity of the individual decision to (dis)connect and, on the societal level, that social norms of disconnection are in transition with disconnection behavior becoming and being perceived as more and more important.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-18T03:25:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231215457
       
  • Bridging Qualitative Data Silos: The Potential of Reusing Codings Through
           Machine Learning Based Cross-Study Code Linking

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      Authors: Sergej Wildemann, Claudia Niederée, Erick Elejalde
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      For qualitative data analysis (QDA), researchers assign codes to text segments to arrange the information into topics or concepts. These annotations facilitate information retrieval and the identification of emerging patterns in unstructured data. However, this metadata is typically not published or reused after the research. Subsequent studies with similar research questions require a new definition of codes and do not benefit from other analysts’ experience. Machine learning (ML) based classification seeded with such data remains a challenging task due to the ambiguity of code definitions and the inherent subjectivity of the exercise. Previous attempts to support QDA using ML rely on linear models and only examined individual datasets that were either smaller or coded specifically for this purpose. However, we show that modern approaches effectively capture at least part of the codes’ semantics and may generalize to multiple studies. We analyze the performance of multiple classifiers across three large real-world datasets. Furthermore, we propose an ML-based approach to identify semantic relations of codes in different studies to show thematic faceting, enhance retrieval of related content, or bootstrap the coding process. These are encouraging results that suggest how analysts might benefit from prior interpretation efforts, potentially yielding new insights into qualitative data.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-13T01:48:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231215459
       
  • Exploring Customer Citizenship Behavior in Social Commerce From the
           Parasocial Perspective

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      Authors: Jinqi Men, Xiabing Zheng, Feifei Shan, Xiao Shi, Feng Yang
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Attention on customer citizenship behavior (CCB) has increased markedly in recent years for both researchers and practitioners. However, existing research lacks deep understanding of the antecedents of CCB in social commerce, especially from the perspective of seller-consumer interaction relationships. Drawing on complexity theory, this study investigated the impacts of the causal configurations of three types of seller-consumer interaction relationships (experience of parasocial interaction (PSI), social interaction, and parasocial relationship (PSR)) on CCB in social commerce. To test this proposition, this study adopted fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) on a sample of 380 experienced social commerce consumers. Our findings indicate that the combination of social interaction and PSR leads to a high CCB among social commerce consumers. Moreover, borrowing from social exchange theory, we further employed partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) to reanalyze the research data. The PLS-SEM results are consistent with the fsQCA results.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-10T03:50:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231214026
       
  • They’re Coming for You! How Perceptions of Automation Affect Public
           Support for Universal Basic Income

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      Authors: Kathryn Haglin, Soren Jordan, Grant Ferguson
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Media stories on the economy tout automation as one of the biggest contemporary technological changes in America and argue that many Americans may lose their jobs because of it. Politicians and financial elites often promote a policy of Universal Basic Income (UBI) as a solution to the potential unemployment caused by automation, suggesting Americans should support UBI to protect them from this technological disruption. This linkage and basic descriptive findings are largely untested: we don’t know much about whether Americans support UBI, see automation as a threat to their job, or connect the two in any meaningful way. Using a Mechanical Turk survey of 3600 respondents, we examine the relationship between Americans’ perception of how much automation threatens their jobs, how much automation actually threatens their jobs, and their support for UBI. Our results indicate that while the public does not view automation as the same threat that elites do, Americans who believe their jobs will be automated are more likely to support UBI. These relationships, however, vary considerably by political party.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-08T01:25:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231212252
       
  • Media Representations of Healthcare Robotics in Norway 2000-2020: A Topic
           Modeling Approach

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      Authors: Mads Solberg, Ralf Kirchhoff
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Robots are projected to affect healthcare services in significant, but unpredictable, ways. Many believe robots will add value to future healthcare, but their arrival has triggered controversy. Debates revolve around how robotics will impact healthcare provision, their effects on the future of labor and caregiver–patient relationships, and ethical dilemmas associated with autonomous machines. This study investigates media representations of healthcare robotics in Norway over a twenty-year period, using a mixed-methods design. Media representations affect public opinion in multiple ways. By assembling and presenting information through stories, they not only set the agenda by broadcasting values, experiences, and expectations about new technologies, but also frame and prime specific understandings of issues. First, we employ an inductive text-mining approach known as “topic modeling,” a computational method for eliciting abstract semantic structures from large text corpora. Using Non-Negative Matrix Factorization, we implement a topic model of manifest content from 752 articles, published in Norwegian print media between 1.1.2000 and 2.10.2020, sampled from a comprehensive database for news media (Atekst, Retriever). We complement this computational lens with a more fine-grained, qualitative analysis of content in exemplary texts sampled from each topic. Here, we identify prominent “frames,” discursive cues for interpreting how various stakeholders talk about healthcare robotics as a contested domain of policy and practice in a comprehensive welfare state. We also highlight some benefits of this approach for analyzing media discourse and stakeholder perspectives on controversial technologies.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-07T07:16:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231212251
       
  • Measuring Hate: Does a Definition Affect Self-Reported Levels of
           Perpetration and Exposure to Online Hate in Surveys'

