Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

HISTORY (859 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 601 - 452 of 452 Journals sorted alphabetically
New England Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
New Hibernia Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Newfoundland and Labrador Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nineteenth-Century Contexts: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Noctua. La tradizione filosofica dall'antico al moderno     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nomenclatura : aproximaciones a los estudios hispánicos     Open Access  
Nordic Journal of Educational History     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Northeast African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Northern History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Northern Scotland     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Notes & Records of the Royal Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Nottingham Medieval Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Nuevo mundo mundos nuevos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nuova Rivista Storica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ohio History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Ohm : Obradoiro de Historia Moderna     Full-text available via subscription  
Opuscula : Short Texts of the Middle Ages and Renaissance     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Oral History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Oriens     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Orvosi Hetilap     Full-text available via subscription  
Osiris     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Oud Holland - Quarterly for Dutch Art History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Oxford German Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Palestine Exploration Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Paradigmi     Full-text available via subscription  
Paragone : Past and Present     Full-text available via subscription  
Parergon     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Parliamentary History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Parliaments, Estates and Representation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Pasado Abierto     Open Access  
Passato e presente     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Passepartout     Open Access  
Past & Present     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 146)
Pastoralism : Research, Policy and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Patrimoines du Sud     Open Access  
Patristica et Mediævalia     Open Access  
Pecia     Full-text available via subscription  
Pedralbes : revista d'història moderna     Open Access  
Penn History Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Peritia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pharmaceutical Historian     Open Access  
Philippine Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Pleine Marge     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
PLURA, Revista de Estudos de Religião / PLURA, Journal for the Study of Religion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Policy and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Polis : The Journal of the Society for Greek Political Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Politéia : História e Sociedade     Open Access  
Politics & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Politikon: South African Journal of Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Politique et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Popular Music History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Porta Aurea     Open Access  
Postcolonial Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Postcolonial Text     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Préhistoires méditerranéennes     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society (hardback)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Engineering History and Heritage     Hybrid Journal  
Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queensland, The     Full-text available via subscription  
Proceedings of the Zoological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Procesos Historicos     Open Access  
Prose Studies: History, Theory, Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Przegląd Nauk Historycznych     Open Access  
Psychoanalysis and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalysis Culture & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Publications du Centre Européen d'Etudes Bourguignonnes     Full-text available via subscription  
Purdue Historian     Open Access  
Quaderns d’Història de l’Enginyeria     Open Access  
Quaker History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Queensland Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Queensland Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Questes : Revue pluridisciplinaire d'études médiévales     Open Access  
Quintana. Revista de Estudos do Departamento de Historia da Arte     Open Access  
RADAR : Historiedidaktisk tidsskrift     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rasenna : Journal of the Center for Etruscan Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Rationality and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Raven : A Journal of Vexillology     Hybrid Journal  
Reinardus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Relaciones. Estudios de historia y sociedad     Open Access  
Renaissance Drama     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Renaissance Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
Renaissance Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Res Gesta     Open Access  
Res Historica     Open Access  
Rethinking History: The Journal of Theory and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Reti Medievali Rivista     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Review of Central and East European Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Reviews in American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Revista Alétheia     Open Access  
Revista Análisis Internacional     Open Access  
Revista Chilena de Historia del Derecho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Crítica Histórica     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Historico-Juridicos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Historia (Concepción)     Open Access  
Revista de História Bilros. História(s), Sociedade(s) e Cultura(s)     Open Access  
Revista de Historia del Derecho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Historia Industrial. Economía y Empresa     Open Access  
Revista de Historia Social y de las Mentalidades     Open Access  
Revista de Historia Universal     Open Access  
Revista de Istorie a Moldovei     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Eletrônica Discente História.com     Open Access  
Revista Habitus : Revista do Instituto Goiano de Pré-História e Antropologia     Open Access  
Revista Historia Autónoma     Open Access  
Revista Maracanan     Open Access  
Revista Memória em Rede     Open Access  
Revista Mosaico : Revista de História     Open Access  
Revista Paginas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revolutionary Russia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revue archéologique de l'Est     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue archéologique du Centre de la France     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue d'Histoire de l'Eglise de France     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue d'histoire de l'enfance     Open Access  
Revue d'Histoire des Textes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue d'histoire du XIXe siècle     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revue d'Histoire Ecclésiastique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue de géographie historique     Open Access  
Revue de l’Histoire des Religions     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revue des Études Arméniennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue d’histoire des sciences humaines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue Mabillon     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Rhetoric Society Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
RIHA Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
RIHC : Revista Internacional de Historia de la Comunicación     Open Access  
Romanticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Romanticism on the Net     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Romantik : Journal for the Study of Romanticisms     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rúbrica Contemporánea     Open Access  
RUDN Journal of Russian History     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RUDN Journal of World History     Open Access  
Rural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Russian Education & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Russian History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Russian Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sacris Erudiri     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Saeculum. Jahrbuch für Universalgeschichte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safundi : The Journal of South African and American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sasdaya : Gadjah Mada Journal of Humanities     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Scando-Slavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Science & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Scientia Canadensis: Canadian Journal of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine / Scientia Canadensis : revue canadienne d'histoire des sciences, des techniques et de la médecine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Scottish Church History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Scottish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Scrineum Rivista     Open Access  
Scrinium : Journal of Patrology and Critical Hagiography     Open Access  
Scrutiny2: Issues in English Studies in Southern Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sémata : Ciencias Sociais e Humanidades     Full-text available via subscription  
Semina : Revista dos Pós-Graduandos em História da UPF     Open Access  
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Serendipities : Journal for the Sociology and History of the Social Sciences     Open Access  
Sibirica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Siècles     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Signos Historicos     Open Access  
Slagmark - Tidsskrift for idéhistorie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Slavery & Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Slavonica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Social History of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Social Science History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Social Sciences and Missions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Società e Storia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Society and Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sociología Histórica     Open Access  
South African Historical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
South African Journal of Economics : SAJE     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
South Asia Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
South Asian History and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
South Asian Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Survey     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
South Australian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription  
South Central Review     Full-text available via subscription  
South European Society and Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Southeast European and Black Sea Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Southwestern Historical Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Soviet and Post-Soviet Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
SPAL : Revista de Prehistoria y Arqueología     Open Access  
Spontaneous Generations : A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sport in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Studi di Storia Medioevale e di Diplomatica - Nuova Serie     Open Access  
Studia Aurea : Revista de Literatura Española y Teoría Literaria del Renacimiento y Siglo de Oro     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia Historiae Ecclesiasticae     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Studia Historiae Oeconomicae     Open Access  
Studia Historyczne     Open Access  
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studia Litteraria et Historica     Open Access  
Studia z Historii Filozofii     Open Access  
Studies in Church History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Studies in Digital Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studies in East European Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Studies in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
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Parergon
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.123
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0313-6221 - ISSN (Online) 1832-8334
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Anne M. Scott (1940–2021)

