Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1647 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (936 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (936 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
SN Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Social & Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Social Development & Security : Journal of Scientific Papers     Open Access  
Social Development Issues     Full-text available via subscription  
Social Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Social History Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Inquiry : Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access  
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Social Landscape Journal     Open Access  
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 133)
Social Research : An International Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Science & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 98)
Social Science Computer Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Science Protocols     Open Access  
Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Social Science Spectrum     Open Access  
Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Social Sciences & Humanities Open     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Sciences and Missions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social Sciences in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Studies and the Young Learner     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Social Studies of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Social Studies Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal  
Social, Humanities, and Educational Studies (SHEs) : Conference Series     Open Access  
Socialiniai tyrimai     Open Access  
Socialium : Revista Cientifica de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift     Open Access  
Sociedad e Infancias     Open Access  
Sociedade e Cultura     Open Access  
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sociétés & Représentations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Society     Open Access  
Socio     Open Access  
Socio-analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Sociología y Tecnociencia     Open Access  
Sophia Austral     Open Access  
Soshum : Jurnal Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Sosio Didaktika : Social Science Education Journal     Open Access  
SosioHumanika: Jurnal Pendidikan Sains Sosial dan Kemanusiaan (Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Education)     Open Access  
Soundings : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South Asian Journal of Social Studies and Economics     Open Access  
Sozial Extra     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal  
Sri Lanka Journal of Advanced Social Studies     Open Access  
Sri Lanka Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Studi Magrebini : North African Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Studia Socialia Cracoviensia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Studies in Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sultan Agung Fundamental Research Journal     Open Access  
Suma de Negocios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Suomen Sukututkimusseuran Vuosikirja     Open Access  
Survey Research Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Sustainability : Science, Practice, & Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Symmetry     Open Access  
Symposion : Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Søkelys på arbeidslivet (Norwegian Journal of Working Life Studies)     Open Access  
Tangent     Hybrid Journal  
Tapuya : Latin American Science, Technology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Technology transfer: innovative solutions in Social Sciences and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
TechTrends     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Teme : Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Tempo Social     Open Access  
Teoría y Praxis     Open Access  
Textos & Contextos (Porto Alegre)     Open Access  
The Batuk     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
The Equilibrium     Open Access  
The EXceptional Parent     Full-text available via subscription  
The New Yorker     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
The Tocqueville Review/La revue Tocqueville     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Winnower     Open Access  
The Women : Annual Research Journal of Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Thesis     Open Access  
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tidsskrift for kjønnsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for samfunnsforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for velferdsforskning     Open Access  
Tieteessä Tapahtuu     Open Access  
Tinkazos     Open Access  
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access  
Trama : Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades     Open Access  
Trans-pasando Fronteras     Open Access  
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Transmotion     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Transtext(e)s Transcultures     Open Access  
Trayectorias Humanas Trascontinentales : TraHs     Open Access  
Trivium     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tulane Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Twentieth Century Communism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Twenty-First Century Society: Journal of the Academy of Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal  
UC Merced Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access  
UC Riverside Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access  
UED Journal of Social Sciences, Humanities and Education     Open Access  
Ultima Década     Open Access  
Uluslararası Anadolu Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi / International Anatolian Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Umanistica Digitale     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Uni-pluriversidad     Open Access  
Universidad de La Habana     Open Access  
Universidad y Ciencia     Open Access  
Universidad, Escuela y Sociedad     Open Access  
Universitas Científica     Open Access  
Universitas-XXI, Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
University of Mauritius Research Journal     Open Access  
Universum : Revista de Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
UNM Environmental Journals     Open Access  
Unoesc & Ciência - ACSA     Open Access  
VA Engage Journal     Open Access  
Variations : Revue Internationale de Théorie Critique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
VFAST Transactions on Education and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Vilnius University Proceedings     Open Access  
Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Wani : Revista del Caribe Nicaragüense     Open Access  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Weather, Climate, and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Workplace : A Journal for Academic Labor     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Social Science     Open Access  
World Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Zambia Social Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Medienwissenschaft     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Œconomia     Open Access  
Вісник ДонНУЕТ. Серія. Гуманітарні науки     Open Access  
Култура / Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

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Journal Cover
Social & Legal Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.45
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0964-6639 - ISSN (Online) 1461-7390
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Trafficking, Rape, or Deceptive Sex' A Historical Examination of
           Procurement Offences in England

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      Authors: Laura Lammasniemi
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the origins of procurement offences and their historical development in England. Procurement offences were created in 1885 to tackle so-called white slavery, as trafficking in women was then sensationally called. Through an analysis of a series of lower-level and appeal cases heard between the years of 1885 and 1925 and their social context, this article dispels myths about procurement for prostitution as an international, organised crime, showing instead how it was localised and poverty driven. The article also shows how procurement transformed from a narrowly defined trafficking-related offence into a broadly applied sexual offence. It came to be used as a ‘catch-all’ sexual offence that had the potential to encompass various distinct offences, from trafficking, rape and child sex abuse to deceptive sex. The legal history of the procurement is of particular importance as deception and questions of conditional consent remain deeply contested in modern criminal law.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-09-27T05:49:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221129107
       