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      Authors: James Hawdon, Ashley Reichelmann, Matthew Costello, Vicente J. Llorent, Pekka Räsänen, Izabela Zych, Atte Oksanen, Catherine Blaya
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this research is to test the validity of commonly used measures of exposure to and production of online extremism. Specifically, we investigate if a definition of hate influences survey responses about the production of and exposure to online hate. To explore the effects of a definition, we used a split experimental design on a sample of 18 to 25-year-old Americans where half of the respondents were exposed to the European Union’s definition of hate speech and the other half were not. Then, all respondents completed a survey with commonly used items measuring exposure to and perpetration of online hate. The results reveal that providing a definition affects self-reported levels of exposure and perpetration, but the effects are dependent on race. The findings provide evidence that survey responses about online hate may be conditioned by social desirability and framing biases. The findings that group differences exist in how questions about hate are interpreted when definitions of it are not provided mean we must be careful when using measures that try to capture exposure to and the production of hate. While more research is needed, we recommend providing a clear, unambiguous definition when using surveys to measure online hate.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-11-01T06:58:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231211270
       
  • Noteworthy Disparities With Four CAQDAS Tools: Explorations in Organising
           Live Twitter Data

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      Authors: Travis Noakes, Patricia Harpur, Corrie Uys
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Qualitative data analysis software (QDAS) packages that support live data extraction are a relatively recent innovation. Little has been written concerning the research implications of differences in such QDAS packages’ functionalities, and how such disparities might contribute to contrasting analytical opportunities. Consequently, early-stage researchers may experience difficulties in choosing an apt QDAS for Twitter analysis. In response to both methodological gaps, this paper presents a software comparison across the four QDAS tools that support live Twitter data imports, namely, ATLAS.ti™, NVivo™, MAXQDA™ and QDA Miner™. The authors’ QDAS features checklist for these tools spotlights many differences in their functionalities. These disparities were tested through data imports and thematic coding that was derived from the same queries and codebook. The authors’ resultant QDAS experiences were compared during the first activity of a broad qualitative analysis process, ‘organising data’. Notwithstanding large difference in QDAS pricing, it was surprising how much the tools varied for aspects of qualitative research organisation. Notably, the quantum of data extracted for the same query differed, largely due to contrasts in the types and amount of data that the four QDAS could extract. Variations in how each supported visual organisation also shaped researchers’ opportunities for becoming familiar with Twitter users and their tweet content. Such disparities suggest that choosing a suitable QDAS for organising live Twitter data must dovetail with a researcher’s focus: ATLAS.ti accommodates scholars focused on wrangling unstructured data for personal meaning-making, while MAXQDA suits the mixed-methods researcher. QDA Miner’s easy-to-learn user interface suits a highly efficient implementation of methods, whilst NVivo supports relatively rapid analysis of tweet content. Such findings may help guide Twitter social science researchers and others in QDAS tool selection. Future research can explore disparities in other qualitative research phases, or contrast data extraction routes for a variety of microblogging services.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T03:04:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231204163
       
  • The Influence of Political Fit, Issue Fit, and Targeted Political
           Advertising Disclosures on Persuasion Knowledge, Party Evaluation, and
           Chilling Effects

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      Authors: Melanie Hirsch, Alice Binder, Jörg Matthes
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      The availability of online data has altered the role of social media. By offering targeted online advertising, that is, persuasive messages tailored to user groups, political parties profit from large data profiles to send fine-grained advertising appeals to susceptible voters. This between-subject experiment (N = 421) investigates the influence of targeted political advertising disclosures (targeting vs. no-targeting disclosure), political fit (high vs. low), and issue fit (high vs. low) on recipients’ party evaluation and chilling effect intentions. The mediating role of targeting knowledge (TK) and perceived manipulative intent (PMI), two dimensions of persuasion knowledge, are investigated. The findings show that disclosing a targeting strategy and a high political fit activated individuals’ TK, that is, their recognition that their data had been used to show the ads, which then increased the evaluation of the political party and individuals’ intentions to engage in future chilling effect behaviors. High political fit decreased individuals’ reflections about the appropriateness of the targeted political ads (i.e., PMI), which then increased party evaluation. Issue fit did not affect individuals’ persuasion knowledge.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-09-12T10:19:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231193731
       
  • Cheap, Quick, and Rigorous: Artificial Intelligence and the Systematic
           Literature Review

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      Authors: Cameron F. Atkinson
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      The systematic literature review (SLR) is the gold standard in providing research a firm evidence foundation to support decision-making. Researchers seeking to increase the rigour, transparency, and replicability of their SLRs are provided a range of guidelines towards these ends. Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning Techniques (MLTs) developed with computer programming languages can provide methods to increase the speed, rigour, transparency, and repeatability of SLRs. Aimed towards researchers with coding experience, and who want to utilise AI and MLTs to synthesise and abstract data obtained through a SLR, this article sets out how computer languages can be used to facilitate unsupervised machine learning for synthesising and abstracting data sets extracted during a SLR. Utilising an already known qualitative method, Deductive Qualitative Analysis, this article illustrates the supportive role that AI and MLTs can play in the coding and categorisation of extracted SLR data, and in synthesising SLR data. Using a data set extracted during a SLR as a proof of concept, this article will include the coding used to create a well-established MLT, Topic Modelling using Latent Dirichlet allocation. This technique provides a working example of how researchers can use AI and MLTs to automate the data synthesis and abstraction stage of their SLR, and aide in increasing the speed, frugality, and rigour of research projects.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-26T07:21:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231196281
       
  • Novelty in News Search: A Longitudinal Study of the 2020 US Elections

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      Authors: Roberto Ulloa, Mykola Makhortykh, Aleksandra Urman, Juhi Kulshrestha
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      The 2020 US elections news coverage was extensive, with new pieces of information generated rapidly. This evolving scenario presented an opportunity to study the performance of search engines in a context in which they had to quickly process information as it was published. We analyze novelty, a measurement of new items that emerge in the top news search results, to compare the coverage and visibility of different topics. Using virtual agents that simulate human web browsing behavior to collect search engine result pages, we conduct a longitudinal study of news results of five search engines collected in short bursts (every 21 minutes) from two regions (Oregon, US and Frankfurt, Germany), starting on election day and lasting until one day after the announcement of Biden as the winner. We find more new items emerging for election related queries (“joe biden,” “donald trump,” and “us elections”) compared to topical (e.g., “coronavirus”) or stable (e.g., “holocaust”) queries. We demonstrate that our method captures sudden changes in highly covered news topics as well as multiple differences across search engines and regions over time. We highlight novelty imbalances between candidate queries which affect their visibility during electoral periods, and conclude that, when it comes to news, search engines are responsible for such imbalances, either due to their algorithms or the set of news sources that they rely on.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-14T01:05:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231195471
       
