Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

HISTORY (859 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 401 - 452 of 452 Journals sorted alphabetically
International Journal of Middle East Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
International Journal of Military History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Regional and Local History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Society Systems Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Review of Social History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Interventions : International Journal of Postcolonial Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Intus-Legere Historia     Open Access  
Iran and the Caucasus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Irish Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Isis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Italian Review of Legal History     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Itinerari di ricerca storica     Open Access  
Izvestia. Ural Federal University Journal. Series 2: Humanities and Arts     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Japanese Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Jernbanehistorie     Full-text available via subscription  
Jewish Culture and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal Asiatique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal for the Study of Judaism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Aging, Humanities, and the Arts: Official Journal of the Gerontological Society of America     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of American History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of American-East Asian Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ancient History and Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Applied History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Arts and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Arts Management, Law, and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Australian Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Baltic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Big History     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of British Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cognitive Historiography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Conflict Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Contemporary Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Contemporary China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Contemporary History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Coptic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Early Christian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Early Modern History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Journal of East Asian Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Ecclesiastical History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of English and Germanic Philology (JEGP)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of European Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Family History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Global History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Historical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Historical Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Historical Research in Music Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Historical Syntax     Open Access  
Journal of History and Future     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Holocaust Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Iberian and Latin American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry     Open Access  
Journal of Intelligence History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Interdisciplinary Conflict Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Interdisciplinary History of Ideas     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Israeli History: Politics, Society, Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Jewish Identities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies: Travesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Latin American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Legal History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Medieval History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Medieval Religious Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Modern Chinese History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Modern Greek Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Modern History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 69)
Journal of Modern Italian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Modern Russian History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Moravian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Natural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of North African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Pacific History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Persianate Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Policy History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Religion in Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Religion in Europe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Russian American Studies (JRAS)     Open Access  
Journal of Scottish Historical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Semitic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Slavic Military Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Social History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Song-Yuan Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of South American Earth Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Southeast Asian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Sport History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of the Australian Early Medieval Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Canadian Historical Association / Revue de la Société historique du Canada     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the Early Republic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of the Geological Society of India     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of the History of Ideas     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 127)
Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of the History of Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46)
Journal of the History of Sexuality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of the Malaysian Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the Philosophy of History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Tourism History     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Transatlantic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Transport History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Urban History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Victorian Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of War & Culture Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Western Archives     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Women's History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journal of World History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Jurnal Candrasangkala Pendidikan Sejarah     Open Access  
Kadim     Open Access  
Kasvatus & Aika     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kirchliche Zeitgeschichte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Konsthistorisk Tidskrift/Journal of Art History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Korean Journal of Medical History     Open Access  
Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Kulturstudier     Open Access  
Kunst og Kultur     Open Access  
L'Atelier du CRH     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
L'Idomeneo     Open Access  
La corónica : A Journal of Medieval Hispanic Languages, Literatures, and Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
La Révolution française     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
LaborHistórico     Open Access  
Labour: Journal of Canadian Labour Studies / Le Travail : revue d'Études Ouvrières Canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Labyrinthe     Open Access  
Lähde     Open Access  
Landbohistorisk Tidsskrift     Open Access  
Language & History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Language in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Le Journal de la Renaissance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Le mouvement social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Le Muséon : Revue d'Études Orientales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Leo Baeck Institute Yearbook     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ler História     Open Access  
Les Cahiers de Framespa     Open Access  
Les Cahiers des dix     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Les Livres d'e-Spania     Open Access  
Levant     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Library & Information History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 133)
Librosdelacorte.es     Open Access  
Lien social et Politiques     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lietuvos istorijos studijos     Open Access  
Literature & History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Livraisons d’Histoire de l’Architecture     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Local Population Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Locus Amoenus     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
London Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Los Trabajos y los Días     Open Access  
Lucentum : Anales de la Universidad de Alicante. Prehistoria, Arqueología e Historia Antigua     Open Access  
Luso-Brazilian Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Madison Historical Review     Open Access  
Management & Organizational History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Manuscrits. Revista d'història moderna     Open Access  
Matatu - Journal for African Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Material Culture Review / Revue de la culture matérielle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Materiales para la historia del deporte     Open Access  
Media History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Mediaevalia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Medicina Historica     Open Access  
Medieval Archaeology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Medieval Feminist Forum : Journal of the Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Medieval History Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Médiévales     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mediterranean Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Memoria y Civilización     Open Access  
Memoria y Narración : Revista de estudios sobre el pasado conflictivo de sociedades y culturas contemporáneas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Memory Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Middle Eastern Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Middle European Scientific Bulletin     Open Access  
Midland History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Mind & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ming Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Mobility in History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Modern & Contemporary France     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Modern China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Modern Italy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Mondo contemporaneo     Full-text available via subscription  
Monthly, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mouseion: Journal of the Classical Association of Canada     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Mozaik Humaniora     Open Access  
Museum History Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Mythos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nations and Religions of Eurasia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Navigator     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nepalese Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art / Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
New England Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Urban History
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.193
Number of Followers: 33  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0096-1442 - ISSN (Online) 1552-6771
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Forgotten Fun: Recollecting the Working-Class Pleasurescape of
           Hamburg’s East End, 1880s-1950s

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alina L. Just
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      In the early twentieth century, St. Pauli was not the only place in Hamburg to go to have fun. In the city’s East End, a wide range of pubs, clubs, and ballrooms turned working-class quarters into a vibrant pleasurescape. Based on historical-topographic and archival research, this paper explores eastern Hamburg’s forgotten pleasurescape with the aim of drawing attention to pleasure culture as a social driving force and of redressing the balance in the city’s one-sided history of pleasure culture. In the course of the study, the term “pleasurescape” is more clearly nuanced and geo-spatial historical mapping further explored as a tool for urban history.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T09:44:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221089873
       
  • “Infrastructuring” Pleasure: Montjuïc Before and After the Lights of
           the 1929 Barcelona International

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      Authors: Aurelio Castro-Varela
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Montjuïc is a long flat-topped hill overlooking the harbor of Barcelona from the southeast border of the city. From 1915 onwards, it underwent a profound transformation turning it into the site of the 1929 International Exhibition. This article revolves around this turning point, examining the aesthetic role of infrastructures in delivering pleasure on the hill before and during the dazzling, monumental display that characterized the event. The sociocultural practices at play in Montjuïc before its re-urbanization are thus recalled and considered in terms of their environmental and bodily features, utterly different from the visual journey later offered within and around the Exhibition venue. I delve into these two regimes of pleasure by theorizing their material forms as functional to and expressive of specific ways of having fun. Consequently, this enquiry concerns the ambient conditions, sensorial landscapes and architectural elements through which pleasure took shape in Montjuïc from the mid-nineteenth century to 1936.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T09:40:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221089862
       
  • Amusement Leaves the Port: Pleasure Institutions and the Reshaping of
           Gothenburg’s Material and Nonmaterial Borders, 1860s-1923

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      Authors: Christina Reimann
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Spaces of pleasure tend to unite people and bridge sociocultural boundaries while involving exclusion mechanisms and tools for social control. Institutions of pleasure also contribute to the spatial configuration of cities. This article explores the role played by pleasure institutions in marking material and nonmaterial borders in turn-of-the-century Gothenburg. It examines how internal city borders, and, in particular, those between areas seen as “port districts” and those conceived as the “city centre,” were constructed, maintained, and given meaning through institutions of pleasure, and how these borders in turn shaped the city’s pleasure culture. Analyzing different social actors’ share in the social practices and discourses that constructed these borders, I argue that pleasure institutions played an important role in the reconfiguration of Gothenburg’s urban space in the course of the city’s tension-fraught entry into urban modernity.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T09:35:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221089861
       
  • Modernity and Leisure: The Construction of Florya Beach in Istanbul
           (1935-1960)

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      Authors: Ceren Hamiloğlu
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      The seashore can be a place where political authorities seek to achieve social progress by offering modern performative spaces for leisure and recreational activities. After the establishment of the Republic of Turkey in 1923, the display of healthy bodies became particularly important for making modernity visible, and for this reason parks, dance halls, sports facilities, and beaches were promoted to a wider audience for the display of bodies in motion. This article analyzes how Florya Beach in Istanbul was reconstructed as a modern urban area, through the beach’s representations in popular media and architectural projects from 1935 until 1960. The article traces the reshaping of a part of the urban waterfront of Istanbul through the everyday life of the city’s residents, representations of the beach, the myth created around Atatürk’s summer residence, and the modernist architecture that embodied the state’s aspirations to modernization and nation-state policies on the beach.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T11:51:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221089870
       
  • Urban Plot: Developing a Consistent Definition for Comparative Urban
           Studies

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      Authors: Katarzyna Słomska-Przech, Michał Słomski
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this paper is to discuss the problem of describing an urban plot and to propose a definition that can be used in comparative studies of historic towns. The need for a uniform definition results from comparative research using spatial databases and historical GIS (hGIS). The article discusses the problems in vectorization of plots for the purposes of hGIS analyses, as well as the methods of presenting urban plots on historical plans that have been used so far, on the example of the Historic Towns Atlas series. We compared the results of the analysis with the plot definitions appearing in the literature on urban studies. Based on the literature review and research discussed in the article, we developed and proposed a plot definition for the ontology of historical urban spaces.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T11:46:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221089942
       