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      Abstract: Anne Scott, a noted scholar of poverty and charity in the later Middle Ages, and a former editor of Parergon, died in early September this year.Anneʼs early childhood was spent in Skerries, a small fishing village north of Dublin. She was the eldest child in a large, close-knit family that grew up in Essex after World War II. She was educated by Ursuline nuns, and joined the order after her secondary schooling finished. After taking final vows, she was able to resume her studies with a BA in English at St Anneʼs College, Oxford. She recalled J. R. R. Tolkien beginning his lectures with Hwæt! (ʻLo!ʼ), the opening word of Beowulf, but sounding in his voice rather like ʻQuiet!ʼ. She later obtained her Postgraduate ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Children and War in Early Modern Europe: An Introduction

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      Abstract: Children and youth experience war from many different perspectives: as victims of physical violence and hunger; through the absence, loss, or injury of family; through forced migration; as soldiers; and as subjects and consumers of war propaganda and memory. As has been recently demonstrated, children can also be held legally culpable, and so stripped of citizenship, for their presence and actions in conflict zones. Children and young people's direct experience of war and the memories of violent conflict is an urgent issue for today's societies. One in six children today live in war zones; the repercussions are not limited to those localities, with 68.5 million people displaced from their homes by war in 2018.1 How ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cultural Immersion: Diplomacy, Learning, and Mobility in the Childhood of
           Federico II Gonzaga during the War of the League of Cambrai (1508–16)

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      Abstract: During the fifteenth century, children belonging to the House of Gonzaga and the House of Este frequently travelled abroad to complete their education in foreign courts and improve diplomatic relationships.1 The Gonzaga were the rulers of the marquisate of Mantua, while the Este reigned over the duchy of Ferrara.2 Although smaller players on the northern Italian political scene, both found ways to circumvent their lack of influence through inventive diplomatic schemes, one of which was to despatch their children as diplomatic objects. While abroad, the Gonzaga and Este offspring availed themselves of the more prestigious educational opportunities at wealthier foreign courts. Several children travelled to Burgundy ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Children and their Mothers in Early Modern Ballads about War

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      Abstract: A ballad about the English naval victory against the Spanish at Málaga in July 1656 rejoices in how the English ships managed to destroy the city's defences, and makes special note of how the Spanish were unable to defend their wives and children. The implication is that the Spanish men were thereby emasculated in the face of the virile English aggressors. However, a sixteenth-century ballad that decries Mary I's persecution of Protestants uses the same kind of imagery to portray that persecution as an assault on 'God's Fort'. Bishop Edmund Bonner, infamous for his interrogations and torture of heretics, is depicted as a military commander, urging his forces to attack defenceless 'wemen and children':Thus, the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Children's Experiences of Violence during the Irish Rebellion of 1641

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      Abstract: The gruesome killing of Protestant infants and children by Irish Catholics has been an important part of the mythology of the Irish Rebellion of 1641.1 This was an Irish Catholic rising against the English Protestant administration of Ireland, which had begun suddenly in Ulster on 23 October 1641 and then spread rapidly throughout the country.2 Within months, exaggerated accounts of the atrocities inflicted on the Protestant settler community by Irish Catholics began to be published in London, fuelling anti-Catholic sentiment in England and throughout Protestant Europe.3 One of the most incendiary publications was The Teares of Ireland (1642), authored by English Presbyterian minister James Cranford, which was ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • 'Joy among the Irish children that […] there will be war': Irish
           Children and Seventeenth-Century Wars

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      Abstract: In December 1660, after the restoration of the Stuart monarchy, rumours flew through tense Protestant communities in Ireland about a planned Catholic Irish resurgence. The rumours were fuelled by living memory of the violence inflicted upon Protestant communities during the 1641 rebellion and fears that further attacks by Catholics were imminent. While there were many specific fears expressed during these tense months, one of them centred on the role of children in renewed violence. The Earl of Montrath, Charles Coote, one of the newly appointed Lords Justice for Ireland, received a letter that related that the Irish were talking of 'deliverance from the English yoke' and 'reported "as joy" amongst the Irish ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • 'A child drew the lots': Children and Youth Experiencing the English Civil
           War

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      Abstract: Silent and silhouetted against the backdrop of England's civil wars are the experiences of children and youth in the histories and archives. Take for example, the conclusion of the successful Parliamentary siege of Pembroke Castle by Oliver Cromwell and his forces in 1648, where three men were tried by court martial and sentenced to death for the Royalist rebellion: Colonel John Poyer, the Parliamentary governor of Pembroke Castle; Major-General Rowland Laugharnem; and Colonel Rice Powel. It was decided that only one of the men should be executed and the remaining two should be banished. A child was chosen to draw one fateful ballot out of the hat. Unnamed, this child held the life of one of the three adult ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Taking Bonnie Prince Charlie to Heart: Children, Emotion, and Rebellion

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      Abstract: In 1729, Antonio David (1698–1750) was commissioned to paint companion portraits of the royal children, Charles Edward Stuart and his brother, Henry Benedict. The children were with their father, James Frederick, and the Stuart court, living in exile in Rome, following the deposition of their grandfather, King James VII and II, from the British throne. The boys were eight and four, and the portraits had been requested by supporters of the family in England. James Frederick was delighted with the paintings and had them reproduced; a pair was placed on display in the Palazzo de Rei to allow them to be copied for distribution amongst their Italian supporters; two replica pairs were sent to Paris. One of these was ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Minorities in Contact in the Medieval Mediterranean ed. by Clara Almagro
           Vidal et al. (review)

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      Abstract: Discussions of 'minorities' and 'majorities' in studies of the medieval Mediterranean are commonplace. This excellent volume constitutes an important call to reflect on the assumptions underpinning the use of these terms. By examining instances when putative minorities have engaged with one another in a medieval Mediterranean context, this volume sets out to show that the designation of 'minority' can be 'dangerously simplistic' (p. 12) and that scholars should instead view the descriptor of minority status as relational, ever-changing, and multivalent, a goal which it admirably achieves. Relative minority status, so Clara Almagro Vidal, Jessica Tearney-Pearce, and Luke Yarbrough remind us in the 'Introduction' ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Early British Drama in Manuscript ed. by Tamara Atkin and Laura Estill
           (review)

