Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

HISTORY (859 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 452 of 452 Journals sorted alphabetically
Studies in East European Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Studies in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Studies in People’s History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes: An International Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Studies in Western Australian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Substantia     Open Access  
Suomen Sukututkimusseuran Vuosikirja     Open Access  
SUSURGALUR : Jurnal Kajian Sejarah & Pendidikan Sejarah (Journal of History Education & Historical Studies)     Open Access  
T'oung Pao     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Tangence     Full-text available via subscription  
Tartu Ülikooli ajaloo küsimusi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teaching History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Tekniikan Waiheita     Open Access  
temp - tidsskrift for historie     Full-text available via subscription  
Temporalidades     Open Access  
Territories : A Trans-Cultural Journal of Regional Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Testimonios     Open Access  
The Americas : A Quarterly Review of Latin American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
The Corvette     Open Access  
The Court Historian : The International Journal of Court Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Eighteenth Century     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
The European Legacy: Toward New Paradigms     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
The Hilltop Review : A Journal of Western Michigan University Graduate Student Research     Open Access  
The Historian     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
The International History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
The Italianist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
The Journal of the Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The Seventeenth Century     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Workshop     Open Access  
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Tiempo y Espacio     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Time & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access  
Traditio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Trans-pasando Fronteras     Open Access  
Transactions of the Philological Society     Hybrid Journal  
Transactions of the Royal Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa     Hybrid Journal  
Transfers     Full-text available via subscription  
Transition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Trocadero     Open Access  
Troianalexandrina     Full-text available via subscription  
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Turkish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Turkish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Twentieth Century British History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
U.S. Catholic Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
UCLA Historical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ufahamu : A Journal of African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Urban History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Urban History Review / Revue d'histoire urbaine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Vegueta : Anuario de la Facultad de Geografía e Historia     Open Access  
Veleia     Open Access  
Viator     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Victorian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Victorian Periodicals Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Vigiliae Christianae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Viking and Medieval Scandinavia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Visual Resources: An International Journal of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Vivarium     Hybrid Journal  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Water History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Welsh History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
West 86th     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Winterthur Portfolio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Women's History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Yesterday and Today     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Weltgeschichte     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Zutot     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
ИСТРАЖИВАЊА : Journal of Historical Researches     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

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Water History
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1877-7244 - ISSN (Online) 1877-7236
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • The Kabu-ido system and factors affecting local groundwater extraction
           control: case study of a customary groundwater management in Japan

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      Abstract: Abstract In the early 1800s, a water conflict occurred in a community named the Fukuzuka Ring Levee on the Noubi Plain, Japan. Upper villages required artesian wells for irrigation and domestic uses, but lower villages did not welcome them because drainage from the wells caused impoundment damage to their paddy fields. The Kabu-ido system was a set of rules, including regulation of the number of wells per village, introduced to de-escalate the conflict. Under the system, groundwater uses were controlled not by external authority, but by the community residents themselves. This paper has two purposes. First, it reconstructs the daily operations of the Kabu-ido system, principally by referring to surviving local diaries, to describe hitherto unknown details regarding the management of groundwater by local people 200 years ago. The diaries show that well managers, selected from residents, regulated the use of wells using various tools, including permission and surprise inspection. Second, this paper evaluates to what extent self-imposed numerical regulation was successful by checking the number of wells listed in village expenditure notes. The documents indicate that regulation did not always work. The factors underlying this are considered using the analytical framework from the commons studies. Analysis shows that, while institutional arrangements of the Kabu-ido system, such as well management with keys, rules of joint responsibility, and the prohibition of indoor wells, work positively in enforcing numerical regulation by lowering the costs of monitoring for unauthorized wells, the natural characteristics of groundwater and climate conditions such as sudden drought work negatively.
      PubDate: 2022-07-16
       
  • Transformation of the coastal social-ecological system in southwest
           Bangladesh due to empolderment

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      Abstract: Abstract Initiated in the early 1960s, the Coastal Embankment Project (CEP) in Bangladesh brought more than 1.2 million hectares of low-elevation coastal land under cultivation through a complex system of embankments and drainage sluices. A significant milestone in the history of water resources management in Bangladesh, CEP catalyzed the socio-economic development of the coastal community over the following decades. However, the human intervention in the complex hydro-geo-morphological settings of the Ganges delta later manifested some challenges. As the embankments had cut off the tidal plains from the rivers, silt started depositing on the riverbeds, which eventually caused drainage congestion inside the polders. Meanwhile, significant changes in landuse occurred as saltwater shrimp farming took over traditional crop cultivation. Shrimp cultivation increased soil salinity inside the polders rendering the land unsuitable for crop cultivation. The kitchen gardens and the fruit plants that grew after the construction of the embankments disappeared from the landscape due to high soil salinity. The cyclone in 2009 badly damaged the embankments in the southwest coastal region resulting in the longstanding suffering of the people. The protected landscape became subject to tidal flooding, sweeping off the decades of development gains. This case study from Bangladesh demonstrates how physical infrastructure can significantly change the bio-physical and socio-economic landscapes in coastal settings and give rise to a new social-ecological system.
      PubDate: 2022-07-12
       
