Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - HISTORY (859 journals)
    - History (General) (45 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (72 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (67 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (10 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (256 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (183 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (48 journals)

HISTORY (859 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 801 - 452 of 452 Journals sorted alphabetically
Studies in Digital Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Studies in East European Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Studies in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Studies in People’s History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes: An International Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Studies in Western Australian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Substantia     Open Access  
Suomen Sukututkimusseuran Vuosikirja     Open Access  
SUSURGALUR : Jurnal Kajian Sejarah & Pendidikan Sejarah (Journal of History Education & Historical Studies)     Open Access  
T'oung Pao     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Tangence     Full-text available via subscription  
Tartu Ülikooli ajaloo küsimusi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Teaching History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Tekniikan Waiheita     Open Access  
temp - tidsskrift for historie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Temporalidades     Open Access  
Territories : A Trans-Cultural Journal of Regional Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Testimonios     Open Access  
The Americas : A Quarterly Review of Latin American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
The Corvette     Open Access  
The Court Historian : The International Journal of Court Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Eighteenth Century     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
The European Legacy: Toward New Paradigms     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
The Hilltop Review : A Journal of Western Michigan University Graduate Student Research     Open Access  
The Historian     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
The International History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
The Italianist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
The Journal of the Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The Seventeenth Century     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The Workshop     Open Access  
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Tiempo y Espacio     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Time & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access  
Traditio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Trans-pasando Fronteras     Open Access  
Transactions of the Philological Society     Hybrid Journal  
Transactions of the Royal Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa     Hybrid Journal  
Transfers     Full-text available via subscription  
Transition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Trocadero     Open Access  
Troianalexandrina     Full-text available via subscription  
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Turkish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Turkish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Twentieth Century British History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
U.S. Catholic Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
UCLA Historical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ufahamu : A Journal of African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Urban History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Urban History Review / Revue d'histoire urbaine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Vegueta : Anuario de la Facultad de Geografía e Historia     Open Access  
Veleia     Open Access  
Viator     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Victorian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Victorian Periodicals Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Vigiliae Christianae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Viking and Medieval Scandinavia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Visual Resources: An International Journal of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Vivarium     Hybrid Journal  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Water History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Welsh History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
West 86th     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Winterthur Portfolio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Women's History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Yesterday and Today     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Weltgeschichte     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Zutot     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
ИСТРАЖИВАЊА : Journal of Historical Researches     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Time & Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.548
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0961-463X - ISSN (Online) 1461-7463
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Spatiotemporal accessibility by public transport and time wealth: Insights
           from two peripheral neighbourhoods in Malmö, Sweden

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chiara Vitrano, Linnea Mellquist
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper contributes to the understanding of spatiotemporal accessibility inequalities by exploring how the current public transport (PT) provision affects the time wealth of PT users living in two peripheral neighbourhoods in Malmö. The paper investigates time-related resources and constraints that concur in defining accessibility inequalities, identifies forms of temporal disadvantage and privilege and addresses the relevance of recognizing and meeting the multiple time-related needs of (potential) PT users. Adopting a mixed-methods approach, the study integrates results from a thematic analysis of interviews and from a GIS spatiotemporal accessibility analysis of PT schedules to understand whether and how the current PT provision (a) allows users to carry out the desired or needed activities by PT in the time available to them, (b) is harmonized with their spatiotemporal access needs and (c) supports or hinders the users’ ability to control their travel time. The paper suggests that, in the observed cases, the PT provision provides unequal opportunities for faster connections and information, exposing some users to time-related transport disadvantage. Also, the current PT provision does not always seem to be harmonized with the participants’ access needs, especially during off-peak hours. The findings highlight the importance of taking into consideration the time wealth of (potential) PT users with different access needs, resources, and constraints, with the aim to both tackle transport disadvantage and support the adoption of sustainable modal choices. The study provides directions for further spatiotemporal accessibility research and for urban time and mobility policies.
      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T02:50:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221112305
       