  • Book Review: Women, Intimate Partner Violence, and the Law by H. DOUGLAS

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      Authors: Jenny Korkodeilou
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-09-14T05:16:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221124399
       
  • Traditional Healing and Law in Contemporary Senegal: Legitimacies,
           Normativities and Practices

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      Authors: Emilie Cloatre, Tidiane Ndoye, Dioumel Badji, Adams Diedhiou
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, we chart the context in which contemporary legal debates around traditional healing in Senegal unfold, pointing in particular to the type of power–knowledge relations that are at stake in both the current legal status–quo, and legal changes proposed in 2017. We interrogate the struggles over legitimacy and recognition that are at play in these processes, and the ways in which different actors relate to both formal legal rules, and more fluid forms of legalities, in which imaginaries of the law, and negotiations with the law, translate into everyday practices. We underline how legal and scientific discourses are mobilised to draw the opportunities and boundaries offered to different healing agents, and to organise their respective authority. Traditional healers overlap with modern health practices, while retaining their own ontologies and claims to legitimacy while representatives of the biomedical professions insist that they should have some oversight over the regulation of all healers. As negotiations continue over the possibility for the state to regulate traditional healing, everyday legal choreographies define the relative roles, possibilities and precarity of different healing agents.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-09-14T05:16:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221122434
       
  • Territoriality and Status in Human Rights Litigation: The Case of
           Israel/Palestine

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      Authors: Irit Ballas
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Both territoriality and political status serve as parameters for determining the extent of a state's obligation to uphold human rights. Scholars have shown that different actors may manipulate the scope of these parameters to serve their particular purposes. Based on interviews with lawyers from Israeli human rights organizations, this article shows how they also manipulate the relationships between these parameters. When representing different clients, lawyers from Israeli human rights organizations accentuate one parameter over the other, demand congruity between them, or reject both. The findings highlight how the movable intersections between territoriality and political status facilitate a multitude of discursive strategies from which lawyers can pick and choose, to address political predicaments they face in their praxis. Furthermore, by judiciously applying these strategies, lawyers are able to mobilize the indeterminate relationship between political status and territoriality to destabilize what they perceive to be the unjust boundaries promoted by the state.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-09-10T08:06:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221124397
       
  • Book Review: Sexual Violence on Trial: Local and Comparative Perspectives
           by RACHEL KILLEAN, EITHNE DOWDS AND ANNE-MARIE MCALINDEN

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      Authors: KELLIE TURTLE
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-09-06T07:08:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221124182
       
  • Health Inequalities: Law & the Pain of Others

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      Authors: Michael Thomson
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Health inequalities are a social injustice experienced globally. State action to address this has generally been insufficient, with inequities persisting, or - as in the case of the UK - worsening. This article contends that social epigenetics has a role in generating more robust state responses and makes two related arguments. First, it is argued that an epigenetic explanation of avoidable health inequalities has the potential to provoke change because it works within the gene paradigm. Second, epigenetics provides an opportunity to challenge a different paradigm, that of the liberal legal subject. This fictive figure has long impoverished understandings of harm and responsibility; including in the context of health inequalities. Martha Fineman’s model of the vulnerable subject is engaged as an alternative to this figure. The original and expansive articulation of the epigenetic landscape - an idea now significantly narrowed – is articulated as a space for an interdisciplinary exploration of the role of epigenetics in securing a state more responsive to inequalities.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-09-06T07:08:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221123028
       
  • Law and Transitions to Capitalism

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      Authors: Susan Dianne Brophy
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Embedded in early debates about the transition to capitalism is the idea that law and legal relations play a pre-determined yet artificial role. While this reflects Marx's general claims about law and capitalism, the more that the legal sphere is held as the realm of fiction, the more that the economic sphere's association to the natural realm grows in concert. This undermines Marx's broader objective to interrogate the apparent naturalization of economic rationales in Capital I. In this essay, I dissect the notion of law as artifice not simply to displace the conceptual association between law and derivation, externality, or fakery, but to rethink the definitive transformation of labour compulsion as it is portrayed in the transition debates. Aided by Elleni Centime Zeleke's Ethiopia in Theory, I ascertain the Eurocentric limits of the early debates, and I recuperate a constructive notion of artifice in a way that does not treat law as a derivative phenomenon prone to stagist interpretations. This perspective informs my call for an approach to law and ‘transitions to capitalism’ that is less enthralled by law's mystifying force and more attentive to the material conditions of labour compulsion.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-29T07:14:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221123029
       
  • Judges’ Understanding of Protests and the Cultural Underpinnings of
           Legal Repression: Examining Hong Kong Court Verdicts

