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  Subjects -> SPORTS AND GAMES (Total: 199 journals)
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International Review for the Sociology of Sport
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.632
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 24  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1012-6902 - ISSN (Online) 1461-7218
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Digital selves: A cross-cultural examination of athlete social media
           self-presentation during the 2020 Tokyo Olympics

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      Authors: Qingru Xu, Eunhui Kim, Sitong Guo
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the social media self-presentation of Chinese, South Korean, and US athletes during the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, with the aim of elucidating the influence of gender and nationalism on their online portrayals across countries. A total of 1800 photographs posted by 278 Olympians were analyzed, revealing that (a) South Korean athletes, particularly males, display a higher prevalence of business-related images in their self-presentation compared to athletes from other countries; (b) Chinese athletes exhibit a greater degree of nationalism in their posted photographs than their South Korean and US counterparts; and (c) female athletes, although gaining agency over their online presence, still demonstrate behaviors reinforcing conventional gender norms. This research underscores the multifaceted interplay of gender, nationalistic, cultural, political, and ideological factors in shaping athletes’ self-representations on social media, offering valuable insights into the complex dynamics that inform their digital self-expression.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2024-02-26T05:43:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231224438
       
  • A quest for legitimacy' An exploratory study of the new meanings of sports
           and physical activity in contemporary Saudi Arabia

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      Authors: Arnošt Svoboda, Billy Graeff, Paul Bretherton, Simona Šafaříková, Daiana Viacelli, Abdul R Al Droushi, Jorge Knijnik
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      The Saudi Arabian Kingdom is currently undergoing significant socio-cultural changes, primarily driven by Vision 2030, a strategic document outlining the nation's future development. This initiative includes efforts to enhance sports participation and physical activity levels across various sectors of the country. This paper represents one of the first attempts to understand the effects of the Vision on domestic sports/physical activities policy through the lens of selected actors in the field. with a special interest in youth sports. Based on extensive fieldwork that took place within the country, including qualitative semi-structured interviews with stakeholders from various organisations within Saudi sports, we identify several key facets seen as crucial enablers or obstacles for the field of sports and physical activities. The individual facets form two main groups – activities of state authorities in Saudi Arabia, specifically the Ministry of Education and Ministry of Sports, and informal practices influenced by broader cultural changes oscillating between the traditional views and contemporary demands. Amongst the identified cultural facets, gender takes a crucial discursive position. As we examine these processes through the lens of concepts of soft power and rightful resistance, we identify formal and informal legitimation practices used by stakeholders to achieve and potentially surpass the goals set by Vision 2030 for the Kingdom's sporting landscape.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2024-02-23T07:07:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902241231818
       
  • From combat boots to running shoes: The role of military service in
           shaping masculine identity in Israeli long-distance running groups

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      Authors: Assaf Lev
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the social construction of masculinity within the Israeli society, focusing on the associations between masculine identity, prior military service, and current involvement in long-distance running. A 2-year ethnographic research design was utilized, involving two running groups, which incorporated participant observation, semi-structured interviews, and running websites. The findings shed light on the significance of military service experience and the utilization of military discourse as strategies employed by runners to navigate the challenges of long-distance running and to reinforce their masculine identity. Through an analysis of the runners’ military discourse and behavior, it becomes evident that the integration of women into traditionally masculine domains of intense physical activity poses a threat to masculine dominance, eliciting various responses from men, such as intensified sports training and the use of sexist and aggressive language. These coping mechanisms contribute to the perpetuation of male dominance within the long-distance running sphere while simultaneously providing male runners with a pseudo-corrective experience associated with their personal history of non-combat military involvement.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2024-02-01T05:42:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231226409
       
  • Grandmasters, distinct elite: Taste submitted to discussion from the
           social conditioning factors of the predilection for chess

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      Authors: Jéssica dos Anjos Januário, Sérgio Settani Giglio, Sílvia Cristina Franco Amaral
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      This study analyzes the relations between the social conditioning factors and the taste for the cultural practice of chess manifested in the discourses of the grandmasters who compose its elite in the Brazilian contemporary context. The theoretical and methodological framework of Pierre Bourdieu was used. For the research method, retrospective semi-structured interviews were carried out personally with each Brazilian chess grandmaster. Thematic Analysis was assigned for the qualitative treatment of the data. The result originated the axis ‘Grandmasters, distinct elite: the naturalness of the cultivation of taste by legitimate heirs’, which mainly analyzes the favoured family origin of these agents and how this affected the success of their high-performance trajectories in this sport. It is concluded that the mechanism of the family cultural heritage acted in the production of a dilettantish taste and lifestyle in relation to chess, characterizing a distanced, liberated and detached attitude towards the practice. This condition is disseminated by its elite and does not include all people who, in Brazil, have different family origins and deal with it from an unequal distribution of opportunities in relation to the practice of this sport.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T04:48:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231226088
       