  • Teaching time; Disrupting common sense

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kevin Birth
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In my course “Time” I set out to disrupt the connection between cognitive tools used to represent time (clocks and calendars) and experiences of time. This article documents some of the topics and pedagogical methods I use: using unusual due dates for assignments, making the clock look strange, disrupting the idea of “now,” showing how clocks cultivate gullibility, exploring the different hour systems of the past, criticizing clock-based logics used in primatological research, explaining the theory of special relativity, and exploring the political and economic consequences of sleep loss.
      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-11-18T03:20:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221138639
       
  • Beyond the clock: Rethinking the meaning of unpaid childcare in the U.S.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nancy Folbre
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Can parental childcare be described as productive work' If so, is this work reducible to the specific physical activities designated in most time use surveys, or does it include more diffuse responsibilities for supervision, socialization, and management' These questions invite attention to debates over the meaning of work itself, which have been shaped not only by gender and academic discipline, but also by empirical results of diary-based time use surveys. Recent quantitative research strongly suggests that neither the temporal demands, nor the economic contributions of parental childcare are fully captured by conventional measurement of specific childcare activities. The numbers themselves urge us to look beyond the clock to carefully consider how time use categories are conceptualized.
      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-10-17T11:12:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221131108
       
  • Syrians’ experiences of waiting and temporality in Turkey: Gendered
           reconceptualisations of time, space and refugee identity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ayşecan Terzioglu
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, the number of refugees has increased considerably throughout the world, and the difficulties they experience have become more visible in political and social science research. Refugees wait for uncertain amounts of time to cross borders, to obtain legal status and papers, and to establish their lives in a new country, where they try to find suitable housing and jobs, and to benefit from health care and educational services. This article explores how Syrian refugees in Turkey reconceptualise time and place when they narrate these periods of waiting as a way of managing its disadvantageous aspects. It argues that they acquire agency through creating narratives of waiting in their own terms, which also help them to redefine their refugee identities, subjectivities and senses of belonging. It suggests that Syrians in Turkey attribute new gendered and embodied meanings to temporality and spatiality in order to cope with their past traumas and the disempowering effects of waiting. Through their narratives, they aim to gain a sense of control over time in cognitive and emotional terms, maintaining their hope to establish new lives despite structural inadequacies and discrimination.
      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-10-13T02:25:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221128633
       
  • Becoming “intimate” with the present moment: Mindfulness and
           the question of temporality

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nis L Primdahl
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Being in the present moment is a key element in most widespread definitions of modern mindfulness. A claim about temporality can thus be said to lie at the core of mindfulness, in which some ways of relating to time are considered subordinate to others; being in the present moment is ascribed higher value than being elsewhere in time. However, although the significance of the present moment is clear, its content and meaning are ambiguous; what temporal states are promoted through mindfulness' This article seeks to theorize this ambiguity by focusing on the specific context of school-based mindfulness as a case in which temporality and education intertwine. Whereas educational research on issues related to time and temporality typically construes time as a condition or resource for educational practices, I argue that school-based mindfulness represents a particular method of making temporality—specifically, the relation between the student self and the present moment—into an object of education. I identify three dimensions of what it means to be in the present moment through empirical examples drawn from a broader study on the educational purposes of school-based mindfulness. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of the complexity of the notion of the present moment in school-based mindfulness for future research in this field.
      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-09-26T05:14:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221123356
       
