Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

HISTORY (859 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 452 of 452 Journals sorted alphabetically
Studies in Church History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Studies in Digital Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Studies in East European Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Studies in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Studies in People’s History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes: An International Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Studies in Western Australian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Substantia     Open Access  
Suomen Sukututkimusseuran Vuosikirja     Open Access  
SUSURGALUR : Jurnal Kajian Sejarah & Pendidikan Sejarah (Journal of History Education & Historical Studies)     Open Access  
T'oung Pao     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Tangence     Full-text available via subscription  
Tartu Ülikooli ajaloo küsimusi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teaching History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Tekniikan Waiheita     Open Access  
temp - tidsskrift for historie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Temporalidades     Open Access  
Territories : A Trans-Cultural Journal of Regional Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Testimonios     Open Access  
The Americas : A Quarterly Review of Latin American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
The Corvette     Open Access  
The Court Historian : The International Journal of Court Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Eighteenth Century     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
The European Legacy: Toward New Paradigms     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
The Hilltop Review : A Journal of Western Michigan University Graduate Student Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Historian     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
The International History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
The Italianist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
The Journal of the Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The Seventeenth Century     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Workshop     Open Access  
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Tiempo y Espacio     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Time & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access  
Traditio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Trans-pasando Fronteras     Open Access  
Transactions of the Philological Society     Hybrid Journal  
Transactions of the Royal Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa     Hybrid Journal  
Transfers     Full-text available via subscription  
Transition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Trocadero     Open Access  
Troianalexandrina     Full-text available via subscription  
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Turkish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Turkish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Twentieth Century British History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
U.S. Catholic Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
UCLA Historical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ufahamu : A Journal of African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Urban History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Urban History Review / Revue d'histoire urbaine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Vegueta : Anuario de la Facultad de Geografía e Historia     Open Access  
Veleia     Open Access  
Viator     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Victorian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Victorian Periodicals Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Vigiliae Christianae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Viking and Medieval Scandinavia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Visual Resources: An International Journal of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Vivarium     Hybrid Journal  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Water History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Welsh History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
West 86th     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Winterthur Portfolio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Women's History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Yesterday and Today     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Weltgeschichte     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Zutot     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
ИСТРАЖИВАЊА : Journal of Historical Researches     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Technology and Culture
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.284
Number of Followers: 33  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0040-165X - ISSN (Online) 1097-3729
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Working in the Electronic Garden: The Visual Rhetoric of Herman Miller's
           Action Office

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      Abstract: This illustrated advertisement, reproduced on the journal's cover, is an elevated perspective of a populated, lushly planted, and colorful open-plan office. Featured in a 1978 trade catalog for Herman Miller's Action Office furniture system, the image targeted a creative audience—architects and designers perhaps specifying the furniture in their projects, as well as business professionals involved in office planning. It is visually complex—the diverse motifs and themes are integral to the message and meaning, reflecting both the artist's ideas and the Herman Miller company's strategic promotion. Too often historians treat images like this one as self-explanatory, but images are as complicated and multivalent as ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Systemic and Epistemic Racism in the History of Technology

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      Abstract: Concerns about racism—systemic and otherwise—have circulated within the Society for the History of Technology for many years. But it is only in tandem with recent U.S. uprisings that these concerns have taken center stage in discussions about SHOT's present and future. Starting with a series of online, grassroots discussions following the public murder of George Floyd in May 2020, members have been grappling with racism and racial thinking not just in SHOT and among the institutions that employ our members but also within the intellectual infrastructures of our field and of science and technology studies more broadly.A series of Presidential Panels at SHOT's virtual annual meeting in November 2021 aimed to further ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Socializing the Technosphere

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      Abstract: In 1969, biologist Julian Huxley and environmentalist Max Nicholson reflected on how space flight and the first moon landing had transformed human perceptions of the earth. Unlike "the moon's naked inanimate lithosphere," the earth possessed a biosphere and "most striking[ly] … an entire semi-autonomous new system, which we may call the technosphere."1 This new sphere was not, however, a straightforward cause for celebration. Like Dr. Frankenstein, humanity had discovered that its creation "has acquired a life of its own," and its "blind momentum" was threatening to lead us to "disaster," not least because humanity was "handicapped by a rapidly obsolescing intellectual and emotional framework carried over from the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Crafted for Mass Production: Imported Spinning Machinery on the Shop
           Floor, China, 1910s–1920s

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      Abstract: Cotton spinning refers to a process of transforming fluffy cotton fibers into thin, long threads. Before the arrival of spinning machinery in China, this was a manual process carried out mostly by mothers and daughters in peasant households. The spinner joined the ends of cotton fibers, each measuring less than 1 inch, by continually attenuating and twisting raw cotton. Using the pressure of her thumb and index fingers, the spinner controlled the speed, amount, and tension of cotton wad spun into the spinning wheel or drop spindle after passing through her fingers. Although seemingly simple, spinning long and continuous yarn at an even thickness and quality required a considerable level of skill.1The mechanization ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Becoming "Escalator-Legged" in Interwar London: Mechanization, Habit, and
           the Mobile Body

