Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

HISTORY (859 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 452 of 452 Journals sorted by number of followers
Heritage, Memory and Conflict Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Nepalese Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Architectural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
History of Classical Scholarship     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
History of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Cuadernos de Investigación Histórica     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Global Intellectual History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cultural Heritage and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Military History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Church History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Italian Review of Legal History     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Navigator     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anales de Historia Antigua, Medieval y Moderna     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Commonwealth Essays and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Istorie a Moldovei     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
British Journal for the History of Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Culture and Modernity     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gimbernat : Revista d’Història de la Medicina i de les Ciències de la Salut     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Opuscula : Short Texts of the Middle Ages and Renaissance     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Food History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Herança : Revista de História, Património e Cultura     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Esclavages & Post-esclavages     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History of Retailing and Consumption     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Hispania Nova. Revista de Historia Contemporánea     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue de géographie historique     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Terrae Septemcastrensis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Divination and Prognostication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Territories : A Trans-Cultural Journal of Regional Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RADAR : Historiedidaktisk tidsskrift     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Historisk Tidsskrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Material Culture Review / Revue de la culture matérielle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mythos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Early Modern Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of History and Future     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actas y Comunicaciones del Instituto de Historia Antigua y Medieval     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Histoire Politique : Revue du Centre d'histoire de Sciences Po     Open Access  
Middle European Scientific Bulletin     Open Access  
Kadim     Open Access  
Emotions : History, Culture, Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Indian Journal of History of Science     Hybrid Journal  
Paragone : Past and Present     Full-text available via subscription  
Medicina Historica     Open Access  
Przegląd Nauk Historycznych     Open Access  
Intelligere : Revista de História Intelectual     Open Access  
Archivos de historia del movimiento obrero y la izquierda     Open Access  
Humanidades em diálogo     Open Access  
Epígrafe     Open Access  
Cadernos CERU     Open Access  
Revista de Historia Universal     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Historia del Arte     Open Access  
Passepartout     Open Access  
Jernbanehistorie     Full-text available via subscription  
Fund og Forskning     Full-text available via subscription  
Anuario del Centro de Estudios Históricos "Prof. Carlos S. A. Segreti"     Open Access  
Journal of Russian American Studies (JRAS)     Open Access  
Connexe : Questioning Post-Communist Spaces     Open Access  
Revista de Historia Industrial. Economía y Empresa     Open Access  
Pedralbes : revista d'història moderna     Open Access  
Audens : revista estudiantil d'anàlisi interdisciplinària     Open Access  
Sociología Histórica     Open Access  
Patristica et Mediævalia     Open Access  
Sasdaya : Gadjah Mada Journal of Humanities     Open Access  
Journal of Historical Syntax     Open Access  
LaborHistórico     Open Access  
Revista Mosaico : Revista de História     Open Access  
Revista Habitus : Revista do Instituto Goiano de Pré-História e Antropologia     Open Access  
SPAL : Revista de Prehistoria y Arqueología     Open Access  
Historia : Instituciones. Documentos     Open Access  
RIHC : Revista Internacional de Historia de la Comunicación     Open Access  
Bajo Guadalquivir y Mundos Atlánticos     Open Access  
Atrio : Revista de Historia del Arte     Open Access  
Sémata : Ciencias Sociais e Humanidades     Full-text available via subscription  
Ohm : Obradoiro de Historia Moderna     Full-text available via subscription  
Res Gesta     Open Access  
Revista de Historia (Concepción)     Open Access  
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies     Open Access  
Studia Historyczne     Open Access  
Journal of Tourism History     Hybrid Journal  
Intercâmbio : Revue d’Études Françaises=French Studies Journal     Open Access  
História : revista da Faculdade de Letras da Universidade do Porto     Open Access  

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Fund og Forskning
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0069-9896 - ISSN (Online) 2246-6061
Published by Royal Danish Library Homepage  [22 journals]
  • Forside

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      Authors: - Redaktionen
      Abstract: -
      PubDate: 2021-01-25
      DOI: 10.7146/fof.v60i.130545
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2021)
       