  • Post-crisis imaginaries in the time of direct-acting antiviral hepatitis C
           treatment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Renae Fomiatti, Adrian Farrugia, Suzanne Fraser, David Moore, Michael Edwards, Carla Treloar
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Until the recent introduction of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) medications, the only available hepatitis C treatments were lengthy and onerous interferon-based therapies, with relatively weak success rates. While experiences of interferon-based treatment have been well documented, there is a need to better understand how the experiences of the ‘old’ treatments shape contemporary treatment experiences. This article uses the concept of ‘post-crisis’ developed in critical scholarship on HIV/AIDS, and recent theorisations of ‘curative time’, to explore the relationship between contemporary treatment experiences and the legacies of interferon-based therapies. In mobilising these concepts, we trouble linear temporal logics that take for granted distinctions between the past and present, old and new, and cure and post-cure, and draw attention to the fluidity of time and the overlapping co-constitutive terrains of meaning that shape treatment experiences. Drawing on 50 interviews with people affected by hepatitis C, we argue that the curative imaginary of DAA treatments – that is, the temporal framing applied to hepatitis C in which cure is expected and assumed – is shaped by the logic of crisis. Here, knowledge of and the possibilities for the new treatments and living with hepatitis C remain tethered to crisis accounts of interferon. Unlike HIV/AIDS, in which the disease itself was figured as crisis, many participants described interferon-based treatments as the crisis: as worse than living with hepatitis C. While the new treatments were widely described as simple and easy, we argue that treatment is not so straightforward and that the crisis/post-crisis relation is central to this complexity. We conclude by considering the significance of these post-crisis enactments for understanding the recent plateauing of DAA treatment uptake, and reflect on how post-crisis futures of hepatitis C ‘cure’ need to address the ongoing constitutive effects of interferon-based treatments.
      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-09-22T11:49:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221128736
       
  • Can we teach undergraduates the history of time'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Justin T. Clark
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This essay examines the author’s experience since 2018 in developing and teaching a third-year undergraduate course on the history of time at a Singapore university, for students specializing in East and Southeast Asian history and the history of technology. History courses are traditionally taught in a chronological format, with clear periodization, and a nearly exclusive focus on written and audiovisual “texts.” The author has found that such an approach is less effective for a course on the history of time, a subject that suggests no obvious periodization or linear narrative, and for which many of his students lack a precise vocabulary. To solve these challenges, the author has borrowed autoethnographic exercises developed by scholars in other disciplines and assigned unconventional tasks such as building water clocks and curating time capsules. While the course has proven popular, it has also invited questions about what a global history of time looks like. Although the industrial and technological history of time is accessible to his students, much of the recent work on temporality presumes a familiarity with European and North American social and political issues that students outside of those regions may lack.
      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-19T02:03:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221111048
       
  • Living in the wrong time zone: Elevated risk of traffic fatalities in
           eccentric time localities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jeffery Gentry, Jayson Evaniuck, Thanchira Suriyamongkol, Ivana Mali
      First page: 457
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Chronobiology research has uncovered a host of maladies linked to social jetlag (SJL), the sleep-disrupting disconnect between solar time and social time. This interdisciplinary study applies chronobiology theory to the potential effect of misaligned time zones on motor-vehicle deaths. In the U.S. 53 million residents live in counties located outside their official time zones’ standard 15° span of longitude, based on degrees west of the prime meridian. We refer to these counties as eccentric time localities (ETLs), all of which lie west of their time zones’ standard western border in the U.S. In contrast, counties within 7.5° of their time zone’s standard geographic center are what we call solar zones. Solar zones do not vary more than 30 minutes from true solar time. ETL residents are forced to rise before dawn, possibly restricting their sleep-time and suppressing both morning and evening zeitgebers that would support their circadian entrainment. Hypothesizing that living in ETLs amplifies social jetlag, data on 417,399 traffic fatalities in the U.S. between 2006 and 2017 from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) census were analyzed via GIS mapping and population-data statistics. Road fatalities among residents of solar zones were compared to those living in ETLs within the same official time zone. ETL residents across the U.S. indicated 21.8% higher fatality-rates than solar residents, with a mean of 1286 additional (i.e., unexpected) deaths-per-year. Results support circadian entrainment theory and are consistent with the SJL construct. The socio-political ramifications of these findings are discussed, as well as the subject of best practices when analyzing whole-population data. The authors conclude that the unquestioned rhetoric of time-zone boundaries should be reconsidered in social policy.
      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-11T02:30:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221104675
       