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      Abstract: On December 10, 1928, distinguished guests and journalists gathered in a subterranean booking hall to celebrate the grand reopening of Piccadilly Circus Underground Station in London. Under construction since 1925, this highly anticipated new Tube station was, according to the Daily Mirror, "one of the greatest engineering feats in history."1 Its circulatory outer ring, clad in expensive Travertine marble and embedded with bronze display cabinets, now allowed pedestrians to traverse the Circus without needing to negotiate the busy surface traffic. At its center, beyond novel banks of automated ticket machines, two new escalator shafts plunged down dramatically to convey passengers to the platforms of the Bakerloo ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Designing for Maintenance: Plant Care Technology in the Office

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      Abstract: In 1967, the Ford Foundation's offices, designed by Kevin Roche, opened in Midtown Manhattan to enormous acclaim in the architectural press. In her review, New York Times architectural critic Ada Louise Huxtable described the building's "subtle splendor," with its solid granite piers and glass-enclosed indoor garden. The original garden, planned by renowned landscape architect Dan Kiley, featured 17 trees, 1,000 shrubs, 148 vines, nearly 22,000 ground cover plants, and 18 aquatic plants, including mostly temperate-climate specimens such as magnolias, eucalyptus, acacias, azaleas, fuchsias, camellias, and bougainvillea, all nestled around a system of walkways, steps, and a pond.1 Original section drawings for the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Beautiful Sounds, Beautiful Life: Cultivating Musical Listening through
           Hearing Aids in 1950s Japan

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      Abstract: In late 1951, a small crowd gathered at Hirosaki University Hospital in Aomori Prefecture, northern Japan, for a unique double-feature concert: a lecture on the personal benefits of hearing aids, followed by a curated listening experience of folk and other popular music genres.1 Afterward, an apple—a representative delicacy of Aomori—was displayed onstage, closing the event with a local touch. Touted by a journalist for the Japanese Deaf News (Nihon chōryoku shōgai shinbun 日本聴力障害新聞) as the first such gathering in Japan, the "Meeting of Listening to Sounds" (Oto wo kiku kai 音を聞 く会) brought together national officials, local politicians, and the two large Japanese hearing aid manufacturers, Rion and Nihon Kohden.2 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Neither Nation nor Empire: Situating Shanghai Radio in a Global
           Technological Moment, 1922–25

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      Abstract: E. G. Osborn, a New Zealand–born journalist, entrepreneur, and conman (he was charged with fraud at least five times in his life), was prolific at many things, separating people from their money being only one of them.1 Despite his possibly criminal flaws, Osborn was also a serial entrepreneur and a key figure in the spread of broadcasting technology. His early radio stations courted legal trouble and provoked heated discussion from Japan to Singapore. In the years between 1922 and 1925, Osborn's stations burst onto the immensely complex economic, legal, and political world of post–World War I East Asia, reflecting and amplifying questions of national sovereignty, imperialist power, and the role of communications ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Manning the Torpedo Boats: How Gendered Insecurities Shaped Naval War in
           the United States and Britain, 1860–1900

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      Abstract: In his 1866 poem "A Utilitarian View of the Monitor's Fight," novelist Herman Melville—perhaps the United States' greatest chronicler of seafaring life—considered the future of naval warfare. He lamented the Battle of Hampton Roads (1862) as a curtain fall on an age of "heroic" war at sea. True, Melville marveled at the industrial power of the world's first battle between ironclad warships, but at the same time he worried that the conflict was somehow "less grand than peace." This was a war of machines, one without human agency, with "No passion, all went on by crank / Pivot, and screw." Melville's forecast was gloomy: "War yet shall be, but warriors / Are now but operatives."1 In his telling, modern naval warfare ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Going Digital: The Research Library and the Pandemic

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      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly transformed the historical research process. The sudden closure of libraries, archives, and museums left scholars physically unable to consult primary sources. Researchers, in turn, restructured their investigations to capitalize on materials they could access digitally. The consequences of these shifts will resonate for years as students defend dissertations and scholars publish books and articles that were shaped by the pandemic. At the same time, collections-based institutions now have the opportunity to learn from their COVID experiences and devise new ways to serve their constituents' needs.As historians in different settings assess the dramatic social changes that have ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Research in the Time of COVID: Virtual Fellowships at the Linda Hall
           Library

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      Abstract: Historians frequently invoke the "annihilation of space and time" when discussing new transportation and telecommunication technologies. The phrase, derived from a 1727 couplet by Alexander Pope, featured in nineteenth-century descriptions of the respective capacities of the railroad and telegraph to convey people and information over vast distances at a previously unimaginable pace.1 The social and economic consequences of that acceleration became synonymous with modernity, and subsequent studies of the telephone, automobile, radio, and airplane used similar language.2 More recently, authors have echoed this rhetoric to explain how the Internet, smartphones, or hyperloop systems might facilitate a smaller, more ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Fellows Online: The User Experience

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      Abstract: The scholars taking part in this discussion were identified in consultation with Benjamin Gross, the vice president for research and scholarship at the Linda Hall Library of Science, Engineering, and Technology. Our goal was to highlight the perspectives of fellows conducting research virtually, who had a wide range of academic interests and professional expertise. The resulting pool of five interviewees included graduate students and established scholars. Their studies were at different types of universities, and their research projects varied widely in terms of geography and temporal scope. Two of these scholars—Mario Bianchini and Ellan Spero—had planned to be in residence in Kansas City, Missouri, before the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Review of Twenty-Six Volumes of History of Science and Technology in China