  • Tokyo’s Black Markets as an Alternative Urban Space: Occupation,
           Violence, and Disaster Reconstruction

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      Authors: Hatsuda Kōsei
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Black markets emerged at every corner in cities across Japan immediately after World War II. They spread rapidly due to the collapse in the distribution and rationing system. The government’s weakened control resulted in tolerance of the markets and occasionally covert government collaboration with black marketeers. In addition, existence of easily accessible open spaces in cities, such as areas that had been cleared of buildings by forced evacuation prior to air raids or that had been left in ruins by the raids, provided the space for black marketeers to build their street stalls. The black markets supported postwar reconstruction. They also had decisive influence on the emergence of new urban structures in postwar Japan. This essay examines the persistence of earlier characteristics of urban space along with the new elements in postwar Japan’s black markets. The new international character of the postwar black markets was evident in the prominence of repatriates from Japan’s former colonies, along with Chinese and Korean residents in Japan. The black market was thus a symbolic point of convergence between the prewar Empire of Japan and the new postwar Japan.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T05:09:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221078912
       
  • Urban Riots and the Everyday Practice of Male Laborers in Prewar Japan

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      Authors: Fujino Yūko
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This essay explores cultural factors in urban riots that occurred frequently in early twentieth-century Tokyo, extending from the 1905 Hibiya riot to the 1918 rice riots, by focusing on the everyday practice of young male laborers, including artisans, factory workers, and day laborers, who were the main participants in these riots. The essay first surveys the characteristics of urban riots in Tokyo in the period from 1905 to 1918 and then examines the everyday practice of male laborers, focusing particularly on the role of violence and impulsiveness. Many works of reportage on the urban lower classes published in the Meiji era (1868-1912) and Taisho era (1912-1926) depicted a lifestyle among male laborers that revolved around drinking, gambling, fighting, and patronizing prostitutes. These behaviors, as well as the emphasis on a Robin Hood–style bravado, were socially retrogressive, but constituted a distinctive culture of masculinity. By behaving “manly,” male laborers could earn esteem in their communities, although they lacked fame, fortune, or education, and could live proudly despite little chance of advancing their social status. This culture among male laborers was deeply related to the frequent occurrence of urban riots, and its waning ultimately led to the decline of riots in Tokyo in the 1920s.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T05:07:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221078917
       
  • Land, Lumber, Labor, and Excrement: A Slumlord’s View of Tokyo at the
           Turn of the Twentieth Century

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      Authors: Jordan Sand
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      The expansion of Tokyo’s periphery in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was led by builder-managers who built simple wooden tenements on former farmland. These tenements provided no more than minimal shelter. In the early years of industrialization, migrants from the countryside joining the new urban proletariat established their foothold in the city in these dwellings. Although the tenement builders were responsible for the majority of the city’s housing, they left almost no trace in the historical record. One exception is Ōsaki Tatsugorō, an illiterate carpenter turned landlord who built thousands of houses between 1885 and 1903, when he dictated his autobiography. This essay uses Ōsaki’s autobiography, together with data on building materials and land prices, rents, and wages, to examine at the micro level the social context and the economic calculus underlying the early construction of the city’s sprawling working-class periphery. The Ōsaki case reveals a transitional moment before a land-centered real estate market governed by contracts and planning regulations redefined the economics of housing.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T05:05:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221078916
       
  • Edo-Tokyo and the Meiji Revolution

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      Authors: Matsuyama Megumi
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This essay explores the changing sociospatial structures of Edo-Tokyo as the city emerged as the dominant political, economic, and cultural center of modern Japan through the Meiji Revolution of the mid-nineteenth century (conventionally called the Meiji Restoration). In the process of relocating the capital after the defeat of the Tokugawa Shogunate, the new government replaced the old ruling class through the disposal of the samurai estates that had once constituted most of Edo. The government’s strategy was to divide the city into two territories: the Inner Precinct (kakunai), which would now house the political core transferred from Kyoto, and the Outer Precinct (kakugai), where former feudal lords and others forced out of the center were relocated. The government used the land of kakunai in projects to enhance the authority of the emperor. Meanwhile, land owned by former feudal lords in the vast area of the kakugai was newly rented out to people who were banned from doing business on the street by the government. The government relied on powerful commoners to act as brokers in this redevelopment. In addition, former feudal estates linked Tokyo and the rest of the archipelago by providing dormitories for youth from the lords’ former fiefs. Modern Tokyo was thus configured by political choices made in the immediate context of the revolution. Other castle towns underwent a similar restructuring at the same time. This process of conversion reorganized spatial hierarchies within Japanese cities, creating a dual urban structure that has continued to shape urban development since.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T05:04:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221078915
       
  • How Disasters Made the Modern City of Tokyo

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      Authors: Suzuki Jun
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      A variety of Western technologies were introduced to Japan after the opening of the country’s ports in 1859. These included newly developed technologies as well as technologies that had been used for centuries, such as brick architecture. The new regime introduced the country’s first experiment in building a fire-resistant cityscape of brick following a large fire in 1872. The government also put imported Western systems of policing and sanitation in place, but it was the modern piped water system introduced by the City of Tokyo that had the greatest impact. A massive flood in Tokyo in 1910 spurred the national project to channel and reinforce waterways. In the middle of this project, the capital was hit in 1923 by the Great Kantō Earthquake, which burned down the majority of the city. Post-earthquake reconstruction brought reinforced concrete buildings to the center city. Streets were widened and regularized. In the meantime, the waterway improvement project was completed, encouraging urbanization of districts to the north and east of the city. This, in turn, resulted in expansion of the administrative area in 1932 to incorporate all of the area of Tokyo’s present 23 wards. In this way, efforts to overcome natural disasters with new technology transformed Tokyo’s cityscape, changed the city’s boundaries, and had a significant effect on local government and municipal autonomy. This essay examines the ways in which Tokyo’s modern development was determined by technological responses to natural disaster.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T05:03:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221078914
       
  • Building Tokyo: Social and Political Histories

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      Authors: Jordan Sand
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This essay introduces contributions by six scholars of modern Japanese history writing about Japanese cities. The essays cover key issues in the history of Tokyo from the late-nineteenth century to the years immediately after World War II. Despite Tokyo’s status as a world city, historical literature in English on the city is still limited. This special feature seeks to address that lack. It includes work by several of the leading figures in urban history working in Japan today. The essays cover urban politics in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, real estate and suburban development, municipal responses to environmental hazards, gender and working-class culture, and informal economies. In this introduction, a brief background on the city is provided, followed by a review of the themes addressed in the other essays.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T05:02:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221078575
       
  • The First Elected Leaders in Japan’s Capital City: Former Shogunal
           Retainers in the Tokyo Prefectural Assembly

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      Authors: Ikeda Maho
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      After the Tokugawa shogunate collapsed in 1868, shogunal retainers in the castle town of Edo, now renamed Tokyo, were forced to rebuild their lives under a new regime. A small number of them eventually reemerged as political journalists and, through involvement in progressive political movements, came to lead the city’s newly established local assembly. Focusing on two such assembly leaders, Fukuchi Gen’ichirō and Numa Morikazu, this essay describes how these shogunal-retainer-turned-journalists tried to build political networks around the Tokyo Prefectural Assembly in the late 1870s and the early 1880s. As the new government abolished the feudal status system and gradually introduced representative government, Tokyo’s socio-political structure underwent dramatic change. Fukuchi and Numa’s attempts were therefore exploratory in nature. Modernizer though they were, the legacy of Tokugawa Japan and Edo nevertheless deeply influenced them when they approached their local constituencies. Reconstructing their efforts to define representative politics for the new city of Tokyo can help us understand the early-modern to modern transition in Japan’s capital city.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T05:02:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221078913
       
  • Erasing Race from the Urban Terrain: The “Colorblind” Path to
           Place-Based Inequality

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      Authors: Erica Gilbert-Levin
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T12:52:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221085546
       
  • Asian Independence: Notes on Modernism and Creativity in the Built
           Environment

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      Authors: Gregory Bracken
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T12:46:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221084718
       
  • Parallel Lives: Bella Abzug, Crystal Eastman, Precarity, Peace, and the
           Politics of Care

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      Authors: Janette Clay
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T12:13:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221085305
       
  • “The Right to Define the Question”: The Center for Urban Affairs and
           Neighborhood Activism in 1970s Chicago

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      Authors: Beryl Satter
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Chicago, the “city of neighborhoods,” was a center for 1970s community activism. This article uncovers the history of Northwestern University’s Center for Urban Affairs (CUA), which worked behind the scenes to create networks—and supply research—that helped Chicago community organizations be so effective. Their work was directed by two veterans of the civil rights movement, John McKnight and Stanley Hallett. Both were committed to “liberating data” and sharing it with community organizations, who used it to remake institutions so that they served rather than exploited surrounding areas. CUA students and faculty pursued research questions raised by community organizations while questioning existing institutional arrangements. CUA activities cast new light on 1970s neighborhood activism in Chicago, which produced innovations in credit, housing, health, municipal resource allocation, and more. Their approach remains critical today, as urban universities again seek models for nonexploitative, mutually beneficial relationships with surrounding communities.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T10:52:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221083327
       