  • ‘I can’t believe I just made history’: A temporal analysis of sports
           media reporting

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      Authors: Chloé Beaudoin, Nicolas Moreau, Mélissa Roy
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Professional sport is a central element of our daily entertainment that contributes to shaping us individually and bonding us collectively: it provides us with shared ‘historic’ moments. This article is interested in these moments, and how the field of sports generates them, by asking the following questions: (1) has the frequency of ‘historic moments’ changed over time, and (2) is the way we make sports history consistent throughout the years' We conducted a temporal analysis of newspaper and magazine articles (n  =  1062) published in France (Le Monde, l’Équipe) and in the United States (USA Today, Sports Illustrated) during three time periods in the 21st century (2003, 2010, 2019). Our results show that: (1) as time passes, ‘historic’ moments occur more frequently; (2) sporting history is increasingly linked to social dimensions; and (3) statistical performances continue to mark history above all else. Although performance-based achievements are consistently celebrated, sporting history cannot be separated from our collective social existence, and the currents therein. We show that the act of making sports history is also bound to the normative, social, and cultural history of a society.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T06:55:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231226092
       
  • Women's transnational migration through football: Possibilities,
           responsibilities, and respectability in Ghana

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      Authors: Paul Darby, James Esson, Christian Ungruhe
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      The growth of girls’ and women's football in Africa, coupled with increased professionalisation in Europe and the United States, has led to rising international migration of African female players. This trend reflects the longer standing culture of independent, transnational migration among African women since the late 1980s and of enlarged possibilities and responsibilities triggered by neoliberal reform across the continent. This article explores how these sporting, cultural and economic transformations have coalesced to influence the aspirations and agency of female youth and young women in Ghana. To do so, we draw on original data from ethnographic fieldwork in Ghana, Sweden and Denmark undertaken between 2015 and 2021. Our findings reveal that for ambitious, talented female footballers, transnational football migration is increasingly viewed as a speculative route to improve ones’ life chances and negotiate intergenerational responsibilities to family. Significantly, the article also illustrates that in seeking to produce this highly prized form of migration, they must carefully navigate gendered social norms and hierarchies related to ‘respectable’ career and life trajectories. The conclusion proposes a critical research agenda to explore the interplay between sporting opportunities, migration aspirations and diverse socioeconomic conditions in Africa.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T01:50:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231224423
       
  • Unicorns, rainbows, and unicorn magic: Storying new knowledge of black
           masculinities within the WWE

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      Authors: Nikolas Dickerson
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines the story arc of a trio of Black male wrestlers called the New Day within the World Wrestling Entertainment industry (WWE) who go from militant nationalists, stereotypical singing/dancing preachers, and finally to self-described unicorns bringing magic back to the WWE. Wrestling is used to explore anti-Blackness, Black masculinity, and conceptions of the human/humanity. Drawing on Katherine McKittrick's Black methodological intervention of textual accumulation to interrogate issues of race, masculinity, and sexuality within their performances, I argue the group's unique position as wrestlers allows us to conceptualize the trio as “writers” of fiction; a position that when read through Kevin Young's concept of storying provides insight into a Black creative practice engaging in alternative worldmaking and rewriting understandings of the human outside of a Western European framework. I advocate that the stories of the New Day not only provide glimpses into new genres of being human, but also forms of Black manhood(s) outside of a patriarchal framework.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2024-01-10T06:59:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231221265
       
  • The Qatar World Cup and Twitter sentiment: Unraveling the interplay of
           soft power, public opinion, and media scrutiny

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      Authors: Ahmed A. M. Hassan, Jia Wang
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      This research examines public opinion on Twitter during the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar, focusing on the interplay between sport, communication, and soft power. It sheds light on the online discourse surrounding a global sporting event by analyzing tweet frequency, sentiment changes, prevalent topics, and the most popular tweets surrounding controversial events. Political discussions surrounding the World Cup initially dominated but gradually declined, shifting the focus to sporting achievements and cultural exchange. Throughout the tournament, the host country, European countries participating in the World Cup, and fans contested the narrative surrounding the event. However, the study highlights how celebrities and public figures had a more significant impact on shaping conversations about sports, cultural exchange, and sociopolitical issues. These findings deepen the understanding of the interplay between sports, politics, culture, and social issues, offering insights to researchers, practitioners, and policymakers.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-12-07T07:28:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231218700
       