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      Authors: Francis L. F. Lee
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Given a concern with legal repression of protests and based on the premise that judges inevitably draw upon common sense ideas in judicial decision-making, this article examines how understandings of protests, protesters and protest policing are embedded in verdicts in protest-related court cases. A textual analysis was conducted on judgements in 21 cases about rioting and incitement associated with three prominent protest events in Hong Kong between 2014 and 2019. The analysis shows that the assumptions of risk aversion and perceptiveness were applied to the protesters and onlookers, whereas the assumption of professionalism was applied to the police. How police actions might influence protesters was ignored. The emergence of protest violence was typically understood in terms of emotional contagion within the crowd. Overall, such ideas and assumptions substantially constrain protests, though they sometimes benefitted the defendants in individual cases. The findings illustrate the cultural underpinnings of legal repression of protests.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-29T07:13:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221122443
       
  • Feminism and Counter-Trafficking: Exploring the Transformative Potential
           of Contemporary Feminism in Portugal

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      Authors: Mara Clemente
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Focusing on the Portuguese case, this article explores the role of feminism in counter-trafficking. Through analysing feminist discourse on human trafficking, the article interrogates feminism's ability and its limitations in challenging or reinforcing some of the most controversial policy outcomes. The article argues that, due to a structural weakness within feminism itself and the profound institutionalisation of counter-trafficking, any possibility of challenging dominant discourses on trafficking remains a distant dream. Rather, counter-trafficking attempts ultimately help create a controversial neoliberal space that strains feminism's transformative potential while simultaneously strengthening bureaucratic state feminism.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T05:36:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221119361
       
  • Is Anti-FGM Legislation Cultural Imperialism' Interrogating Kenya's
           Prohibition of Female Genital Mutilation Act

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      Authors: Hannelore Van Bavel
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Postcolonial feminists and anthropologists have criticised anti-female genital mutilation (FGM) efforts for being ethnocentric and for imposing ‘Western’ values onto African communities. Recently, a Kenyan medical doctor has petitioned against Kenya's Prohibition of FGM Act, arguing that the Act is unconstitutional and the entrenchment of Western values. This article critically interrogates the allegation that African legislation against ‘FGM’ (FGM) embodies the culturally-imperialist imposition of Western values by empirically examining how Kenya's anti-FGM Act was produced and became contested. The findings show that international power hierarchies influence who can speak and what can be said about FGM. However, the findings simultaneously challenge the Africa/West and cultural relativism/imperialism divide present in some of the critiques of anti-FGM legislation and interventions. I argue that the notion of ‘imposition’ does not adequately capture the African agency and the transnational collaborations that went into both producing and contesting the Act.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T05:36:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221118862
       
  • Silence and Voice in Oral Hearings: Spatial, Temporal, and Relational
           Conditions for Communication in Asylum and Compulsory Care Hearings

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      Authors: Livia Johannesson
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The legal right to be heard by a judge is an important human right. However, what happens if a claimant does not meet the requirements of legal communication when given the opportunity to be heard in court' In this article, I address this question by exploring how temporal, spatial, and relational conditions encourage or silence vulnerable claimants’ voices in asylum hearings and compulsory psychiatric care hearings in Swedish administrative courts. In addition, I analyze the multiple functions orality has when judges make decisions in these case types. The results provide nuance to claims in previous studies about the importance of enough time, spaces that signal solemnity, and flexibility in judges’ approaches to vulnerable claimants’ voices by demonstrating how these conditions interact with each other and generate different communicative atmospheres. Moreover, this study challenges the idea that oral hearings are necessarily beneficial for claimants as it demonstrates that under certain conditions orality can place claimants at a disadvantage and amplify their defenselessness. However, orality brings legitimacy to court proceedings even in these cases as it communicates justice to the public evaluating these procedures from a distance.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T06:45:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221118654
       
  • Dangerous Patterns: Joint Enterprise and the Culture of Criminal Law

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      Authors: Henrique Carvalho
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This paper develops a methodological framework to understand criminal laws as cultural artefacts—as manifestations of structures, processes and struggles which are part of the broader social (re)production of meanings, values and affects. The first section sets out the groundwork for a cultural examination of criminal law, deploying insights from cultural theory to understand criminal law's function in securing civil order. The paper then maps and critically analyses the cultural structure of the law of joint enterprise, which it argues is conditioned by a danger formation centred on the racialised and hostile construction of the image of the urban gang. The third section investigates the implications of this danger formation to the possibility of legal change through a cultural reading of the UK Supreme Court decision in R v Jogee. The paper concludes by reflecting on the value of a cultural understanding of criminal law.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T07:28:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221119351
       
  • Two Roads Converge: The Interchange Between the Mental Health and Legal
           Discourses in Sexual Assault Trials

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      Authors: Inbar Cohen, Tali Gal, Guy Enosh
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Disciplinary differences between mental health and legal discourses limit the implementation of mental health knowledge (MHK) in legal proceedings. This study examined the interchange between these discourses, focusing on sexual assault cases that required testimonies of mental health expert witnesses (MHEWs) in Israel. 42 multi-perspective interviews including 16 MHEWs and 26 legal practitioners were analyzed using critical discourse analysis. Participants’ statements relayed three depictions of the interchange between mental health and legal discourses: a dichotomized one, which regards both discourses as incompatible; a tactical one, which regards MHK as beneficial when serving legal interests; and a radical one, which regards MHK as imperative to legal discretion, placing therapeutic considerations ahead of legal ones. The study provides a first empirical analysis of the law-mental-health interchange. In particular, it identifies an emerging practice of therapeutic-legal ("theralegal") discretion, which reflects an understanding that legal considerations alone cannot address complex criminal legal issues.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T07:14:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221117388
       