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      Abstract: The History of Science and Technology in China (中国科学技术史, HSTC, hereafter referred to as "the series"), completed in 2011, is an encyclopedic and multivolume collection offering a comprehensive and systematic overview of the history of various technologies in China from the earliest to premodern times.1 Under chief editor Lu Jiaxi 卢嘉锡, former president of the Chinese Academy of Sciences 中国科学院 (CAS), the series was compiled and implemented by the Institute for the History of Natural Sciences 自然科学史研究所 (IHNS) in the Chinese Academy of Sciences. A team of over 100 experts dedicated over twenty years to this undertaking.2 Within the Chinese research community, this is a landmark series for understanding China's ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Pipe Dreams: Water and Empire in Central Asia's Aral Sea Basin by Maya K.
           Peterson (review)

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      Abstract: The continuity of a vision for irrigation is on display in Peterson's Pipe Dreams, where the author's research reveals that Imperial Russia's dreams of constructing vast new systems of canals in Central Asia's arid lands found even more grandiose fulfillment when the Soviet government implemented its development plans. At times engineers and investors drew on indigenous Central Asian knowledge, but more frequently, top-down plans ran into material, social, economic, and natural obstacles. Peterson highlights three inherently contradictory goals that the Russian and Soviet governments pursued: turning Kyrgyz nomads into sedentary farmers, opening Central Asia to settlement by colonizers, and making Central Asia ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Classes of Labour: Work and Life in a Central Indian Steel Town by
           Jonathan Parry (review)

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      Abstract: Jonathan Parry's book is a welcome addition to Indian labor historiography, which began with the British official discourse relating Indian poverty to the conservatism of its labor, contrary to Indian nationalists' emphasis on colonial exploitation. The postcolonial period saw a range of studies based on the Marxist notion of labor as a seamless, dynamic, and militant force, posited against Indian landholding and capitalist classes. A by-product of the "Whig historiography of industrialization," this unilinear grand narrative does not account for the fragility of the labor movement in India.A new genre of works on Indian labor, including culture-centered ones, emphasized the north–south binary and thus failed to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Enduring Change: The Labor and Social History of One Third-Front
           Industrial Complex in China from the 1960s to the Present by Ju Li
           (review)

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      Abstract: This book presents fifty years in the life of Nanfang Steel (NS), an industrial complex in China's inland province of Sichuan. It was built during the Third Front Construction (TFC), when, following the rupture with the Soviet Union in 1960, Mao mobilized people in an extreme effort to achieve self-reliance despite huge technological backwardness and scarce crucial resources. In its peak years, NS employed around 30,000 workers, had apartment blocks, high-quality schools, shops, restaurants, and a glorious "ten mile steel-city avenue."It is a passionate book, which professes a clear aim: giving workers a voice in order to challenge the existing scholarship that depicts them as victims either of "Communist ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cuba's Digital Revolution: Citizen Innovation and State Policy ed. by Ted
           A. Henken and Sara Garcia Santamaria (review)

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      Abstract: Cuba's Digital Revolution, edited by Ted A. Henken and Sara Garcia Santamaria, brings into focus the tension between the Cuban Revolution's state socialist model and Cuba's increasing participation in the "worldwide digital revolution," which has incrementally challenged the state's control over Cuba's media landscape. Since 2013, Cuba has experienced both top-down, government-sponsored public access to the Web, as well as the citizen inventos or workarounds to create, share, and access digital content. Each chapter provides an original contribution to the study of Cuba's evolving mediascape, and the collection argues that technology is dramatically "reconfiguring the evolution of the cultural, economic, and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Hacked Transmissions: Technology and Connective Activism in Italy by
           Alessandra Renzi (review)

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      Abstract: Hacked Transmissions by critical media scholar Alessandra Renzi is a deep dive into the exciting journey of the pirate microtelevision movement known as Telestreet, active in Italy between 2002 and 2010 before succumbing to the switch to digital broadcasting. It is a thoughtful ethnography of what the author calls "connective activism"—a type of media activism that centers social justice in collaborative media production and foregrounds an ethics of care in political organization. The book will interest scholars across disciplines, including media studies, new media art, and historians of technology, for two reasons: it provides a unique window into the little-documented trajectory of the Telestreet movement ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Wie der Sozialstaat digital wurde: Die Computerisierung der
           Rentenversicherung im geteilten Deutschland [How the welfare state went
           digital: The computerization of pension insurance in divided Germany] by
           Thomas Kasper (review)

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      Abstract: The digitalization of public administration is a hot topic, with utopian visions from "smart cities" and nation-states vying to serve as global models for communal online access to social services and political participation. But are administrators right to assume that citizens expect everything in a few clicks, or should there be some consideration of human-machine interaction problematics' As demonstrated in The Government Machine, Jon Agar's classic study of the history of computing in Britain, government computing sought to gain control over state action and in turn fomented a view of government as an information-processing entity. Agar found it curious that U.K. governments should presume low anxiety about a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mit der Post in die Zukunft: Der Bildschirmtext in der Bundesrepublik
           Deutschland von 1977 bis 2001 [Postal service into the future:
           Bildschirmtext in the Federal Republic of Germany, 1977–2001] by Hagen
           Schönrich (review)