  • Who Killed Granada' From “the Beautiful” to “the Wounded” City
           of Falla and Lorca

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      Authors: Francisco J. Giménez-Rodríguez
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Two opposed conceptualizations of Granada, shared across poetry, painting (and photography) and music, combined to create a contrasting transmedia soundscape of the city throughout the twentieth century. Granada “the Beautiful” responded to the romantic myth of the city and was rooted mainly in the Alhambra, an Arab palace among the mountains, filled with gardens and water fountains. This idealized image could be heard in Manuel de Falla’s literary and pictorial dream: Noches en los Jardines de España [Nights in the Garden of Spain] (1916), and also appeared in Federico García Lorca’s musical conception of his city (1933). Fifty years later, the democratic transformation of Spain generally led to a punk, poetic deconstruction of the city in Rimado de ciudad [Rhyming from the City] (1983), singing about the margins of the city: Granada “the Wounded”, emerging from the suburbia and from the dark streets of the Arab quarter: the Albaicín.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T10:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221080404
       
  • The Home Front: World War I, Tenant Activism, and Housing Policy Before
           the New Deal

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      Authors: Maia Silber
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      During World War I, mass migration to military manufacturing centers and the suspension of most private construction placed immense pressure on urban rental housing markets. Seeking to address the wartime housing “emergency,” Congress established the nation’s first public housing programs and federal agents based in major cities implemented informal policies to control rents. After the war, national policy shifted away from assisting struggling tenants to promoting homeownership for those who could afford it. However, empowered by the assistance they had received during the war, Philadelphia tenants continued to insist on the need for government action to curtail evictions and rising rents. Though divided by race, ethnicity, income, and political affiliation, struggling tenants shared the belief that the city’s housing problems required collective solutions.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-04-08T08:58:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221083320
       
  • “If the Municipality Cannot Do It!”: Negotiating the Boundary between
           State and Society in Early Republican Turkish Cities

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      Authors: Isaac Hand
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the ways in which debates about urban policy became a space for members of the literate Turkish public to negotiate the boundary between state and society during a period of dramatic social transformation in the 1930s. Inspired by circulating urbanist discourses, Turkish reformers reimagined society from street level up by passing a series of laws which empowered municipalities and abolished the neighborhood muhtar and council of elders, the basic units of local administration since 1829. Eleven years later, however, these offices were reconstituted and absorbed into municipal bureaucracy where they became the focus of heated party politics and struggles across Turkey. The debates which brought about this transformation, I argue, were ultimately about how far into daily life the authority of the government should extend and in what ways Turkey was able to adopt international standards of urbanism in a time of economic and political uncertainty.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T11:21:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221083258
       
  • “To Live with Honor, or Die”: The Metamorphosis of Place, National
           Symbols, Masculinities, and Practices under State Terrorism (1973-1990)

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      Authors: Claudia Stern
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the value of urban history and material culture in the study of memory. More specifically, it offers an examination through a masculine lens of the ways in which urban icons have impacted and shaped individual and national identities. The article focuses on Bulnes Square in Santiago de Chile and the Eternal Flame of Liberty as a key place and symbol of Augusto Pinochet’s “fascism in progress.” I draw on local press archives, advertising, and photographs to further explore the gender metaphor of state and nation as expressions of monolithic nationalism and their perpetuation of a hypermasculine tone, examining their links to place and national memory construction.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T06:32:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221083043
       
  • Economies of Scale: Civic Space and Civil Rights in the Modern Consumer
           City

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      Authors: Elizabeth White Nelson
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T10:39:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221077090
       
  • Good Trouble

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      Authors: Chris Rasmussen
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-03-01T05:00:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221078269
       
  • William Wood, The American Woolen Company and the Creation of a Model Mill
           Village in Shawsheen, Massachusetts

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      Authors: John R. Mullin, Zenia Kotval
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Shawsheen, a model mill village planned and built in Andover, Massachusetts, between 1906 and 1924, was based on the vision of William Wood, then president of the American Woolen Company. It was arguably the most unique textile mill village ever built in New England. The article begins with a discussion of the motivation for the project. It then shifts to a summary of the critical features of Wood’s vision and identifies the historic institutional paths that informed him. This is followed by an analysis of how the plan was successfully implemented and an explanation of what happened to Shawsheen over time. The article ends with an interpretation of the significance of the Shawsheen experience in the context of the history of New England mill towns.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T07:10:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442221076875
       
  • Mobilizing Suburban Stereotypes: The Case of Ville d’Anjou
           (1956-1973)

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      Authors: Frederic Mercure Jolette, Clarence Hatton-Proulx, Sophie L. Van Neste
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we examine how in the 1960s the political leadership in Anjou, a suburban community in the Greater Montreal region, cultivated the stereotypical ideal of a bourgeois residential suburb in contrast with its actual dynamics of development in the metropolitan region. Our analysis focuses on three dimensions of the suburban ideal: residential monofunctionalism, political autonomy, and an exclusive and apolitical community. For each of these dimensions, we show how Anjou’s political leadership grappled with a complex reality and adapted the suburban ideal to ensure that their community, dependent as it was on metropolitan infrastructure and a host to heavy industry, could still be considered an ideal suburb. Our contribution speaks to the material and political impacts of such representation in a more complex set of processes of suburban and metropolitan development.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-02-16T06:09:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211069188
       
  • Metabolic Flows of Water in İstanbul in the Nineteenth Century: Tap
           Water, Waste, and Sanitation

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      Authors: Esra Sert
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Considering the age of socio-ecological crises in which we live, the urgency of understanding the complicated relationship between society and nature is apparent. To achieve this, unfolding the urban metabolism of cities through metabolic flows from the perspective of urban political ecology will grow increasingly essential in the future. This paper aims to explore the concept of urban political ecology as a perspective for understanding emergence of a new urban metabolism in İstanbul in the nineteenth century through metabolic flows of water. The context of “metabolic” emphasizes labor as an agent for the very production of nature as urbanized nature through tap water, waste, and sanitation. It shows the transition and the conflict between the labor-intensive urban metabolism and capital-intensive urban metabolism of İstanbul, which started in the nineteenth century. The metabolic flows of water in terms of infrastructure were affected by the first impacts of foreign capital investments and capitalist relations.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-02-05T09:51:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211073461
       
  • Identifying Urban Agriculture as Heritage: Traditional Urban Grape Gardens
           in the Ancient City of Xuanhua, China

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      Authors: Yichen Jiang, Axel Timpe, Frank Lohrberg
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Urban agricultural heritage is an essential subject when investigating urban history. The preservation of it contributes to inheriting farming traditions, supporting local food, and reinforcing the cities’ cultural identity. To emphasize the significance and urgency of preserving urban agricultural heritage, this article first describes the concept of urban agricultural heritage from historical, ecological, social, and economic dimensions. We then choose the traditional urban grape garden in the Ancient City of Xuanhua as a case study. According to a new method we have developed, we provide a comprehensive description of the existing issues in the grape garden and the external factors that impact the study area. The results show that the traditional farming technique has been inherited; the urban fabric of courtyards containing grape funnels has not changed; the study area still lacks social concerns; and a part of households should optimize their business models.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-02-05T09:48:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211063170
       
  • A “Most Conscientious and Considerate Method”: Residential Segregation
           and Integrationist Activism in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, 1960-1970

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      Authors: Emma Maniere
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article unearths a meticulous system of residential segregation operative in Grosse Pointe, Michigan—a wealthy suburb of Detroit—from 1945 to 1960. Potential homebuyers were ranked based upon their ethnic descent, nativity, accent, manner of dress, and “swarthiness” of skin, among other characteristics; as such, the Point System stringently measured and indeed vested real estate brokers with the power to construct suburban whiteness. After analyzing what I call the “work of white supremacy” that undergirded the Point System, this article then tracks its demise after well-publicized state and federal hearings. This article then details the community’s response to the first “move-ins” of black families in 1964, as well as longer-running liberal integration efforts spearheaded by local activists through the decade’s end. Ultimately, the Point System adds to our understanding of production of race and suburban exclusion in the midcentury United States.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-01-29T09:24:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211066936
       
  • Socialist Architecture and Planning as Global Expertise

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      Authors: Juliana Maxim
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-01-25T12:16:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211069930
       
  • The Politics of Infrastructure in Inner-City Communities in Kingston,
           Jamaica, From 1962 to 2020