  • Surviving child sexual abuse in women's artistic gymnastics: ‘It's
           beautiful, because had I stayed in the past, I wouldn’t have evolved as
           a person’

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      Authors: Natalie Barker-Ruchti, Valeria Varea
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      The USA Gymnastics sex abuse scandal raised global awareness about child sexual abuse (CSA) in women's artistic gymnastics. The ensuing media coverage also centre-staged victims’ survivorship stories, a process that for many moved from dissociating, recognising and disclosing CSA to feeling comfort when connecting with survivors and accepting CSA as part of their life history. However, scholarship on what survivorship from CSA in sport entails, and importantly, what it means to athletes, is limited. In this article, we frame the survival of CSA using Arthur Frank’s socio-narratological conceptualisation of people being able to process the devastating consequences of a life-threatening and/or a life-altering event, and present the survivorship stories of two former gymnasts, Maria and Lucia (pseudonyms). For these two women, survivorship was facilitated by hearing others’ stories of sexual abuse, purposefully facing their CSA experiences and connecting with one another later in life to raise awareness about sexual abuse in sport. Thus, in addition to presenting Maria and Lucia's stories for the purpose of providing CSA victims with a survivorship narrative, we outline and reflect on the role hearing and telling stories have in CSA survivorship.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-12-06T10:19:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231218180
       
  • Young refugees’ experiences of accumulating horizontal and vertical
           social capital through organised and informal sports

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      Authors: Martin Nesse, Sine Agergaard, Lucy V Piggott
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      For the last 20 years, Putnam's conceptualisations of bonding and bridging social capital have become a common reference for policies and programmes that seek to promote integration in and through sports. However, few researchers have looked beyond face-to-face interactions to how sports may develop migrants’ relations to formal associations, institutions, and agencies in civil society. In this article, we aim to explore how young refugees accumulate diverse forms of social capital through participation in sports clubs and informal sports. Drawing on Lewandowski's conceptualisations of horizontal and vertical social capital, we analyse 10 young refugees’ experiences with sports participation in Norway. The results show that informants found it challenging to participate in sports clubs due to conflicting views on how to ‘do sports’ as well as processes of ‘othering’. As a result, their opportunities for accumulating vertical social capital (social connections and resources across vertical power differentials) were limited and only identified for the most highly skilled informants. Consequently, the informants dropped out of sports clubs and instead joined informal sports to experience a sense of community and belonging with peers similar to themselves. By doing so, the informants were able to accumulate horizontal social capital (resources within a specific socioeconomic or cultural stratum) as well as negotiating specific types of vertical social capital. Overall, our findings illustrate some of the challenges and limitations of Norwegian sports policy and clubs in facilitating social capital and, thus, social mobility for young refugees.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-12-06T10:19:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231217941
       
  • ‘For those few minutes you are free’: The meaning of sport from
           imprisoned men's perspective

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      Authors: Johannes Müller
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Based on an ethnographic study in a German prison, this article explores the question of what meaning incarcerated men attach to sport in light of the loss of freedom and autonomy which according to Sykes are particular ‘pains of imprisonment’. The material shows the following: (1) Incarceration is perceived by imprisoned men as a life under duress and proves to be a stark contrast to life outside prison due to the limited freedom of movement, action and decision making. (2) Sport is a means for incarcerated men to bring back memories of being free and to mentally escape into the time before imprisonment. (3) Sport is one of the few opportunities for imprisoned men to spend time in fresh air, which results in a physically–sensually experienced liberation. (4) Participation in sports enables the incarcerated to temporarily regain freedom of action and decision making. Overall, the findings indicate that sport can best be understood as a help in coping with incarceration. It is concluded from the findings that imprisoned men attach their own meanings to sport, largely detached from the function of sport ascribed by the institution (such as rehabilitation and health promotion).
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-11-30T05:34:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231217186
       
  • The art of balance: Indigenous sport governance between traditional
           government and self-governance

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      Authors: Kati Lehtonen, Eivind Åsrum Skille, Josef Fahlén
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      The governance of Indigenous people is in many contexts a combination of political ambitions to promote self-governance, and more traditional policies and governance practices. These combinations often carry unintended contradictions and exclusionary processes. In this article, we investigate the consequences of one such contradiction: the aspiration for self-determination and self-governance on the one hand and the aspiration for broader political influence in decisions about resources to Sámi sport on the other. Since legitimation of governance structures and practices is essential for their overall functionality, we constructed the research question: What strategies are used to legitimise the policy and governance practices of Sámi sport' To explore this research question, we employed Sámi sport in Finland as an empirical case. Results show that authorisation as a legitimation strategy is prominent and used at institutional and individual levels. Moral evaluation as strategy is based on authoritative actors’ personal choice. Inclusion and integration in mainstream policy is seen as a rational legitimation strategy, which is supported by narratives where smallness and uniqueness are dominant.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-11-30T05:33:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231217185
       