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      Abstract: There are many origins for the not yet thoroughly defined construct that is commonly called "The Internet." Currently under discussion are the interactive data networks that national postal services in many countries operated during the 1980s.Hagen Schönrich's work on how Bundespost (the German Postal Service) developed the Bildschirmtext (BTX) system is not meant to be a history of the underlying technology, which others have detailed, such as Heinz Bahr, Bildschirmtext ist für alle da (1988) or Volker Schneider, Technikentwicklung zwischen Politik und Markt (1989), also positioning BTX in the sociocultural context. Schönrich tells the story of this data network, from identifying the need for a new communications ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Homebrew Gaming and the Beginnings of Vernacular Digitality by Melanie
           Swalwell (review)

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      Abstract: In Homebrew Gaming and the Beginnings of Vernacular Digitality, Melanie Swalwell sheds light on homebrew microcomputer game development in New Zealand and Australia in the 1980s, providing important insight into two topics that are typically outside the margins of video game studies. Swalwell argues that homebrew programmers engaged with their microcomputers as both consumers and producers, and this production of homebrew video games by users is the beginning of when digitality became a part of everyday life. Further, Swalwell states that this history is significant because of its inflection on the present.This study analyzes, recalls, and evaluates how everyday users engaged with home computing when it was new. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Atari Age: The Emergence of Video Games in America by Michael Z. Newman
           (review)

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      Abstract: I was born too late to be a part of the "Atari Age," but the epoch explored by Michael Z. Newman in Atari Age: The Emergence of Video Games in America echoes through today. Going beyond the exploration of the technological context of the Atari Video Computer System (VCS or Atari), the book uses the object as a kind of touchstone to examine a wide array of technological, social, and cultural shifts in the United States leading up to the 1980s. Different from Platform Studies from MIT Press, such as Montfort and Bogost's Racing the Beam or Altice's I AM ERROR, Newman examines a cultural and historical period punctuated by the Atari, rather than the particular technological artifact itself.Pitched as "New Media ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Typewriter Century: A Cultural History of Writing Practices by Martyn
           Lyons (review)

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      Abstract: Written by historian of reading and writing practices Martyn Lyons, this book explores the relationship between creative writers and their typewriters. The "Typewriter Century," as Lyons defines it, began in the 1880s with the widespread commercialization of the typewriter and Mark Twain's claim to be the first novelist to use a writing machine. The century ended in the 1980s as word-processing technologies superseded typewriters. Although, as noted, the typewriter is experiencing something of a comeback in the twenty-first century. This work expands on Lyons's 2014 article in Quærendo, which looked at the use of typewriters by Henry James and Jack Kerouac. In addition, there are sections on the typing practices ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • In the Forest of No Joy: The Congo-Océan Railroad and the Tragedy of
           French Colonialism by J. P. Daughton (review)

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      Abstract: This is a book about colonial violence. J. P. Daughton tells the story of the Congo-Océan Railway, the construction of which cost between 20,000 to 60,000 lives and left thousands more laborers undernourished, sick, and traumatized. The 500 km railway, connecting Brazzaville with the Atlantic port Pointe-Noire (both in present-day Republic of the Congo), first envisioned in the 1880s, was built between 1921 and 1934. Although officially relying on volunteers, the construction sites became known as exceptionally violent workplaces both in French Equatorial Africa and the imperial center, France. How is it possible then, Daughton asks, that despite the knowledge of horrendous working conditions, the project was ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Powerful Frequencies: Radio, State Power, and the Cold War in Angola,
           1931–2002 by Marissa J. Moorman (review)

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      Abstract: The cover of Marissa Moorman's most recent book shows a wire-and-bead-art radio-receiving set she bought in Johannesburg. It illustrates her approach to radio, which she considers to be more than a technology—her study shows that radio is a set of practices that is used to mobilize support for political views. In her study of the history of radio broadcasting in Angola, she discusses different political contexts in which radio was used by different actors to project their respective views on the future of the country, which turned from a Portuguese overseas territory into an independent state in 1974 and from then on was dominated by elites originating in the resistance movement Movimento Popular de Libertação de ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Cinema in Flux: The Evolution of Motion Picture Technology from the
           Magic Lantern to the Digital Era by Lenny Lipton (review)

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      Abstract: What's the best way to describe the nature of cinema' An old joke circulating among film archivists captures it very well: Outside of a movie theater, a group of people discusses the show they have just seen. One person asks, "What did you think of the film'" "Awesome, beautifully written and masterfully directed," says a regular patron. "Awful, all scratched and full of splices," says the projectionist. This imaginary conversation reflects the twofold nature of film as narrative text and physical artifact, and consequently of cinema as art form and technology. This dichotomy is apparent in most cinema scholarship, where the material aspect of the medium is usually subordinated to the aesthetic one. Lenny Lipton ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Chinatown Film Culture: The Appearance of Cinema in San Francisco's
           Chinese Neighborhood by Kim K. Fahlstedt (review)

