Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

HISTORY (859 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 452 of 452 Journals sorted alphabetically
Studies in East European Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Studies in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Studies in People’s History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes: An International Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Studies in Western Australian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Substantia     Open Access  
Suomen Sukututkimusseuran Vuosikirja     Open Access  
SUSURGALUR : Jurnal Kajian Sejarah & Pendidikan Sejarah (Journal of History Education & Historical Studies)     Open Access  
T'oung Pao     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Tangence     Full-text available via subscription  
Tartu Ülikooli ajaloo küsimusi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teaching History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Tekniikan Waiheita     Open Access  
temp - tidsskrift for historie     Full-text available via subscription  
Temporalidades     Open Access  
Territories : A Trans-Cultural Journal of Regional Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Testimonios     Open Access  
The Americas : A Quarterly Review of Latin American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
The Corvette     Open Access  
The Court Historian : The International Journal of Court Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Eighteenth Century     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
The European Legacy: Toward New Paradigms     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
The Hilltop Review : A Journal of Western Michigan University Graduate Student Research     Open Access  
The Historian     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
The International History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
The Italianist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
The Journal of the Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The Seventeenth Century     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Workshop     Open Access  
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Tiempo y Espacio     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Time & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access  
Traditio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Trans-pasando Fronteras     Open Access  
Transactions of the Philological Society     Hybrid Journal  
Transactions of the Royal Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa     Hybrid Journal  
Transfers     Full-text available via subscription  
Transition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Trocadero     Open Access  
Troianalexandrina     Full-text available via subscription  
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Turkish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Turkish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Twentieth Century British History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
U.S. Catholic Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
UCLA Historical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ufahamu : A Journal of African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Urban History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Urban History Review / Revue d'histoire urbaine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Vegueta : Anuario de la Facultad de Geografía e Historia     Open Access  
Veleia     Open Access  
Viator     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Victorian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Victorian Periodicals Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Vigiliae Christianae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Viking and Medieval Scandinavia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Visual Resources: An International Journal of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Vivarium     Hybrid Journal  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Water History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Welsh History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
West 86th     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Winterthur Portfolio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Women's History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Yesterday and Today     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Weltgeschichte     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Zutot     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
ИСТРАЖИВАЊА : Journal of Historical Researches     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
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Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.101
Number of Followers: 27  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0360-2370 - ISSN (Online) 1938-6133
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Friendship, Not Freedom: Dependent Friends in the Late Eighteenth-Century
           Novel

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      Abstract: The topic of friendship has in recent years gained much attention from scholars aiming to consider anew canonical eighteenth-century novels. Two book-length studies on friendship in the eighteenth-century British novel were published in 2017 alone. Katrin Berndt, whose study connects Enlightenment-era conceptions of friendship to late eighteenth-century British novels, usefully observes that the language of friendship sits on a continuum of social reform that, at its most radical, turns into the language of revolution. She emphasizes this point with a epigraph from the Swiss thinker Ernst Halter: "There is no friendship without equality."1 Bryan Mangano likewise considers how eighteenth-century novelists use the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Fragile Communities in the Crusoe Trilogy

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      Abstract: That Robinson Crusoe is the quintessential model of homo economicus is now a critical commonplace. Such an interpretation became increasingly widespread in the wake of the 1762 publication of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Émile, in which Rousseau praises Crusoe for his ability to independently carry out a variety of tasks ranging from building furniture to baking bread. For Rousseau, the fact that Crusoe does not have to cooperate with another to complete each task means that he is less likely to be transformed into an automaton, a fate that tends to await those who participate in an economic system founded on specialization and the division of labor.1 As Rousseau suggests, then, Crusoe's self-reliance guarantees his ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Family Instruction in The Farther Adventures of Robinson Crusoe: Consider
           the Children

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      Abstract: In his Present State of the Parties (1712), Daniel Defoe allows himself a brief but unreservedly nostalgic journey into the glorious "Last Age of Dissenters":Their Ministers were Men known over the Whole World; their general Character was own'd even by their Enemies; generally speaking they were Men of liberal Education; had a vast Stock of Learning; were Exemplar in Piety. … As were the Ministers, so in a Proportion were the People … their Families were little Churches, where the Worship of God was constantly kept up; Their Children and Families were duly Instructed.1After a few pages of wallowing, however, Defoe turns to the present and informs his fellow Dissenters of the more pressing issue at hand—the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Defoe's "Mobbish" Utopias