  • Lethal Force, Legal Consciousness and the Social Field of Policing

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      Authors: Richard Martin
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-25T12:06:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221115699
       
  • Echoes and Antibodies: Legal Veridiction and the Emergence of the
           Perpetual Hepatitis C Subject

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      Authors: Kate Seear, Suzanne Fraser, Sean Mulcahy, Dion Kagan, Emily Lenton, Adrian Farrugia, kylie valentine
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      New drugs with the potential to cure hepatitis C have emerged. There is great optimism within medicine about the transformative potential of cure, but this overlooks the entrenched discrimination and stigma associated with both hepatitis C and injecting drug use and the role of law in re/producing it. Drawing on interviews with key stakeholders such as policymakers, lawyers, and representatives from peer organisations (N = 30), Latour’s (2013) work on legal veridiction, Fraser and Seear’s (2011) conceptualisation of hepatitis C as a ‘gathering’, and Mol’s (2021) work on being, this paper explores the possibility that legal processes complicate the linear trajectory of progress and transformation cure promises. Our participants’ identify various legal processes that allow hepatitis C to echo or linger in people’s lives after treatment. These processes are remaking hepatitis C, and making perpetual hepatitis C subjects. We argue that we must grapple with these forces in the era of cure.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-25T12:06:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221115698
       
  • Bringing Sociology of Law Back into Pierre Bourdieu's Sociology: Elements
           of Bourdieu's Sociology of Law and Dispute Transformation

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      Authors: Annette Olesen, Ole Hammerslev
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The academic response to Bourdieu's sociology of law has mainly followed his Weberian focus on the role of legal professionals in state transformations. However, rereading Bourdieu's “The Force of Law” through the lens of its references and relating it to the sociology of law “of the moment” (i.e. that of the 1980s), it becomes clear that Bourdieu's sociology of law is more sophisticated than has generally been acknowledged. In this article, we reread Bourdieu's article with a specific focus on the hitherto overlooked parts that elucidate dispute transformation. We unpack one of Bourdieu's most central sources, Felstiner et al. (1981), by rereading it in the light of Bourdieu's sociological tools. Emphasizing Bourdieu's implicit points about the pre-dispute phase accentuates how habitual dispositions and forms of capital have an impact on the possibilities available to citizens to transform a justiciable problem into a legal dispute.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-25T12:05:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221115696
       
  • Book Review: Capitalism as Civilisation: A History of International Law by
           NTINA TZOUVALA

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      Authors: JEENA SHAH
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T12:33:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221111475
       
  • Book Review: Earthbound: The Aesthetics of Sovereignty in the Anthropocene
           by DANIEL MATTHEWS

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      Authors: NEIL WALKER
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T01:39:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221108067
       
  • The Embodiment of Contempt: Ontario Provincial Prison Food

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      Authors: Kelly Struthers Montford
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Prison food is central to the prison experience and is a physically invasive manifestation of carceral power. This article draws on 61 interviews with individuals with lived experience of provincial prisons in Ontario, Canada. Participants reported that the food was unhealthy, small-portioned, bland, and steamed to the point that they could not discern what they were eating. Others reported living in fear of the food, whether because it was molding, spoiled, or had been tampered with. For many participants, their experience of incarceration was that of hunger and unwanted bodily changes. Poor quality prison food bolstered an underground food economy in which trading, gambling, or intimidation were used by prisoners to access more and/or better foods. Overall, prison food was a means through which social, political, and institutional contempt for prisoners was communicated to and embodied by prisoners.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T05:34:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221104253
       
  • Reasonably Unreasonable: American Use of Force Jurisprudence and Police
           Impunity

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      Authors: Anthony M Triola
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This paper tracks Use of Force jurisprudence from the seminal cases of Graham v. Connor and Tennessee v. Garner to our contemporary moment. I am interested here in assessing the evolving meaning of “reasonableness” over time, especially as it relates to legal mechanisms such as qualified immunity which enable agents of the state to utilize excessive force with impunity. The logic of these cases is contextualized against the contemporary moment of reckoning with the realities of state-sanctioned anti-black violence, something from which a theory of reasonability cannot be cleanly separated.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T08:29:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221102540
       
  • Performing Legal and National Identities: Australian Citizenship
           Ceremonies and the Management of Cultural Diversity