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      Abstract: The twenty essays in this volume introduce or newly interpret evidence of authorship, transmission, and performance in playscripts copied in England or Scotland from the fifteenth to the seventeenth centuries, a period when printing had not wholly displaced handwritten texts. The authors explore records of performances before audiences who ranged from poor and illiterate to middle-class, scholarly, courtly, and regal. They show that scripts were preserved for entertainment, edification, and propaganda, and that the copyists were variously named or unnamed, amateur or professional, male or female. All the contributions advance understanding of early British drama, while a few radically revise received opinions.Of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Magnificence and Princely Splendour in the Middle Ages by Richard Barber
           (review)

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      Abstract: The first thing one notes about this volume is that it is beautifully presented, which is quite fitting for a book devoted to magnificence and splendour. Its quarto format and high-quality paper allow the numerous colour illustrations to be appreciated in vivid detail, but it is not a 'coffee-table book' intended mainly for decoration: the illustrations are essential, but they do not dominate the work.Instead, the substance of the book is a discussion of princely display in Western Europe, supported by an extensive bibliography and aimed at the educated but non-specialist reader. It covers the period from, roughly, 500 to 1500 ce, and its thesis is that the rediscovery of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics by Latin ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Feeling Heart in Medieval and Early Modern Europe: Meaning,
           Embodiment, and Making ed. by Katie Barclay and Bronwyn Reddan (review)

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      Abstract: As a field, the history of emotions has grown richly over the last ten years. Katie Barclay, who works with the Australian Research Council's Centre for the History of Emotions (CHE), has, along with Bronwyn Reddan, collected a wide-ranging and thoughtful collection on the heart as a site for and of emotion. Other contributors in The Feeling Heart in Medieval and Early Modern Europe also have connections to CHE, which financially supported the project in its introductory stages, while others approach the topic from different views again. The collection's perspectives in art and material history, and literary and manuscript studies, provide a range of critical reflection on the heart from approximately the years ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Arthur of the Low Countries: The Arthurian Legend in Dutch and Flemish
           Literature by Bart Besamusca and Frank Brandsma (review)

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      Abstract: This book is the tenth volume in a series that is now three decades old; the first volume, The Arthur of the Welsh, was published in 1991. The series has grown to be a respected collection of Arthurian scholarship that steers the reader away from the hegemonic (for anglophone scholarship in particular) English tradition to the many lesser-known iterations, and their noteworthy textual variations. This particular volume expands considerably on previous accessible works in this topic: Roger Sherman Loomis's Arthurian Literature in the Middle Ages (Clarendon Press, 1959), W. H. Jackson and Silvia Ranawake's The Arthur of the Germans (University of Wales Press, 2000), and Leah Tether and Johnny MacFadyen's Handbook of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Settlements and Strongholds in Early Medieval England: Texts, Landscapes,
           and Material Culture by Michael D. J. Bintley (review)

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      Abstract: While not all scholars of the early medieval period will accept Michael Bintley's views, this book is an invaluable introduction to some new approaches to interpretation of the period between the departure of the Romans and the coming of the Normans in England, such as those of John Blair and Éamonn Ó Carragáin. In this book Bintley hopes to open further areas for future research. He is primarily interested in changing our understanding of the ways in which the authors of contemporary vernacular literary works presented the links between people and the places in which they lived.The texts that survive from any period are important, but they have a particular place in any largely non-literate society, such as early ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Playful Letters: A Study in Early Modern Alphabetics by Erika Mary
           Boeckeler (review)

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      Abstract: Playful Letters offers a compelling reading of early modern alphabetics, navigating a diverse set of primers, prints, and images spanning from western Europe to Russia. Boeckeler's driving premise—that letters are material bodies with pluripotent histories—provides a persuasive framework for understanding how teachers, artists, and religious or political authorities could wield them.The first chapter engages with French engraver Geofroy Tory, whose seminal work Champ Fleury (1529) anatomizes each letter as a body on a grid, reading each according to didactic humanist principles. Scholars interested in Jeffrey Masten's work on this subject in Queer Philology (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016) can find a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reading and Writing in Medieval England. Essays in Honor of Mary C. Erler
           ed. by Martin Chase and Maryanne Kowaleski (review)

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      Abstract: Mary C. Erler's work invites us to think differently about the enactment of culture in literate practices and communities. This collection of essays intersects explicitly with her interests and pays homage to her influence. Themes of literacy, and particularly women's literacy, the practice of devotion by lay and religious women, and the ownership and transfer of books, are prevalent. This is not to say the work is in any way repetitive. Far from it. Rather, this book is a crafted exploration of ways to do history, with exemplary essays in different styles. Each chapter in this book provides insight into ways of understanding the past and engaging with it through objects, imagery, and words.Joyce Coleman's chapter ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sofonisba's Lesson: A Renaissance Artist and her Work by Michael W. Cole
           (review)

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      Abstract: Sofonisba Anguissola (c. 1535–1625) was the first Italian Renaissance woman artist to achieve international recognition. Considered by her contemporaries as a marvellously gifted painter after nature, Sofonisba's portraits, her specialization, were believed to come 'alive' (Vasari, 'Vita di Benvenuto Garofalo e di Girolamo da Carpi, pittori ferraresi, e d'altri Lombardi', in his Le Vite de più eccellenti pittori, scultori et architettori, 2 vols, Florence, Giunti, 1568, ii, 561–62).Michael Cole's Sofonisba's Lesson brilliantly brings this female artist to life, exploring her art within the context of the networks and relationships that formed her world. Sofonisba's paintings, Cole argues, are 'an expression of such ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Episcopal Power and Personality in Medieval Europe, 900–1480 ed. by
           Peter Coss et al. (review)

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      Abstract: It is difficult to exaggerate the role of bishops in medieval Europe. They often had to navigate a delicate tightrope between the demands of the Church and the pressures of the state. But what is a bishop' These figures are hardly shadowy, and they were thought to hold power directly from God and functioned as divine representatives on earth, while their charisma reflected and influenced their communities of activity. They were leaders, politicians, warriors, and officials of the Church, sometimes functioning in all of these roles simultaneously. This volume assesses the medieval episcopate in terms of power and personality. It is a collection of fourteen essays that emerged from a 2015 conference that discussed ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Historiography and the Shaping of Regional Identity in Europe: Regions in
           Clio's Looking Glass ed. by Dick E. H. de Boer and Luĺs Adão da Fonseca
           (review)