  • Who’s cooking tonight' A time-use study of coupled adults in
           Toronto, Canada

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bochu Liu, Michael J Widener, Lindsey G Smith, Steven Farber, Dionne Gesink, Leia M Minaker, Zachary Patterson, Kristian Larsen, Jason Gilliland
      First page: 480
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Understanding how coupled adults arrange food-related labor in relation to their daily time allocation is of great importance because different arrangements may have implications for diet-related health and gender equity. Studies from the time-use perspective argue that daily activities such as work, caregiving, and non-food-related housework can potentially compete for time with foodwork. However, studies in this regard are mostly centered on individual-level analyses. They fail to consider cohabiting partners’ time spent on foodwork and non-food-related activities, a factor that could be helpful in explaining how coupled partners decide to allocate time to food activities. Using 108 daily time-use logs from seventeen opposite-gender couples living in Toronto, Canada, this paper examines how male and female partners’ time spent on non-food-related activities impact the total amount of time spent on foodwork by coupled adults and the difference in time spent on foodwork between coupled women and men. Results show that both male and female partners took a higher portion of foodwork when their partner worked longer. When men worked for additional time, the couple-level duration of foodwork decreased. Without a significant impact on the gender difference in foodwork duration, women’s increased caregiving duration was associated with a reduction of total time spent on foodwork by couples. An increase in caregiving and non-food-related chores by men was associated with an increased difference in duration of foodwork between women and men, which helped secure a constant total amount of foodwork at the couple level. These behavioral variations between men and women demonstrate the gender differences in one’s responsiveness to the change of partners’ non-food-related tasks. The associations found among non-food-related activities and foodwork are suggestive of a need to account for partners’ time allocation when studying the time-use dynamics of foodwork and other daily activities.
      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-22T04:50:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221100696
       
  • Bias in estimated working hours in time diary research: The effect of
           cyclical work time patterns on postponing designated registration days

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Petrus te Braak, Theun Pieter van Tienoven, Joeri Minnen, Ignace Glorieux
      First page: 508
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Due to the diversification and fragmentation of working time arrangements, the organisation of working weeks now differ substantially from each other. To account for week-to-week variability in working time estimates in time diary research, it is important that respondents keep their time diaries on designated registration days. At the same time, this week-to-week variability might lead respondents to postpone their participation to convenient registration days. Research shows that, due to diverse time cycles, postponing participation leads to substantial bias. However, these findings pre-date online time diary methodologies. In online time diary studies, algorithms assign registration days and, therefore, postponement is solely done at the convenience of the respondent and no longer relies on the availability of the interviewer. Analyses of online time diary data from Flemish (Belgian) teachers (ndiary days = 59,969; nteachers = 8567) reveal that postponement depends on (the day in) the time cycle. This postponement is partially selective and thus leads to biased working time estimates. Some oversampling strategies are suggested to account for this possible bias, but a designated, consecutive 7-day time diary approach with postponement remains the recommended standard for collecting reliable working time estimates.
      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T09:06:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221111948
       
  • Sustainability in times of disruption: Engaging with near and distant
           futures in practices of food entrepreneurship

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Koen van der Gaast, Eveline van Leeuwen, Sigrid Wertheim-Heck
      First page: 535
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The sustainability transformation of the food system involves imagining a sustainable future whilst functioning within the current unsustainable food system. Some argue there is a difference between the goal-oriented and comfort seeking form in which the near future is engaged, and the reflexive, imaginary way in which the distant future is engaged. This begs the question, how is engagement with near and distant futures balanced, and what does this mean for the overall sustainability transformation of the food system' We studied future engagement in practices of food entrepreneurship in the Dutch province of Flevoland during the disruption caused by the covid-19-induced lockdowns. This disruption posed a challenge and an opportunity to study near and distant future engagement in depth. Through an online survey and offline semi-structured interviewing, we questioned practitioners of sustainable food entrepreneurship during the first and second lockdown, respectively. The findings show near future engagement is mostly associated with immediate change in practices enforced by the covid-19 lockdown, whereas distant future engagement primarily was visible in continuous change in practices as associated with sustainability. However, this does not mean near and distant future were perfectly balanced. Therefore, we argue pre-existing trends with regards to sustainability can be accelerated or obstructed when they meet the immediate effects of disruption. Our paper concludes by stating the need for more research to the interaction of near and distant futures in different contexts and circumstances.
      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T09:37:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221083184
       