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      Authors: Henrice Altink
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      The “politics of infrastructure” reproduces inequality, leaving many urban residents without access to water, sanitation, and other basic services. Inner-city residents in Kingston, the capital of Jamaica, have long coped with poor drainage and waste collection that increases flood and health risks. Drawing upon a wide range of sources, this study examines how a system of patronage and partisan politics in Jamaica has helped to (re)produce this infrastructural deficit that has harmful effects on many inner-city residents, from independence in 1962 to the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, the busiest on record. In doing so, it will enhance understanding of the nature of Jamaican politics at the local level, highlighting that politics of the Kingston and St Andrew Corporation (KSAC)—the municipal council—was marked by a continuous interaction between citizens, councilors, MPs, and civil servants, and that short-term jobs and contracts were the most important avenues of patronage
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-01-25T12:14:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211068031
       
  • The Cultural Center of the World: Art, Finance, and Globalization in Late
           Twentieth-Century New York

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      Authors: Sarah Miller-Davenport
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores why New York City’s municipal government, together with private benefactors, poured an unprecedented amount of money into the arts during the 1980s, a time of broader austerity. While other public expenditures saw dramatic cuts, the arts were considered essential to the city’s future as a center for global capital—as a way to lure financial elites and young professionals to the city, create new forms of revenue-raising consumption, and cement New York’s reputation as the ultimate global city. New York had always had a vital arts scene. But in the 1980s, the arts were monetized in new ways to serve capital—and capitalists. Arts and culture were central to the new urban lifestyle that helped produce the explosion of global finance. But as arts and culture increasingly came to be associated with a luxury lifestyle, the arts themselves became a luxury, inaccessible to most New Yorkers.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-01-25T12:13:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211064856
       
  • Controlling Land, Controlling People: Urban Greening and the Territorial
           Turn in Theories of Urban Planning in the Soviet Union, 1931-1932

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      Authors: Johanna Conterio
      First page: 479
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the relationship between urban planning and social order in the Soviet Union in the 1930s. From the mid-1930s, urban planners sought to shape the social order by reducing urban population density, limiting urban growth, and controlling mobility. The article explores how urban planners translated the ideal of less densely populated cities into designed built environments, through a study of how they theorized urban green space. This study ties the history of urban planning to the history of urban policing, mass operations, and the social repressions of the Stalinist 1930s through the lens of territoriality. It treats the rise of urban planning and urban policing as part of a single, state project to establish social order in cities, through establishing control over territory, implicating Soviet urban planners in the violent processes of social engineering of Stalinism.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-03-14T11:40:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211063171
       
  • Asian Cities: Armature, Enclave, Heterotopia

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      Authors: Gregory Bracken
      First page: 928
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2022-02-16T10:16:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211026277
       
  • “Natural and Cultural Treasures”: On Access and Activism in Building
           Urban Park Systems in Seattle and New York/ New Jersey

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      Authors: Erin Becker-Boris
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-12-30T11:39:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211065982
       
  • Local Communities and Separate Space: The Zionist Stance on Jewish
           Settlement in Arab Cities—The Case of Acre

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      Authors: Anat Kidron
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article looks at the impact of harsh environmental conditions on the development of the Zionist narrative and the pursuit of Jewish urban settlement in Arab cities, specifically Acre. While overcoming adversity was part of the Zionist farming ethos, settling in areas that were environmentally challenging was one of the factors that kept the Zionist establishment from acknowledging or supporting urban Jewish settlement in Arab towns. In fact, the openly professed ideology of settling in such locations and creating mixed cities was implemented only in the few cases where an economic or political incentive existed. These incentives aside, environmental issues like swampy land and seasonal flooding were major inhibiting factors, not only affecting the scope of Jewish settlement but also the way they were addressed in the Zionist narrative.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-12-09T10:25:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211055002
       
  • Dismantling the Safety-Net Hospital: The Construction of
           “Underutilization” and Scarce Public Hospital Care

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      Authors: George Aumoithe
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Safety-net hospitals are vulnerable to government financing. After the Nixon administration encouraged states to conduct utilization review to identify medical cost savings, federal campaigns against hospital subsidies placed public hospital systems in perilous states and paralleled efforts in cities to eliminate “underutilized” facilities. New York City mayor John Lindsay sought a political balance between community participation and the technocratic search for underused beds. Subsequent mayors Abe Beame and Ed Koch proved less sympathetic. With community participation limited to symbolic input on hospital administrator hiring, south Brooklyn, the Bronx, and Harlem all suffered closures. This article contributes to literature on urban governance and health care administration by showing how macroeconomic fiscal decision-making overrode local demands and eventually became microeconomic motivators between and within hospitals. Municipal hospitals and Community Accountability Boards debated austerity budgeting’s negative effects on chronic and epidemic disease readiness, while the Health and Hospitals Corporation framed deprivation as patient choice.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-11-10T08:32:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211056971
       
  • Suburban Restaurants as Evolving Suburban Anchors: The Sportsmen’s
           Lodge, Ventura Boulevard, and the Growth of Los Angeles’s San Fernando
           Valley

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      Authors: Laura Barraclough
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Examining the historical evolution of the Sportsmen’s Lodge, a restaurant and banquet facility located on Ventura Boulevard in Los Angeles’s San Fernando Valley, this essay argues that suburban restaurants have served as vital “suburban anchors” facilitating suburban growth and place-making. Established in the 1920s as a recreational fishing concession for the film industry, the Sportsmen’s Lodge expanded to become a renowned restaurant and banquet hall by the 1940s. Its facilities were used not only for social gatherings among politically conservative white homeowners, but also for business meetings where attendees strategized for the suburban region’s growth. Ironically, their success in recruiting suburban industry and infrastructure produced an increasingly dense and diverse suburban landscape in which the Sportsmen’s Lodge’s itself ultimately became obsolete. The Lodge’s recent demolition and redevelopment as a mixed-use retail complex signals the multiple purposes fulfilled by suburban restaurants, while highlighting the limits to their evolution in diversifying suburbs.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-10-20T11:08:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211050021
       
  • Gay Pride in the Urban New South: Politics, Neighborhood, and Community in
           Atlanta and Charlotte

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      Authors: La Shonda Mims
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Atlanta, Georgia, and Charlotte, North Carolina, serve as urban centers of the Southeast and archetypal New South cities. In the last decades of the twentieth century, city and corporate leaders in Atlanta often welcomed the growth of gay visibility and the resulting queer tourism. While Charlotte’s leaders promoted growth and longed to be like Atlanta, they rebuffed queer visibility. For many queer people, Atlanta lived up to an oft-repeated maxim; it was a city too busy to hate. Charlotte’s pattern of significant and sustained growth throughout the twentieth century led to its well-chosen Chamber of Commerce slogan, labeling the city as a great place to make money, which proved true for many queer people. Still, this financial success did not equal support. City politicians often set aside opportunities to exploit the burgeoning gay market while rejecting Charlotte’s queer citizens wholesale.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-10-11T10:16:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211047553
       
  • A Visualization Tool for 1790s Charleston: Locating an Enslaved Population
           Using GIS

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      Authors: Sarah Collins
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article promotes the value of GIS methodologies to integrate and analyze a range of historic sources dating to the eighteenth century, utilizing Charleston, South Carolina as a case study. Data compiled from the 1790 Federal Census, the 1790 Charleston trade directory, and Ichnography of Charleston 1788 provide vital and complementary evidence that allows the population of the city to be located, which in turn provides a means of assessing late eighteenth-century residency patterns and the enslaved urban population. The value of data visualization is explored, underscoring the need for historians to engage with visual representations of data to communicate research results.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-10-09T04:31:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211048500
       
  • Through the Ivory Curtain: African Americans in Cleveland Heights, Ohio,
           before the Fair Housing Movement

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      Authors: J. Mark Souther
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the largely neglected history of African American struggles to obtain housing in Cleveland Heights, a first-ring suburb of Cleveland, Ohio, between 1900 and 1960, prior to the fair housing and managed integration campaigns that emerged thereafter. The article explores the experiences of black live-in servants, resident apartment building janitors, independent renters, and homeowners. It offers a rare look at the ways that domestic and custodial arrangements opened opportunities in housing and education, as well as the methods, calculations, risks, and rewards of working through white intermediaries to secure homeownership. It argues that the continued black presence laid a foundation for later advances beginning in the 1960s that made Cleveland Heights, like better-known Shaker Heights, a national model for suburban racial integration.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-10-04T02:20:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211045083
       
  • Social and Spatial Governance: The History of Enclosed Neighborhoods in
           Urban China

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      Authors: Mengbi Li, Jing Xie
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 calls for a new understanding of urban landscape and associated living. As an emerging topic, lockdown urbanism involves an unpredictable future where lockdown or quarantine may be a come and go new normal for everyday practice, but the topic itself seems to have escaped historical inquiry. This paper attempts to answer why the strict lockdown is suitable for China by revealing a long and complex history of urbanization and its social and administrative organization. The urban fabric is characterized by a system of urban patterns: enclosed communities, the spatial layout and service distribution of the neighborhood, and the formation of the center. It was also animated by daily ritualistic practices, such as the control of time, quotidian lockdown practice (yejin), and individual ties within the enclosed neighborhood. This paper contributes to a better understanding of the deep history of urban form and the order and logic behind lockdown urbanism.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-09-28T12:04:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211040460
       