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      Abstract: This book emerges from the EuroCORECODE programme, which funded research, under the European Science Foundation, into the development of regional cohesion from the Middle Ages to the present. EuroCORECODE comprised three 'Collaborative Research Projects': CURE (investigating the history of regional cohesion); CULTSYMBOLS (saints' cults as a focus for regionality); and UNFAMILIARITY (exploring perceptions of otherness). Contributions to this miscellany come from all three, though primarily the first: the volume's editors were CURE's project leaders. The scheme's nature was such that scholars from a nation were funded by that nation. Therefore, if a state chose not to participate there would be no research (generally ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cities, Saints, and Communities in Early Medieval Europe: Essays in Honour
           of Alan Thacker ed. by Scott DeGregorio and Paul Kershaw (review)

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      Abstract: Celebrating some four decades of the significant contribution of Alan Thacker to early medieval studies, editors Scott DeGregorio and Paul Kershaw have collated eighteen articles themed primarily around Thacker's most prominent interest, the English scholar Bede (c. 673–735). The articles, from a range of notable contributors, investigate questions of saintly cults, heresy, episcopal relations, biblical exegesis, and reception.Kershaw's overview of Thacker's career and contributions, including a useful bibliography of his work, is followed by Mark Handley's exploration of the surviving epitaph of the Merovingian king, Childebert (d. c. 558) and its connection to the cult of the Spanish martyr, Vincent of Saragossa ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Blondus Flavius, Roma Instaurata 1 ed. by Fabio Della Schiava (review)

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      Abstract: Chaos of ruins! who shall trace the void, […] And say, 'here was, or is', where all is doubly night'In 1445–46 the humanist Biondo Flavio quickly put together the work that has earned him the title 'the father of archaeology'. Honouring the repossession of the city of Rome by Pope Eugenius IV after his Florentine exile, Roma instaurata is famous for being the first systematic study of the city's aedificia et loca (§72), impelled by a desire for historical accuracy. Biondo had probably been collecting material for it for years and draws on an impressively wide range of ancient and medieval sources, sifted for their trustworthiness.In Book 1 Biondo introduces the work with two topics which enable him to survey the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Accounts and Accountability in Late Medieval Europe: Records, Procedures,
           and Socio-Political Impact ed. by Ionut Epurescu-Pascovici (review)

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      Abstract: It has become fashionable to publish collections of papers by different authors loosely linked to a topic that is important in many different historical areas and structures. This has the advantage of identifying practices that would be clarified by comparison. Accounting procedure is a topic which has only recently started to receive the attention it merits, and this volume illustrates the range of aspects that need further attention. Each chapter is dense and carefully expounded and must be read slowly if its full significance is to be appreciated. Unfortunately, however, the chapters lack a common approach, although some similar conclusions do emerge.By the later Middle Ages, efficient accounts were critical to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Myths and Magic in the Medieval Far North: Realities and Representations
           of a Region on the Edge of Europe ed. by Stefan Figenschow et al. (review)
           

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      Abstract: This study of the medieval Far North examines the northerly regions of Hálogaland and Finnmǫrk, and the northerly peoples: the Finns, the Sámi, and the Bjarmians, and their social, political, geographic, and cultural articulation and interconnectedness with Norway to the south. Here the alterity of the medieval Far North is re-oriented, looking instead southwards to Norway and beyond to centralizing European authority. Established at the University of Trømso in 2010, the Creating the New North research group is concerned with these regions and peoples between 500 and 1800, from the earlier eras of open interaction between different groups and cultures, to the later periods as it became subject to emerging southern ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Making the Profane Sacred in the Viking Age: Essays in Honour of Stefan
           Brink ed. by Irene García Losquiño et al. (review)

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      Abstract: Dedicated to Professor Stefan Brink, this Festschrift presents a pleasingly coherent collection of essays concerned with themes from Brink's own interdisciplinary scholarship: studies grounded in philology, onomastics, archaeology, and mythology that have or are concerned with the connections between the landscape, religion, and culture.This volume is organized into five sections which delve into the sacred/profane dichotomy within pre-Viking, Viking Age, and medieval Scandinavian society. Part I, 'Understanding Sacredness', provides a theoretical underpinning for the following chapters, through a close examination, and challenge of, accepted definitions of sacred words, places, and concepts. Part II, 'Sacredness ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The City of Blue and White: Chinese Porcelain and the Early Modern World
           by Anne Gerritsen (review)

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      Abstract: In her first chapter, Anne Gerritsen claims that this new monograph examines how Jingdezhen became 'the empire's premier site of ceramics production' and will offer 'a cultural history of the meanings and representations that shaped this history of this extraordinary city' (p. 6). Both are explored, and yet the work is also much more than that, so much so that it might not always satisfy the range of readers who are likely to engage with the text. Something of this tension is echoed in the work's title, in which the city is referenced, but not by name, and as much focus is placed upon the product made in Jingdezhen, referred to as 'Chinese porcelain'. But then, that is also part of Gerritsen's argument—that ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Playfulness in Shakespearean Adaptations ed. by Marina Gerzić and
           Aidan Norrie (review)

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      Abstract: 'Play' is the thing in Marina Gerzić and Aidan Norrie's Playfulness in Shakespearean Adaptations. The purpose of the collection is to highlight the importance of irreverence and play in the creation of 'new "Shakespeares"', as described in the book's abstract. From Victorian burlesque to contemporary graphic novels, this collection provides a range of material for the reader interested in Shakespearean adaptation of drama (his poems are not extensively addressed). The collection seems best suited to students or scholars new to examples of adaptation or those wanting to expand their knowledge of it.The first section is entitled 'Page to Stage/Stage to Page'. Roberta Grandi opens with emphasizing the long history of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Chronicles of Medieval Wales and the March: New Contexts, Studies, and
           Texts ed. by Ben Guy et al. (review)

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      Abstract: Based on work undertaken by the Welsh Chronicles Research Group (founded in 2014 and hosted by Bangor University), editors Ben Guy, Georgia Henley, Owain Wyn Jones, and Rebecca Thomas have collated eleven articles as a culmination of the group collaboration, including five new editions and translations of select Welsh chronicles. The articles, from a range of impressive contributors, investigate questions of local and European contexts, reception and integrity, provenance and influences, as well as publishing editions of O Oes Gwrtheyrn, the Cardiff Chronicle, the Chronicle of Gregory of Caerwent, Blwydyn eiseu, and Brut Ieuan Brechfa.Part I, 'Synopses', begins with Huw Pryce's overview of chronicle writing in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Medieval Women on Film: Essays on Gender, Cinema and History ed. by Kevin
           J. Harty (review)