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      Authors: Anne Macduff
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Academic scholarship analyses how citizenship law reforms such as longer residency requirements and tougher language tests reinforce culturally exclusionary national narratives. Citizenship ceremonies however, have largely escaped scholarly attention. Drawing on Australia as a case study, this article addresses that gap. After examining how Australian citizenship is performed at ceremonies, this article argues that although the government states that citizenship ceremonies should welcome new citizens, deep suspicions about the cultural diversity of migrants are also conveyed. This paper contributes to an understanding of how citizenship ceremonies reinforce culturally exclusionary national narratives, even where the legal criteria for acquiring citizenship status is non-discriminatory. This paper also illustrates how citizenship ceremonies are important sites for the construction and communication of legal identities.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T04:46:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221100494
       
  • Worker Representation in the Regulation of Occupational Health: Explaining
           the Shift to Knowledge Activism

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      Authors: Alan Hall
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explains the origins, features and impacts of ‘knowledge activism’ as an emergent form of collective OHS resistance. Coupling labour process theory with Pierre Bourdieu‘s concepts of capital, the analysis connects transformations in production, management, technology, and neoliberal governance to shifts in labour/management power relations, both within the joint committee and the workplace more generally, as defined by the relative social, cultural and symbolic capital accumulated and mobilized by worker representatives.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T05:25:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221099361
       
  • Bereaved Family ‘Involvement’ in (Prisoner) Death Investigations:
           Whose ‘Satisfaction’'

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      Authors: Philippa Tomczak, Elizabeth A. Cook
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      A duty to investigate deaths in detention is enshrined within international legislation including Article 2 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). A core purpose of these investigations, following UK case law, is that bereaved families ‘have the satisfaction of knowing that lessons learned […] may save the lives of others.’ We highlight the striking absence of evidence illustrating the ‘satisfaction’ of bereaved families, utilising a case study of prisoner death investigations undertaken by the Prisons and Probation Ombudsman (PPO) and Coroners in England and Wales. Drawing on data from semi-structured interviews with 26 stakeholders, we explore what may produce familial ‘satisfaction’ and question who is satisfied by prisoner death investigations. Our analysis demonstrates that bereaved family ‘satisfaction’ was regularly spoken about by investigators and invoked to legitimise investigations despite limited evidence thereof. In conclusion, we highlight how the Ombudsman and Coroners should reconsider their practices to better satisfy families and manage expectations.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T07:51:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221100480
       
  • Book Review: Torture as State Crime: A Criminological Analysis of the
           Transnational Institutional Torturer Melanie Collard by DAWN L. ROTHE

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: DAWN L. ROTHE
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T07:51:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221101717
       
  • You Ain’t Woman Enough: Tracing the Policing of Intersexuality in
           Sports and the Clinic

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      Authors: Mireia Garcés de Marcilla Musté
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article traces the continuities and discontinuities in the history of sporting and clinical rules concerning intersexuality. Through the parallel investigation of how intersexual bodies have been monitored, examined, and modified in the sporting and medical worlds, I argue that neither of them have ‘progressed’ to become more ‘respectful’ or ‘inclusive’. Rather, changes in the management of intersexuality in both areas consist in different iterations of a pervasive conceptualisation of bodies as dichotomously gendered. I contend that medical and sporting bodies’ supposedly ‘scientific’ search to ‘determine’ gender not only is a failed endeavour, given the contradictory gender ‘markers’ that have been ‘discovered’ and enforced on bodies, but also constitutes an attempt, disguised through discourses of health and fairness, to render intersexuality a problematic form of embodiment.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T07:50:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221086595
       
  • Book Review: Obligations: New Trajectories in Law by Scott Veitch

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      Authors: Jia Liu
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T05:26:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221099607
       
  • Making Legal Knowledge Work: Practising Proportionality in the German
           Repetitorium

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      Authors: Jacco Bomhoff
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents a cultural and critical study of ‘proportionality review’ as a legal knowledge format and practice. The setting for this study is German public law, and in particular a domain of German legal education that is rarely analyzed even in Germany: the classes and materials offered by Repetitoren. These are commercial providers that aim to prepare students for the all-important ‘First Juridical Examination’. In this setting, proportionality is presented as a principle that matters, a doctrine that works, and a technique that jurists – lawyers, judges, but especially also law students – can learn to perform. Sustaining the sense that proportionality ‘works’, however, itself requires work, in particular in the form of largely invisible background constraints on what can count as suitable problems and appropriate solutions. In these processes of making proportionality into a ‘doable’ technical instrument, the German legal-constitutional order as a whole is presented as a feasible, achievable project. The article looks at how proportionality's success is produced and experienced, and at what its status as a foundational, near-ideal legal instrument means for the character of the German constitutional and legal imagination.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T07:47:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221092962
       
  • Policing Commercial Sex in 1970s France: Regulating the Racialized Sexual
           Order