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      Abstract: Chinatown Film Culture fills an important lacuna in both U.S. film history and the history of Chinese America in the early twentieth century. By shifting focus away from racist on-screen representations to Chinese American moviegoing and film exhibition practices in San Francisco's Chinatown, the book is one of the latest additions to a strand of New Film History scholarship that decenters film analysis and focuses instead on local film culture where the relationship between film exhibition and place is key.The fecundity of this method lies in the very specificity of the locality in question, an especially crucial lens for studies of the nickelodeon era (1905–1915) when exhibition practices were not yet ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Photography's Materialities: Transatlantic Photographic Practices over the
           Long Nineteenth Century ed. by Geoff Bender and Rasmus R. Simonsen
           (review)

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      Abstract: Photography's Materialities is a significant publication, bringing together scholars working in discrete fields of photographic analysis as well as researchers outside art history and media disciplines who draw on photographic sources. The diverse chapters are concerned with photographs' engagement with the broader worlds of their creation and consumption. To this end, Bruno Latour's "actor-network theory," which considers technologies' activated uses within systems of trade and knowledge exchange, has inspired all contributors.Maura Coughlin's, Jacob W. Lewis's, and Mary Marchard's chapters examine the intersections between photographic processes and content. Coughlin interrogates the organic and thematic links ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Samuel Beckett and Technology ed. by Galina Kiryushina, Einat Adar, and
           Mark Nixon (review)

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      Abstract: Samuel Beckett … and technology' A surprising topic for an academic conference, an even more surprising subject of a book to follow. Or so it would seem.Samuel Beckett: Minimalism. Avant-garde. Theatre of the Absurd. Such is the terminology on which Beckett's devoted were raised. But "habit is a great deadener," as Vladimir tells us in Waiting for Godot, and, while many moved on to speak of the work of this greatest of twentieth century playwrights/novelists from other aesthetic perspectives and from intradisciplinary points of view as well—the philosophic and psychoanalytic foremost among them—it was not until relatively recently that a predominant but inauspicious dimension of Beckett's work was recognized. It ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Historia de la ciencia ficción latinoamericana I: Desde los orígenes
           hasta la modernidad [A history of Latin American science fiction: From its
           origins to modernity] ed. by Teresa López-Pellisa and Silvia G. Kurlat
           Ares (review)

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      Abstract: Historia de la ciencia ficción latinoamericana I reevaluates the role of science fiction (SF) in the Latin American canon. Arguing that SF literature was common in a region that has long used literature to negotiate its relationship to science, technology, and modernity (pp. 10–11), the authors situate SF at the heart of nation-building projects (p. 14). The volume addresses the conspicuous lack of scholarly attention to SF through a transregional approach that interrogates the place of SF in the national letters of an array of Latin American countries. The collection of chapters hits the sweet spot between identifying new material, providing a theoretically rich analysis, and advocating for a more inclusive ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Mapping AIDS: Visual Histories of an Enduring Epidemic by Lukas Engelmann
           (review)

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      Abstract: Lukas Engelmann's intensely theoretical book addresses the changing visualization of HIV/AIDS with a focus on AIDS atlases. He locates his narrative within the historiography of both the theory and visual elements of medicine. In so doing, Engelmann's study of how the challenges of "seeing" the AIDS epidemic have changed since the 1980s adds to the growing body of social research on HIV/AIDS, particularly Paula Treichler's work that established medicine as a legitimate focus for cultural analysis and made social research a core response for researching the epidemic.Engelmann structures his book in three sections, utilizing different versions of the AIDS atlas produced between 1986 and 2008 to trace different ways ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Radiation Evangelists: Technology, Therapy and Uncertainty at the Turn of
           the Century by Jeffrey Womack (review)

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      Abstract: Anyone who has worked on the history of radiation cannot avoid wondering at the public's faith in the commercial uses of X-ray technologies. For example, historian Rebecca Herzig estimates that tens of thousands of women across the United States and Canada may have taken X-ray treatments for hair removal, despite the fact that the practice was officially deemed harmful and taken off the market in 1946. In fact, women continued to use it well into the 1960s. But why has this been the case, despite the early warnings and signs of danger'In Radiation Evangelists, Jeffrey Womack poses this urgent question in relation to patients and practitioners of X-rays and radium in the early twentieth century. The answer is ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Lure of the Beach: A Global History by Robert C. Ritchie (review)

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      Abstract: The Lure of the Beach is a grand narrative of the development of beach resorts. Author Robert Ritchie begins his narrative on the English beach in the eighteenth century, where the upper classes, upon the advice of medical practitioners, immersed themselves in cold seawater as a general therapy. The beachbased health resorts that developed with this practice subsequently diffused to the British colonies, Europe, and the United States. As the demand for accommodations and bathing facilities grew, entrepreneurs and municipal officials welcomed the economic contributions of beach resorts. In the nineteenth century, promenades (or boardwalks in America) and piers with amusement centers helped transform the beach into ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Camp Century: The Untold Story of America's Secret Arctic Military Base
           