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      Abstract: Kevin J. Harty has been at the centre of medievalismist cinema studies since 1991 with the publication of his invaluable Cinema Arthuriana: Essays on Arthurian Film (Garland, 1991). His new collection—a compendium of fascinating and often innovative case studies on medieval women in world cinema—builds upon this work, centring gender in the discussion and broadening the scope beyond Arthuriana to encompass a multitude of cinematic medievalisms. The collection provides a sound basis for anyone interested in filmic medievalism (what Harty calls the 'reel Middle Ages') and/or in the intersection of medievalism and discourses of gender. Harty sets out to show 'just how multi-faceted medieval women's screen lives can ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Companion to Geoffrey of Monmouth ed. by Georgia Henley and Joshua Byron
           Smith (review)

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      Abstract: Is it not strange that well into the digital age, by which time we should be experiencing the end of the printed book as we know it, we should see the production of, not just many hard-copy books, but so many large and expensive ones' The present, with over 500 pages and a hefty price tag, is one such. And like many of its bulk, this one is a multi-authored volume, with no fewer than twenty-five contributors, some of them graduate students, for whom it might be their first publication (once it might have been a journal article). Yet some of the most central names in recent Geoffrey of Monmouth studies, such as Julia Crick, Michael Reeve, and Neil Wright, are missing.A 'Companion' such as this should do at least ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Figure of Minerva in Medieval Literature by William F. Hodapp (review)

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      Abstract: As scholarship continues to re-examine the ways ideas traversed the medieval world through literature, delving into the relationship between author and audience, William F. Hodapp's volume following the figure of Minerva from antiquity to the later Middle Ages offers critical perspectives on medieval authors' use of established imagery. Drawing on a wide range of texts from the classical world through to sixteenth-century England and Scotland, Hodapp proposes that the way medieval people engaged with antiquity in literature shows that both author and audience had an assumed understanding of classical figures. Intertextuality is central, and Hodapp asserts that 'poetics and reading practices [were] at the heart of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Inwardness, Individualization, and Religious Agency in the Late Medieval
           Low Countries: Studies in the Devotio Moderna and its Context ed. by
           Rijcklof Hofman et al. (review)

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      Abstract: As someone who listened to Thomas à Kempis read at boarding school mealtimes, I found it interesting to discover more of his context in the Devotio Moderna movement in the Low Countries during the late medieval period. The chapters in this book arise from a conference in Nijmegen in October 2016 and cover different aspects of the Devotio Moderna in the period and region described. There is no obvious overarching theme, though Hofman suggests the themes are 'an improved analysis of inwardness and private devotion in the late medieval Low Countries' and 'whether individualization really played a role in religious agency' (p. 17). The early chapters cover the theme of individualization and personhood in relation to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Games and Visual Culture in the Middle Ages and Renaissance ed. by Vanina
           Kopp and Elizabeth Lapina (review)

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      Abstract: The authors of the collected essays in Games and Visual Culture in the Middle Ages and Renaissance acknowledge their debt to the theory of play conceptualized in Johan Huizinga's classic text Homo Ludens (1938; English translation Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1949). Huizinga examines the importance of play in human culture covering rules, play space, and its secretive ritualistic and holy elements.By drawing on Huizinga's thesis, Vanina Kopp and Elizabeth Lapina edit a volume that takes an innovative wide-ranging look at game-playing. Games studied range from board games to sports, indoor and outdoor, and even an intriguing combination of different play types. The volume also encompasses 'a broad geographical area ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Excerptum de Talmud: Study and Edition of a Thirteenth-Century Latin
           Translation by Isaac Lampurlanés Farré (review)

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      Abstract: The so-called 'trial of the Talmud' that took place in Paris in 1240 and the subsequent burning of many copies of the Talmud in the following year is not a comfortable subject. This volume—the first to appear in a new Brepols series 'Contact and Transmission'—devoted to intercultural encounters from late antiquity to the early modern period provides a study in a meticulously documented critical edition of a Latin summary of the Talmud, along with an English translation, by Isaac Lampurlanés Farré. This summary, the so-called Excerptum de Talmud, is itself based on the much larger Extractiones de Talmud, a sequentially organized collection of almost 1900 passages culled from the Talmud, critically edited by Ulisse ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Embodiment, Identity, and Gender in the Early Modern Age by Amy E. Leonard
           and David M. Whitford (review)

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      Abstract: Merry Wiesner-Hanks, Distinguished Professor Emerita at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee's Department of History, has made ground-breaking contributions to scholarship in the fields of gender, religion, and global history in the early modern period. This collection of essays brings together the far-reaching and thought-provoking themes of Wiesner-Hanks's vast scholarship in eighteen chapters divided into three sections. The engaging and tightly structured essays deftly engage with Wiesner-Hanks's scholarly output using a variety of methodologies to address the intersections of identity, gender, and the body in the early modern period. The volume begins with a foreword about Merry Wiesner-Hanks by Natalie Zemon ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Ghosts, Holes, Rips and Scrapes: Shakespeare in 1619, Bibliography in the
           Longue Durée by Zachary Lesser (review)

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      Abstract: Until recently, book history, bibliography, and textual studies tended to be regarded as almost moribund backwaters of literary studies. In part owing to the material turn, these areas have suddenly become fashionable; indeed, some might see them as now some of the most influential and innovative fields in the discipline, perhaps along with approaches through queer theory, and critical race studies. This book by Zachary Lesser is a fine example of what we perhaps now need to call Revolutionary Bibliography (as opposed to the early twentieth century's New Bibliography).Ghosts, Holes, Rips and Scrapes is perhaps slightly narrower in scope than Lesser's brilliant analysis of the anti-teleological effect of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Tudor Textiles by Eleri Lynn (review)