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      Abstract: At the beginning of Daniel Defoe's Captain Singleton, Captain Bob, acting as if he is being interviewed for a biographical dictionary recording the deeds of great men such as he, notes that he cannot give much information about his "Pedigree" other than knowing that he was stolen away from his parents, sold to a woman, and used as a sales prop, much as Daniel Day Lewis does with an orphan in There Will Be Blood.1 Some irony may implicate the wealthy pirate who perhaps half-believes he is indeed a great figure, but most of it points to the concept of noble birth as nonsensical. As Defoe was to argue in the conclusion to his poem, The True-Born Englishman, such concepts are a "Cheat": it is only what we ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Liberal Theory and Eighteenth-Century Criticism

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      Abstract: By almost universal consent, professional literary criticism is an invention of the long eighteenth century, while literary theory, the systematic, metacritical practice that undergirds a great deal of academic work on literature, has its roots in nineteenth-century hermeneutics. Perhaps this is part of the reason that "high" theory, as it has been called, has often found a cold reception in the bastions of eighteenth-century studies. Although this situation has changed considerably in the last decade or so, even a cursory glance at conference proceedings or the indices of period journals confirms the strong and continuing presence of historicist and archive-focused scholarship. To the extent that theory has made ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "A tedious accumulation of nothing": Christopher Smart, Imperialist
           Archives, and Mechanical Poetry in the Eighteenth Century

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      Abstract: Knowest thou that trees and fruits flourish upon the earth To gratify senses unknown—trees, beasts, and birds unknown; Unknown, not unperceivd, spread in the infinite microscope.1Let Dawn, house of Dawn rejoice with the Frigate Bird which is found upon the coasts of India.2This essay begins with a trick question: is Christopher Smart's Jubilate Agno a twentieth-century poem' Smart wrote Jubilate Agno during what he called his "jeopardy," a six-year confinement in St. Luke's asylum from 1757–63, but the work remained unpublished until W. F. Stead released a version as Rejoice in the Lamb in 1939.3 After its publication, Jubilate Agno was popularized by twentieth-century experimental poets and literary scholars. It ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Robert Burns and the Refashioning of Scottish Identity through Song

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      Abstract: The Scots Musical Museum in six volumes (initiated and published by James Johnson between 1787 and 1803) was a project to which Robert Burns devoted great time and energy toward the end of his life. It was, according to the Introduction, the solution to a perceived problem: "It has long been a just and general Complaint, that among all of the Music Books of Scots Songs that have been hitherto offered to the public, not one, nor even all of them put together, can be said to have merited the name of what may be called A Complete Collection."1 Certainly the drive toward completeness was in keeping with the philosophical drives of the Scottish Enlightenment. However, what Charles Duffin calls the "creative urgency" ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Animal Domestication and Human-Animal Difference in Buffon's Histoire
           Naturelle

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      Abstract: One of the first texts of Georges Louis Leclerc, comte de Buffon's Histoire Naturelle, génerale et particulière, is the "Initial Discourse" (1749), in which he presents the method one should employ when studying nature. Buffon claims that the first truth one is forced to acknowledge when undertaking a serious study of Natural History is one that is probably humiliating to mankind: that man ought to place himself within the class of animals.1 In the same text, we also learn that classifications are the fruit of human imagination and science, and so do not belong to nature itself. In other words, when distinguishing classes or species, the result is "more of an order appropriate to our own nature than one pertaining ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Marvelous Maples: Visions of Maple Sugar in New France, 1691–1761

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      Abstract: This is the study of a breakfast topping. At first glance, this would seem far afield from eighteenth-century studies. Yet, the dark, thick, boiled down tree sap known as maple syrup, which twenty-first century North Americans frequently pour on top of their morning pancakes and waffles, has a surprising connection to the eighteenth-century colonial project in North America, particularly New France.1 In this article I contend that this natural sweetener, which remains an important economic engine and cultural touchstone in modern day Québec, troubled eighteenth-century French beliefs about their own mastery of knowledge, the environment, technology, and the Indigenous Peoples of the Great Lakes.2 Toward this end, I ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "Pirate Vices, Public Benefits": The Social Ethics of Piracy in the 1720s

