Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

HISTORY (859 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 452 of 452 Journals sorted alphabetically
Studies in Digital Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Studies in East European Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Studies in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Studies in People’s History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes: An International Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Studies in Western Australian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Substantia     Open Access  
Suomen Sukututkimusseuran Vuosikirja     Open Access  
SUSURGALUR : Jurnal Kajian Sejarah & Pendidikan Sejarah (Journal of History Education & Historical Studies)     Open Access  
T'oung Pao     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Tangence     Full-text available via subscription  
Tartu Ülikooli ajaloo küsimusi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teaching History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Tekniikan Waiheita     Open Access  
temp - tidsskrift for historie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Temporalidades     Open Access  
Territories : A Trans-Cultural Journal of Regional Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Testimonios     Open Access  
The Americas : A Quarterly Review of Latin American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
The Corvette     Open Access  
The Court Historian : The International Journal of Court Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Eighteenth Century     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
The European Legacy: Toward New Paradigms     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
The Hilltop Review : A Journal of Western Michigan University Graduate Student Research     Open Access  
The Historian     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
The International History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
The Italianist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
The Journal of the Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The Seventeenth Century     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Workshop     Open Access  
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Tiempo y Espacio     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Time & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access  
Traditio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Trans-pasando Fronteras     Open Access  
Transactions of the Philological Society     Hybrid Journal  
Transactions of the Royal Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa     Hybrid Journal  
Transfers     Full-text available via subscription  
Transition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Trocadero     Open Access  
Troianalexandrina     Full-text available via subscription  
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Turkish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Turkish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Twentieth Century British History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
U.S. Catholic Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
UCLA Historical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ufahamu : A Journal of African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Urban History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Urban History Review / Revue d'histoire urbaine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Vegueta : Anuario de la Facultad de Geografía e Historia     Open Access  
Veleia     Open Access  
Viator     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Victorian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Victorian Periodicals Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Vigiliae Christianae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Viking and Medieval Scandinavia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Visual Resources: An International Journal of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Vivarium     Hybrid Journal  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Water History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Welsh History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
West 86th     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Winterthur Portfolio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Women's History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Yesterday and Today     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Weltgeschichte     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Zutot     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
ИСТРАЖИВАЊА : Journal of Historical Researches     Open Access  

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Water History
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1877-7244 - ISSN (Online) 1877-7236
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Editorial

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      PubDate: 2022-11-24
       
  • Taming the torrent: changes in flood protection at the Gürbe River
           (Switzerland) from the nineteenth century until today

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper analyses the flood protection history of the Gürbe River (Switzerland), a 29-km-long tributary of the Aare River. The upper reach of the river has the character of a mountain torrent and an exceptionally difficult flooding situation. For centuries, riparian communities were only able to take small protective measures. In the mid-nineteenth century, the flood protection strategy changed: between 1855 and 1881, the Gürbe River was channelised and stabilised by a torrent control system. Although the situation improved, flood damage could not be prevented as intended. Therefore, dozens of consecutive projects were implemented—without interruption until today. This paper examines why small watercourses are useful case studies, which protection measures were taken at the Gürbe River, how they corresponded to the prevailing flood protection philosophy, whether they were linked to floods and how flood protection influenced land use. The Gürbe regulation, its consecutive projects and the connected drainages had far-reaching effects: They allowed an intensive agricultural use of the valley floor, the construction of roads, a railway, and new settlements. Consequently, the social and economic pressure on the hazard area increased steadily over the decades. It created a vicious circle: the more that protective structures were built, the more important and profitable flood prevention became, and the more structures were raised. A reevaluation finally took place in the late twentieth century, based on increasing environmental awareness, and fostered by a catastrophic flood. However, the implementation of new projects proved to be difficult due to conflicting interests.
      PubDate: 2022-11-17
       
  • Supplying a medieval metropolis: water management and agriculture in the
           hinterland of early Islamic Basra