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      Abstract: When people think of the Tudors and textiles, most picture the sumptuous dress at the courts of Henry VIII and his daughter Elizabeth I, which made these monarchs living spectacles of wealth and power. In Tudor Textiles, Eleri Lynn pushes readers to look beyond the clothing worn by these monarchs and to examine how tapestries, carpets, arras, embroidered decorative objects, and furnishings were used in the courts, ceremonies, and pageantry of Tudor England. Lynn is well placed to write on such a topic, as she is curator of the Royal Ceremonial Dress Collection at Historic Royal Palaces and was formerly an assistant curator in the Department of Furniture, Textiles, and Fashion at the Victoria and Albert Museum. This ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Treason and Masculinity in Medieval England: Gender, Law and Political
           Culture by Amanda E. McVitty (review)

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      Abstract: In Treason and Masculinity, Amanda McVitty explores shifting notions of treason, and its cultural, social, and political implications, viewed through a gender lens. She traces changing understandings of treason from 1384 (an occasion of trial by combat) to 1424 (the execution of Sir John Mortimer). McVitty determines that treason exists on a continuum and shifts across this period in response to discourses of true and false manhood, chivalric values, and the need for kings to align their manly bodies with the social body and the body politic. In this context, the separation of the crown from Richard II and the attaching of it to the Lancastrian kings 'continued to be re-enacted through the rhetoric of treason ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Queer Philologies: Sex, Language, and Affect in Shakespeare's Time by
           Jeffrey Masten (review)

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      Abstract: Medieval and early modern scholars frequently reflect on their disciplinarity, yet only relatively recently have they begun to consider how various normative and powerful social systems have influenced the generation and fruition of their fields. Over the past two hundred years, these fields have operated under fairly homogenous and exclusive academic structures that value and uphold white, Eurocentric, and heteronormative systems of critical engagement and historical e/valuation. Contributing to a contemporary reckoning with just such an exclusionary pedigree, Jeffrey Masten considers the ways that exclusions have been enforced within philological considerations of early modern texts. In Queer Philologies: Sex ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Solitude and Speechlessness: Renaissance Writing and Reading in Isolation
           by Andrew Mattison (review)

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      Abstract: Andrew Mattison's work of literary criticism takes as its leitmotif the concept of isolation—of author, of reader, and of text. It is a response to the concentration on collaboration and community that has dominated literary studies in recent decades. Applying this focus to a range of poetic sources in English dating from the sixteenth and (predominantly) the seventeenth centuries, Mattison interrogates the social and literary forces that act upon authors, readers, and indeed on texts themselves as material and immaterial forms. One of the most interesting aspects of this fruitful approach is its consideration of readers across time, as Mattison discusses the reception of early modern texts during the lifetimes of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Teaching the History of the English Language ed. by Colette Moore and
           Chris C. Palmer (review)

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      Abstract: The one-semester History of the English Language (HEL) course is typically offered in an English department and often (if misleadingly) affiliated with the premodern curriculum. The thirty-eight contributors to this volume from the Modern Language Association's 'Options for Teaching' series address multiple, mostly US, pedagogical approaches. The volume continues earlier discussions about teaching HEL (Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Teaching, 13.2 (2006), 14.1 (2007), 15.2 (2008), 18.1 (2011)). As reflective practitioners, the writers base their advice on their classroom experiences and challenges. With some exceptions, they present thoughtful, hands-on, sometimes transformative discussions of how to teach HEL ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Bonds of Humanity: Cicero's Legacies in European Social and Political
           Thought, ca. 1100–ca. 1550 by Cary J. Nederman (review)

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      Abstract: This survey of Cicero's legacy across the Middle Ages (c. 1100–c. 550) constitutes a considerable feat of primary source scholarship alone. The Bonds of Humanity plumbs the chief works of social and political thought that radiate out from the influence of Marcus Tullius Cicero's texts directly, or owe something to the spirit of Ciceronianism, or come 'via intermediary sources' like Saint Augustine (p. 87). 'Cicero's legacies of social and political thought' (such is the author's subtitle), drawn from eighteen medieval and early modern authors, form the subject matter; Cary Nederman's goal is nothing less than 'to illuminate how elements of […] thought were transformed, recombined, and otherwise adapted in order to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • How to Think Like Shakespeare: Lessons from a Renaissance Education by
           Scott Newstok (review)

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      Abstract: In How to Think Like Shakespeare, Scott Newstok 'explore[s] what seem to [him] to be the key aspects of thinking, and how to hone them' (p. ix). Overlaying those aspects onto what Newstok perceives as current deficiencies in education, How to Think Like Shakespeare playfully juxtaposes early modern and contemporary habits of thought by way of wide-ranging examples from texts, practices, or institutions. While works such as Mary Thomas Crane's Shakespeare's Brain (Princeton University Press, 2001) and Lyn Tribble's Cognition in the Globe (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011) direct their approaches to composition and theatrical practice through scholarship in cognition, How to Think Like Shakespeare has 'deliberately short' ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Burning the Books: A History of Knowledge under Attack by Richard Ovenden
           (review)

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      Abstract: The title and subtitle of this book perhaps give a slightly misleading indication of its contents. It is indeed about the frequently deliberate destruction of books and other documents, sometimes involving fire but also military action, religiously inspired vandalism, and (at least in the author's view) 'underfunding, low prioritization and general disregard' (p. 36) in the case of the ancient library of Alexandria. It is not primarily a book about censorship, though of course censorship of knowledge materials and their deliberate destruction are often closely associated. But almost as much as it is about such deliberate destruction it is an account of efforts to prevent it happening. Richard Ovenden is the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Abbaye du Saint Esprit: Spiritual Instruction for Laywomen,
           1250–1500 by Pinder Janice (review)

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      Abstract: Vernacular writings for the spiritual instruction of women in late medieval Europe were not isolated phenomena. Ideas of spiritual direction took many forms. Janice Pinder argues that the Abbaye du Saint Esprit likely emerged in northern France or the southern Netherlands from a 'context of experimentation with new forms of religious life among the laity where features of beguinal life and prayer were familiar and viewed with approval' (p. 8). One should not misjudge the force and influence of female spirituality between the Atlantic and the deeper reaches of central Europe. One cannot read the Abbaye without thinking of related texts addressed to communities of women elsewhere. Around 1413 the Czech priest Jan Hus ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • What Is North' Imagining and Representing the North from Ancient Times
           to the Present Day ed. by Oisĺn Plumb et al. (review)