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      Authors: Rébecca Franco
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Based on multi-sited archival research, this article examines the racialized regulation of commercial sex in 1970s France, and whether and how this was intertwined with the protection of a racialized, gendered, and class-based sexual order. In doing so, this article contributes to a contextualized and historicized analysis of the construction of race and colour-blindness in French legislation and law enforcement. During and after the Algerian War, colonial anxieties about sexual threats posed by North African male labour migrants in the French metropole played a role in the discussion on commercial sex and motivated politicians, policymakers and journalists to argue for its selective tolerance. The author argues that the indirect legislation on commercial sex granted discretionary power to the police to protect the sexual order through colourblind justifications. This enabled law enforcement to implement and enforce universalist legislation ‘from below’ in a racially particularistic way.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-04-22T06:53:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221094754
       
  • The Ethics of Capital Punishment and a Law of Affective Enchantment

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      Authors: Sabrina Gilani
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This paper re-reads American Appellate and Supreme Court rulings about the constitutionality of execution by electrocution from the perspective of new materialism. Using the case of Provenzano v. Moore, this paper highlights how the existing jurisprudence develops a notion of cruelty that deliberately avoids the sensual and affective dimensions of punishment. Given the profoundly corporeal nature of punishment and even more so capital punishment, any consideration of the ethics of punitive practice must meaningfully engage with the body, its situatedness, and its material networks, all of which enact punishment as a social phenomenon. Employing Jane Bennett's ethics of affective enchantment, grounded in the ethico-onto-epistemology of new materialist thinkers, this paper critiques the majority opinion in Provenzano by demonstrating how it feeds into modern disenchantment. It then draws on Provenzano's landmark dissent to show how ethical practice stems from deliberately opening oneself up to the wonderment of an entangled world produced through the acknowledgement of nonhuman selves and plastic bodies. This has the potential to generate an understanding of ‘humane’ punishment that better, and more meaningfully accounts for how human beings relate to and engage with the world around them.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T06:38:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221094938
       
  • Fake News in Brazil's 2018 Presidential Elections: A Systems Theory
           Approach to Judicial and Legal Responses

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      Authors: Marco Antonio Loschiavo Leme de Barros, Lucas Fucci Amato, Diana Tognini Saba, Paula Pedigoni Ponce
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article adopts an approach from social systems theory to map the legislative and judicial responses produced by Brazilian law in light of the 2018 presidential election in Brazil, a political event marked by the mass dissemination of fake news. The study applies social systems theory to observe and interpret the legislative process in relation to a Draft Statute on Fake News which is part of a regulatory movement concerning digital communications and personal data in Brazil. The article combines this with observations on case law from the Superior Electoral Court regarding fake news dissemination during the 2018 presidential election. The results of these analyses demonstrate the difficulty of regulating fake news in Brazil and the problems with a legal framework based on the deference of the Judiciary to legislative decisions; its openness to technology experts; and the adoption of “regulated self-regulation” as a way of building an interface between legal and political national systems and transnational digital platforms.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T09:43:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221094152
       
  • Does Gender Blindness Improve Gender Equality' Female Judges and the
           Glass Ceiling Effect in the Islamic Judicial System in Indonesia

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      Authors: Achmad Kholiq, Iim Halimatusa’diyah
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the increasing participation of women judges worldwide, including in Muslim countries, the glass ceiling effect in female judges’ careers remains persistent. Using the Islamic judicial system in Indonesia as a case study, this article aims to analyze the representation of female judges and examine why the glass ceiling effect exists in the Islamic judicial system in Indonesia. Drawing on interviews with twenty judges in various provinces in Indonesia and analyzing the gendered organization framework, this article argues that gender blindness in the Islamic judicial organization has contributed to the persistence of gender inequality and the glass ceiling effect. This article also argues that a gender-neutral setting contributes to sustaining or encouraging gendered practices within organizations. Furthermore, focusing on work-life balance as the only solution for addressing the under-representation of women in the public sphere does not necessarily ease them from caring responsibilities as the gendered division of labor in the domestic sphere has not changed. Therefore, we suggest that making the judicial system a gender transformative organization is essential in order to reduce the glass ceiling effect in the Islamic judicial system in Indonesia.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T07:35:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221094153
       
  • Drug Violence, War-Crime Distinction, and Hierarchies of Victimhood

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      Authors: Katja Franko, David Rodriguez Goyes
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Issues related to victimhood are central to transitional justice and international criminal justice. However, processes of transitional justice do not usually include victims of drug-related violence, despite the fact that in several Latin American countries deaths caused by cartel violence easily meet criteria of civil war. This article's central argument is that distinctions between victims of war and victims of what is often termed conventional crime are of great importance to notions of legitimate victimhood in transitional contexts. Taking Colombia's Victims’ Law (2011) as a case study, we argue that the binary distinction between war and crime fails to address the needs of victims of mass drug violence and creates a hierarchy among victims. This has important symbolic, legal and material implications for those who find themselves in the less favoured category. Victims of drug related violence struggle to access justice and to make their voices heard in public discourses about violence. We argue that the current understanding of mass drug violence as ‘conventional crime’ represents a Northern perspective on violence, which can be counter-productive when used uncritically in Southern contexts.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T02:57:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221091226
       
  • Lay Advisers in Family law Settings: The Role and Quality of Advice
           Provided on Social media