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      Abstract: Abstract Following its foundation in the 630s CE, medieval Basra rapidly expanded to became one of the most populous cities of southern Iraq and the wider Gulf region. At its foundation, the city’s surrounding environment appears to have been poorly suited to sustaining a large urban population. This paper examines the different ways in which the early Islamic population of Basra transformed the immediate environs of the city to improve the urban water supply and the agricultural potential of the city’s hinterland. In particular, this included the construction of substantial canals connecting Basra with sources of water such as the marshes to the north of the city and the Shaṭṭ al-cArab—the river which forms at the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates and flows past Basra to the Gulf. The tidal influence of the Gulf causes the water level of the Shaṭṭ al-cArab to rise and fall daily and, by exploiting this characteristic, the medieval population of Basra could irrigate large swathes of land surrounding the city. Analysis of historic satellite imagery reveals possible evidence for the infrastructure that made this possible—including the remains of field systems bounded by, and interspersed with, canals as well as large raised linear ridge features which occur in tandem with relict canal systems. This paper critically assesses the evidence for the dating of these features, potential scenarios for how they functioned and their relationship to the medieval city of Basra.
      PubDate: 2022-11-17
       
  • River regulation, infrastructure, and small-town modernity on the
           Hungarian Danube, 1870–1945

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      Abstract: Abstract This article examines a small, unexceptional Hungarian town on the Danube River from the late nineteenth century to the Second World War. It explores the many interactions between the residents of this town and the river. It draws on—but also seeks to expand—the existing historiography on Hungarian rivers. Its sources comprise largely unused archival materials, small-town newspapers, engineering reports, maps, and memoirs. The article demonstrates how important the river was in the lives of many residents and argues that in some areas river regulation projects increased rather than decreased local adaptations to the Danube. A growing river infrastructure in particular created new possibilities for the residents of this small town, and many eagerly grasped them. But the benefits of river regulation and infrastructure on the Danube were unevenly distributed, and a careful examination reveals competing views about the uses and meanings of the river. This article points to the need for further studies of how large infrastructure projects are deeply embedded in local contexts.
      PubDate: 2022-11-17
       
  • Addressing conflict over dams: The inception and establishment of the
           World Commission on Dams

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      Abstract: Abstract The World Commission on Dams (WCD) was active between 1998 and 2000. Despite the Commission’s short life, it left a lasting mark on the global debate on large dams, one of the most intractable and conflicted issues in environmental governance. Existing accounts of the Commission focus chiefly on its recommendations and their influence on dam planners. Another major topic of interest has been the novelty of making global environmental policy through multi-stakeholder dialogue rather than through intergovernmental negotiation. This focus on technicalities, results, and institutional design underplays the Commission’s political significance. It was a bold and innovative attempt to find common ground between promoters and opponents of dams on which a new way of thinking about and planning dams could be built. In this paper, we focus on the emergence of the Commission, in response to the evolving conflict over dams, particularly between the World Bank and its critics. We explore the processes that led to the establishment of the Commission and its role as an attempt to transform conflict into cooperation by bringing together pro- and anti-dam communities.
      PubDate: 2022-11-01
       
  • Hydrological maps as a tool for the exploration of historical water
           systems at Badami, Karnataka, India

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      Abstract: Abstract Badami is a renowned heritage site in the semi-arid part of Karnataka, India, known for its ornate sandstone structures and a historical reservoir, Agastya Thirtha. The present study uses Remote Sensing imagery to identify water features and digital elevation model to generate hydrology maps (catchment and stream maps) and demonstrates the role of historical water harvesting systems in this landscape. The use of hydrology maps has enabled recognising the significance of the seemingly mundane looking, lesser-known small water harvesting structures that dot the landscape, which have sustained the millennium-old reservoir. The study has made an original contribution by identifying the historical water structures of Badami that form part of a larger hydrological network. These structures are (1) a few cisterns (2) a cliff cut channel and an open masonry channel (dating to the Chalukyan period), (3) an aqueduct (dating to the Vijayanagara period) and (4) low masonry walls that were built for channeling water. The paper also presents an analysis of the topography, hydrology, and engineering systems developed in the past for sustainably harvesting water.
      PubDate: 2022-10-21
       
  • Editorial

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      PubDate: 2022-10-05
       
  • The 1899 proposed Orange River Projects between the Cape and the Orange
           Free State by