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      Abstract: Though how Australians and New Zealanders historically have perceived 'the North' is certainly something worth studying, the focus of this book, as its series title indicates, is on northern Europe and the higher latitudes of North America. It contains a brief introduction and twenty very diverse essays, covering a time span from classical antiquity (and arguably prehistory, in the case of two essays focusing on perceptions of Maeshowe, Orkney—one by Jay Johnston of The University of Sydney) to the twenty-first century. The institutional affiliations of the authors extend to ten countries, with British and Scandinavian institutions predominating. Essay lengths vary considerably: those by Anna Heiða Pálsdóttir and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Historiography and Identity, I: Ancient and Early Christian Narratives of
           Community ed. by Walter Pohl and Veronika Wieser (review)

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      Abstract: This volume, the first of a new sub-series, 'Historiography and Identity', within Brepols's well-established 'Cultural Encounters in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages' series, originates from the prolific Visions of Community (VISCOM) research cluster at the University of Vienna, led by Walter Pohl. The purpose of this planned six-volume series is to explore, through a collection of case studies, the interrelationship between historiographical sources and the complex evolution of political, religious, and ethnic identity within early medieval Europe, as well as aiming to develop critical methodologies for other researchers to apply to their own studies. This first volume looks primarily at the historians and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Wolsey by Glenn Richardson (review)

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      Abstract: John Skelton's satirical poem directed against the rise of Thomas Wolsey, Why Come Ye Nat to Court (1521–22), asks: 'Why come ye nat to court' To which court''(ll. 398–99). Surely the residence of the butcher's son from Ipswich could not be mistaken for that of the English king' Skelton's lines feature in Glenn Richardson's recent contribution to scholarship on the English cardinal who fell so spectacularly from grace, drawing attention to material display at the Tudor court and the inherent danger in seeking to rise above one's allotted station in life.Richardson is well established as an historian of the Tudor court and Renaissance monarchy, having explored the 1520 diplomatic meeting between Henry VIII and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Early Modern Women's Complaint: Gender, Form, and Politics ed. by Sarah C.
           E. Ross and Rosalind Smith (review)

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      Abstract: Early Modern Women's Complaint: Gender, Form, and Politics is an exciting new collection of fifteen essays on early modern women's complaint which represents a welcome extension of current scholarship on early modern women's engagement with complaint, one of the most pervasive literary modes in English writing in print and manuscript over the years 1550–1700. Much scholarship to date has identified Ovid's Heroides as the locus classicus for early modern complaint, but Sarah C. E. Ross and Rosalind Smith, the editors of this collection, argue that the mode is far more capacious. The volume traces the genealogy of female complaint through sixteenth- and seventeenth-century religious, political, legal, and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cities of Strangers: Making Lives in Medieval Europe by Miri Rubin
           (review)

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      Abstract: Every so often, as historians do more research and further revise and extend their opinions about the meaning of the material available on a subject, it becomes necessary for a new survey to be composed in order to present the latest interpretations of the particular subject studied to a wider audience. The history of medieval cities has reached that point, and Miri Rubin's present work provides a short, readable introduction to current approaches to a thousand years of life in European cities, which she sees as a coherent entity that came to an end around the Reformation when new developments emerged. In the way of such overviews, the footnotes are as vital as the text, since they provide the detailed evidence for ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Women and Economic Power in Premodern Royal Courts ed. by Cathleen Sarti
           (review)

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      Abstract: Conceived from discussions amongst scholars at numerous academic conferences, Women and Economic Power in Premodern Royal Courts merges two novel approaches. The notion of analysing premodern royal courts as businesses; and the businesswomen behind them. What is remarkable about the volume is that despite being absent from historical records and subjected to patriarchal prejudice, the women studied here made themselves known through economic power. As editor Cathleen Sarti asserts in the introduction, the volume contests 'dominant narratives of women's dependence on their spouses' (p. 2). The essays collected as four chapters restore the imbalance of previously disregarded or understudied premodern records in order ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Indecent Exposure: Gender, Politics, and Obscene Comedy in Middle English
           Literature by Nicole Nolan Sidhu (review)

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      Abstract: Nicole Nolan Sidhu has written a compelling book that delivers what its title promises: an engaging and ground-breaking investigation which intersects the rhetoric of obscenity, gender, and political theory in Middle English literature. Examining the works of Geoffrey Chaucer, William Langland, and their 'fifteenth century heirs' (p. 13), this study seeks to illustrate 'the innovatory, philosophically complex character' (p. 13) of obscene comedy in this chapter of the history of Middle English literature.Indecent Exposure is, however, a specialized work that avoids disciplinary segregation. It contextualizes and analyses notions and conceptions of obscenity across an array of disciplines (art, literature, history ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Intolerant Middle Ages: A Reader ed. by Eugene Smelyansky (review)

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      Abstract: This is the twenty-third in a series of 'readers' designed for undergraduate teaching. Each document is preceded by an introduction placing it in context and followed by a series of questions of a general nature—for example, 'What does this document tell us about sexual practices of the late medieval clergy and other members of the Church'' (p. 272). On the basis of the document in question—the confession of a transvestite prostitute—the most obvious answer would seem to be that the clergy held the teachings of their Church in utter contempt. This conclusion points to the dangers of combining general questions with isolated documents.There are seventy-seven documents divided into nine sections concerning various ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Authority and Power in the Medieval Church, c. 1000–c. 1500 ed. by
           Thomas W. Smith (review)

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      Abstract: This is a superb and substantial collection. Thomas Smith has successfully marshalled twenty-two chapters in this interdisciplinary exploration of power and authority in the medieval Church, curating a varied yet coherent compilation. While some of the chapters are more explicitly linked to the book's central themes than others, the collection nonetheless succeeds in demonstrating how enormously variable Church power and authority was in form, justification, and expression over time and space. A key issue that emerges across the contributions concerns the Church's ability to move beyond claims to authority to act upon those claims, and how often those mechanisms of power were dependent upon local cooperation. The ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Late Anglo-Saxon Prayer in Practice: Before the Books of Hours by Kate H.
           Thomas (review)

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      Abstract: This codicological study is a revision of a thesis awarded a PhD in English and Related Literatures by the University of York in 2011. The early Middle Ages, Kate Thomas explains, inherited a complex tradition of private prayer intricately related to the monastic practice of chanting psalms and prayers at the times of the canonical hours. The foundational document for monastic reform in England, Regularis Concordia (c. 973), gave greater encouragement to nuns and monks to engage in private prayer than the Regula Benedicti had done. Thomas Bestul in 1986 identified thirty-nine manuscripts dated before 1100 that include private prayers or devotional works in Latin or in Old English.Private prayer, as Thomas defines ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The World of the Crusades by Christopher Tyerman (review)