  • The Impact of Economic Degradation on the Uí Bhriain Civil War
           (1276–1318): An Agent-Based Modeling Approach

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      Authors: Vinicius Marino Carvalho
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Between 1276 and 1318, English magnates unsuccessfully attempted to establish a lordship in the Irish kingdom of Thomond, southwestern Ireland, by exploiting a dynastic feud dividing the then-ruling lineage, the Uí Bhriain. The conflict coincided with a series of extreme events that beset western Europe in the late 13th and early 14th centuries, such as the beginning of the Little Ice Age and the Great European Famine of 1315–1322. The goal of this work was to evaluate to the extent to which economic degradation at the turn of the 14th century affected the outcome of the war. The hypothesis that such degradation affected the war’s outcome was tested using agent-based modeling, which involved the virtual reconstruction of Late Medieval Thomond to study past conditions by proxy. This article describes the historical research carried out to elaborate the conceptual model, the implementation of the model as a computer simulation, and the experiments carried out to virtually explore the Uí Bhriain Civil War. A quantitative analysis of the experimental results revealed some correlation between late 13th century economic degradation and the fortunes of belligerent factions in the wars of 1276–1318, although the effect was not sufficiently strong to have been a crucial factor in the outcome of the conflict.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-12T12:52:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231194983
       
  • Cyberbullying and Traditional Bullying Victimization, Depressive Symptoms,
           and Suicidal Ideation Among Chinese Early Adolescents: Cognitive
           Reappraisal and Emotion Invalidation as Moderators

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      Authors: Jianhua Zhou, Haiyan Zhao, Yan Zou
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined how depressive symptoms play mediating roles between cyberbullying and traditional bullying victimization and suicidal ideation and the moderating roles of cognitive reappraisal and emotion invalidation. A total of 1,823 Chinese adolescents (Mean age = 11.20, SD = 1.21, 47.8% girls) participated this study. Results showed that cyberbullying victimization was more strongly related to suicidal ideation than traditional bullying victimization. Depressive symptoms played mediating roles between cyberbullying and traditional bullying victimization and suicidal ideation. Cognitive reappraisal mitigated the effects of cyberbullying and traditional bullying victimization on depressive symptoms, and perceived emotion invalidation strengthened the effect of depressive symptoms on suicidal ideation. Results further showed that the mediating effect of depressive symptoms was more prominent when there were low levels of cognitive reappraisal and more perceived emotion invalidation. Promoting youths’ cognitive reappraisal and providing validating responses to their depressive symptoms could mitigate the destructive effects of bullying victimization on suicidal ideation.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-08-02T10:40:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231192237
       
  • Studyholism and Health Outcomes: Could Internet Addiction Make the
           Difference'

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      Authors: Danila Molinaro, Yura Loscalzo, Carmela Buono, Ludovica Del Giudice, Alessio Lustro, Chiara Ghislieri, Paola Spagnoli
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Recently, Loscalzo and Giannini have proposed Studyholism as a possible new clinical condition, highlighting its potential antecedents and outcomes. The present study investigates the moderating role of Internet addiction in the relationship between Studyholism, academic exhaustion and insomnia. Three hundred and eighteen Italian university students (85.50% female; mean age = 22.98 ± 4.34) participated in the survey during the third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. The two moderation models were tested using the structural equation model with Mplus 7. Results showed a significant direct effect of Studyholism on both academic exhaustion and insomnia and also confirmed the moderating role of Internet addiction in the aforementioned relationships. Although there is a linear relationship between Studyholism and the outcomes, at lower levels of Internet addiction, there is a greater effect of Studyholism on both academic exhaustion and insomnia than at medium and high levels of Internet addiction. Based on these findings, we suggest screening students who report insomnia and academic exhaustion for both Internet addiction and Studyholism, as they might both contribute to these negative health-related aspects.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-28T10:44:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231192233
       
  • Guaranteed Incentives and Prize Drawings: Effects on Participation, Data
           Quality, and Costs in a Web Survey of College Students on Sensitive Topics
           

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      Authors: Jennifer Dykema, John Stevenson, Cameron P. Jones, Brendan Day
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Many studies rely on traditional web survey methods in which all contacts with sample members are through email and the questionnaire is administered exclusively online. Because it is difficult to effectively administer prepaid incentives via email, researchers frequently employ lotteries or prize draws as incentives even though their influence on survey participation is small. The current study examines whether a prize draw is more effective if it is divided into a few larger amounts versus several smaller amounts and compares prize draws to a small but guaranteed postpaid incentive. Data are from the 2019 Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Sexual Misconduct. Sample members include 38,434 undergraduate and graduate students at a large Midwestern university who were randomly assigned to receive: a guaranteed $5 Amazon gift card; entry into a high-payout drawing for one of four $500 prizes; or entry into a low-payout drawing for one of twenty $100 prizes. Results indicate the guaranteed incentive increased response rates, with no difference between the prize draws. While results from various data quality outcomes show the guaranteed incentive reduced break-off rates and the high-payout drawing increased item nonresponse, there were no differences across incentive conditions in rates of speeding, reporting of sensitive data, straightlining, or sample representativeness. As expected, the prize draws had much lower overall and per complete costs.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-21T02:48:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231189853
       