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      Abstract: Abstract The implementation of water resource management projects is not immune to the impulses of domestic and international politics, people’s perceptions, norms and power, and the perceptions and reactions of humans to the biophysical environment. In this article, I investigate two projects: the Odendaalstroom irrigation project and the Aliwal North water supply and hydro-electric scheme. Both were mooted in 1898 and investigated in 1899 by the Cape Colony (under British control) and the independent Boer Republic of the Orange Free State. These projects could have been the earliest examples of transboundary river cooperation between two state entities in South Africa. This was, however, not meant to be since the outbreak of the Second Anglo-Boer War between Britain and the Orange Free State and the South African Republic in October 1899 stymied these plans. The theoretical departure of the article is analytical eclecticism, which is the selective utilisation of different theories to deepen our understanding of issues, actors and structures. That said, I will employ a range of perspectives to shed light on the history of the two projects. In other words, the paper interrelates socio-political theory and historical material to understand how water resource management projects had been influenced by politics, norms and power relations. I will employ three international relations theories: holistic constructivism, liberal-pluralism and variants of realism to move towards a deeper understanding of the projects and the context surrounding their non-implementation. Based on these theories, it is not only state or government action that can have an impact on water resource projects, but also individuals’ (and not only political leaders) norms and perceptions towards one another and the issue at hand.
      PubDate: 2022-09-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00303-0
       
  • The heretical boat smugglers: analyzing the role of water in the
           Albigensian Crusade

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      Abstract: Abstract Water was always on the minds of medieval travelers and for crusaders it became a critical part of the military pilgrimage. It is considered as a source of life and a means of movement through rivers and seas but in the case of the Albigensian Crusade, water took on a new meaning. Battles along river fronts and the clandestine boat smuggling of heretics were actions by a heretical Cathar community that confronted orthodox religion. Yet, the symbolic consideration of water in a land-locked Occitania permanently and theologically shifted the location of where a crusade could be. The crusading goal of Jerusalem was moved away from the Levant and into southern France, but water also became a significant function of ordinary life during an extraordinary Crusade. Figurative literary devices in the limited and partisan source material emphasized how water was used to propel convicted heretics away in the night but also provide the only form of nourishment for Cathar elite. From the baptismal water to its symbolic representation as the bridge between orthodox Catholic expansion in the Holy Land and French heresy, water was continually referenced by primary sources yet has been overlooked as a major historical theme in Cathar history. The liminality of rivers in the Crusade, where they acted as the boundaries between forces but also as a crucial location for anonymity and secrecy, heightened the role of water in the lives of those involved with the Crusade.
      PubDate: 2022-08-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00306-x
       
  • Small scale water control works in Early Imperial China

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      Abstract: Abstract China has arguably the longest continuous tradition of writing on water control, but many of the oldest texts were produced by the central government and discuss only the largest water control projects. In recent decades, archaeologists have excavated several caches of documents written on wood and bamboo that contain important new evidence on the management of water systems that were not mentioned in traditional historical texts, including river dikes and irrigation reservoirs. Legal texts make clear that managing local water systems was a regular government responsibility across the Qin and Han empires. Two groups of documents have been discovered that were produced by officials surveying ruined water infrastructure to evaluate the labor that would be needed to repair them. Overall these documents make clear that the early Chinese empires had a sophisticated administrative system to maintain a highly anthropogenic network of waterways for the benefit of agricultural society.
      PubDate: 2022-08-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00305-y
       
  • Ancient water management in the casa dell’Efebo in Pompeii

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      Abstract: Abstract The remarkable state of preservation of the buildings within the archaeological site of Pompeii permits an unparalleled study of Roman life. Strategies for water management have been considered by many scholars, and is an important aspect in the analysis of household function (for example Jansen et al. 2011; Trusler 2016; Dessales 2013). The Casa dell’Efebo (also known as House of the Ephebe and Domus P. Cornelius Tages) contained a diverse assortment of water management strategies. The focus of this paper is to review the water and sanitation features present in the property and describe their functional relationship. Additionally, our goal is to present a socioeconomic interpretation of the placement using spatial analysis and evolutionary theory.
      PubDate: 2022-08-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00304-z
       
  • “From bank to bank, as much as the tide and the sea’s waves cover.”
           Possession, border and conflicts around salmon fishing resources in the
           Bidasoa estuary (Basque Country): a long-term approach

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      Abstract: Abstract Several social practices converge in the codification of fishing resources management: specific adaptation to aquatic environments, possessory and jurisdictional acts, access and rights-systems, resistance actions operated by excluded social groups, and conflicts derived from it all. The present work proposes to explore the relations between all these aspects by focusing on a local case study, the Bidasoa estuary (Basque Country). A large volume of medieval and modern documentary sources is available on the matter, which can be complemented with several cartographic records and material traces still visible on the ground. These materials have been considered together to analyse the intersection of different actors and interests at the local scale, and their reflection on the re-elaboration of diplomatic relations between central political authorities. Our results reveal a set of complex social relations articulated around these resources over several centuries, evidencing the relevance of commons as a key element for the comprehension of past societies.
      PubDate: 2022-08-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00307-w
       