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      Abstract: This recent translation of a 2017 research monograph by two Danish historians of science brings to the attention of English readers a well-publicized but now largely forgotten episode of the Cold War involving the construction of a U.S. Army base under the Greenland ice. Camp Century operated between 1959 and 1967 in the northwestern area of the Arctic territory, 150 miles (240 kilometers) from the still active U.S. Air Force base in Thule. Stretching across 6,000 feet (1,800 meters) of tunnels, Camp Century was home to up to 200 scientific and military personnel and powered by a portable nuclear reactor. Officially, the camp's purpose was to trial construction techniques in the Arctic environment and support ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Panama Railroad by Peter Pyne (review)

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      Abstract: Peter Pyne's The Panama Railroad is a cogent, well-researched work about the challenges of building modern infrastructures against hostile environments in the mid-nineteenth century. He also shows that his book fills a void, noting the absence of recent studies on the history of the Panama railroad and citing a handful of much older texts published before 1970. The narrative is highly readable and avoids jargon but tends to be more descriptive in its study of this history and lacks a deeper historiographical engagement with scholarly literature on Panama and socioeconomic themes related to Latin America.The book is organized into three sections. Initially, Pyne introduces readers to the lives and activities of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • La Puissance du vent: Des moulins à vent aux éoliennes modernes [The
           power of the wind: From windmills to modern wind turbines] by Philippe
           Bruyerre (review)

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      Abstract: Philippe Bruyerre's La Puissance du vent is an important contribution to the history of wind power generators in Europe over the past three hundred years.Resulting from his Ph.D., the book introduces an original interdisciplinary approach to the history of technology by analyzing wind energy in France, Denmark, and Germany. Instead of producing a chronological account of wind generation techniques and applications, the author focuses on four "technical stages" (scènes techniques) in different times and spaces, from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. This focus is at once stimulating and challenging: Stimulating because readers can take full advantage of the theoretical and historiographical framework ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Green Revolution in the Global South: Science, Politics, and
           Unintended Consequences by R. Douglas Hurt (review)

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      Abstract: The so-called Green Revolution (GR) was an agricultural intensification approach based on the development of high-yield varieties of wheat, rice, and maize, and on the use of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, insecticides, and large-scale irrigation. It made its way from Mexico to India and from the Philippines to sub-Saharan Africa between the 1940s and the 1970s, driven by concerns about the connections between lack of food resources, population growth, and political stability, and by the trust in the power of technology to solve social, economic, and political problems. Historical research on the GR has been scarce for a long time, and only in recent years have historians paid more systematic attention to it. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • On an Empty Stomach: Two Hundred Years of Hunger Relief by Tom Scott-Smith
           (review)

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      Abstract: Human nutrition, and especially humanitarian food aid, is shaped by sociopolitical conditions. This is the entirely unsurprising and decidedly unexciting conclusion of what is nevertheless an interesting and, in many respects, revealing book.In ten chapters, Scott-Smith offers a chronological story of technological approaches to food aid, starting with the soup kitchens of the mid-to-late eighteenth century. This is followed by two chapters on the development of scientifically inspired food aid, notably the development of new concentrated foodstuffs (Chapter 2) and the rise of a mechanistic view of human nutrition (Chapter 3).The following two chapters focus on the rising ambition in colonial settings (Chapter 4) ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Chemistry of Fear: Harvey Wiley's Fight for Pure Food by Jonathan Rees
           (review)

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      Abstract: Jonathan Rees's The Chemistry of Fear: Harvey Wiley's Fight for Pure Food is interested in a well-known person of the history of food and its regulation in the United States, Dr. Harvey W. Wiley. As chief chemist and director of the Division of Chemistry in the United States Department of Agriculture, Wiley had a leading role in the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906. Is he really the father of this law' Rees provides an answer to this question by showing all the complexity of his character and the evolution of his opinions throughout his career, including his activism at Good Housekeeping magazine after retirement.Organized into fourteen thematic chapters, the book traces Wiley's life through a selection of eleven ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Atomic Americans: Citizens in a Nuclear State by Sarah E. Robey (review)

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      Abstract: In Atomic Americans, historian Sarah E. Robey examines how in the decades immediately following World War II, citizens worked within nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in order to lead the U.S. government to construct a Civil Defense state. To do so, she relies heavily on documents from these organizations, including letters, pamphlets, and films, alongside news reports and government archives, all to paint a vivid picture of an American electorate scrambling to save themselves from the bomb.By the 1949 detonation of a Soviet atomic bomb, such fears were warranted. With the American atomic monopoly over in just four short years, U.S. citizens, for perhaps the first time ever, began to ponder how to protect ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Technological History of Cold-War India, 1947–1969: Autarky and
           Foreign Aid by William A. T. Logan (review)

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      Abstract: For historians of modern India, any study on Indian development during the Cold War will invariably reference Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru's 1963 maxim that dams were "the new temples of India." This phrase is so ubiquitous that it would surely be center spot on any Indian development bingo card. One of the many successes of historian William A. T. Logan's A Technological History of Cold-War India is the unpacking of this phrase and exploration of how technological development, whether in the form of dam building or reactor construction, drove Indian state-making in the decades following its 1947 independence. Furthermore, Logan skillfully reframes Indian development as a technological undertaking. For years ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Doomsday Clock at 75 ed. by Robert K. Elder and J. C. Gabel (review)