  • Monitoring Looting at Cultural Heritage Sites: Applying Deep Learning on
           Optical Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Data as a Solution

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      Authors: Mark Altaweel, Adel Khelifi, Mohammad Maher Shana’ah
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      The looting of cultural heritage sites has been a growing problem and threatens national economies, social identity, destroys research potential, and traumatizes communities. For many countries, the challenge in protecting heritage is that there are often too few resources, particularly paid site guards, while sites can also be in remote locations. Here, we develop a new approach that applies deep learning methods to detect the presence of looting at heritage sites using optical imagery from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). We present results that demonstrate the accuracy, precision, and recall of our approach. Results show that optical UAV data can be an easy way for authorities to monitor heritage sites, demonstrating the utility of deep learning in aiding the protection of heritage sites by automating the detection of any new damage to sites. We discuss the impact and potential for deep learning to be used as a tool for the protection of heritage sites. How the approach could be improved with new data is also discussed. Additionally, the code and data used are provided as part of the outputs.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-10T12:31:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231188471
       
  • TikTok and Civic Activity Among Young Adults

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      Authors: Kenneth W. Moffett, Laurie L. Rice
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      TikTok is known for its lighthearted dance and lip-synch videos, yet videos with the hashtag #politics have garnered nearly 14 billion views. Does young adults’ politically oriented expression on TikTok lead to increased civic engagement offline' TikTok helps incorporate young adults into political social networks that may encourage additional civic activity. In addition, the playful, humorous nature of TikTok-based political expression encourages young adults to develop participatory, political selves. Using data from a 2020 survey of Americans between 18 and 25 years old, we find that posting political videos on TikTok connects with higher offline civic engagement. The results suggest that playful political expression is an important feature for promoting young adult civic engagement.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-10T09:18:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231188470
       
  • Not All Bots are Created Equal: The Impact of Bots Classification
           Techniques on Identification of Discursive Behaviors Around the COVID-19
           Vaccine and Climate Change

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      Authors: Rui Wang, Dror Walter, Yotam Ophir
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      As concerns about social bots online increase, studies have attempted to explore the discourse they produce, and its effects on individuals and the public at large. We argue that the common reliance on aggregated scores of binary classifiers for bot detection may have yielded biased or inaccurate results. To test this possibility, we systematically compare the differences between non-bots and bots using binary and non-binary classifiers (classified into the categories of astroturf, self-declared, spammers, fake followers, and Other). We use two Twitter corpora, about COVID-19 vaccines (N = 1,697,280) and climate change (N = 1,062,522). We find that both in terms of volume and thematic content, the use of binary classifiers may hinder, distort, or mask differences between humans and bots, that could only be discerned when observing specific bot types. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-07-06T05:49:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231188472
       
  • Integrating Human Insights Into Text Analysis: Semi-Supervised Topic
           Modeling of Emerging Food-Technology Businesses’ Brand Communication on
           Social Media

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      Authors: Leona Yi-Fan Su, Tianli Chen, Yee Man Margaret Ng, Ziyang Gong, Yi-Cheng Wang
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Textual social media data have become indispensable to researchers’ understanding of message strategies and other marketing practices. In a new departure for the field of brand communication, this study adopts and extends a semi-supervised machine-learning approach, guided latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA), which incorporates human insights into the discovery and classification of topics. We used it to analyze tweets from businesses involved with an emerging food technology, cultured meat, and delineated four key message strategies used by these brands: providing functional, educational, corporate social responsibility, and relational content. We further ascertained the relationships between brands and the key topics embedded in their Twitter data. A comparison of model performance suggests that guided LDA can be an advantageous alternative to traditional LDA, which is characterized by high efficiency and immense popularity among researchers, but—because of its unsupervised nature—yields findings that can be difficult to interpret. The present study therefore has critical theoretical and methodological implications for communication and marketing scholars.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-06-26T08:24:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231184532
       
  • Incorporating Virtual Reality in Public Health Campaigns: COVID-19 as the
           Context

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      Authors: Zhan Xu, Veronica Weser, Lulu Peng, Mary Laffidy
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      One of the greatest challenges for public health campaigns is communicating health risks due to the existence of psychological distance. Using COVID-19 as a context, this study designed and tested virtual reality (VR) campaigns based on construal level theory. It assessed the immediate and after-effects of VR on COVID-19 preventive intentions/behaviors and risk perceptions. A total of 120 participants were randomly assigned to see one of four messages: a VR message emphasizing self-interest, a VR message emphasizing other-interest, a print message emphasizing self-interest, or a print message emphasizing other-interest. Preventive intentions/behaviors were assessed at three different times: before, immediately after, and one week after the experimental treatment. Immediately following message exposure, participants exposed to the VR messages perceived a higher level of self-risk than those exposed to print messages. Disgust and fear mediated these effects. One week following message exposure, unvaccinated participants exposed to the VR messages had a higher intention to get vaccinated than those exposed to print messages. Recommendations on how to effectively utilize VR in health interventions are provided.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-06-21T03:39:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231185257
       
  • Dynamic Analysis of the Timing of Survey Participation: An Application of
           Event History Analysis of the Stochastic Process of Response in a
           