  • Venusins Autografer

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      Authors: Peter Andersen
      Pages: 11 - 52
      Abstract: Peter Andersen: Venusinus’s autographs
      Today thirteen autograph manuscripts are known by the Danish humanist Jon Jacobsen
      Venusinus (d. 1608), cited in older research particularly with reference to his opposition
      to exorcism. His enemies compared him to Faust; an admirer described him as ‘the
      man with the enchanting name’. He first called himself Coronensis, alluding both to
      his upbringing in Landskrona and to his close association with the royal house, but he
      changed his name about 1595 to Venusinus, referring both to Ven, the island on which
      he claimed to have been born, and Venusia, Horace’s home town. Seven bookplates
      provide an insight into this Dane’s personal library. Among his books was a copy of
      William Lambarde’s Archaionomia, from which he quotes twenty-four Old English words.
      Five entries in his alba amicorum bear witness to his circle of friends, which included
      several Calvinists. Three entries contain his hitherto neglected Latin and Greek mottos.
      The albums also allow partial reconstruction of his travels abroad. A recently rediscovered
      letter to the German Calvinist Johannes Piscator is particularly interesting and
      doubles the quantity of known text from Venusinus’s hand.
      PubDate: 2021-01-25
      DOI: 10.7146/fof.v60i.130493
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2021)
       
  • Baserer de såkaldte Bartholinannaler sig på danske
           middelalderlige årbøger'

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      Authors: Svend Clausen
      Pages: 57 - 68
      Abstract: Svend Clausen: Are the Annales Bartholiniani based on Danish medieval
      annals'
      The article discusses the so-called Annales Bartholiniani, written by the Danish scholar
      Thomas Bartholin (1659‑1690). Analysis of a series of events that are clearly dated incorrectly
      in the Annales Bartholiniani and a comparison of the dating of these events
      with the content of Danish medieval annals suggest that the inaccurate dating of such
      events in the Annales Bartholiniani must go back to the Danish medieval annalistic
      traditions. This proves that a great deal of the content of the Annales Bartholiniani
      must go back either directly or indirectly to the content of Danish medieval annals. It
      also points to the fact that there needs to be more discussion of the Annales Bartholiniani
      in future studies, as they also contain a great deal of information not available
      elsewhere, and the close link between them and the content of Danish medieval annals
      makes it much more likely that Bartholin may have used also some Danish medieval
      annals now lost in addition to the medieval annals still known to us. In this respect,
      such an identified close link between the Annales Bartholiniani and the known content
      of the Danish medieval annalistic traditions may help significantly in explaining also
      some of the otherwise unknown information present in the Annales Bartholiniani.
      Discussions of the content for years such as 1087 and 1142, for example, suggest that
      specific details such as these may go back directly or indirectly to a now lost medieval
      Danish annalistic tradition.
      PubDate: 2021-01-25
      DOI: 10.7146/fof.v60i.130494
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2021)
       