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      Abstract: Tyerman starts his new publication with the words: 'The medieval crusades are both well-known and much misunderstood' (p. xviii). An astute statement from the author of God's War: A New History of the Crusades (Harvard University Press, 2008), a massive 1000-plus-page work on the topic in question. Anyone familiar with that impressive tome will be wondering how Tyerman has managed to publish another book on the topic of the crusades, and possibly why. The answer is rather simple: God's War covered nearly every aspect of the crusades, but lacked the illustrations, graphs, and other titbits that make The World of the Crusades such a treat.As for his opening statement, Tyerman surely tries his best to shed light once ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Een Huyshouding in 'T Kleyn.' Het poppenhuis van Petronella de la Court in
           het Centraal Museum Utrecht by Margreet van der Hut (review)

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      Abstract: Dollhouses have gained increasing attention in recent years as sites of wealthy women's expression in early modern Europe, especially in the Netherlands, where a number of houses from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries survive. Among these is that of Petronella de la Court, which has been housed since 1921 in the Centraal Museum in Utrecht. De la Court, who lived on the Singel in Amsterdam in the mid-seventeenth century, kept the dollhouse in her home along with an extensive collection of artworks, porcelain, and other curiosities that are known to us from the inventory made after her death in 1707. From this it can be seen how much the dollhouse was a reflection of the material culture with which she ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Memories in Multi-Ethnic Societies: Cohesion in Multi-Ethnic Societies in
           Europe from c. 1000 to the Present, I ed. by Przemysław Wiszewski
           (review)

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      Abstract: In this volume's preface the editor asks: 'why have we focused on conflicts, while neglecting traces of mutual help, or at least of peaceful coexistence'' (p. 12). The essays in this book all, in some way, seek to answer that question and provide alternative windows into multi-ethnicity in Europe's past. This collection therefore offers a multifaceted examination of Europe's multi-ethnic histories and historiographies. It is arranged in three parts to look at deep histories and ethnic memories; the phenomenon of multi-ethnicism in political unities; and the role of ethnicity in forming nations and their historiographical narratives. A fourth part offers a final case study from relatively modern times and a much ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Mélusine Romance in Medieval Europe: Translation, Circulation, and
           Material Contexts by Lydia Zeldenrust (review)

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      Abstract: The popularity of the fascinating story of Mélusine, a beautiful lady of fairy nature married to a human knight, Raymondin, is well attested in medieval European versions of the romance. A condition of their otherwise happy and prosperous marriage is that Raymondin must not look for Mélusine on Saturdays, as once a week she must secretly change into a half-serpent. Also, most of their sons, who become knights, have from birth a monstrous deformity. Eventually Raymondin spies on his wife, sees her bathing in the shape of a half-serpent and betrays her secret. Thereupon Mélusine must, in serpent form, leave the human world. In a contemporary human context, the story thus has supernatural fairy elements, features of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Terrorism before the Letter: Mythography and Political Violence in
           England, Scotland, and France 1559–1642 by Robert Applebaum (review)

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      Abstract: This ambitious work has a great deal to offer scholars of early modern history as well as the study of terrorism. Robert Applebaum reconsiders acts of political violence from the mid-sixteenth to the mid-seventeenth century, within the framework of terrorism (p. 1). He does so, in part, to make the case for studying terrorism from historical perspectives, and for introducing such perspectives into 'critical terrorism studies' (p. 35). This is a significant departure from previous scholarship, which has considered themes of terrorism in contemporary literature, but so far avoided comprehensive examination of early modern terrorism (pp. 3, 25). Terrorism before the Letter makes a further claim for the value of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Late Medieval Devotional Compilations in England ed. by Marleen Cré
           et al. (review)

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      Abstract: This anthology discusses minor religious texts that have long been the wallflowers of medieval English literature: here they hold the floor. Part I offers Vincent Gillespie on the Speculum Christiani, Ralph Hanna on The Three Arrows on Doomsday, Ian Johnson on biblical texts as 'heterarchic' (randomly structured compilations), Annie Sutherland on A Talkyng of the Love of God, and Margaret Connolly on early readers of the Pore Caitif and the Contemplations of the Dread and Love of God.Part II addresses manuscript transmission: Diana Denissen on the Pore Caitif and the Contemplations again, Sarah Macmillan on the ascetic treatises Life of Soul and Book of Tribulation, and Marleen Cré on four abbreviated and anomalous ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Medievalism, Politics and Mass Media: Appropriating the Middle Ages in the
           Twenty-First Century by Andrew B. R. Elliott (review)

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      Abstract: Political medievalisms have been a hallmark of the twenty-first century, since at least George W. Bush's declaration of a 'Crusade on Terror' in the wake of the September 11 attacks. Andrew Elliott's book stands out in the scholarship on political medievalism for two key reasons: it is grounded in media and cultural studies—approaches that have the capacity to account meaningfully for the digital spaces in which much contemporary political medievalism takes place; and it treats both Western right-wing (including far-right) and Islamic medievalisms. The first of these provides foundations for an important reorientation of concern about 'misappropriation' of the past by far-right and extremist political actors that ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Teaching Early Modern English Literature from the Archives ed. by Heidi
           Brayman Hackel and Ian Frederick Moulton (review)

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      Abstract: Teaching Early Modern English Literature from the Archives explores the value and difficulties of teaching from early modern texts—texts now largely available electronically. Students can easily access wide-ranging canonical and non-canonical texts outside of critical editions; educators, therefore, need to understand the evolving potentials and pitfalls of student research. This collection of essays will interest such educators for two reasons. First, its topics are diverse, ranging from archival work in palaeography to virtual representations of early modern playing spaces. Second, as W. Scott Howard, Peggy Keeran, and Jennifer Bowers note, 'knowledge of how and why [any archive] was created gives insight into ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Notes on Contributors

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      Abstract: Katie Barclay is Deputy Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence in the History of Emotions and Associate Professor and Head of Department in History at The University of Adelaide. She has written widely on the history of emotions, gender and family life. Her monographs include Love, Intimacy and Power: Marriage and Patriarchy in Scotland, 1650–1850 (Manchester University Press, 2011); Men on Trial: Performing Emotion, Embodiment and Identity in Ireland, 1800–1845 (Manchester University Press, 2019); and Caritas: Neighbourly Love and the Early Modern Self (Oxford University Press, 2021). With Andrew Lynch and Giovanni Tarantino, she edits the journal Emotions: History, Culture, Society. Her current research ... Read More
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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