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      Abstract: The end of the Golden Age of Piracy, that period in the early decades of the eighteenth century that forms the core narratives of Charles Johnson's A General History of the Pyrates, can perhaps be dated specifically to 12 July 1726, the date of the execution of the pirate William Fly. Fly's story is chronologically the latest in the General History. In Johnson's version, he appears very much as the last of a dying breed, stubbornly trying to operate within a culture that had largely been eradicated, thanks to Woodes Rogers's aggressive war on piracy. Fly himself, although defiant and rebellious to the end, is hard to romanticize as a swashbuckling, freedom-loving adventurer; exceptionally violent, short-tempered ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Introduction: Daniel O'Quinn's Melancholy Cosmopolitanism

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      Abstract: An English bluestocking traveling with her ambassador husband is detained in Belgrade for a month thanks to the military rule of a corrupt pasha. Trapped inside, she takes solace in the good company of her host, an accomplished scribe who long ago eschewed the dangers of a political career in favor of a retired life of cultivated ease. Treated to the comforts of fine wine, her host's good table, and excellent conversation on everything from the woman question to poetry, she is quite comfortably entertained. In this "scene of hospitality" she finds "a kind of sanctuary from" the world outside, which is a nightmarish "historical zone of violence, irrationality, and death." The bluestocking in question is, of course ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Archive and the Repertoire of the Treaty of Karlowitz

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      Abstract: At first glance, Daniel O'Quinn's new monograph, Engaging the Ottoman Empire: Vexed Mediations, 1690–1815, seems like a departure from his previous monumental work in eighteenth-century theater history. O'Quinn here eschews discussion of any of the myriad of plays set in the Ottoman Empire from the Restoration and eighteenth century, such as William Davenant's The Siege of Rhodes and Voltaire's Mahomet. Much scholarship looking at English-Ottoman relations focuses on the representation of the Turks, and nowhere was this transcultural fascination more prominent than on the stage.1 As O'Quinn states in the introduction to Engaging the Ottoman Empire, eighteenth-century imperial thought was comparative, and the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Empire and Modern Media: Vanmour or Less

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      Abstract: The opening mise en scène in Daniel O'Quinn's Engaging the Ottoman Empire is sure to capture the attention of art historians. Gaining permission to visit the Rijksmuseum's storerooms, while the museum was closed for renovation, O'Quinn makes his way to the museum director's office where he encounters Jean-Baptiste Vanmour's monumental painting, View of Istanbul from the Dutch Embassy at Pera. "It is a labored, confused painting. Time passes. In so many words, the director indicates that he will be happy not to look at this painting when he moves into his new office."1 I chuckled when I read this, because I've had similar moments in my own quest for the "art of empire": creative works that occupy an uneasy place in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Wrinkles in Imperial Time

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      Abstract: Exposing the intricate connections between global geopolitical machinations and local intimate bonds, between classical inheritances and Enlightened modernity, Daniel O'Quinn's magisterial Engaging the Ottoman Empire: Vexed Mediations, 1690–1815 illuminates how aesthetic forms and knowledge practices mediate affective, cultural, erotic, and political relations across competing spatial and temporal scales. The book summons a dazzling array of materials—paintings, travel narratives, memoirs, letters, maps, poems, buildings, antiquarian collections—to testify to the complexity of European relations with the Ottoman Empire during the long eighteenth century. The sheer abundance and variety of objects thrust the reader ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Between Geographic and Conceptual Fields: Mapping Microhistories in the
           Eighteenth-Century Ottoman Empire

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      Abstract: When examining the many visual and textual accounts produced at the time of the 1699 Treaty of Karlowitz, Daniel O'Quinn poses a central question using a theatrical metaphor: why is the stage—the simple four-room building constructed "in the middle of nowhere" to house the treaty negotiations—accorded far more attention in these sources than the actors'1 This question is a characteristic example of how O'Quinn's close examination of a nexus of related images and texts frequently uncovers surprising repetitions, absences, and contradictions at his subject's very center. These are, of course, the "vexed mediations" named in his subtitle that he weaves together to construct a constellatory, rather than a cumulative ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Rabble, Rubble, Repeat