  • Den første grønlandske bog

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      Authors: Flemming A. J. Nielsen, Thorkild Kjærgaard
      Pages: 73 - 107
      Abstract: Flemming A. J. Nielsen And Thorkild Kjærgaard:
      The First Greenlandic Book
      Ever since the arrival of Norse peasants in south-west Greenland in the second half
      of the tenth century there have been links between the immense island (2.2 million
      km2) in the north-eastern corner of the American hemisphere and the Scandinavian
      world. At the end of the twelfth century, the ancestors of today’s Inuit, a whale- and
      seal-hunting people speaking a language of the Eskimo-Aleut group, migrated from
      Ellesmere Island across the narrow Smith Sound to northern Greenland. Within two
      and a half centuries, the Norse peasants had, it seems, been exterminated by the Inuit,
      but Greenland was never forgotten in Scandinavia. In the European world it was generally
      recognised that Greenland was Norwegian territory. In 1380 Norway entered
      into a union with Denmark, and the dream of restoring connections with Greenland
      therefore became a shared Danish-Norwegian dream, although it seemed less and less
      practicable as time went by and the Davis Strait between Baffin Island and Greenland
      began to teem with Dutch and British whalers and trading ships.
      However, in 1721 the course of history changed. A Norwegian priest, Hans Egede
      (1686‑1758), who had been offering his services for more than a decade, was appointed
      ‘Royal Missionary in Greenland’ and was given the necessary support for an expedition
      aiming to re-establish the old connection and to reintroduce Christianity into Greenland.
      Egede’s Greenlandic adventure succeeded, and over the course of the eighteenth
      century Greenland was reintegrated, bit by bit, into the multicultural, multinational
      Danish-Norwegian state and society.
      In 1814 Norway was divided as a result of the Napoleonic Wars. Mainland Norway
      (what we know as Norway today) was ceded to Sweden while the remote Norwegian
      islands in the North Atlantic (Greenland, the Faroe Islands and, until 1944, Iceland)
      were annexed to the kingdom of Denmark.
      Being a true officer of the Danish-Norwegian empire, where every child had to
      be taught to read and appreciate Luther’s Small Catechism, Egede struggled from
      the outset with the exotic Greenlandic language, not just to learn to speak a vaguely
      understandable ‘kitchen-Greenlandic’ but also to acquire the deeper understanding
      of phonetic and grammatical structures that was needed in order to develop a written
      version of the language.
      During Egede’s fifteen years in Greenland (1721‑36), all the documents pertaining
      to the mission were handwritten. This was true also for the basic Christian texts in
      Greenlandic which Egede and his helpers began to produce and distribute among the
      growing number of converts from as early as 1723. Back in Copenhagen in 1736, Egede founded the so-called Seminarium Groenlandicum. The purpose of this institution was
      twofold: to teach basic Greenlandic to new missionaries and catechists before they went
      to Greenland, and to produce books printed in Greenlandic in order to have a more
      major and focused impact on Greenlandic society than the sporadic effects obtainable
      with handwritten texts that were constantly being altered by being laboriously copied
      out by hand again and again.
      The first book published in Greenlandic as part of this programme was a spelling
      book containing reading exercises based on Luther’s Small Catechism in addition to a
      collection of prayers and eight hymns translated from the Danish, comprising a total of
      forty pages prepared by Egede and printed in Copenhagen in 1739 to be sent to Greenland
      the same year. As a bridge between written and printed culture in Greenland, this
      small book marked an important milestone in early modern Greenland. Until now it has
      been known only from uncertain and elusive bibliographical sources – sceptical voices
      have even doubted whether it ever existed, but two copies of the book have recently
      been located and identified in the holdings of the Royal Library. Our article provides
      a thorough study of the book: how it came to be forgotten, how it was rediscovered,
      the nature of its contents and details of its typographical layout.
      Less than a century after Hans Egede’s arrival in Greenland, almost everybody in
      western Greenland had learned to read and write, and the local vernacular had become
      a literary language. Later, in 1861, Greenland’s first newspaper was established.
      It was written and edited from the outset by Greenlanders eagerly discussing their own
      affairs. As a result of the discussions, scattered groups of individuals throughout the
      enormous but thinly populated island coalesced into a nation, and, thanks to Egede’s
      endeavours and those of his many successors throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth
      centuries, Greenlandic is today the only native American language that is used for any
      and every purpose by its speakers, whether it be literature, pop music, government,
      church services or legislation.
      PubDate: 2021-01-25
      DOI: 10.7146/fof.v60i.130495
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2021)
       
  • Forsynet, giftermålspolitikken og døden i leilighetsdiktningen til
           Københavns boktrykker-klan Godiche, Høpffner, Berling og Møller

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      Authors: Walter Baumgartner
      Pages: 113 - 156
      Abstract: Walter Baumgartner: Forsynet, giftermålspolitikken og døden
      i leilighetsdiktningen til Københavns boktrykker-klan Godiche, Høpffner,
      Berling og Møller
      At the beginning of the eighteenth century four of the most important publishing
      houses in Copenhagen were owned by a clan of printers that included immigrants
      from Germany: Høpffner, Godiche, Berling and Glasing/Møller. My case study examines
      the occasional poetry written for weddings, apprentices’ final examinations
      and bereavements. This genre, which has always been considered as of little value, is
      here taken seriously, with its roots in baroque rhetoric and poetics. It is accorded an
      aesthetic value and various social and identity-building functions. This is utilitarian
      poetry (Gebrauchslyrik) for the prosperous artisan class, which circulated privately or
      semi-publicly in the form of elaborately designed single sheets or small booklets. The
      authors were often students or poets who wanted to earn some money. In addition to
      the explicit content, symptomatic gaffes and omissions shed light on facts and problems
      concerning ‘das ganze Haus’, the (consanguineous) marriage, the succession, religion
      and the breaking down of the guild system. The baroque repertoire of topoi and forms
      soon became inadequate to deal with more recent social and aesthetic developments,
      and occasional poetry gradually declined after 1800.
      PubDate: 2021-01-25
      DOI: 10.7146/fof.v60i.130496
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2021)
       
  • "Eine Schreckliche Zeit ist eingebrochen"