  • “A Dumping Ground for the South”: Race, Place, and Poverty in
           Newburgh, New York (1945-1961)

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      Authors: Tamara Boussac
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the urban politics that led to the outbreak of the Newburgh, New York, welfare controversy in 1961. It uncovers the intricate interplay between race, place, and poverty that led to the early backlash against social welfare from the immediate postwar years to the early 1960s. Newburgh officials engineered their welfare reform as a political response to the economic, demographic, and urban transformations the city underwent in the 1950s. Race was central to their concerns as they scapegoated newly arrived African American migrants and blamed them for the city’s population loss and slowing economy. Welfare reform served at once as a tool for migratory, demographic, and racial regulation. The Newburgh story demonstrates that welfare regulation was used by city officials to enforce racial hierarchies in the Jim Crow North and suggests that city politics should be taken into greater account in the history of the American welfare state.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-09-24T12:22:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211045631
       
  • The Diffusion of Participatory Planning Ideas and Practices: The Case of
           Socialist Yugoslavia, 1961-1982

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      Authors: Mina Blagojević, Ana Perić
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Although both praised and contested for its advanced conceptual elaboration and ineffective practical implementation, respectively, participatory planning has largely been considered a Yugoslav national legacy and a point of diversification compared with other similar contexts. However, there has been little research on the roots and features of public participation as observed through the lens of international influences on Yugoslav spatial and urban planning. By identifying the main channels (professional networks and events) and nodes (planning organizations and documents) in the diffusion of participatory planning ideas at both the international and national levels, we trace the evolution of citizen participation discourse in Yugoslavia. Based on archival research of the relevant documents (selected articles in professional journals, decrees, and plans), the paper examines the authenticity of the concept of citizen participation in Yugoslavia to, finally, elucidate the specificities of its implementation in the context of socialist self-management.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-09-17T11:18:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211044501
       
  • Identity Construction and Placemaking through Literature and
           Festivalization in Secondary Cities

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      Authors: Alexander Vari
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-09-08T06:34:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211044156
       
  • Tonic for Body or Soul: Fresh Air for Poor Children in Progressive Era New
           York City

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      Authors: Marika Plater
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      The Fresh Air Fund and the Floating Hospital were two charities that launched in Gilded Age New York City and flourished during the Progressive Era. Part of the fresh air charity movement, both organizations argued that impoverished children living in crowded tenement districts needed fresher air. But these reformers had strikingly different notions of what fresh air was and where to find it. The Floating Hospital cast fresh air as medicine that children could breathe in the city’s harbor, but urban air could never be fresh to the Fresh Air Fund. Using fresh air as a symbol of rural wholesomeness in contrast to urban deviance, the organization aimed to mold children into model citizens by exposing them to the countryside. Diverging ideas about cities and air impacted children’s experiences, determining whether charities treated them equally regardless of race or sex and whether reformers respected or tried to break familial bonds.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-08-31T09:28:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211040453
       
  • Fandom, Place Protection, and Urban Planning: Two Sporting Case Studies

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      Authors: Sean Brawley, Erik Nielsen
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores the intersections between the study of sport and the study of the city through the extension of sport history to themes traditionally explored by geography—notably urban planning scholars. Its focus is two case studies related to urban planning decisions in early millennial Sydney, Australia. Through an examination of public submissions in response to building development applications made by two community-owned professional sports organizations competing in the National Rugby League, the study explores how modern sporting fandom complicates ideas about place and locality through forms of delocalization and glocalization. The authors conclude that when exploring the phenomenon of place protection, the built environment is not necessarily the primary factor informing a sense of place attachment in an urban environment.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-08-28T11:16:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211040452
       
  • The People’s Park: Investigating Different Forms of Ownership of
           Victoria Park (1840-1890)

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      Authors: Victoria Bellamy
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines the management of London’s Victoria Park over a fifty-year period from when it was laid out at the beginning of the 1840s to 1890. It investigates questions raised by other recent studies about the relationship between public and private and between the individual and the population within public parks. This is achieved by a consideration of two separate but interlinked aspects of the park: its spatiality (its relationship to the city) and its functionality (its relationship to the individual). By examining these aspects, a palimpsest of different conceptions of Victoria Park can be uncovered, which in turn directly relate to the potential field of actions in the real space of the park.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-08-27T10:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211034860
       
  • Global Cities in Analog: Modernism and Intercity Relations, 1900-1940

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      Authors: Joshua K. Leon
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article reflects on modernism from 1900 to 1940 on globalist terms. The turn of the twentieth century was a period of rapid urbanization, pronounced intellectual foment, labor politics, and severe colonial relations. Its upheavals formed the context for modernist approaches to city building. It was also a period of unprecedented interconnectedness where modernisms coalesced under a series of transnational movements. The Werkbund, Bauhaus, and Congrés Internationaux d’Architecture Moderne (CIAM) gained international recognition, influencing the creation of whole cities. Global cities studies, the research program most responsible for conceptualizing urban networks, have oddly little to say about the modernist period that prefigured the global city. This article breaks this arbitrary barrier in global cities studies, which equate global cities with the advent of digital linkages. By doing so, it recognizes the international city as its immediate precursor, fostering remarkable political, economic, and social changes under the heading of modernism. The twenty-first century neoliberal city archetype looks politically limited by comparison, its ossified institutions in need of reinvigoration.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-08-11T08:58:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211037309
       
  • Urban Segregation in a Nordic Small Town in the Late-Seventeenth Century:
           Residential Patterns in Sortavala at the Eastern Borderland of the Swedish
           Realm

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      Authors: Kimmo Katajala, Antti Härkönen
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      The general view of urban segregation in pre-modern towns has been that the wealthy lived near the administrative and economic center(s), while the poor were pushed to the limits of the town. This approach has been questioned by studies proving that urban spaces were socially mixed. This dilemma has been studied here by examining in detail the urban segregation in one small town, Sortavala, at the eastern borderland of the Swedish realm. The analysis shows that the town space was bipolarly segregated. The “gentry,” officeholders and the like, lived near the market square and town hall; the wealthy burghers along the main street. However, even the poorest taxpayers lived among the wealthy and those of high social rank. The segregation was relative: the proportion of the wealthy grew in the grid plan in the town center; the settlements growing “freely” outside the original grid plan were for the poor only.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-08-10T10:12:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211037313
       
  • The Significance of the Crabgrass Frontier in American Urban History

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      Authors: Tim Keogh
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-07-29T11:15:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211034854
       
  • The Travails of Black Miami

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      Authors: Paul S. George
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-07-29T11:14:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211033259
       
  • Nature in the City: Parks, Pollution, and the Challenge of Sustainability

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      Authors: Charles E. Closmann
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-07-23T08:41:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211033257
       
  • Dams and the Age of Abundance: Hydraulic Boosterism, Regional Growth, and
           the Reemergence of Water Scarcity in Central Texas

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      Authors: Andrew M. Busch
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Austin, Texas, has long been a fast-growing city associated with high technology, live music, creative economic sectors, and an abundance of cultural capital. These traits, along with its location in the Sunbelt, usually explain its rapid and consistent growth. This essay argues that an artificial abundance of water, created by a series of dams and reservoirs built from 1938 to 1960, is an important factor in Austin’s development. Dams and water incentivized real estate development, provided power and recreational opportunities, and created an attractive image that leaders used to promote the city. Rapid growth caused by artificial abundance, however, also masked the city’s environmental risk and threatens to undermine its resilience as climate events like droughts become more frequent and intense. Thus, technocratic solutions to urban environmental problems often become problems themselves as their impacts on the landscape become naturalized over time.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-07-22T12:35:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211008865
       
  • Identifying Food Identities in Urban History

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      Authors: Adam Shprintzen
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-07-20T11:36:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211033553
       
  • Making and Unmaking the Chocolate City: Three Recent Works on Washington,
           D.C.