  • Inclusive, inviting, inspiring: Insights into the experiences of women's
           football fans in Australia and Germany

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      Authors: Christiana Schallhorn, Kasey Symons, Jessica Kunert, Lina-Doreen Rose
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Despite growing interest in women's football, limited research exists on its fans and their fan experience. Thus, findings from women's football culture against the background of hegemonic masculinity are presented, demonstrating how the space counteracts this concept. An online survey for fans located in Australia and Germany was developed to explore perceived differences in the culture of women's football. Participation in online (social media, broadcast) and offline (in stadium, in-person events) communities was examined. Further findings identified relevant themes for women's football fans: (1) the authentic character of women's football; (2) the strong bond between teams, players and fans; (3) the stadium as a safe space; (4) the friendly atmosphere in the stadium; and (5) less commercialisation, mediatisation and professionalisation. Implications for women's football, its fans and fan culture are discussed.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-11-27T08:34:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231215296
       
  • Participation of girls and women in community sport in Ghana: Cultural and
           structural barriers

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      Authors: Derrick Charway, Åse Strandbu
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Despite numerous international and national policy documents promoting girls’ and women's empowerment and participation in community sports, the actual access to sport for women and girls is still restricted in several countries. This paper explores the situation in Ghana. Through the analytical lens of Cooky and Messner’s theory of ‘the unevenness of social change’, we analyse the cultural and structural barriers that prevent girls and women from participating in sport in Ghanaian communities. The data material is document analysis, focus groups and semi-structured interviews with male and female officials representing state-funded regional and district sports organisations as well as non-state sports organisations in Ghana. The findings reveal that cultural barriers, rooted in deep-seated cultural norms and structural hindrances that undermine gender-inclusive policies, contribute to the limited participation of girls and women in community sport. Furthermore, the interplay between these cultural and structural factors leads to gender-specific practices and fewer women in leadership positions. Based on our analyses, we suggest that structural changes (enforcing and implementing gender policies) can result in cultural changes (positive gender equality outcomes) over time.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-11-16T05:45:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231214955
       
  • Media (re)presentation of a black woman esports player: The case of
           Chiquita Evans in the NBA 2K League

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      Authors: Egil Trasti Rogstad
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the media construction of Chiquita Evans, the first woman to participate in the NBA 2 K League, uncovering a complex interplay of gender norms and power dynamics. Explored through Foucauldian discourse analysis, her identity negotiation within this unique space, where sport, gaming, and media converge, is illuminated. Evans emerges as a trailblazer who challenges and reshapes established gender conventions in the male-dominated esports arena. While her defiance of gender norms is evident, the media's focus on her physicality inadvertently perpetuates gendered expectations. Moreover, Evans’ participation showcases her navigation of racial and gender norms, exposing lingering biases. The intersection of sport and media logic demonstrates evolving dynamics while also highlighting challenges faced by women players. Overall, the media construction of Evans works to encourage acceptance while reproducing established stereotypes, suggesting that increased representation may not inherently challenge power dynamics.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-11-13T10:41:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231211683
       
  • Becoming and being a masters athlete: Class, gender, place and the
           embodied formation of (anti)-ageing moral identities

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      Authors: Nicholas Hookway, Catherine Palmer, Zack Dwyer, Casey Mainsbridge
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Once discouraged or viewed as dangerous, Masters athletes are now seen as exemplars of how people should age. This paper qualitatively examines the sporting pathways, embodied experiences and the moral formation of ageing identities among ‘young-old’ athletes competing in the 16th Australian Masters Games. Held in regional Tasmania (Australia), the Games attracted over 5000 participants competing across 47 sports over an 8-day period. Contributing to a critical body of scholarship on Masters athletes, the paper shows that class and gender inequality shape processes of becoming and being a Masters athlete that are rarely acknowledged in the ‘heroic ageing’ accounts the participants narrate. Further, the paper develops a unique spatial perspective on Masters sport that recognises the potential of the Games to disrupt place-based stigma but also identifies its class dimensions both as a site of middle-class shame and consumer opportunity for affluent sports tourists. We draw upon Allen-Collinson's concept of ‘intense embodiment’ to spotlight the sensory pleasures, pain and injuries of training and competing as an older athlete but also as an important lens for analysing the construction of ageing moral identities that can stigmatise and exclude the inactive old.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T07:58:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231211680
       
  • Sport and policy in ‘contested nations’: Analysing policy and
           political considerations in Taiwan and Scotland