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      Authors: Tatiana Grieshofer
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The study explores the quality of advice offered by lay advisers on social media groups and online forums. The focus is on the online advice provision in relation to child-related cases, which are part of private or public family law proceedings in the context of England and Wales. Since many addressees of such advice are self-represented litigants, it is crucial to understand what kind of support is offered by law advisers, whose professional motivation or level of expertise are underexplored. By drawing on content analysis and discourse analysis, the study reflects on the substantive content and linguistic framing of the advice offered online. The article contextualises the role of lay advisers in light of (1) the challenges self-represented litigants experience when accessing the justice system and (2) the growing popularity of using online resources and social platforms for obtaining legal information and advice.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T09:01:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221090132
       
  • Loyalty, Liberty, and the Law: Analysing the Juxtaposition of Nation and
           Citizen in the Indian Sedition Law

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      Authors: Ayesha Pattnaik
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the Indian sedition law laid out in Section 124(A) of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) which criminalises expression of disaffection towards the government. It analyses the functions of the sedition law in colonial and constitutional India. Rather than taking a legal approach to examine whether the sedition law is inimical to democracy, this socio-legal analysis studies the media and political discourse around sedition cases to evoke an underlying pattern of the use of the law across time and political regimes. It reveals how the law has been used in contemporary India to weave a narrative of the nation-state and national interests, often pitted against human rights and individual liberties. It goes on to argue that in post-colonial India, the law has simultaneously been critical in building a binding national identity while also enabling nationalism to be used as a political instrument that can subversively monitor and discipline citizens.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-03-31T06:43:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221086859
       
  • ‘Gold Standard' Legislation for Adults Only: Reconceptualising Children
           as ‘Adjoined Victims' Under the Domestic Abuse (Scotland) Act 2018

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      Authors: Ilona Cairns, Isla Callander
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In this article we argue that the Domestic Abuse (Scotland) Act 2018 should not be regarded as ‘gold standard’ in the way in which it seeks to recognise the harms caused to children who experience intimate partner coercive control in their living environment. We argue that children should be reconceptualised children as ‘adjoined victims’ of intimate partner domestic abuse and that the 2018 Act should be amended to include a parallel section 1 offence of ‘abusive behaviour towards partner or ex-partner and adjoined child’. By offering the first academic analysis of why and how the criminal law should seek to capture children’s experiences of coercive control, this article contributes to broader discussions about criminalising coercive control and the scope of such offences. It highlights key lessons that can be learnt from the Scottish story so far and sounds a note of caution against simply ‘rolling out’ the Scottish approach elsewhere.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-03-29T08:12:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221089252
       
  • Sexual Violence in the Digital Age: Replicating and Augmenting Harm,
           Victimhood and Blame

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      Authors: Rachel Killean, Anne-Marie McAlinden, Eithne Dowds
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines some of the complexities and tensions which lie at the intersection of popular and official constructions of technology-assisted sexual violence (TA-SV). It argues that many of the core contextual understandings of victimhood and harm which underpin the cultural and legal framing of offline forms of sexual violence are not only reproduced but augmented in virtual settings. Drawing on debates from critical victimology, the article argues that TA-SV amplifies traditional understandings of ‘victim’ and ‘offender’ behaviours concerning sexual crime. In so doing, it highlights the particular challenges around: a) the ‘ideal victim’; (b) responsibilisation and blame; and c) victim-offender-bystander continuums which emerge not only within discourses on TA-SV, but also through the use of digital evidence at trial. The article concludes by examining the broader implications for academic discourses on victimhood and the challenges for legal and cultural discourses in responding to sexual violence in the digital age.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T09:12:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221086592
       
  • Migrant Labor Supply Chains: Architectures of Mobile Assemblages

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      Authors: Shikha Silliman Bhattacharjee
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores the potential for Assemblage Theory to supplement current approaches to studying labor migration in law and the social sciences. Based upon a study of women's migration for garment and domestic work in India, I lay out the labor supply chain assemblage (LSCA) as a framework for understanding how workers find employment across multi-site, dynamic trajectories. Migration into temporary employment requires workers to move between jobs on an ongoing basis. Accordingly, studying labor supply chains as fluid assemblages defined by labor market conditions, component elements, and various agents provides a methodology for analyzing frequent job searches, across recruitment geographies, that include a range of recruitment actors. By accommodating temporal, territorial, and relational analysis, this approach provides insight into how labor migration processes for migrant garment and domestic workers in India articulate with the development of markets, working conditions, and social hierarchies – including on the basis of gender and caste.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T12:37:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221080519
       
  • External Intimacy: Community-based Intervention Concerning Crime and the
           Integral State in Quebec