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      Abstract: A little over two hundred years before anti-racist organizers such as A. Sivanandan retorted "we are here, because you were there" against efforts to delimit British citizenship to an imagined autochthonous whiteness, a group of white British men traveled to one such "there" to find their origins, founding in the process some of the practices and discourses that continue to define cultural heritage preservation today.1 Britain, they and their elite patrons ruminated, was founded by Brutus, a descendant of Aeneas, the Trojan hero-turned-refugee to whom Virgil traced the origin of Rome.2 However much their classical learning oriented educated British men to the worlds of ancient Greece and Rome, their proverbial ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • On Walls, Bridges, and Temporal Folds: Epic, Empire, and Neoclassicism
           Revisited

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      Abstract: Late in his chapter on Lady Mary Wortley Montagu's work in Engaging the Ottoman Empire, Daniel O'Quinn calls her letter book, the epistolary account of her travels to Vienna and Constantinople in 1716–18 often known as the Turkish Embassy Letters, a "counter epic."1 It's an arresting claim, comparing a collection of occasional letters to a genre defined by its length, cohesion, and public importance. Lady Mary, according to O'Quinn, "turns the [epic] tradition on itself to reveal what it cannot adequately represent: the recurrent trauma of war" (209). But what does it mean to turn a tradition on itself' And how does that process reveal things previously unseen' Unpacking this argument about Lady Mary's ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • What Eludes Us

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      Abstract: Reading these seven essays has been a humbling experience. I am honored that Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture and Ashley Cohen have assembled and curated these multiple viewpoints on Engaging the Ottoman Empire from such a wide array of disciplines, and each essay simply confirmed my preexisting admiration for the contributors. Each essayist has crystallized key aspects of the book's argument more powerfully than I had done in the first instance. For a book that was itself already a constellation to have this kind of afterlife among colleagues in quite disparate fields has amplified its argument, but has also activated concerns that had hitherto remained vestigial or were simply overlooked. The strange thing ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Contributors to Volume 51

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      Abstract: Nathan D. Brown is Assistant Professor of French at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina. His primary research interest lies in the transatlantic connections between France and New France in the eighteenth century.Renee Bryzik holds an M.A. in Eighteenth-Century Studies from King's College, London and a Ph.D. in English from the University of California, Davis. Her writing has appeared in Eighteenth-Century Studies and The Scriblerian, among other publications. She is an Instructor of English at Saint Clair County Community College in Port Huron, Michigan.Katherine Calvin is Assistant Professor of Art History at Kenyon College. Her research on early modern travel literature, antiquarianism, and the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Note from the Editors

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      Abstract: Volume 51 of Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture is, in some ways, the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies's very own journal of the plague year. As COVID-19 hit North America in the early spring of 2020, the academic conferences and public lectures that serve as the seedbed for our contributions were all abruptly canceled or postponed. As the pandemic spread, almost everyone in the field found themselves scrambling to work in conditions unlike anything most of us were used to, all while experiencing levels of anxiety, uncertainty, and unsought responsibility that made stringing two sentences together often seem a daunting task. Nonetheless, some scholarly work found a way to bloom and we are ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
      Issue No: Vol. 51 (2022)
       
  • Novel Paintings: Learning to Read Art through Joseph Highmore's Adventures
           of Pamela

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      Abstract: In 1744, the portrait painter Joseph Highmore announced the completion of a possibly unprecedented project: adapting a contemporary English novel into painting.1 Highmore had transformed Samuel Richardson's Pamela: Or, Virtue Rewarded into a grand series of twelve oil paintings, subsequently reproduced in a series of engravings. Highmore's Adventures of Pamela series marks a significant moment in the development of literary-artistic relations.2 Adapting a novel was itself novel. Though the field of history painting had long been centered on literary subjects such as religion, mythology, and classical poetry, English fiction was a newer, more controversial genre that artists had previously avoided.3 Highmore drew ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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