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      Authors: Tim Kumfer
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-07-20T11:34:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211033258
       
  • Recognizing Principles of Integrated Urban Planning in Historical
           Development of the City: A Case Study of Banja Luka

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      Authors: Brankica Milojević, Igor Kuvač
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Integrated urban planning is based on the necessity of constantly adapting to complex social processes and applying methodology that supports multidisciplinarity, flexibility, and adaptability. In trying to achieve future visions and to meet trends of urbanization, inherited contextual values are often forgotten. Although the impression that everything was better before is based on nostalgia, the urban development history should still be analyzed. This article analyzes principles of integrated urban planning by reviewing twentieth-century development of Banja Luka. The objective is to recognize, to evaluate, and to adapt those principles to the contemporary context and to reconsider them in the future. The analysis shows the positive and negative values of the development, which reveals that the principles of integrated urban planning were present in each period. As their singularity and fragmentation without the systematic integration was not efficient enough, recommendations for improving integrated urban planning in the specific context are given.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-07-20T11:33:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211030624
       
  • Architecture in Eighteenth-Century East and Southeast Asia Chinese
           Quarters

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      Authors: Pedro Luengo
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Chinese quarters developed significantly during the eighteenth century along the coasts of East and Southeast Asia, exhibiting a common urban milieu in cities such as Manila, Batavia, Hoi An, and Nagasaki. Sharing similarities, they can be found both in states ruled by Asians and by Europeans, allowing for a comparison. This paper aims to prove that urban and architectural approaches of Chinese enclaves in these ports were similar in the eighteenth century and clearly referenced historic water towns of southern China. To do this, historical plans and textual sources of the aforementioned four overseas cities will be used. These results aim to be valuable as an historical basis for studies on acculturation processes in contemporary Chinese quarters.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-07-13T06:29:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211029249
       
  • How and Why U.S. Single-Family Housing Became an Investor Asset Class

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      Authors: Brett Christophers
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Having historically been avoided by institutional financial investors, U.S. single-family housing—that is, free-standing residential property—received large investment inflows after the global financial crisis of 2007-2009 to rapidly become a substantial asset class. Why' And why then' The materialization of an unprecedented investment opportunity—large stocks of cheap, favorably located urban housing—was certainly pivotal. But the attractiveness of that opportunity was enhanced by a series of parallel and (for investors) propitious historical shifts in four key realms: technology, finance, housing supply, and ideas. In short, the investment transformation that occurred was “overdetermined.” The article develops this argument with a focus on investment by the firm that led the way: the Blackstone Group.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-07-09T05:58:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211029601
       
  • “Saving Trees, Land, and Boys”: Juveniles, Environment, and “the
           Unfinished City”

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      Authors: Jeffrey C. Sanders
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines juvenile delinquency, environment, and race in the War on Poverty’s approach to urban poverty—especially in Los Angles—during the 1960s. It focuses on the role played by the Youth Conservation Corps program that sent “at-risk” youth into western public lands to be reformed and, ostensibly, to be trained as future breadwinners.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-07-03T01:07:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211025732
       
  • Sufis and the Sufi Lodges in Istanbul in the Late Nineteenth Century: A
           Socio-Spatial Analysis

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      Authors: Ahmet Yusuf Yüksek
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the socio-spatial history of Sufism in Istanbul during 1880s. Drawing on a unique population registry, it reconstructs the locations of Sufi lodges and the social profiles of Sufis to question how visible Sufism was in the Ottoman capital, and what this visibility demonstrates the historical realities of Sufism. It claims that Sufism was an integral part of the Ottoman life since Sufi lodges were space of religion and spirituality, art, housing, and health. Despite their large presence in Istanbul, Sufi lodges were extensively missing in two main areas: the districts of Unkapanı-Bayezid and Galata-Pera. While the lack of lodgess in the latter area can be explained by the Western encroachment in the Ottoman capital, the explanation for the absence of Sufis in Unkapanı-Bayezid is more complex: natural disasters, two opposing views about Sufi sociability, and the locations of the central lodges.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-06-19T11:13:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211025253
       
  • Retail Suburbanization, Modernization, and Growth in Sydney during
           Australia’s Postwar Boom

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      Authors: Matthew Bailey
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article uses Sydney as a case study to examine the process of retail decentralization during Australia’s postwar boom, showing how the form and function of capital city retailing changed completely in just a couple of decades. Suburban migration, the emergence of mobile car-driving consumers, socially constructed gender roles, the ongoing importance of public transport networks, planning regimes that sought to concentrate development in designated zones, and business growth strategies that deployed retail formats developed in America all played a role in shaping the form and function of Australian retailing during the postwar boom. In the process, the retail geographies of Australia’s capital cities were transformed from highly centralized distribution structures dominated by the urban core, to decentralized landscapes of retail clusters featuring modern retail forms like the supermarket and shopping center that would come to define Australian retailing for the remainder of the century.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-06-17T09:14:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211023600
       
  • Abandoning the SRO: Public Health Withdrawal from Sanitary Enforcement in
           Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

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      Authors: Jeffrey Masuda
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This paper situates a ten-year period of political upheaval in addressing the problem of Single Room Occupancy (SRO) housing in Vancouver, Canada, within an epistemic transformation of public health. Until 1970, the Vancouver Health Department exemplified a colonial history of public health in establishing the city’s skid road as a cordon sanitaire. But the 1970s saw a sudden fading of the Department’s authority just as a more collaborative approach to housing policy was emerging. The sunsetting of sanitary enforcement was driven in part by the arrival of a “new public health” that became primarily concerned with defining public health problems and solutions through the regulation of racialized bodies and behaviors—a cordon thérapeutique. By the 1980s, this shift constituted an epistemic and regulatory abandonment of SRO housing, leading to the accelerated deterioration of the entire housing stock and costing incalculable human suffering and the loss of lives.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-06-04T01:47:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211018795
       
  • Planning Practice in Latin America: The Legacy of the Traveling Urbanists
           and Other Vertical Dialogues

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      Authors: Fernanda Cantarim, Clovis Ultramari
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      During the first half of twentieth century, Europe was the world vanguard for urban planning ideas. European urbanists traveled to Latin America, participated in urban plans, influenced local professionals, and had their ideas replicated by secondary sources. This influence transformed not only Latin American cities but also their academic and professional practice of urbanism. First, two items contextualize the discussion: the third part discusses the reality of Latin American largest cities in early 1900s, and the fourth part identifies main traveling urbanists and their trajectories in Latin America. The last part presents a temporal reading of facts and urban trends. The fifth part discusses the legacy of old vertical dialogues and shifts in the relation between Latin America and central countries. Main conclusions are that (1) between Latin America and Europe existed a vertical and almost exclusive dialogue, and (2) recent shifts seem to impair the old model of central–peripheral transfer of urban planning ideas.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-06-01T12:56:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211018663
       
  • “Snet,” Our Man in Miami: Urban Tourism, Illegal Gambling, and the
           Challenge of a Sinful Southern City, 1941-1944

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      Authors: Keith D. Revell
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      South Florida developed as an urban gambling resort center that posed both cultural and political challenges to the traditional southern values that animated the state’s approach to regulating vice. This article examines the conflicts over vice tourism in South Florida by focusing on the relationship between Governor Spessard Holland and former Miami Beach Mayor Louis “Snet” Snedigar. Snedigar became Holland’s undercover informant when the governor cracked down on illegal gambling as part of his effort to fund the state’s old-age pension program by taxing bets placed at horse tracks in South Florida. By exploring the entanglement between a conservative southern state and a “liberal” urban outpost, this article illustrates how the southern approach to urban development forestalled the emergence of South Florida as a recreational gambling resort comparable to Las Vegas.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-05-26T08:54:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211013787
       
  • A Big Plan for Small Homes: The Effort to Set Housing Standards in Turkey

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      Authors: Emre Altürk
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article is about the short-lived space standards for urban housing in Turkey. Introduced in the 1960s, the standards were a crucial part of a policy that aimed to balance the housing demand and the development agenda by steering the market toward affordable housing. The Turkish state was not a significant actor in housing production. Nor had it ever before substantially intervened to regulate the housing market. The standards, however, exemplified a bold move stemming from a welfare and planning perspective. Although standards’ influence was curbed, the policy is important to address as it aimed to remedy a problem that continues today, namely, the disjunction between the housing provision and the means of the middle- and low-income groups. While a sixty-year-old policy does not provide immediate answers for today, it does offer insight into the history and context of some of the current housing issues.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-05-25T11:36:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211017496
       
  • Colonial Domesticity and the Modern City: Bandung in the Early
           Twentieth-Century Netherlands Indies

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      Authors: Farabi Fakih
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      The article shows that the expansion of modern colonial cities in the first half of twentieth-century Netherlands Indies was a result of changing colonial domesticity. The rise of European families along with the modernized middle-class Indonesian and Indonesian-Chinese families opened the market for a new kind of urban living space. Decentralization of municipalities made possible stronger relationship between local government and city boosters, who had connection with the real estate and tourism industries. This changing class and economic relations in the city resulted in the formation of an urban institution that linked local governance, the real estate industry, and the production of urban colonial imaginaries that were modern and predicated on a fetish of white, European urban spaces. Such a phenomenon has not yet been fully explored in the context of colonial cities.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-05-21T01:21:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211015910
       
  • Promoting “Orderly and Sound Growth”: 1960s Debates Over Administering
           Public Transportation in Service of Mobility or Regional Planning

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      Authors: Yonah Freemark
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article reconstructs debates within the Kennedy and Johnson administrations regarding the management of U.S. public transportation. Should transit be treated as a component of the mobility system, or as a tool of land-use planning' In the midst of jurisdictional battles triggered by the formation of two new departments, officials fiercely disagreed about this question and adapted their practices to gain the upper hand. I document how interest in organizing metropolitan growth and concerns about destructive road projects helped justify national housing agencies managing transit programs beginning in 1961. But Congress shifted them to the Department of Transportation in 1968. This was due, I argue, to lingering racist, anti-urban sentiments about housing-agency programs benefiting low-income people and transportation officials previously focused on highways devoting newfound attention to multimodal projects. Despite a fleeting moment of attention to regional land-use and transportation policy, this change ultimately bifurcated and diminished federal planning oversight.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-05-13T07:14:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211014502
       