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      Authors: Rolf Becker
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      The response patterns across the fieldwork period are analyzed in the context of a panel study with a sequential mixed-mode design including a self-administered online questionnaire and a computer-assisted telephone interview. Since the timing of participation is modelled as a stochastic process of individuals’ response behaviour, event history analysis is applied to reveal time-constant and time-varying factors that influence this process. Different distributions of panelists’ propensity for taking part in the web-based survey or, alternatively, in the computer-assisted telephone interview can be considered by hazard rate analysis. Piecewise constant rate models and analysis of sub-episodes demonstrate that it is possible to describe the time-related development of response rates by reference to individuals’ characteristics, resources and abilities, as well as panelists’ experience with previous panel waves. Finally, it is shown that exogenous factors, such as a mixed-mode survey design, the incentives offered to participants and the reminders that are sent out, contribute significantly to time-related response after the invitation to participate in a survey with a sequential mixed-mode design. Overall, this contribution calls for a dynamic analysis of response behaviour instead of the categorization of response groups.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-06-15T03:09:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231183871
       
  • Emoji as a Social Presence Tool Among Arab Digital Media Users: Do the
           Demographic Variables of the Sender Play a Role'

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      Authors: Shuaa Aljasir
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      To contribute to the current knowledge, this research was conducted, perhaps for the first time, among 1354 Arab users of digital media platforms to investigate emoji as a social presence tool and how the variables of the gender, generation, and the sender’s relationship to the receiver affect the usage and interpretation of the appropriateness of these graphical icons. Among the significant results of this study, generation and gender explained a significant amount of the variance in the frequency and motivation index. Interestingly, there was a significant, three-way interaction among senders’ gender, raters’ gender, and salience. The analysis also showed that the generation and relationship of the sender had a statistically significant effect on appropriateness ratings.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-06-13T11:28:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231181638
       
  • Translation and Validation of the Brief Inventory of Technology
           Self-Efficacy (BITS): Simplified and Traditional Chinese Versions

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      Authors: Arne Weigold, Ingrid K. Weigold, Xiangling Zhang, Ning Tang, Yun Kai Chong
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Computer self-efficacy (CSE) continues to be an important construct in research and application. Two measures of CSE, the Brief Inventory of Technology Self-Efficacy (BITS) and the Brief Inventory of Technology Self-Efficacy – Short Form (BITS-SF) were recently developed to correct for issues in other available measures. The BITS and BITS-SF were originally written in English, and their psychometric properties assessed in samples from the United States. The current two studies translated the BITS and BITS-SF into simplified Chinese (Mainland China) and traditional Chinese (Taiwan) and assessed their psychometric properties. In Study 1, 207 adults in Mainland China completed the simplified Chinese BITS and BITS-SF, as well as measures given to assess convergent, discriminant, and concurrent validity. In Study 2, 273 adults in Taiwan did the same, except that they completed the traditional Chinese BITS and BITS-SF. In both studies, the translated BITS showed evidence of a three-factor correlated structure, and the translated BITS-SF yielded several underlying classes consistent with theory and scoring interpretation. Additionally, the translated measures’ scores showed solid evidence of convergent, discriminant, and concurrent validity. The results replicate the findings using the original BITS and BITS-SF and extend them to simplified Chinese and traditional Chinese translated versions. These versions are recommended for use in research and applied settings to assess CSE and are available for use. Both the original and translated measures are available for download at www.bitssurvey.com.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-30T01:16:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231176596
       
  • Seeded Sequential LDA: A Semi-Supervised Algorithm for Topic-Specific
           Analysis of Sentences

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      Authors: Kohei Watanabe, Alexander Baturo
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Topic models have been widely used by researchers across disciplines to automatically analyze large textual data. However, they often fail to automate content analysis, because the algorithms cannot accurately classify individual sentences into pre-defined topics. Aiming to make topic classification more theoretically grounded and content analysis in general more topic-specific, we have developed Seeded Sequential Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA), extending the existing LDA algorithm, and implementing it in a widely accessible open-source package. Taking a large corpus of speeches delivered by delegates at the United Nations General Assembly as an example, we explain how our algorithm differs from the original algorithm; why it can classify sentences more accurately; how it accepts pre-defined topics in deductive or semi-deductive analysis; how such ex-ante topic mapping differs from ex-post topic mapping; how it enables topic-specific framing analysis in applied research. We also offer practical guidance on how to determine the optimal number of topics and select seed words for the algorithm.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-29T06:56:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231178605
       
  • The Impact of day of Mailing on Web Survey Response Rate and Response
           Speed

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      Authors: Peter Lynn, Annamaria Bianchi, Alessandra Gaia
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      The day of the week on which sample members are invited to participate in a web survey might influence propensity to respond, or to respond promptly (within two days from the invitation). This effect could differ between sample members with different characteristics. We explore such effects using a large-scale experiment implemented on the Understanding Society Innovation Panel, in which some people received an invitation on a Monday and some on a Friday. Specifically, we test whether any effect of the invitation day is moderated by economic activity status (which may result in a different organisation of time by day of the week), previous participation in the panel, or whether the invitation was sent only by post or by post and email simultaneously. Overall, we do not find any effect of day of invitation in survey participation or in prompt participation. However, sample members who provided an email address, and, thus, were contacted by email in addition to postal letter, are less likely to participate if invited on Friday (email reminders: Sunday and Tuesday) as opposed to Monday (email reminders: Wednesday and Friday). Given that no difference between the two protocols is found for prompt response, the effect seems to be due to the day of mailing of reminders. With respect to sample members' economic activity status, those not having a job and the retired are less likely to participate when invited on a Friday; this result holds also for prompt participation, but only for retired respondents. Also, sample members who work long hours are less likely to participate when invited on a Friday; however, no effect is found for prompt response.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-27T01:27:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231173887
       
  • Integrating Street Views, Satellite Imageries and Remote Sensing Data Into
           Economics and the Social Sciences