  • The Kabu-ido system and factors affecting local groundwater extraction
           control: case study of a customary groundwater management in Japan

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      Abstract: Abstract In the early 1800s, a water conflict occurred in a community named the Fukuzuka Ring Levee on the Noubi Plain, Japan. Upper villages required artesian wells for irrigation and domestic uses, but lower villages did not welcome them because drainage from the wells caused impoundment damage to their paddy fields. The Kabu-ido system was a set of rules, including regulation of the number of wells per village, introduced to de-escalate the conflict. Under the system, groundwater uses were controlled not by external authority, but by the community residents themselves. This paper has two purposes. First, it reconstructs the daily operations of the Kabu-ido system, principally by referring to surviving local diaries, to describe hitherto unknown details regarding the management of groundwater by local people 200 years ago. The diaries show that well managers, selected from residents, regulated the use of wells using various tools, including permission and surprise inspection. Second, this paper evaluates to what extent self-imposed numerical regulation was successful by checking the number of wells listed in village expenditure notes. The documents indicate that regulation did not always work. The factors underlying this are considered using the analytical framework from the commons studies. Analysis shows that, while institutional arrangements of the Kabu-ido system, such as well management with keys, rules of joint responsibility, and the prohibition of indoor wells, work positively in enforcing numerical regulation by lowering the costs of monitoring for unauthorized wells, the natural characteristics of groundwater and climate conditions such as sudden drought work negatively.
      PubDate: 2022-07-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00302-1
       
  • Transformation of the coastal social-ecological system in southwest
           Bangladesh due to empolderment

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      Abstract: Abstract Initiated in the early 1960s, the Coastal Embankment Project (CEP) in Bangladesh brought more than 1.2 million hectares of low-elevation coastal land under cultivation through a complex system of embankments and drainage sluices. A significant milestone in the history of water resources management in Bangladesh, CEP catalyzed the socio-economic development of the coastal community over the following decades. However, the human intervention in the complex hydro-geo-morphological settings of the Ganges delta later manifested some challenges. As the embankments had cut off the tidal plains from the rivers, silt started depositing on the riverbeds, which eventually caused drainage congestion inside the polders. Meanwhile, significant changes in landuse occurred as saltwater shrimp farming took over traditional crop cultivation. Shrimp cultivation increased soil salinity inside the polders rendering the land unsuitable for crop cultivation. The kitchen gardens and the fruit plants that grew after the construction of the embankments disappeared from the landscape due to high soil salinity. The cyclone in 2009 badly damaged the embankments in the southwest coastal region resulting in the longstanding suffering of the people. The protected landscape became subject to tidal flooding, sweeping off the decades of development gains. This case study from Bangladesh demonstrates how physical infrastructure can significantly change the bio-physical and socio-economic landscapes in coastal settings and give rise to a new social-ecological system.
      PubDate: 2022-07-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00301-2
       
  • Watering white supremacy in Kenya: settler colonialism and the
           disappearing of the Ewaso Ng’iro river 1919–1955

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      Abstract: Abstract Settler colonialism in Kenya and elsewhere was, amongst other things, an environmental regime based upon specific ideologies of resource use and availability. The resource rights and requirements of nomadic and pastoral communities were written away in favor of extractive uses rooted in capitalist production, as well as a mythical ideal that settlers could create a facsimile of pre-industrial Britain overseas. This article argues that settlers’ pursuit of these goals in the region of the Ewaso Ng’iro river led to a discursive and material erasure of indigenous livelihoods and claims to water downstream. In removing, diminishing, and eliminating the flow of the river into the Northern Frontier via large scale irrigation operations, the settlers of the Nanyuki region placed the river within an ethnonationalist ideology of water that elevated their new European Eden above all else. By tracking the slow diminishment of the Ewaso Ng’iro’s water level and the settler-nomad contestation over it, this article shows that the possible erasure of a rural population whose way of life was antithetical to both the racial and economic priorities of settlers was a necessary side-effect for the realization of a proto-econationalist ideology emanating from the upper middle class and elite settlers of the Ewaso Ng'iro’s catchment area.
      PubDate: 2022-05-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00298-8
       
  • Representing the operation and evolution of ancient Piraeus’ water
           supply system