  • The Urban Spatial Pattern of the Pseudo-Colonial City in Southeast Asia: A
           Case Study of the Eastern Area of Bangkok, Thailand, during the
           Thai-Imperialism Period (1855-1932)

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      Authors: Nicha Tantivess, David J. Edelman
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses the urban spaces of the pseudo-colonial city via the urban transformation in the eastern area of Bangkok between 1855 and 1932. During this period, the Thai royal government was under pressure from colonialism in the Southeast Asian region. To prevent colonization of the country, the kings aimed to strengthen their economic and political powers through administrative reform, educational development, infrastructure construction, and land commodification Thus, the urban spaces in Bangkok were significantly transformed. The eastern area became a transitional zone between the administrative center of the royal government and the commercial center where foreign traders resided. Furthermore, this transitional zone continued expanding into the area of rural communities, and, consequently, the traditional settlements of the local people gradually lost population.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-05-10T01:14:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211012984
       
  • Goon Squad Democracy' The Rise of Vigilant Citizenship through Victim
           Support and Neighborhood Watches in Amsterdam (1980-1990)

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      Authors: Wim De Jong
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This paper analyses the rise of a new kind of urban citizenship in the context of the urban crisis of the 1980s: the vigilant citizen, characterized by a view of citizens as possible victims, who assume and are called upon to take responsibility for social safety. Top-down policy explanations insufficiently clarify why the polarized debate over urban petty crime developed into a consensus by the mid-1980s. Tying in with recent trends in urban police history, this paper shows the diversity of bottom-up actors in Amsterdam that helped to, sometimes unintentionally, further a communitarian “social safety” agenda: vigilantes and victim-support groups, the former based in more conservative circles, the latter partly inspired by women advocacy groups. These actors entered into a sometimes-tense dynamic with the police and municipality, which took up the challenge of providing victim support and of educating the public for neighborhood prevention. This slowly yielded results.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T07:02:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211010474
       
  • The Second Line of the Leningrad/ Saint Petersburg Metro between Old and
           New Urban Structures

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      Authors: Phillip Schroeder
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the development of the Leningrad subway second line as a tool to make the diverse city space merge and shrink. While planning the Leningrad subway, architects and engineers had to consider recent and historical developments. Bringing together urban developments from the nineteenth century up to the reconstruction in the 1940s was crucial for the construction of this urban infrastructure and the city space. The blue line, which opened in 1961, cuts through the city on a straight line. During the planning and construction process, city planners considered various routes and developments to bring together rather different parts of Leningrad and make the city grow into one urban space. Whereas the perception of city spaces is mostly connected to its surface, the subterranean structures play a crucial role to understand not just the development of the city space itself but also its current perception.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-03-26T12:09:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211003240
       
  • Dividing the City: Race-Restrictive Covenants and the Architecture of
           Segregation in St. Louis

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      Authors: Colin Gordon
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Dividing the City uses a newly discovered, parcel-level, record of restrictive covenants (circa 1850-1950) to document the scope, variety, location, timing, dissemination, and impact of racial restrictions in the City of St. Louis. We underscore the important differences, in their use and their impact, between new subdivision restrictions and petition-based restrictive agreements in older neighborhoods. And we establish the importance of these restrictions to both a dramatic increase in residential segregation before 1950 and the maintenance of that segregation—through public and private policies that emulated and adapted these restrictions even after the Supreme Court held them unenforceable—across the ensuing decades.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-03-26T12:05:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0096144221999641
       
  • Mao’s Steeltown: Industrial City, Colonial Legacies, and Local Political
           Economy in Early Communist China

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      Authors: Koji Hirata
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the construction of industrial cities in the early years of the People’s Republic of China (PRC; 1949-) by focusing on Anshan—a major steel city in Manchuria (Northeast China) that had been constructed by the Japanese prior to 1945. I demonstrate that the PRC industrial cities embodied the nature and limits of the new socialist regime’s vision of industrialization. The early PRC overwhelmingly focused its resources on heavy industry, which translated into the financial and bureaucratic superiority of industrial enterprises to city governments. The early PRC industrial cities drew from not only the Soviet urban-planning model but also the legacies of pre-revolutionary regimes, even including imperial Japan. The construction of industrial cities was driven by negotiations among various actors including city officials, enterprise managers, and domestic migrants. Building on the multi-layered local, national, and transnational forces, the industrial city of Anshan was a microcosm of the early PRC.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-03-26T12:03:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0096144221994329
       
  • Nearly Got Shot Dead, and He Didn’t Get His Little Check Yet: Workers,
           Crime, and Law and Order in New York City, 1962-1970

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      Authors: Glenn Dyer
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Historians have conducted important research on the rise of law-and-order politics in New York City, where anxieties over women’s freedoms, political battles over police oversight, and crime impacts in poor communities contributed to its rise. The numerous walkouts, negotiations, and worker-management conflicts around high-crime areas in New York City suggest that the question of law and order was a salient workplace issue as well for the members of Communication Workers of America Local 1101. In their case, such concerns predate the rhetorical rise of law and order and help us better understand why such politics found fertile ground among working-class New Yorkers, white and black. Repeated incidences, largely in the city’s black ghettoes, prompted workers with a strong class consciousness and commitment to solidarity to transform the problems and experiences of individual workers into a shared question to be addressed via collective action.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-03-20T11:00:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0096144221999645
       
  • City of Water Port-au-Prince, Inequality, and the Social Meaning of Rain

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      Authors: Claire Antone Payton
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      The history of water infrastructures in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, illuminates the role of the environment in the production of social and political inequality. This article combines original archival research with insights from political ecology and urban anthropology to argue that the circulation of drinking water and flood water was a critical and quotidian form of exchange connecting Haiti’s stratified social hierarchies. A comparative historical analysis of two neighborhoods representative of elite and non-elite communities demonstrates that water infrastructures exacerbated poverty and inequality by facilitating the upward distribution of wealth and the downward distribution of risk. A case study of water politics in the 1970s shows how the Duvalier dictatorship’s technocratic reforms changed urban elites’ expectations of the state and made urban water dynamics a key metric for assessing the presence of the state in daily life. Dominant narratives of urban crisis in Haiti tend to focus exclusively on the challenges posed by unchecked rural-to-urban migration and the demographic expansion of the underclass. This article offers a new angle by uncovering the destructive environmental consequences of elite-driven urban development.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-02-24T05:46:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0096144221992030
       
  • Housing Programs for the Poor in Addis Ababa: Urban Commons as a Bridge
           between Spatial and Social

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      Authors: Marianna Charitonidou
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      The article presents the reasons for which the issue of providing housing to low-income citizens has been a real challenge in Addis Ababa during the recent years and will continue to be, given that its population is growing extremely fast. It examines the tensions between the universal aspirations and the local realities in the case of some of Ethiopia’s most ambitious mass pro-poor housing schemes, such as the “Addis Ababa Grand Housing Program” (AAGHP), which was launched in 2004 and was integrated in the “Integrated Housing Development Program” (IHDP) in 2006. The article argues that the quotidian practices of communities and their socio-economic and cultural characteristics are related to the spatial attributes of co-housing practices. Drawing upon the idea that there is a mutual correspondence between social and spatial structures, it places particular emphasis on the analysis of the IHDP and aims to show that to shape strategies that take into account the social and cultural aspects of daily life of the poor citizens of Addis Ababa, it is pivotal to invite them to take part in the decision-making processes regarding their resettlement. Departing from the fact that a large percentage of the housing supply in Addis Ababa consists of informal unplanned housing, the article also compares the commoning practices in kebele houses and condominium units. The former refers to the legal informal housing units owned by the government and rented to their dwellers, whereas the latter concerns the housing blocks built in the framework of the IHDP for the resettlement of the kebele dwellers. The article analyzes these processes of resettlement, shedding light of the fact that kebele houses were located at the inner city, whereas the condominiums are located in the suburbs. Despite the fact that the living conditions in the condominium units are of a much higher quality than those in the kebele houses, their design underestimated or even neglected the role of the commoning practices. The article highlights the advantages of commoning practices in architecture and urban planning, and how the implementation of participation-oriented solutions can respond to the difficulties of providing housing. It argues that understanding the significance of the endeavors that take into account the opinions of dwellers during the phase of decision-making goes hand in hand with considering commoning practices as a source of architecture and urban planning frameworks for low-cost housing in this specific context. The key argument of the article is that urban planning and architecture solutions in Addis Ababa should be based on the principles of the so-called “negotiated planning” approach, which implies a close analysis of the interconnections between planning, infrastructure, and land.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-02-10T06:57:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0096144221989975
       