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      Authors: Ren-Shiang Jiang, Stuart Whigham
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Policy learning from other international contexts is an important strategy during the sports policymaking process for the government of Taiwan, and recent research has examined potential parallels between Taiwan and Scotland with regards to sports policy. Although the status of Taiwan and Scotland is not the same, interesting comparisons can be made given their shared status as ‘contested nations’ that are often in the shadow of their closest neighbours with whom there is an uneasy political relationship – respectively, China and England. As a consequence, sport is regarded in both countries as an important vehicle for establishing and promoting a distinctive identity, albeit with contrasting political and policy considerations. Drawing upon 15 semi-structured interviews with sports policymakers and politicians from both Taiwanese and Scottish contexts, this paper critically examines the similarities and contrasts with regards to the political considerations which shape and constrain the nature of sport policy in each context. This analysis will focus on the role of central government, local government, sport policy organisations, and sporting National Governing Bodies in both Taiwan and Scotland, with particular emphasis on the position of sport within the broader policy, political, ideological and constitutional considerations for policymakers in each context.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-11-08T06:41:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231212827
       
  • ‘Best run club in the world': Manchester City fans and the
           legitimation of sportswashing'

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      Authors: Colm Kearns, Gary Sinclair, Jack Black, Mark Doidge, Thomas Fletcher, Daniel Kilvington, Katie Liston, Theo Lynn, Guto Leoni Santos
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      The term sportswashing has been discussed and analysed within academic circles, as well as the mainstream media. However, the majority of existing research has focused on one-off event-based sportswashing strategies (such as autocratic states hosting major international sports events) rather than longer term investment-based strategies (such as state actors purchasing sports clubs and teams). Furthermore, little has been written about the impact of this latter strategy on the existing fanbase of the purchased team and on their relationship with sportswashing and the discourses surrounding it. This paper addresses this lacuna through analysis of a popular Manchester City online fan forum, which illustrates the manner in which this community of dedicated City fans have legitimated the actions of the club's ownership regime, the Abu Dhabi United Group – a private equity group operated by Abu Dhabi royalty and UAE politicians. The discursive strategies of the City fans are discussed, in addition to the wider significance of these strategies on the issue of sportswashing and its coverage by the media.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-11-07T08:48:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231210784
       
  • ‘Inclusivity for who’': An analysis of ‘race’ and female fandom at
           the 2022 UEFA European Women's Championships

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      Authors: Anika Leslie-Walker, Katie Taylor, Esther Jones Russell
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the experiences and identities of minority ethnic women at the UEFA Women's Euros (UWE) held in England in 2022. It does so at a time when women sports fans have become more visible in the historically male-dominated environs of football fandom, particularly in the United Kingdom (UK), and when questions of ‘race’, ethnicity and gender are longstanding, contested elements of British culture and society. Through a Black feminist thought methodology allied to critical race theory principles, the study contributes an essential intersectional account of minority ethnic women's sports fandom experiences at a major international event. The findings confirm that the growth of women's football in the UK, motivated minority ethnic women to attend the UWE. However, the current visibility and inclusivity of professional women's football demonstrates a lack of diversity and cultural sensitivity, which often inhibits minority ethnic women from presenting their identities to further engage with and support the game's growth.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-11-07T07:39:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231210769
       
  • Climate change versus winter sports; can athlete climate activism change
           the score'

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      Authors: Natalie LB Knowles, Daniel Scott, Michelle Rutty
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Outdoor winter sports sit on the frontlines of climate change, with athletes subject to increasingly unsafe, unfair and non-ideal competition and training conditions as a result. With athletes’ livelihoods and the future of winter sports on the line, this research investigates if and how winter athletes use their position as public figures, celebrities and role models to challenge the hegemonic structures in sports and society driving climate change. Framed through the broad athlete-activism literature, this study used a qualitative survey of 390 elite winter-sport athletes and coaches combined with eight key stakeholder interviews to understand athlete climate activism. Results demonstrate that winter athletes’ climate action is generally low risk constituting advocacy rather than activism. Athletes express fear of being called out as hypocritical for their high-carbon sport and lifestyle, insecurity over their level of climate education and frustration with the lack of climate action from international- and national-level winter-sport organizations. Scholarly, grassroots and sport-based activism may help athletes engage more effectively in climate activism within and beyond sport.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T06:41:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231209226
       
  • How has the media's construction of a discourse of nationalism evolved'
           Critical discourse analysis of Korean sports nationalism through the FIFA
           World Cup