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      Abstract: In June 2022, it was seventy-five years since a clock first graced the front page of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, a publication that since 1945 sought to avert catastrophe by supplying information and encouraging debate about the atomic bomb among learned and scientific communities in the United States and abroad. Situated at the intersection of security politics, cultural history, design history, and visual communication/art, this book charts the history of the Bulletin's doomsday clock. Snippets of the clock's history exist mainly in the pages of the magazine, especially since the 1980s; in histories of the nuclear age (like Paul Boyer's By the Bomb's Early Light and Spencer Weart's The Rise of Nuclear ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Autarchia e multinazionali: Casi di imprese estere del settore chimico in
           Italia durante il Fascismo [Autarky and multinationals: Cases of foreign
           companies in Italy's chemical sector during Fascism] ed. by Marco
           Bertilorenzi (review)

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      Abstract: Historians dealing with the relationship between industry and Fascism in Italy have generally claimed the government's decisive role in the country's industrialization process. This role was implemented through creating public enterprises such as IRI, the Institute for Industrial Reconstruction, founded in 1933, and through constructing bureaucratic-organizational structures that framed private companies' actions. The state was also instrumental in determining a business focus that favored a decidedly oligopolistic system that was needed to increase industrialization.If the Fascist regime's relationship with Italian industries has been extensively studied, so far fewer studies have investigated Italy-based ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Physical Models: Their Historical and Current Use in Civil and Building
           Engineering Design ed. by Bill Addis (review)

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      Abstract: Readers of Technology and Culture will find a great deal of useful information in this edited collection but may also find some frustrations. The focus of the book is the somewhat neglected subject of the role of physical models in the history of design from ancient times to the present. The editor argues that physical models provide a way for designers to convey ideas to those who build engineering artifacts and to provide a way to test that the designed artifact will function as intended. As such, physical models represent a crucial "third strand" along with theory and practice in the development of engineering science. Nearly half of the book deals with physical models that were developed from ancient times ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Les artilleurs et la monarchie hispanique (1560–1610): Guerres, savoirs
           techniques, État [Artillerymen and the Hispanic monarchy (1560–1610):
           Wars, technical knowledge, and the State] by Brice Cossart (review)

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      Abstract: While artillery is seen as a technique with major consequences—key to the military revolution, the rise of the Modern State, and the European overseas expansion—the very nature of this technical change, its chronology, and its components still largely remain to be established (even after the pioneering works of B. S. Hall, Ph. Contamine, or B. Buchanan). Historiographic cathedrals are erected on sand. Hence the major interest of Brice Cossart's book, based on a thesis defended in 2016, which undertakes to answer the question of the mode of training and the nature of the knowledge of the artillerymen of the Hispanic monarchy in the second half of the sixteenth century. Such a formulation of the question doesn't ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A History of Water Engineering and Management in Yemen: Material Remains
           and Textual Foundations by Ingrid Hehmeyer (review)

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      Abstract: Recently, history of technology as a discipline and the general focus in science and technology studies (STS) have witnessed shifts toward understanding technology and technical knowledge as everyday practice. Another trend is interest in global processes, which obviously needs to be grounded in local evidence. Ingrid Hehmeyer's A History of Water Engineering and Management in Yemen embodies these trends. Based on archeological evidence to supplement ancient texts, it also expands our view beyond the Global North.A History of Water Engineering and Management in Yemen seeks to understand the intergenerational transfer of knowledge about water supply and management practices spanning several epochs and presents them ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Limiting Outer Space: Astroculture After Apollo ed. by Alexander C. T.
           Geppert, and: Militarizing Outer Space: Astroculture, Dystopia and the
           Cold War ed. by Alexander C. T. Geppert, Daniel Brandau, and Tilmann
           Siebeneichner (review)

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      Abstract: A decade ago, Alexander Geppert's edited collection Imagining Outer Space: European Astroculture in the Twentieth Century introduced the neologism "Astroculture," or "a heterogeneous array of images and artifacts, media and practices that all aim to ascribe meaning to outer space while stirring both the individual and collective imagination." Reviewing that volume for this journal, the esteemed space historian Roger D. Launius found its breadth and interdisciplinary approach "both refreshing and unnerving," as an array of perspectives ranging from history to anthropology to literary studies were corralled together to examine European responses to the promise and reality of space exploration. Launius expressed ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Making the Palace Machine Work: Mobilizing People, Objects, and Nature in
           the Qing Empire ed. by Martina Siebert, Kai Jun Chen, and Dorothy Ko
           (review)

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      Abstract: Emperors, empresses, kings, and queens all need homes, servants, and spending money. Early modern history provides many examples of the institutional arrangements devised for these purposes—British, French, Japanese, Swedish, Austro-Hungarian, Thai, Ottoman, Vatican, and Russian. In eighteenth-century China, such supporting functions were performed by a single institution, the Imperial Household Agency (Neiwufu), the subject of Making the Palace Machine Work.The Imperial Household of the Qing dynasty was a large and wealthy organization built on earlier foundations, headquartered in Beijing but with operations that stretched across an expanding empire. Veiled by the quasi secrecy associated with royal security ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Warmes Wasser – Weiße Ware: Energiewende im Badezimmer, 1880–1939
           [Warm water – White goods: Energy transition in the bathroom,
           1880–1939] by Nina Lorkowski (review)