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      Abstract: Abstract The newly excavated urban water supply system of the city of ancient Piraeus provides an excellent opportunity for the study and evaluation of the issues of sustainability, adaptability, simplicity and environmental protection, which are of main concern in modern engineering design practices. Well-digging in the area of Pireaus dates back to the city’ founding during the Classical period. However, scarcity of groundwaters stimulated development of water harvesting techniques, mainly cisterns for the collection of rain water, and to the gradual increase of their capacity in order to avoid overflows. Changes to land plot areas and the increase in water demand during the Hellenistic period affected the operation of cisterns triggering a variety of subterranean constructions that expanded the existing capacity. During the Roman period, the city’s water needs for domestic and public use skyrocketed beyond the supply capacity of the water resources of the Piraeus’ peninsula. On account of this, an aqueduct which transferred water from outside the peninsula was constructed in the 2nd century AD, while cisterns and wells were gradually abandoned. The present paper examines the operation of ancient Piraeus’ urban water supply system and its evolution across nine centuries by studying the operation and evolution of cisterns through a combination of excavation finds (from the Ephorate of Antiquities of Piraeus and the Islands) and quantitative techniques. Water consumption during several historical periods and the available water resources of the peninsula were quantified and a hydrologic model was developed to simulate the daily operation of the cisterns over an 82-year period. Various circumstances were examined by running numerous scenarios for the: (a) magnitude of collecting area, (b) annual water demand, and (c) capacity of the cisterns. For each scenario, the reliability of the hydro-system for supplying residences with water was estimated. Simulation results were then correlated with specific socio-economic characteristics of the corresponding historical periods.
      PubDate: 2022-05-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00299-7
       
  • “Goodbyeee”

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      PubDate: 2022-05-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00300-3
       
  • The mills of god grind slowly: the Na’aman River milling dispute and the
           thirteenth-century hydraulic crisis in the Crusader States

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      Abstract: Abstract In the mid-thirteenth century, the Hospitaller and Templar military orders engaged in a long-running dispute over the supply of water to two hydraulic gristmills outside the city of Acre in the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem that prompted international scandal, royal and papal intervention, and mutual attempts at sabotage. This article examines this dispute in the context of a broad survey of milling operations in the Crusader States and argues that this dispute was representative of a widespread hydraulic shortfall in the Latin East by the thirteenth century, when the kingdom’s military collapse and the increased cultivation of sugar cane aggravated a pre-existing shortage of water-power in the relatively labor-poor eastern Mediterranean. The efforts of local landholders like the military orders to maintain access to hydraulic resources provide an instructive example of a pre-modern society’s efforts to accommodate an environmental crisis.
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00296-w
       
  • Urban water supply infrastructure in Grudziądz (northern Poland): from
           the Middle Ages to the pre-modern times

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      Abstract: Abstract This article presents the history of the water supply system in Grudziądz (Poland) over the centuries, from the Middle Ages to the end of the nineteenth century. The location of Grudziądz on the high escarpment of the Vistula River made it difficult to supply water to the town. The innovative technical facilities, such as a water-work and water supply tower had to be constructed because the gravitational waterworks could not be applied. The basis for the research was the analysis of historical sources. In this study, non-invasive methods were used (aerial prospection, LiDAR scanning and geophysical surveys with Ground Penetrating Radar), since the hydrotechnical objects are located in a functioning urban space and no excavations could be carried out. The research included: (i) the measurements, exploration and preparation of photo-documentation of the water tower, (ii) providing a digital model of the tower, (iii) finding the tunnel inside the tower, and (iv) attempting to locate the tunnel's course outside the tower.
      PubDate: 2022-01-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00295-3
       
  • “…[T]he movement of a celestial system than a human invention:”
           Abram Blanding and bringing water to Columbia

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      Abstract: Abstract Abram [sometimes referred to as Abraham] Blanding (1776–1839) constructed a waterworks that captivated the citizens of the planned city of Columbia, South Carolina, bringing a wondrous scene of mechanistic intervention in nature. He was able to integrate the steam engine with original innovations regarding piping to transport fresh water into the new frontier city. The establishment of the waterworks also fulfilled Columbia’s political desires to bring water to its citizens. Columbia became a more progressive city based on the standards of the nineteenth century. But while building the waterworks in Columbia would become an asset to the city, it would also be an eventual irritation to Blanding. Overall, this paper is a case study in how ambitious engineers, like Abram Blanding, used technology to provide a reliable source of drinking water at the turn of the nineteenth century
      PubDate: 2022-01-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00294-4
       
 
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