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      Authors: Lars Schreiber Pedersen
      Pages: 161 - 209
      Abstract: Lars Schreiber Pedersen: “Eine schreckliche Zeit ist eingebrochen”.
      H.O. Lange’s correspondence with Adolf Erman 1914‑1919
      Taking outset in the comprehensive correspondence between the Egyptologist and
      chief librarian at the Royal Library from 1901 to 1924, H.O. Lange (1863‑1943), and his
      German mentor and professor in Egyptology at the University of Berlin, Adolf Erman
      (1854‑1937), this article focuses on their correspondence during the four years of the
      First World War (1914‑18) and in the first year of peace in 1919.
      The letters between the long-time colleagues and friends are far from fully preserved,
      but they still provide a good insight into their views on the predominant talking point
      of the time – the war, especially who they held responsible for much of the misery and
      horror of the war. Furthermore, the correspondence provides insight into an international
      academia under pressure, in particular Egyptology, where international research
      collaboration came to a halt at the outbreak of war, and Germany’s longstanding leading
      position within the field was challenged.
      For the Egyptologist H.O. Lange the time before the outbreak of war in the summer
      of 1914 had been quite satisfying academically. In March, although he had otherwise
      often felt rather academically isolated in Copenhagen, he had an opportunity to visit
      Erman in Berlin, and at the end of July, Erman presented Lange’s recent scientific work
      to the members of the Philosophical-Historical Class at the Royal Prussian Academy
      of Sciences.
      After the outbreak of war, Lange quickly proclaimed his full loyalty to Erman, and
      at the same time he stressed the importance of securing peace and unity within the
      scientific community. This was a task that, probably more than anyone else in the field
      of Egyptology, the Danish Egyptologist felt the need to take on in the following years,
      and he returned to this again and again in his letters to Erman.
      Just as for Lange, the outbreak of war in 1914 sparked deep concern for the almost
      sixty-year-old Erman, who, in a sort of internal exile, decided to intensify work on his
      masterpiece, the dictionary of the Egyptian language, which he had started in 1897.
      However, Erman also felt a degree of optimism and confidence in a German victory
      on the battlefield that had also seized many of his countrymen. He welcomed
      the national enthusiasm triggered by the outbreak of the war. In early August 1914
      Germany had declared war on Russia and France, and then invaded neutral Belgium,
      but in his opinion Germany was the victim, not the aggressor. Like almost all German
      academics Erman shared the perception that the Entente was primarily responsible for
      the outbreak of war, and like them he looked forward to settling the score with the
      principal opponent: Britain. Lars Schreiber Pedersen: “Eine schreckliche Zeit ist eingebrochen”.
      H.O. Lange’s correspondence with Adolf Erman 1914‑1919
      Taking outset in the comprehensive correspondence between the Egyptologist and
      chief librarian at the Royal Library from 1901 to 1924, H.O. Lange (1863‑1943), and his
      German mentor and professor in Egyptology at the University of Berlin, Adolf Erman
      (1854‑1937), this article focuses on their correspondence during the four years of the
      First World War (1914‑18) and in the first year of peace in 1919.
      The letters between the long-time colleagues and friends are far from fully preserved,
      but they still provide a good insight into their views on the predominant talking point
      of the time – the war, especially who they held responsible for much of the misery and
      horror of the war. Furthermore, the correspondence provides insight into an international
      academia under pressure, in particular Egyptology, where international research
      collaboration came to a halt at the outbreak of war, and Germany’s longstanding leading
      position within the field was challenged.
      For the Egyptologist H.O. Lange the time before the outbreak of war in the summer
      of 1914 had been quite satisfying academically. In March, although he had otherwise
      often felt rather academically isolated in Copenhagen, he had an opportunity to visit
      Erman in Berlin, and at the end of July, Erman presented Lange’s recent scientific work
      to the members of the Philosophical-Historical Class at the Royal Prussian Academy
      of Sciences.
      After the outbreak of war, Lange quickly proclaimed his full loyalty to Erman, and
      at the same time he stressed the importance of securing peace and unity within the
      scientific community. This was a task that, probably more than anyone else in the field
      of Egyptology, the Danish Egyptologist felt the need to take on in the following years,
      and he returned to this again and again in his letters to Erman.
      Just as for Lange, the outbreak of war in 1914 sparked deep concern for the almost
      sixty-year-old Erman, who, in a sort of internal exile, decided to intensify work on his
      masterpiece, the dictionary of the Egyptian language, which he had started in 1897.
      However, Erman also felt a degree of optimism and confidence in a German victory
      on the battlefield that had also seized many of his countrymen. He welcomed
      the national enthusiasm triggered by the outbreak of the war. In early August 1914
      Germany had declared war on Russia and France, and then invaded neutral Belgium,
      but in his opinion Germany was the victim, not the aggressor. Like almost all German
      academics Erman shared the perception that the Entente was primarily responsible for
      the outbreak of war, and like them he looked forward to settling the score with the
      principal opponent: Britain.
      PubDate: 2021-01-25
      DOI: 10.7146/fof.v60i.130497
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2021)
       