  • Watering white supremacy in Kenya: settler colonialism and the
           disappearing of the Ewaso Ng’iro river 1919–1955

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      Abstract: Abstract Settler colonialism in Kenya and elsewhere was, amongst other things, an environmental regime based upon specific ideologies of resource use and availability. The resource rights and requirements of nomadic and pastoral communities were written away in favor of extractive uses rooted in capitalist production, as well as a mythical ideal that settlers could create a facsimile of pre-industrial Britain overseas. This article argues that settlers’ pursuit of these goals in the region of the Ewaso Ng’iro river led to a discursive and material erasure of indigenous livelihoods and claims to water downstream. In removing, diminishing, and eliminating the flow of the river into the Northern Frontier via large scale irrigation operations, the settlers of the Nanyuki region placed the river within an ethnonationalist ideology of water that elevated their new European Eden above all else. By tracking the slow diminishment of the Ewaso Ng’iro’s water level and the settler-nomad contestation over it, this article shows that the possible erasure of a rural population whose way of life was antithetical to both the racial and economic priorities of settlers was a necessary side-effect for the realization of a proto-econationalist ideology emanating from the upper middle class and elite settlers of the Ewaso Ng'iro’s catchment area.
      PubDate: 2022-05-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00298-8
       
  • Representing the operation and evolution of ancient Piraeus’ water
           supply system

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      Abstract: Abstract The newly excavated urban water supply system of the city of ancient Piraeus provides an excellent opportunity for the study and evaluation of the issues of sustainability, adaptability, simplicity and environmental protection, which are of main concern in modern engineering design practices. Well-digging in the area of Pireaus dates back to the city’ founding during the Classical period. However, scarcity of groundwaters stimulated development of water harvesting techniques, mainly cisterns for the collection of rain water, and to the gradual increase of their capacity in order to avoid overflows. Changes to land plot areas and the increase in water demand during the Hellenistic period affected the operation of cisterns triggering a variety of subterranean constructions that expanded the existing capacity. During the Roman period, the city’s water needs for domestic and public use skyrocketed beyond the supply capacity of the water resources of the Piraeus’ peninsula. On account of this, an aqueduct which transferred water from outside the peninsula was constructed in the 2nd century AD, while cisterns and wells were gradually abandoned. The present paper examines the operation of ancient Piraeus’ urban water supply system and its evolution across nine centuries by studying the operation and evolution of cisterns through a combination of excavation finds (from the Ephorate of Antiquities of Piraeus and the Islands) and quantitative techniques. Water consumption during several historical periods and the available water resources of the peninsula were quantified and a hydrologic model was developed to simulate the daily operation of the cisterns over an 82-year period. Various circumstances were examined by running numerous scenarios for the: (a) magnitude of collecting area, (b) annual water demand, and (c) capacity of the cisterns. For each scenario, the reliability of the hydro-system for supplying residences with water was estimated. Simulation results were then correlated with specific socio-economic characteristics of the corresponding historical periods.
      PubDate: 2022-05-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00299-7
       
  • “Goodbyeee”

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      PubDate: 2022-05-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00300-3
       
  • Hydraulic Opulence: Artesian Wells and bathing in Mexico, 1850–1900

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      Abstract: Abstract Before 1850 Mexico City’s scarce water resources were produced by a handful of nearby springs channeled through centuries-old city infrastructures to a limited number of taps in large houses and to public fountains that served the majority of the population. In the second half of the nineteenth century, artesian wells tapping the Valley of Mexico’s aquifers enabled landowners and businessmen to produce copious amounts of water almost anywhere with little effort. Private access to groundwater supplied newly built bathhouses and propelled changes to, and the rapid expansion of, social practices of bathing and swimming. This infrastructure, expanded supply, and new practices gave shape to a widely shared and historically durable assumption that there are no limits to the supply of water – what I call hydraulic opulence. After 1900 hydraulic opulence fueled soaring demand and continuous efforts by the state to expand hydraulic infrastructure and supply.
      PubDate: 2022-05-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00297-9
       