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      Abstract: Until the end of the twentieth century, the history of technology was largely uninformed about and disinterested in the household. Recognizing this deficit, however, the field has since made up for some of its omissions. The processes of work organization and mechanization in the kitchen and house are now much better researched in regional and comparative studies, as well as in the diversity of their social implications. Only the development of the mechanization of domestic body washing has been neglected so far. Perhaps this is due to the fact that the bathroom and personal hygiene are difficult to explore methodically because of the intimacy of the activities performed there. Perhaps it is also because, as Nina ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Une histoire politique du canal de Göta: Technique, infrastructure et
           pouvoirs en Europe du Nord (années 1790–1832) [A political history of
           Göta Canal: Technology, infrastructure and power in northern Europe
           (1790–1832)] by Thomas Gauchet (review)

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      Abstract: Large transportation infrastructure projects are not only long term and costly, but the grander the scale, the more complicated and entangled projects tend to become, often highlighting the balance between public-sector involvement and private-sector engagement, and with political, technological, and economic implications.Sweden's major transportation infrastructure undertaking in the nineteenth century before the railways, and the subject of Thomas Gauchet's dissertation, is the Göta Canal project. The idea was grand: connect the North Sea and the Baltics through an inland waterway, making use of the recently opened Trollhätte Canal and connecting several lakes from west to east.The project was initiated at a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Cesty a dial'nice na Slovensku v medzivojnovom období [Roads and highways
           in Slovakia during the interwar period] by Michal Ďurčo (review)

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      Abstract: This monograph is this young Slovak historian's first book, based on his dissertation defended in 2019. So far, in Czech/Slovak/Czechoslovak historiography, little research has looked at the development of the road network. Recently, roads in the Pardubice Region featured in Štěpán and Pražan, Silnice v Pardubickém kraji, 2009. As works published in the past (for example, Musil, Po stezkách k dálnicím, 1987) are now outdated, Michal Ďurčo's monograph is therefore a welcome contribution. His focus on the interwar period divided by 1928, when the Road Fund Act was issued, is very important, as it was a time when load directions in Slovakia changed, initiated by the establishment of the Czechoslovak state, and motor ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Autonorama: The Illusory Promise of High-Tech Driving by Peter Norton
           (review)

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      Abstract: Implausible claims about the capabilities and technological maturity of safe, fast, and automated cars are neither new nor surprising, according to Peter Norton. He traces the rise and fall of these claims in the United States over nearly a century, arguing that they have never been true and, in fact, cannot be, since they are dishonest by design. This short book is a warning about the dangerous hype of self-driving cars, embedded in a broader argument about technology, capitalism, and marketing.The bulk of the book examines four waves of revved-up excitement about the imminent arrival of high-tech motoring, labeling each of them "Futuramas" after the General Motors exhibits at the 1939 and 1964 New York World's ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Silver Veins, Dusty Lungs: Mining, Water, and Public Health in Zacatecas,
           1835–1946 by Rocio Gomez (review)

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      Abstract: Water was indispensable for refining silver ores using mercury. It provided energy for the mills to grind the ores and the aqueous medium for the complex chemical reactions during refining. Furthermore, it washed away reagents and mineral waste from the haciendas. Thus, the title of this book catches the attention of those interested in Mexico's history of silver.Set in Zacatecas, Mexico, between 1835 and 1946, it reviews the water management problems in a town caught between the aridity of its environment and its dependence on the silver industry. The book's arguments are presented in three themes through the lens of extraction ecology. The first is the author's version of the processes of mining and refining ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Timber, Sail, and Rail: An Archaeology of Industry, Immigration, and the
           Loma Prieta Mill by Marco G. Meniketti (review)

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      Abstract: Marco Meniketti is a long-time leader in the field of historical archaeology, and in Timber, Sail, and Rail he combines his professional history with his personal interest in immigration. As an Italian American working in California, he is deeply invested in the extent to which one can read an archaeological site for ethnicity. Given the complex and varied ethnic history of the West Coast timber industry, Meniketti decided to test this thesis.He is the first to note that his successes were modest. In short, the archaeological record does not definitely demonstrate variegated ethnic roles and cultures in this particular California timber camp between 1885 and 1920. Whether this dims your view of this book depends ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Author Index Vol. 63 (2002)

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      Abstract: Achim, M., "Review of The Science of Useful Nature in Central America by S. Brockmann," 570Adar, E.; see KiryushinaAddis, Bed., Physical Models, reviewed by D. F. Channell, 1250Alekna, J., "Neither Nation nor Empire," 1078Alsina, M. J., "Aviation for the People," 153Ammermann, F. N, "Review of In the Forest of No Joy by J. Daughton," 1187Andersen, C., "Review of Experten der Erschließung by S. Beese," 889Arribet-Deroin, D., "Review of Le Canon au Moyen Age et à La Renaissance by E. de Crouy-Chanel," 565Askari, K., "Review of Underground by B. Atwood," 572Atwood, B., Underground, reviewed by K. Askari, 572Auderset, J., "Review of Eigensinnige Musterschüler by H. Hartmann," 268Babintseva, E., "Review of The Power of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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