  • Little Arabia: A California Ethnoanchor

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      Authors: Noah Allison
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Tucked into strip malls along Brookhurst Street are the scattered agglomeration of restaurants, markets, bakeries, butcher shops, hookah lounges, educational centers, hair salons, and clothing stores catering to groups who come from the Middle East and North Africa. Proliferating over the last twenty-five years, this Anaheim thoroughfare is colloquially known as Little Arabia. The small strip of commerce is supported by the nation’s largest Arab population residing throughout Southern California. The emergence of Little Arabia is similar to what scholars refer to as “ethnoburbs,” “invisiburbs,” and “design assimilated suburbs.” Little Arabia, however, represents something different: what this paper refers to as an “ethnoanchor.” To illustrate the descriptive utility of the ethnoanchor typology, this paper unpacks the historical, spatial, social, and political dynamics of Little Arabia to illustrate how contemporary migration patterns are influencing suburban regions, collectively illustrating the constitution of a new kind of American dream.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-02-05T09:57:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0096144221992036
       
  • “Here We Go Again”: Race and Redevelopment in Downtown
           Richmond, Virginia, 1977-Present

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marvin T. Chiles
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines newspapers, archival collections, interviews, and personal papers to place Richmond, Virginia, at the center of the national debate about public–private revitalization projects. Since World War II, America’s urban leaders, led by interracial coalitions of black politicians and white business elites, have used racial capitalism to promise that tax-funded redevelopment projects would enrich their cities, provide better public services, and reconcile the legacy of racist urban planning. Richmond’s issues with Project One and the Sixth Street Marketplace in the 1980s, as well as recent issues with the Navy Hill Project, reveals the continuum of political and economic peril that comes with using such plans. Because urban revitalization is supremely profit-driven and shaped by the economic thinking that created disparate levels of white corporate wealth and black urban poverty, it is bound to exacerbate systemic racism.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-02-04T09:38:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0096144221992374
       
  • “And How Pretty They Are!”: Lawn Tennis, Tourism, and Gender Relations
           at Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, 1880s-1920s

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      Authors: Robert J. Lake
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      In the four decades straddling the turn of the nineteenth century, the small Ontario town of Niagara-on-the-Lake experienced marked growth in its tourism industry. Catering predominantly to wealthy upper-middle-class Canadian and American visitors, the lake-side settlement offered numerous opportunities for polite recreation. Chief among them was lawn tennis, a sport that sat somewhat outside of the mainstream in terms of its high-class, mixed-sex participation demographic. While its players were imbued with a strong amateur philosophy, local boosters recognized the sport’s potential to generate tourism income through its two tournaments, but this hinged on the outward presentation among its players/guests of refined gentility—a reflection of both class and gender—both on and off the court. This article considers how lawn tennis tournaments fit into the town’s burgeoning tourism industry, and examines gender relations—particularly the role of women—in relation to this development.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-01-23T10:36:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0096144220983348
       
  • “A Great Injustice”: Urban Capitalism and the Limits of Freedom in
           Nineteenth-Century New York City

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      Authors: Alexander Manevitz
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      Seneca Village was the largest African American landowning community in New York City until it was destroyed to build Central Park. Although it has largely been overlooked, Seneca Village reframes the early history of American capitalism at the intersection of race, freedom, and urban development, diversifying the narrative to place African American city-dwellers as actors at the center of the narrative. Real estate capitalism made Seneca Village possible, with residents using it as a means to social, political, and economic advancement, but it also destroyed Seneca Village. That paradox reveals how an emerging American urban commercial capitalism consolidated power in places Seneca Villagers could not access even when they tried. These men and women played critical, yet unacknowledged, roles as the whole nation struggled to navigate multiple visions of capitalism, their inherent inequalities, and their implications for the future.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-01-23T10:31:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0096144220976119
       
  • Bandstands and Modernity: Constructing Spanish Cities Musically

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      Authors: Gloria Araceli Rodriguez-Lorenzo
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses the interplay between sound and urban spaces in Spain, from the end of nineteenth century until 1936. Free outdoor concerts performed by bands in public urban spaces offered a new aural experience audience from across an increasing range of very diverse social groups, almost ritualizing both the practice of listening to music and the spaces in which that music was heard—all at a time when those very spaces were changing, in a way which mirrored the wider reconfiguration and modernization of Spanish cities. Case studies focusing on political, social, and cultural changes in urban spaces are analyzed, in order to understand how cities developed new spaces for social interaction, the modern sonic environment, and the ways in which those cities have appropriated culture for their citizens, as a symbol of urban modernity.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-01-06T05:22:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0096144220976125
       
  • The Origins of Urban Renewal in Singapore: A Transnational History

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      Authors: Stephen Dobbs, Kah Seng Loh
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the origins of urban renewal in Singapore through a transnational history lens. It focuses on the role in particular of two United Nations–led teams of experts one headed by Erik Lorange and the other by Charles Abrams in the early 1960s and the impact these had on how urban renewal proceeded in Singapore’s central city area. This approach broadens the focus to encompass more than just the role played by Singapore’s Housing and Development Board and Urban Renewal Authority which dominates much of the existing scholarship. In doing so it finds that there was much more agreement between these international experts and their visions of a modern city and that of the Singaporean agencies and individuals tasked with implementing renewal.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-01-05T07:48:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0096144220985521
       
  • Mapping Mosques of Old Algiers Before the French Colonial Demolitions:
           Through Albert Devoulx Manuscript (1870)

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      Authors: Mustapha Ben-Hamouche
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents the precolonial map of religious buildings in old Algiers (Casbah) that is based on an unedited manuscript that goes back to 1870. It helps to reconstitute the original urban fabric, locate the disappeared buildings, and identify the impacts of the demotion actions on the town. Among the 167 buildings that existed at the arrival of the French army, only forty-seven buildings remained at the time of the author. The approach combines the literature sources with old maps and the detailed sketches that were undertaken by the Genie Militaire. The overlapping of the historical data on the present satellite images was made through georeferencing and the use of geographic information system, ARC-GIS 10.6. Beyond the understanding of the present urban geometric complexity of Casbah, this work helps in colonial historiography and raises historical consciousness in architecture and planning.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-01-01T06:48:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0096144220976123
       
  • Brighton Fair: The Life, Death, and Legacy of an Animal Suburb

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrew Robichaud
      First page: 638
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores the development and legacy of nineteenth-century “animal suburbs,” focusing on Boston and Brighton, Massachusetts. As domesticated animals were pushed from downtowns—and as large-scale animal industries emerged in the 1800s—urban areas grappled with what to do with livestock populations for urban consumers and markets. Animal suburbs like Brighton marked important developmental forms—marking key changes in human-animal relationships, and also in urban development, law, politics, and environmental change. These animal suburbs had distinctive built environments, ecologies, economies, and social landscapes that shaped development in the nineteenth century and in the many decades that followed. This paper explores the life and death of one animal suburb—Brighton—and shows the centrality of these marginal spaces in explaining why parts of American cities look the way they do today, while also providing insight into developments of nineteenth-century law, political development, and capitalism.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-06-05T06:39:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211018188
       
  • Schools, Black Students, and Democracy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jonna Perrillo
      First page: 678
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-03-25T11:36:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211001309
       
  • Survival and Assimilation: Non-elite Whites in Civil War-Era Southern
           Cities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Robert K. Nelson
      First page: 686
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-03-20T11:15:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211000054
       
  • Identities, Assimilation, and Race

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: John J. Bukowczyk
      First page: 690
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-03-22T11:29:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211000320
       
  • Struggle, Urban Appropriation, and Cities of the Future

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jill Jensen
      First page: 697
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-03-25T11:38:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211004906
       
  • Neoliberalism, Neoliberal Cities, and the Search for Urban Political
           Development

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Richardson Dilworth
      First page: 703
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-03-20T10:58:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211001060
       
  • The Enclosure of the Ejidos of Bogotá: Imperial Wars and the End of
           Common Lands in Colonial New Granada

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      Authors: Constanza Castro Benavides
      First page: 760
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.
      The article analyses the enclosure of the ejidos of the city of Bogotá in the second half of the 18th century, one century before the liberal government definitively abolished common property in Colombia. It shows how, as the land demand increased with population and economic growth, not only landowners but also the Crown sought to increase their income at the expense of common lands. Unlike the classic enclosures in England, the Cabildo kept control over the ejidos of Bogotá. By furthering the private use of municipal ejidos without expropriating Cabildos, the Crown sought to activate the agrarian economy safeguarding, at the same time, the local financial structure that sustained the empire. Emphasizing the fiscal nature of municipal ejidos, this article shows how imperial dynamics transformed land use on both sides of the Atlantic and explores the specificities of common-land enclosures in some of the Spanish colonies.
      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-10-16T07:31:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211041972
       
  • Understanding Chicago’s Latino Communities Through Religion,
           Politics, and Identity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lilia Fernandez
      First page: 937
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T12:29:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211010411
       
  • Saving the Barrio: Immigration and Social Movements in Latino Urban
           History

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Felipe Hinojosa
      First page: 942
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-06-28T12:56:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211028784
       
  • The Intersection of Sexuality, Privacy and Protest after World War II

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Danielle Dumaine
      First page: 949
      Abstract: Journal of Urban History, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Urban History
      PubDate: 2021-07-23T08:45:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00961442211033260
       
 
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