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      Authors: Eduardo González Castillo
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article deals with the contradictory way in which community-based intervention concerning crime relates to political domination and to the institutions of the State in Quebec, Canada by exploring the pertinence of the Gramscian conception of civil society. Surprisingly, although Antonio Gramsci offers an interesting set of concepts for the study of the relationship between civil society and government institutions, his ideas have rarely been used to understand community intervention in general and that related to public security in particular. Gramscian concepts such as civil society, political society, hegemony, and the integral State strike us as particularly useful in this regard. In our opinion, they offer a much more comprehensive view of the current relationship between community action (civil society) and the criminal justice system (the government) than narratives that insist on the alleged autonomy of civil society and on the weakening of the State. To show the utility of these concepts, we used them to understand community tensions related to racially discriminatory practices by police officers in the multiethnic borough of Montréal-Nord in Montreal.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T11:56:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221076089
       
  • Zooming In: Courtrooms and Defendants’ Rights during the COVID-19
           Pandemic

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      Authors: Esther Nir, Jennifer Musial
      First page: 725
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 placed unprecedented strains on criminal court systems, necessitating moves to digital platforms with little preparation. To study the influence of virtual courtrooms on defendant rights (e.g. effective assistance of counsel, speedy and public trials, among others), we qualitatively analyzed the journals of 44 student court watchers, documenting their observations of online court proceedings in a single state in the Northeastern United States. We find that virtual courtrooms are highly disorganized and fraught with technical malfunctions, compromising defendants’ appearances online, and impeding their ability to confer with counsel and address the court. Defendants with less access to digital platforms and incarcerated individuals are disproportionately impacted. Further, court actors tend to treat virtual court in a casual manner and are often unprepared to litigate cases, resulting in undue delays, and extended periods of pre-trial detention. Policy recommendations to improve technologies and administrative procedures are discussed.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T11:56:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221076099
       
  • Queer Conflicts, Concept Capture and Category Co-Option: The Importance of
           Context in the State Collection and Recording of Sex/Gender Data

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      Authors: Ben Collier, Sharon Cowan
      First page: 746
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Queer, trans and non-binary lives, bodies, relationships, and communities often complicate the taken-for-granted processes through which the state manages those under its power. In this article, we explore the forms of power and harm at play in attempts to quantify people through administrative processes of state data collection about sex and gender, and in the current UK and Scottish context, examine some of the sites for wider conflicts over constructions of sex and gender in public life. We emphasise the need to collect sex/gender data in ways that reflect the intersectional lives of data ‘subjects.’ We also suggest that governments and public bodies should not adopt a unitary definition of sex or gender in data collection exercises such as the census, or other administrative categories such as criminal justice records, and argue those who lobby to record ‘sex not gender’ in data collection are engaging in a strategy of concept capture (reducing sex to a binary, biological model that excludes trans and non-binary people) through the co-option of a number of administrative and legal categories across a wide range of social and political fora. We conclude by recommending that public bodies asking about sex and gender should: co-produce questions with the community that is being surveyed; ensure that the wording of each question, and its rubric, is sensitive to the context in which it is asked and the purpose for which it is intended; and avoid attempting to offer any overarching standard definition of sex or gender that would be applicable in all circumstances. To engage in meaningful sex/gender data collection and recording that does not cause harm, governments and public bodies should avoid relying on reductive, over-simplistic and generalistic categories that are designed to fit the standardised norm. In being attentive to individual contexts, needs and interests when formulating categories and records, they can make space for more intersectional experiences to be made visible.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T01:52:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639211061409
       
  • Insult, Charisma, and Legitimacy: Turkey's Transition to Personalist Rule

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Defne Över, Irem Tuncer-Ebetürk
      First page: 773
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars exploring transitions to personalist rule focus on coercive power transfer to personalist rulers and argue that forming viable political coalitions, undermining power-sharing agreements, and mobilizing non-democratic institutions play a crucial role in transferring coercive power. However, no regime can rule by coercion alone, and transitions to personalist rule also involve making new frameworks of legitimacy. Exploring the connections between Turkey's recent transition to personalist rule and the drastic jump in the number of insult proceedings that accompanied the transition, this article finds that insult proceedings play a particular role in making new frameworks of legitimacy in transitions to personalist rule. We argue that insult proceedings work as a coercive method of punishment that curbs dissent while constructing a new framework of legitimacy based on the ruler's charisma. The study builds on an in-depth examination of insult cases filed during Erdoğan's presidency in Turkey and interviews with legal experts and suspects. It contributes to the understanding of the use of laws and legality in autocratization processes.
      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T02:05:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639211073652
       
  • Book Review: Dispute Resolution in China: Litigation, Arbitration,
           Mediation, and their Interactions by WEIXIA GU

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sida Liu
      First page: 796
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T09:13:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221088529
       
  • Book Review: The Routledge Handbook of Law and Society by MARIANA
           VALVERDE, KAMARI CLARKE, EVE DARIAN-SMITH & PRABHA KOTISWARAN

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carl Makin
      First page: 798
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T05:26:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221096555
       
  • Book Review: Historical Criminology by DAVID CHURCHILL, HENRY YEOMANS and
           IAIN CHANNING

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      Authors: LIZZIE SEAL
      First page: 800
      Abstract: Social & Legal Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Social & Legal Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T11:58:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09646639221100491
       
 
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