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      Authors: Guan-Yuan Wang
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Street views, satellite imageries and remote sensing data have been integrated into a wide spectrum of topics in the social sciences. Computer vision methods not only help analysts and policymakers make better decisions and produce more effective solutions but they also enable models to achieve more precise predictions and greater interpretability. In this paper, we review the growing literature applying such methods to economic issues and the social sciences, in which social scientists employ deep learning approaches to utilise image data to retrieve additional information. Typically, image data produce better results than traditional approaches and can provide detailed results and helpful insights to improve society and people’s well-being.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-26T11:50:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231178604
       
  • Social Network and Semantic Analysis of Roe v. Wade’s Reversal on
           Twitter

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      Authors: Zehui Dai, Cory Higgs
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      On June 24, 2022, the Supreme Court released its decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health, which officially repealed Roe v. Wade and its subsequent rulings. Employing social network analysis and semantic analysis methods, the current project reviews the public reaction among Twitter users shared from the May 2 draft leak to the June 24 official repeal, using a series of Twitter hashtags related to Roe v. Wade. The project identified the main influencers within the network, namely, journalist/news organizations, Internet celebrities, activists/activist groups, professional/non-profit organizations, and politicians/political organizations through social network analysis. Through semantic analysis, the authors found prominent themes such as legal concerns, discourse on reproductive rights, distrusting of Supreme Court’s authority, and political nepotism. The results offer policy implications and communication message strategies to healthcare providers and policymakers. The authors believe that the polarizing nature of Roe v. Wade-related issues will be a crucial factor in shaping voters’ decisions during the upcoming 2024 presidential election.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T06:11:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231178602
       
  • Like, Comment, and Share on TikTok: Exploring the Effect of Sentiment and
           Second-Person View on the User Engagement with TikTok News Videos

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      Authors: Zicheng Cheng, Yanlin Li
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      TikTok—the world’s most downloaded app since 2020, has become a place for more than silly dancing and lip-syncing. TikTok users are increasingly turning to TikTok for news content. Meanwhile, news publishers are embracing TikTok to reach a younger audience. We aim to examine the content strategy adopted by the most-followed news publishers on TikTok and how effective their TikTok strategy is in spurring audience engagement in terms of liking, commenting, and sharing. This study retrieved 101,292 TikTok news videos as of November 22, 2022. With the help of computer vision, natural language processing, and sentiment analysis, we found that TikTok news videos containing negative sentiment and more second-person view shots are associated with significantly higher audience engagement. In addition, this study demonstrated that the TikTok video features and engagement levels differ between the news publishers and other TikTok creators. Moderator analysis shows that both the effect of negative sentiment on engagement and the effect of the second-person view on engagement are moderated by the TikTok account type. The impact of negative sentiment and second-person view on engagement behaviors becomes smaller or even insignificant for news publisher TikTok videos. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed in this study.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T03:20:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231178603
       
  • Cutting Through the Comment Chaos: A Supervised Machine Learning Approach
           to Identifying Relevant YouTube Comments

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      Authors: A. Marthe Möller, Susan A. M. Vermeer, Susanne E. Baumgartner
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Social scientists often study comments on YouTube to learn about people’s attitudes towards and experiences of online videos. However, not all YouTube comments are relevant in the sense that they reflect individuals’ thoughts about, or experiences of the content of a video or its artist/maker. Therefore, the present paper employs Supervised Machine Learning to automatically assess comments written in response to music videos in terms of their relevance. For those comments that are relevant, we also assess why they are relevant. Our results indicate that most YouTube comments are relevant (approx. 78%). Among those, most are relevant because they include a positive evaluation of the video, describe a viewer’s personal experience related to the video, or express a sense of community among the video viewers. We conclude that Supervised Machine Learning is a suitable method to find those YouTube comments that are relevant to scholars studying viewers’ reactions to online videos, and we present suggestions for scholars wanting to apply the same technique in their own projects.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-16T07:29:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231173895
       
  • Do Shy Individuals Engage in Cyber Aggression' The Multiple Mediation of
           Passive Use and Relative Deprivation and the Moderation of Moral
           Sensitivity

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      Authors: Jinzhe Zhao, Zhen Guo, Liying Jiao, Mengke Yu, Huiyue Shi, Yan Xu
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Shyness has been shown to be linked to aggression. However, whether this relationship occurs in cyberspace and the mechanisms that might affect it are largely unexplored. Based on the social fitness model, the current study examined the relationship between shyness and cyber aggression, as well as the mediating roles of passive use and relative deprivation. Moreover, according to the integration of the social information processing model and moral domain theory, moral sensitivity serves as a moderator in the direct and indirect links between shyness and cyber aggression. A total of 700 Chinese college students (Mage = 18.68, 53.57% women) participated in the current study and completed multiple questionnaires, namely, the Shyness Scale, Cyber-Aggression Scale, Passive Use of Social Network Site Scale, Relative Deprivation Scale, and Ethical Sensitivity Scale. The results showed that shyness was positively associated with cyber aggression through the multiple mediating effects of passive use and relative deprivation. Additionally, moderated mediation analysis indicated that moral sensitivity moderated the direct and indirect relationship between shyness and cyber aggression. A high level of moral sensitivity weakened the association of shyness with cyber aggression and the association of relative deprivation with cyber aggression, supporting the moderated mediation model. This study implicates the underlying mechanisms of the relationship between shyness and cyber aggression and preventative interventions to reduce the risk of cyber aggression.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-16T05:28:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231176326
       
  • Why Device-Related Digital Inequalities Matter for E-Government
           Engagement'