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      Authors: Woochul Kim
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on Fairclough's critical discourse analysis, this study sheds light on sports nationalism and traces changes in the media's discursive construction of the Korean national football team over time by analyzing news articles from three different World Cups. Korean sports nationalism has evolved in complex ways and has been influenced by a combination of factors, including the colonial experience, initiatives by the former military government, the hosting of mega-sporting events, local professional leagues, and the globalization of athletes on the world stage. Given the multifaceted nature of Korean sports nationalism, this study aims to examine how it has changed in response to social transformations, particularly the impact of neoliberal globalization. The findings reveal that sports nationalism is often manifested in the terms of “fighting spirit” or “sacrifice” as a core national trait. However, it increasingly incorporates and embraces a new neoliberal meritocratic culture and subjectivity that foregrounds individual success on the world stage as a new form of nationalism in an era of accelerating globalized and commodified sports elitism.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-10-27T06:23:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231208849
       
  • “It becomes a fight against who I am, rather than what I say”: Gender,
           positionality, and inclusion in esports leadership

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      Authors: Lucy V. Piggott, Anne Tjønndal
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Within this article, we draw upon Kezar and Lester's three components of positionality theory to explore how multiple and overlapping aspects of esports leaders’ identities influence their experiences and perceptions of working within esports organisations. We present findings collected through interviews with 11 leaders from nine Scandinavian esports organisations. Our findings show that the experiences of the esports leaders are strongly gendered. For example, all four women informants reported experiences of discrimination and marginalisation, whilst none of the men informants described incidents of this nature. The positionality of the women influenced the varied nature and extent to which they experienced discrimination and marginalisation, as well as their experiences of agency to resist and transform these practices. Meanwhile, the positionalities of both women and men influenced their recognition of privilege and the value they placed on inclusion and diversity. Furthermore, the gendered experiences of individual leaders were influenced by the specific esports context within which they work, including wider issues of discrimination and marginalisation across the esports community. Overall, our findings demonstrate that future strategies to make esports more gender inclusive need to appreciate how positionality influences the power that individuals have to access and influence esports organisations.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-10-09T06:47:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231206652
       
  • A holistic framework of power to observe constraining and enabling
           manifestations and outcomes of power within international Sport for
           Development and Peace partnerships

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      Authors: Joanne Clarke
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this article is to introduce a holistic framework of power that can serve to examine constraining and enabling manifestations of power within international Sport for Development and Peace (SDP) partnerships. The article is grounded in the recognition that the international SDP sector is wrapped up in ‘post-colonial residue’ and brings to the fore issues and power and inequality based on the construction and maintenance of hegemonic power relations. The article calls for SDP scholars to challenge the nature of partnerships and practices within the sector between international partners from the global north and global south. To develop and advance the case for this novel theoretical framework for studying power in SDP, the article is organized into three parts. The first part highlights the critical literature from the SDP and international development sectors concerning the nature of power relations with a specific focus on critical debates concerning social hierarchies. The second part offers a theoretical proposition and a three-phase theoretical model drawing on the work of Giulianotti, Lukes and Coleman to argue that power within international SDP partnerships is not static but needs to be recognized as a complex interplay of actions and outcomes. Finally, the article highlights how and why the holistic theoretical framework may be useful for SDP scholars in analysing and challenging power relations in future empirical-based research.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-10-09T06:47:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231206099
       
  • ‘Male, violent and dangerous’: The gender prejudices in rugby from the
           perception of current and former athletes of the Brazil women's rugby 7's
           national team

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      Authors: Giovanna Xavier de Moura, Elizabeth Pike, João Paulo Melleiro Malagutti, Fernando Augusto Starepravo
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Rugby is considered by many to be the antithesis of femininity because, since its creation, it has been a way for men to prove their masculinity. For this reason, the trajectory of women who practice it can be permeated with prejudices. The aim of this article is to advance the conceptual understanding of gender prejudice, stereotypes and discrimination, through an evaluation of the sports trajectory of cis women rugby players in Brazil. Ten female athletes, who are current or former athletes of the Brazil women's rugby 7's national team, were interviewed. They identified gender prejudice in relation to: (1) playing a sport considered masculine in which women should not take part; (2) being considered not to be able to practice it; (3) having bodies which do not fit the requirements of the ideal female body; (4) playing a violent sport; (5) trying to highlight attributes of femininity in publicity and press coverage. We conclude that, in the sport of rugby in Brazil, women are treated unfairly, with unequal salaries and limited opportunities. Moreover, they suffer prejudice and social pressure where they need to constantly reaffirm their sexuality, their femininity and their technical competence to play rugby.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-10-05T05:23:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231204726
       