  • Bestilt arbejde

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      Authors: John T. Lauridsen
      Pages: 215 - 258
      Abstract: John T. Lauridsen: Hot work.
      Changes in attitudes in the Copenhagen press between 1941 and 1943
      The position of the Danish press and the behaviour of the Foreign Ministry’s press
      centre during the German occupation have only been examined sporadically and inadequately.
      This is illustrated taking outset in Politiken’s crime correspondent, Vilhelm
      Bergstrom’s diary and articles recording two court cases involving communists in 1941
      and 1943. The legal proceedings in both cases were commissioned and orchestrated
      by the German occupation forces, using Danish courtrooms as the backdrop. In 1941,
      the Foreign Ministry’s press centre called on newspapers to write about the case, but in
      1943 the head of the centre remained silent while the drama unfolded as the Germans
      wanted. There was also a clear difference between the press coverage in 1941 and 1943.
      In 1941, the majority of the press coverage was about an international terrorist story
      centred on communism as the villain, and there was no lack of violent outcomes in
      newspaper leaders. None of them cast a thought for the mindless contribution they
      were making to the occupying forces’ anti-communist propaganda. The backdrop for
      this was widespread anti-communism in Denmark.
      The situation had changed in 1943. It dawned on journalists that they had served
      the interests of the occupying forces in their coverage of a brutal murder committed
      by communists in 1936, and they wrote their reports on the 1943 case with this in
      mind. They were more restrained, even though the murder story in itself was juicy
      stuff in peaceful Denmark. As one of the journalists noted, it was time to think about
      the future, with the advance of the USSR after the German defeat at Stalingrad, the
      political landscape could change very quickly, so it was a bad idea to have been a mere
      mouthpiece for the occupying forces. Reflection had taken over.
      PubDate: 2021-01-25
      DOI: 10.7146/fof.v60i.130498
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2021)
       
  • Hvad blev der af Julemandshæren' Om arkivering af flygtige
           scenekunstformer

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      Authors: Anna Lawaetz
      Pages: 263 - 298
      Abstract: Anna Lawaetz: Whatever Happened to the Santa Claus Army'
      On Archiving Ephemeral Theatre Forms
      Since the 1960s there has been a paradigm shift in the theatre towards a post-dramatic
      theatre, in which the playtext is not the most important basis for the staging but is part
      of an interplay with other parameters such as visuals, sound, and movement. This poses
      challenges to traditional archival strategies that rely on the playtext. New collection
      strategies are required to ensure this cultural heritage is preserved.
      This study takes as its starting point a work that goes beyond the unities of action,
      time and place and challenges the collection strategies the most: The Santa Claus Army
      (Julemandshæren) by the theatre group Solvognen (1968‑83). The performance took
      place over five days in the Copenhagen area in December 1974, and was included in
      the Cultural Canon in 2006 as an important contribution to Danish culture. The study
      examines only records preserved at The Royal Danish Library due to the legal deposit
      act, as the Special Collection Department made no further acquisitions. Two sources are
      identified in the study: first, contemporary and subsequent recollections, and second,
      works based on material from The Santa Claus Army that paraphrase the original. The
      study compares the so-called repertoire, the oral narrative of the event, and the archival
      records and highlights the differences. It furthermore shows how the re-staging of the
      work in 2006 by a younger artist is based mainly on the so call repertoire.
      The Santa Claus Army is well documented, although no playtext was collected. The
      performance is unfortunately not representative as Solvognen systematically used the
      media to promote and enlarge their work. The main scoop of this study is that it
      shows how Solvognen are over-represented in contemporary and later media coverage
      through the legal deposit act compared to other theatre groups in the 1970s. This calls
      for reflections on collection strategies. A revision of the legal deposit act is proposed
      as well as archival strategies known from other performing arts archives.
      PubDate: 2021-01-25
      DOI: 10.7146/fof.v60i.130499
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2021)
       
  • Kort over Charlotte Amalie havn og by, St. Thomas, o. 1684-1688

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      Authors: Rasmus Christensen
      Pages: 303 - 310
      Abstract: -
      PubDate: 2021-01-25
      DOI: 10.7146/fof.v60i.130500
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2021)
       
  • Små bøger med vidtfavnende forgreninger - erhvervelser til
           Judaistisk Samling

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      Authors: Eva-Maria Jansson
      Pages: 315 - 318
      Abstract: -
      PubDate: 2021-01-25
      DOI: 10.7146/fof.v60i.130501
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2021)
       
  • Om forfatterne

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      Authors: - Redaktionen
      Pages: 320 - 322
      Abstract: -
      PubDate: 2021-01-25
      DOI: 10.7146/fof.v60i.130503
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2021)
       
 
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