  • Sea ice out of time: Reckoning with environmental change

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julianne Yip
      First page: 561
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In September 2007, Arctic sea ice plummeted to a shocking record minimum at the time. The amount of ice lost that summer was equal to that lost over the previous 25 years. As Arctic sea ice escapes scientists’ predictions, scholars in the social sciences and humanities have critically interrogated “nature”/“culture” divides that treat the time of nature as unchanging and distinct from human beings. This essay examines what concept of time emerges through Arctic sea ice as an analytic lens. By this, I mean scientific knowledge of sea ice and the conceptual possibilities for thinking ice temporalities and environmental time-reckoning that it opens up. Attending to these possibilities suggests different kinds of “clocks” to help reckon the time of environmental changes in the form of (1) climate anomalies (e.g., deviations in ice thickness), which offer a different way of telling environmental time that attends to the physical specificity of substances; and (2) the Arctic Oscillation, a semi-periodic world weather pattern that emerges from the thick of relationships among ice, atmosphere, ocean, and now humans, generating a collective planetary time. Finally, I argue that the relational human–nonhuman production of planetary time shifts the focus in social studies of time from collective time-reckoning, which assumes entities have a socioculturally determined concept of time, toward temporal coordination as a less anthropocentric mode of ordering shared realities. Coordination decenters “the Human” as an epistemic ordering principle and enlarges ordering to include a diversity of nonhuman ways of being. Through temporal coordination, environmental prediction would be the ordering of a collective reality that a multiplicity of human and nonhuman ways of being make together rather than the search for a more precise clock, or development of better technoscientific means to capture nonhuman temporalities external to human beings.
      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-08-07T01:06:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221111335
       
  • Temporalities of vulnerability: Unemployment tactics during the Spanish
           crisis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Álvaro Briales
      First page: 584
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper I analyse the processes of vulnerabilisation related to unemployment, based on the case of Spain in the period 2010–2020. I conceptualise unemployment time as empty time that unemployed people attempt to fill using temporal tactics. To explain the degree of temporal agency of the unemployed, I shall analyse their tactics according to four social conditions: previous work socialisation, duration of unemployment, domestic relationship and social class. In terms of method, this study was based on quantitative time data obtained from the most recent Time Use Survey for Spain (from 2009 to 2010), and on qualitative time use data obtained from eight discussion groups and 49 interviews with unemployed people. Drawing on these data, I analyse relationships between temporal tactics in unemployment, the social conditions of the subjects and their processes of vulnerability, and define five temporal tactics, which I term: the investing time tactic, the domestic hyperactivity tactic, the domestic work rejection tactic, the constant effort tactic and the non-tactic. I conclude by demonstrating that these tactics can be sequenced as stages in a process of vulnerability associated with gradual desynchronisation from pre-unemployment times, underlining the importance of socio-temporal categories and conditions in understanding vulnerability.
      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-09-24T03:17:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221122485
       
  • Book Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ari Stillman
      First page: 608
      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T05:44:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X221111035
       
  • WITHDRAWAL – Administrative Duplicate Publication: Time, space and care:
           Rethinking transnational care from a temporal perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2020-01-20T07:34:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X13491342
       
  • WITHDRAWAL – Administrative Duplicate Publication: Time, space and care:
           Rethinking transnational care from a temporal perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Time & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Time & Society
      PubDate: 2020-01-20T07:34:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961463X19894445
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.210.85.190
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-