  • Public support for athlete activism in Germany: A survey experiment

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      Authors: Swantje Müller, Henk Erik Meier, Markus Gerke, Michael Mutz
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Professional athletes increasingly use their popularity to speak out about political topics off and on the field. However, only few studies explore how audiences react to political speech in elite sports. Existing research has tended to focus on very few high-profile cases, usually in the United States, such as Colin Kaepernick's anthem protest. Going beyond single cases, this paper investigates factors that systematically influence public support for elite athletes’ political activism. We integrated a vignette experiment into a survey of the German population (N = 1002). Using multi-level regression models, we analyze how public support for athlete's political acts varies with political topics, the specific political action carried out as well as the local reference of the issue in question. Moreover, we also compare the level of public support for political actions between athletes and non-athlete celebrities. Findings indicate that support is subject to conditions: Athletes receive more support when their critique refers to political topics abroad (as opposed to domestic topics) and when non-disruptive actions are chosen, for example, expressions of opinion instead of boycotts. The specific message has the strongest influence on support: actions and statements that express a progressive political claim for stricter environmental protection receive more support compared to a rather conservative claim for border security. Findings add to the state of knowledge by showing which forms of political activism meet with broad acceptance and which are likely to polarize audiences.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-10-05T05:23:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231202193
       
  • Social status and sport: A study of young Norwegians

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      Authors: Ørnulf Seippel, Håvard Bergesen Dalen
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we study social status associated with sport. First, we examine the extent to which sport gives social status to Norwegian youths and athletes, how sport does so compared to other status markers and how sport and other various status markers vary by age, gender and cultural class. Second, we study how sport performances influence social status (popularity and likeability) among athletes. We hypothesise that (i) sport has a high status in general and especially among sport participants, (ii) sport loses attraction by age, but less so among sport participants than the general youth population, (iii) sport gives more status to boys than girls and (iv) sport performances influence athletes’ popularity and likability. We use data from the nationally representative Ungdata project of 2015 (N = 22,856, response rate 70%) and a study conducted by the authors on young athletes participating in organised sport (N = 387, response rate 74%). The results show that sport has a high status, especially among young sporting males. Cultural class seems less important for sport status. For status within the context of sports, the best-performing athletes are the most popular and best liked athletes. The findings are discussed with regard to recruitment, continuation and dropout from sports.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T07:56:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231202924
       
  • Reviewing and problematizing methods and analytical strategies of
           discourse analysis in sport, exercise, and physical education studies

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      Authors: Katherine Sveinson, Ulrik Wagner
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      The field of sport, exercise, and physical education studies continues to utilize and strives to enhance rigor in qualitative approaches. We build upon this work by narrowing a focus to appropriately applying rigorous discourse analysis (DA). Though variations of DA have been increasingly incorporated into sport, exercise, and physical education studies, a comprehensive overview specifically covering which methods underpin DA and which analytical strategies are adopted is missing. Therefore, we conducted a structured scoping review by identifying 1810 papers from journal and database searches from 2000 to April 2022, then narrowed the sample to 560 papers that specifically conducted a DA. The review focuses on studies and practices within Foucauldian Discourse Analysis, Critical Discourse Analysis, and Discursive Psychology. By adopting a problematizing approach, we critically question taken-for-granted practices of DA, and through our synthesis, we argue that uses of DA tend to be organized around three archetypes: as a method detached from theoretical origin, as a lens with less emphasis on methodological description by primarily utilizing theory to contextualize and interpret insights, and as a path where theory and methods overlap with appropriate methodological descriptions focusing on textual analysis.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T01:02:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231200369
       
  • Is sport's ‘gateway for inclusion’ on the latch for ethnic minorities'
           A discourse analysis of sport policy for inclusion and integration

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      Authors: Fiona Dowling
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars have increasingly called for the need to problematise and critically examine sport policy for integration/inclusion. This article aims to contribute to this ongoing debate by presenting a Foucauldian-inspired discourse analysis of the languaging of three decades of Norwegian sport policy for integration/inclusion, as well as non-sport policy that seeks to use sport as a policy tool. The analysis demonstrates how ideas and practices about the integration of ethnic minorities in sport are constructed in the shadows of the ‘real business’ of sport. Self-evident ‘Truths’ about inclusion/integration convey simplistic notions of assimilation into existing sport practices, reify notions of homogenous groups both with regard to the majority and the ethnic minority Norwegian population, distributing power unequally across the majority–minority divide, and contribute to construct sport as a racially coded, Eurocentric practice. The pervasive, long-standing idea that sport is inclusive works discursively to marginalise contradictory ideas, such as the complexities of integration that focus upon the need for a transformation of structures and practices, and ‘Truths’ like resourceful ethnic minorities or an adaptable sports organisation remain currently almost unthinkable. The analysis bears witness to scholars’ claims for the need to broaden research methodologies and policies for integration in/through sport, such that inequitable, Eurocentric, assimilated practices can be re-languaged to enable hybrid, transnational sports spaces frequented by resourceful participants.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-09-12T06:28:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231198864
       