  • The mills of god grind slowly: the Na’aman River milling dispute and the
           thirteenth-century hydraulic crisis in the Crusader States

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      Abstract: Abstract In the mid-thirteenth century, the Hospitaller and Templar military orders engaged in a long-running dispute over the supply of water to two hydraulic gristmills outside the city of Acre in the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem that prompted international scandal, royal and papal intervention, and mutual attempts at sabotage. This article examines this dispute in the context of a broad survey of milling operations in the Crusader States and argues that this dispute was representative of a widespread hydraulic shortfall in the Latin East by the thirteenth century, when the kingdom’s military collapse and the increased cultivation of sugar cane aggravated a pre-existing shortage of water-power in the relatively labor-poor eastern Mediterranean. The efforts of local landholders like the military orders to maintain access to hydraulic resources provide an instructive example of a pre-modern society’s efforts to accommodate an environmental crisis.
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-022-00296-w
       
  • Urban water supply infrastructure in Grudziądz (northern Poland): from
           the Middle Ages to the pre-modern times

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      Abstract: Abstract This article presents the history of the water supply system in Grudziądz (Poland) over the centuries, from the Middle Ages to the end of the nineteenth century. The location of Grudziądz on the high escarpment of the Vistula River made it difficult to supply water to the town. The innovative technical facilities, such as a water-work and water supply tower had to be constructed because the gravitational waterworks could not be applied. The basis for the research was the analysis of historical sources. In this study, non-invasive methods were used (aerial prospection, LiDAR scanning and geophysical surveys with Ground Penetrating Radar), since the hydrotechnical objects are located in a functioning urban space and no excavations could be carried out. The research included: (i) the measurements, exploration and preparation of photo-documentation of the water tower, (ii) providing a digital model of the tower, (iii) finding the tunnel inside the tower, and (iv) attempting to locate the tunnel's course outside the tower.
      PubDate: 2022-01-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00295-3
       
  • “…[T]he movement of a celestial system than a human invention:”
           Abram Blanding and bringing water to Columbia

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      Abstract: Abstract Abram [sometimes referred to as Abraham] Blanding (1776–1839) constructed a waterworks that captivated the citizens of the planned city of Columbia, South Carolina, bringing a wondrous scene of mechanistic intervention in nature. He was able to integrate the steam engine with original innovations regarding piping to transport fresh water into the new frontier city. The establishment of the waterworks also fulfilled Columbia’s political desires to bring water to its citizens. Columbia became a more progressive city based on the standards of the nineteenth century. But while building the waterworks in Columbia would become an asset to the city, it would also be an eventual irritation to Blanding. Overall, this paper is a case study in how ambitious engineers, like Abram Blanding, used technology to provide a reliable source of drinking water at the turn of the nineteenth century
      PubDate: 2022-01-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00294-4
       
  • Editorial

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      PubDate: 2021-11-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00293-5
       
  • Looking for more groundwater. From the exploitation of the Bou Hafna
           aquifer (1895–present) to Franco-Tunisian hydrogeology

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      Abstract: Abstract There is currently a trend in hydrological sciences to bond with the human dimensions of water. This is quite a turning point as the past few decades have rather been marked by the ‘naturalization’ of water, disregarding the fact that ‘hydrological spaces’ are the outcome of the constantly evolving relationships between water and society, in which hydrological sciences play a significant role. In this paper, we focus on a case study in Central Tunisia and question the relationship between the exploitation of water and the progressive development of hydrological sciences. With a history spanning more than a century, the scientific and technical ups and downs of the progressive exploitation of the Bou Hafna aquifer system provide a fascinating close-up of the emergence of a scientific discipline: hydrogeology. This case study shows how in the 1960s, concerns converged to a point of total control of a ‘resisting’ nature in which the physical dimensions of water supplanted all others. But the most recent stages of this history, marked by an increase in contestations in a post-revolutionary context, suggest that ‘social resistance’ may influence future developments in hydrogeology towards taking the social and political dimensions of water more into account thanpreviously.
      PubDate: 2021-11-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00291-7
       
  • Mapping Vaqf-Ābād Qanāt watercourse in the urban landscape of Yazd City
           in two distinct periods: fourteenth and twentieth century