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      Authors: Matías Dodel
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Mobile devices were key drivers for recent Internet expansion in lower-income countries, democratizing access. Nonetheless, concerns arose regarding their role in the creation of new digital underclass related to the capital-enhancing consequences of Internet use. Among these, e-government engagement allows individuals to reduce the administrative burdens of governmental interactions. Nonetheless, its uptake has been proven to be highly stratified in Latin American countries where most services are not digital-by-default. The article argues that disparities in digital access play a role in this e-government divides. It examines the antecedents and determinants of household computer access and mobile-only Internet use, and e-government engagement in Brazil. Based on “TIC Domicilios 2019” survey, using logistic regressions to predict household access to computers, mobile-only Internet access, and e-government engagement. Mediation analyses of the latter models are conducted, testing the sequential nature of socio-digital inequalities based on the DiSTO framework. Findings show that living in a household with computers reduces the chances of being a mobile-only user and increases the odds of e-government engagement. Mobile-only access reduces e-government engagement. The effects of socioeconomic status and digital inequalities are mediated by household access to computers and mobile-only use. Implications for digital inclusion policies are discussed.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-15T03:08:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231176595
       
  • Mind the Like-Minded. The Role of Social Identity in Prosocial
           Crowdfunding

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      Authors: Anna Monik, Michał Parzuchowski
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Current social challenges have increased the interest in globally spread collective actions, especially those taking place in virtual space. Crowdfunding is one form of online activism that has recently gained importance. Although research conducted so far indicates the significance of social motives among participants of crowdfunding campaigns, knowledge about the psychosocial mechanisms involved in its effectiveness is limited. This article attempts to reinforce the position of crowdfunding as one of the forms of collective action and to expand knowledge about possible psychosocial factors that could shape participation in crowdfunding campaigns. In three pre-registered studies (N = 823), we found that the social identity based on a shared worldview positively correlated with the intention to participate in prosocial crowdfunding. Moreover, the relationship between opinion-based group identity and collective action varied depending on participation type (predicted vs. experienced engagement in a campaign). In other words, when people gather in communities built around shared opinions on a given social issue, they develop a sense of community, which can translate into activities for the benefit of the group such as supporting crowdfunding campaigns. However, in the case of actual behaviour, unlike with the declaration of participation, the strength of the relationship with social identity significantly diminishes. The results are discussed in relation to the theory of collective action.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-05-04T12:28:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231173889
       
  • Retraction Notice: “Taxation Issues for Digital Financial
           Assets”

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      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-04-26T04:41:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231171468
       
  • From Calculations to Reasoning: History, Trends and the Potential of
           Computational Ethnography and Computational Social Anthropology

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      Authors: Manolis Peponakis, Sarantos Kapidakis, Martin Doerr, Eirini Tountasaki
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      The domains of computational social anthropology and computational ethnography refer to the computational processing or computational modelling of data for anthropological or ethnographic research. In this context, the article surveys the use of computational methods regarding the production and the representation of knowledge. The ultimate goal of the study is to highlight the significance of modelling ethnographic data and anthropological knowledge by harnessing the potential of the semantic web. The first objective was to review the use of computational methods in anthropological research focusing on the last 25 years, while the second objective was to explore the potential of the semantic web focusing on existing technologies for ontological representation. For these purposes, the study explores the use of computers in anthropology regarding data processing and data modelling for more effective data processing. The survey reveals that there is an ongoing transition from the instrumentalisation of computers as tools for calculations, to the implementation of information science methodologies for analysis, deduction, knowledge representation, and reasoning, as part of the research process in social anthropology. Finally, it is highlighted that the ecosystem of the semantic web does not subserve quantification and metrics but introduces a new conceptualisation for addressing and meeting research questions in anthropology.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-04-12T07:40:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231167692
       
  • Machines As Social Entities (MASE) Scale: Validation of a New Scale
           Measuring Beliefs in the Sociality of Intelligent Machine Agents

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      Authors: Joo-Wha Hong
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Researchers examining the social relationship between humans and machine agents have been faced with a series of obstacles, mainly due to the lack of appropriate study tools. To address this need for measurement toolkits, this article examines the development and validation of the Machines As Social Entities (MASE) scale. MASE was created to measure people’s beliefs in machine agents as social entities. Together, the results from a series of studies, including exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), demonstrate that the MASE is a reliable and valid measure. Potential uses of the scales are then discussed.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-04-07T12:54:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231167211
       
  • Performative Quantification: Design Choices Impact the Lessons of
           Empirical Surveys About the Ethics of Autonomous Vehicles

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      Authors: Hubert Etienne, Florian Cova
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, researchers have emphasized the relevance of data about commonsense moral judgments for ethical decision-making, notably in the context of debates about autonomous vehicles (AVs). As such, the results of empirical studies such as the Machine Moral Experiment have been influential in debates about the ethics of AVs and some researchers have even put forward methods to automatize ethical decision-making on the basis of such data. In this paper, we argue that data collection is not a neutral process, and the difference in study design can change participants’ answers and the ethical conclusions that can be drawn from them. After showing that participants’ individual answers are stable in the sense that providing them with a second occasion to reflect on their answers does not change them (Study 1), we show that different conclusions regarding participants’ moral preferences can be reached when participants are given a third option allowing AVs to behave randomly (Study 2), and that preference for this third option can be increased in the context of a collective discussion (Study 3). We conclude that design choices will influence the lessons that can be drawn from surveys about participants’ moral judgments about AVs and that these choices are not morally neutral.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-03-21T03:23:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231164329
       
  • Online Hate Speech as a Moral Issue: Exploring Moral Reasoning of Young
           Italian Users on Social Network Sites