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      Abstract: Abstract The qanāt of Vaqf-Ābād (The word Vaqf-Ābād comprises two words: Vaqf is Persian for Arabic Waqf, meaning ‘endowment’ and -Ābād is a Persian suffix for many cities’ and places’ names, meaning ‘habitable/ cultivated’.) has been supplying water to Yazd City for more than seven centuries. In 2016, the qanāt dried out due to the severe impact of groundwater over-exploitation that was, in turn, a consequence of population growth and higher water demands. Today, Vaqf-Ābād Qanāt is at risk because of limited available knowledge about its route and related hydraulic structures in the city. Therefore, documentation of its physical state, including its watercourse and associated hydraulic structures, seems necessary to preserve this invaluable heritage. This issue is becoming more urgent, as only a few people recall the Vaqf-Ābād Qanāt course in the city and their knowledge has not been recorded previously. The objective of this research is therefore to discuss the path of Vaqf-Ābād Qanāt within the city of Yazd in two historical periods of the fourteenth and twentieth century, together with its embedded intangible aspects. Archival research was conducted to collect and analyse available data, allowing the mapping of the qanāt in the fourteenth century. By studying recent qanāt texts and its endowment documents, the route of Vaqf-Ābād Qanāt in the last hundred years was identified. Field observations and interviews with qanāt masters as well as Yazd’s elderly citizens were used to verify the authenticity of these data. Finally, the recent main route of Vaqf-Ābād Qanāt and its hydraulic structures were mapped in modern Yazd. While the traces of its route are disappearing gradually, Vaqf-Ābād Qanāt is still alive in the collective memory of Yazd’s elderly residents. Mapping this qanāt as well as recording its tangible and intangible aspects are of utmost importance as a basis for further conservation and management of this endangered cultural heritage.
      PubDate: 2021-11-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00290-8
       
  • Hydraulic engineering analysis of Roman water infrastructure: a review of
           practice and possibilities

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      Abstract: Abstract A short review is presented covering English-language publications where quantitative engineering analysis has been used to study and gain insight into how ancient Roman and Mediterranean water systems functioned. The review covers work on using technical engineering perspectives to try and understand the geometrical layout of water systems, quantitative work of a type readily accomplished by undergraduate civil engineering students, such as calculating the flow capacity of aqueducts and other conduits of known dimensions, and more involved studies using computational techniques usually applied by specialist engineers in research or industry. It is concluded that the many different levels of analyses employed have given insight into how Roman water systems worked, for example the amount of water they delivered, and the kinds of issues their designers and operators might have faced. It is hoped that this review will inspire further interdisciplinary study in Archaeohydrology, using modern engineering techniques to amplify and extend the story of Roman water systems told by archaeologists.
      PubDate: 2021-11-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00285-5
       
  • Mapping the history of sailing

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      Abstract: Abstract A chronological worldwide map of sailing history is presented, emphasizing when sailing as a technology/activity appeared for the first time in each coast of the world, due to local invention, technological diffusion, or mere routes expansion. The map is the product of compiling and synthetizing historiographic works dealing with sailing history across regions and epochs; an effort that is presented to make explicit the map’s foundations. The map necessarily shows each world region’s precocity or lateness in sailing, while also, interestingly, exposing places that acted as persistent barriers to the expansion of sailing. Hopefully the map will be a useful tool to better visualize sailing history, and will encourage the search for explaining the non-trivial patterns of its spread over the world.
      PubDate: 2021-11-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00292-6
       
  • Material evidence of folk hydrology in rural Canada: The well auger and
           dowsing rods of Hamilton “Ham” Brereton

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      Abstract: Abstract An unusual well-boring apparatus and a selection of dowsing rods that once belonged to Hamilton “Ham” Brereton (1917–1992) of Navan, Ontario, Canada, are preserved in the collection of the City of Ottawa Museums. These artifacts are important material evidence of popular experiences and understandings of groundwater hydrology in one rural Canadian region during the early- and mid-twentieth century. Brereton’s dowsing practice demonstrates his adaptation of well-documented dowsers’ lore and underlines the importance of dowsing as a “ritual response” to groundwater uncertainty. Similarly, in designing and operating a well auger, Brereton and his father, both blacksmiths, carefully considered local geological and hydrological conditions and challenges; like other North American well auger inventors, they produced a tool that was singularly well suited to boring in local overburden. Drawing upon family recollections, hydrological and folklore studies, patents of invention, practices in other regions, and the artifacts themselves, this article demonstrates that close attention to such material evidence can reveal important details about “folk hydrology,” that is, understandings of groundwater behaviour and strategies for groundwater exploitation that are grounded in experience and attachment to place.
      PubDate: 2021-10-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00289-1
       
  • The evolution of the Nile regulatory regime: a history of cooperation and
           conflict

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      Abstract: Abstract The objective of this study is to trace the historical evolution of the present Nile Basin regulatory framework and examine its influence on the current interactions among Nile riparian states. This research adopts a case-study design, with in-depth qualitative analysis of the Nile Basin as an example of the complex transboundary relations over shared waters. It uses an analytical framework derived from the New Institutional Economics (NIE) to analyse the evolution of the institutional framework that has governed the Nile basin and how it affected the annual water share allocated to each riparian country. The study argues that the historical beliefs and social norms of the riparian societies have been among the major factors that influenced the cooperation attempts during the past century and determined their outcomes. Therefore, a prerequisite to develop sustainable cooperation is levelling the playing field by addressing the beliefs and norms that have prevented cooperation while identifying the beliefs that can support cooperation.
      PubDate: 2021-10-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00287-3
       
  • Rivers and canals as “other factors” in the partition of India

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      Abstract: Abstract The demand to partition British India was mainly made on the basis of Hindu-Muslim “differences”. However, at the time of drawing boundary line, the Boundary Commission (BC) for Bengal and Punjab also considered “other factors”. In fact, some of the decisions of the BC were highly influenced by the “other factors.” This paper examines how the other factors,’ mainly canals, rivers, and irrigation systems, influenced Radcliffe’s decisions to demarcate the boundary between India and Pakistan. It looks at some of the debates on Radcliffe’s decisions regarding the territory and analyses the bearing of such decisions on the water disputes between India-Pakistan, and India-Bangladesh.
      PubDate: 2021-10-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00286-4
       
  • The arbitration of nature: state, water, and civil engineering in Northern
           Ireland directly after partition

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      Abstract: Abstract Begun in the summer of 1923, the Silent Valley Reservoir was the first large scale civil engineering project after the division between the North and the South of Ireland. It was the continuation of a previous project. In the late Nineteenth Century a portion of the Kilkeel and Annalong Rivers in the Mourne Mountains had been diverted 35 miles to provide water for the growing industrial city of Belfast in the North of Ireland. A reservoir in the mountains was also planned at a later date but this was delayed by the Great War and then by Irish political instability and the high cost of construction in immediate post war period. Before being completed the project had to overcome several obstacles. Firstly, the Mourne Mountains were claimed by the South of Ireland and thus subject to the Boundary Commission of the Anglo-Irish peace treaty. The Water Commissioners had brought important British political leaders to tour the Silent Valley construction site in an attempt to demonstrate how implausible a situation (in their opinion) that the South should control the major water supply to the capital city of the North. Secondly, shortly after the Boundary Commission was shelved, the combination of fluid subsoil and the failure to locate bedrock at expected depth brought construction to a halt while an engineering, political, and legal solution was sought for the expensive and now publicly controversial project. This article traces the contingent relationship between state (sovereignty) and technology (water reservoir) using a socio legal and socio material description of the crucial arbitration process enabling further time and resources for resolution of the difficulty. Ultimately an air-shaft device for excavating under increased atmospheric pressure had to be designed taking in mind both technical and political difficulties. Today the 3000-million-gallon reservoir, first imagined in the late Nineteenth Century, continues to be a major water source for the city of Belfast.
      PubDate: 2021-10-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00284-6
       
  • The cistern-system of early modern Venice: technology, politics and
           culture in a hydraulic society

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      Abstract: Abstract At a time when European cities depended on three sources of fresh water for their domestic and industrial needs—rivers, spring-fed aqueducts and groundwater wells—early modern Venice added a fourth possibility: a dense network of cisterns for capturing, filtering and storing rainwater. Venice was not unique in relying on rainwater cisterns; but nowhere in Italy (indeed in Europe) was the approach so systematic and widespread, the city concerned so populous, the technology so sophisticated and the management so carefully regulated as in the lagoon city. To explore Venice’s cistern-system, a range of primary sources (medical treatises, travellers’ accounts, archival records) and the contributions of architectural, medical and social historians, and archaeologists are analysed. The article examines the system’s functioning and management, including the role of the city’s acquaroli or watermen; the maintenance of freshwater quality throughout the city, in the context of broader sanitation measures; and the place of the “wells” and fresh water in daily life in Venice. As a means of teasing out the myriad links between nature, technology and society in early modern Italy, the article concludes with a brief comparison of the politics of water supply management in the very different urban realities of (republican) Venice, (viceregal) Naples and (papal) Rome.
      PubDate: 2021-10-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00288-2
       
  • Correction to: The Surco canal, an ancient irrigation canal in Lima, Peru,
           and a citizens’ campaign for its protection

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      Abstract: In the original publication of this article, the Acknowledgement section and Author Information were missing and are given below.
      PubDate: 2021-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12685-021-00275-7
       
 
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