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      Authors: Francesca Ieracitano, Caterina Balenzano, Sabrina Girardi, Cataldo Giuliano Gemmano, Francesca Comunello
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      Taking a neo-Kohlbergian approach, we explore the moral reasoning of 486 young Italian users of social network sites exposed to moral dilemmas concerning online hate speech. The aims are to understand what moral reasoning schemas they use as they face homophobic, racist, or sexist online hate speech, and what influence personal values and moral disengagement might have on their moral reasoning process. The results reveal the prevalence of Maintaining Norms reasoning (conformity to rules and authority) in making moral decisions concerning online hate speech and confirms the mediating role of Hate Speech Moral Disengagement in the relationship between personal values and the moral reasoning process.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-03-06T10:28:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231161124
       
  • Confirmation Bias in Seeking Climate Information: Employing Relative
           Search Volume to Predict Partisan Climate Opinions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yifei Wang, Kokil Jaidka
      Abstract: Social Science Computer Review, Ahead of Print.
      In an increasingly digitized world, online information-seeking (OIS) behaviors have reflected people’s intentions and constituted a critical component in synthesizing public opinion. Climate change is among the gravest threats facing the world today, and previous studies have adopted OIS data to gauge public interest in climate change. However, such studies have ignored the psychological attributes of search keywords and the role of social identities in influencing OIS. This study explores whether search strategies align with the expected confirmation biases of regions with different partisan beliefs. We use spatial web search trends to show the significant differences in the search keywords adopted by the Democrat-majority (“climate change”) versus the Republican-majority (“global warming”) regions of the United States. Furthermore, using the region-level search and survey data (2008–2018), we demonstrate that the preferential use of search keywords can predict climate opinions. This study concludes by discussing the significant findings and the open questions for future work.
      Citation: Social Science Computer Review
      PubDate: 2023-03-03T09:35:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08944393231160963
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
Shanlax International Journal of Arts, Science and Humanities     Open Access  
SHS Web of Conferences     Open Access  
Si Somos Americanos     Open Access  
Signos : Investigación en Sistemas de Gestión     Open Access  
Simbiótica     Open Access  
SINTESA : Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Ilmu Politik     Open Access  
SN Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Social & Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Social Development Issues     Full-text available via subscription  
Social Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Social History Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Inquiry : Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access  
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Social Landscape Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Social Research : An International Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Science & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 101)
Social Science Computer Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Science Protocols     Open Access  
Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Social Science Spectrum     Open Access  
Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Social Sciences & Humanities Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Sciences and Missions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Sciences in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Studies and the Young Learner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Studies of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Social Studies Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Social, Humanities, and Educational Studies (SHEs) : Conference Series     Open Access  
Socialiniai tyrimai     Open Access  
Socialium : Revista Cientifica de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift     Open Access  
Sociedad e Infancias     Open Access  
Sociedade e Cultura     Open Access  
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociétés & Représentations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Socio     Open Access  
Socio-analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Sociología y Tecnociencia     Open Access  
Sophia Austral     Open Access  
Soshum : Jurnal Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Sosio Didaktika : Social Science Education Journal     Open Access  
SosioHumanika: Jurnal Pendidikan Sains Sosial dan Kemanusiaan (Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Education)     Open Access  
Soundings : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South Asian Journal of Social Studies and Economics     Open Access  
Sozial Extra     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Sri Lanka Journal of Advanced Social Studies     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Studi Magrebini : North African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Studia Socialia Cracoviensia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Studies in Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Sultan Agung Fundamental Research Journal     Open Access  
Suma de Negocios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Suomen Sukututkimusseuran Vuosikirja     Open Access  
Survey Research Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Sustainability : Science, Practice, & Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Symmetry     Open Access  
Symposion : Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Søkelys på arbeidslivet (Norwegian Journal of Working Life Studies)     Open Access  
Tangent     Hybrid Journal  
Tapuya : Latin American Science, Technology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Technology transfer: innovative solutions in Social Sciences and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
TechTrends     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Teme : Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
Teoría y Praxis     Open Access  
Textos & Contextos (Porto Alegre)     Open Access  
The Batuk     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
The Equilibrium     Open Access  
The EXceptional Parent     Full-text available via subscription  
The New Yorker     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Winnower     Open Access  
The Women : Annual Research Journal of Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Thesis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tidsskrift for kjønnsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for samfunnsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tieteessä Tapahtuu     Open Access  
Tinkazos     Open Access  
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access  
Trama : Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades     Open Access  
Trans-pasando Fronteras     Open Access  
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Transtext(e)s Transcultures     Open Access  
Trayectorias Humanas Trascontinentales : TraHs     Open Access  
Trivium     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tulane Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Twentieth Century Communism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Twenty-First Century Society: Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
UC Merced Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access  
UC Riverside Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access  
UED Journal of Social Sciences, Humanities and Education     Open Access  
Ultima Década     Open Access  
Uluslararası Anadolu Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi / International Anatolian Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Umanistica Digitale     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Uni-pluriversidad     Open Access  
Universidad de La Habana     Open Access  
Universidad y Ciencia     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Universitas Científica     Open Access  
Universitas-XXI, Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
University of Mauritius Research Journal     Open Access  
Universum : Revista de Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
UNM Environmental Journals     Open Access  
Unoesc & Ciência - ACSA     Open Access  
VA Engage Journal     Open Access  
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
VFAST Transactions on Education and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Vilnius University Proceedings     Open Access  
Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Wani : Revista del Caribe Nicaragüense     Open Access  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Weather, Climate, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Workplace : A Journal for Academic Labor     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Social Science     Open Access  
World Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Zambia Social Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Medienwissenschaft     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Œconomia     Open Access  
Вісник ДонНУЕТ. Серія. Гуманітарні науки     Open Access  
Култура / Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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