  • Training the Mobile Great Wall: Social class and player–coach
           interactions in a Chinese basketball academy

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      Authors: Teng Ge
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Although athletes are considered the most important actors in training and competitions, many studies tend to view them as passive recipients of resources and opportunities that coaches and parents provide for them. This study investigates the active role that athletes might play in training by asking how athletes might proactively obtain opportunities on their own behalf when interacting with coaches. Through a 16-month ethnographic study of one elite Chinese basketball academy, I show that players’ class backgrounds shape their interactions with coaches, which in turn create different training experiences and athletic outcomes. Compared to their less-privileged peers, relatively privileged players not only respond to coaches’ directions more independently and actively, but also make requests to coaches more frequently and fluently. Relatively privileged players’ interaction strategies and behaviors give them advantages in meeting coaches’ implicit expectations in training by customizing the seemingly collectivist training programs in ways that fit their own needs. Consequently, they are more likely to elevate their athletic performances and prevent potential injuries in relation to their less-privileged teammates. The findings highlight the active role that athletes can play in sports training and new mechanisms through which stratifications are (re)produced in the field of professional sports.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-09-11T05:41:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231200361
       
  • Citizenship without identity' Instrumentalism, nationalism and
           naturalization in Chinese men's football

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      Authors: Peizi Han, Shengying Tang, Alan Bairner
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Representing the nation in sports mega events has become a highly contested issue with the acceleration of the transnational movement of athletes. This research has examined Chinese people's attitudes to the naturalization of football players. The article discusses the findings in the context of the qualifying stages for the 2022 FIFA Men's World Cup by presenting and analysing data collected from semi-structured interviews and social media extracts. Two main issues were debated by Chinese people concerning the identity of naturalized athletes. One was the ethnicity of the naturalized footballers in relation to nationality, with some people questioning whether they belong to China and can represent China. The other issue concerned the players’ skills and ability which influenced considerations of how much they could help China to qualify for the World Cup Finals. In relation to Chinese nationalism, national identity and Chinese sports, this study reveals, through the window provided by the presence of these naturalized footballers, how football, instrumentalism, nationalism and naturalization have been inextricably linked and have interacted with one another within the current context. The article analyses how pragmatic values have negotiated with ethno-cultural nationalism and impacted on the Chinese public's attitudes towards naturalized athletes, their image being presented in variable and dynamic ways by football fan netizens after each qualifying game.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-09-11T05:40:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231199580
       
  • South Korean members’ experiences on the LPGA Tour: The first decade
           after Se Ri Pak's appearance in 1998

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      Authors: Seungyup Lim, Michael Diacin, Adam Love
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      This study explored the experiences and perceptions of South Korean players on the Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA) Tour with respect to stereotyping and discrimination. Specifically, we investigated South Korean Tour members’ perspectives about interactions with their fellow golfers, LPGA officials, and members of the media. A combination of group and individual interviewers with 11 South Korean women who played on the LPGA Tour were conducted, and data were analysed using Hatch’s nine-step inductive analysis method. Researchers identified six themes based on patterns in participants’ responses regarding their experiences. These themes included: (a) inconsistent enforcement of rules regarding use of native language during tournament play; (b) inconsistent enforcement of rules regarding interactions with parents; (c) lack of English fluency impact upon pro-am experiences; (d) limited media coverage; and (e) lack of English fluency limiting self-advocacy. Participants perceived that their race and lack of English fluency impacted their overall experiences, in particular the treatment they received from other tour members, tour officials, and the media. Participants’ perspectives demonstrate the prevalence of the “yellow peril” and “perpetual foreigner” stereotypes during this era of the LPGA Tour.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-08-24T09:54:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231194487
       
  • Locating the Supporter Liaison Officer in the football field: Bridges,
           brokers and the ‘supporter gaze’

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      Authors: Jan Andre Lee Ludvigsen
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines a relatively recent yet under-researched role in the governance of elite European football – namely, the Supporter Liaison Officer. The Supporter Liaison Officer, as appointed by football clubs, is commonly envisioned as a mediator between fans and the clubs, authorities and security actors situated in the European football field. However, following its formal inception in the 2012/2013, little is known about how stakeholders understand the evolving and heterogeneously implemented Supporter Liaison Officer role. Drawing upon documentary and interview data, this article unpacks two key themes to develop two primary arguments. First, it argues that Supporter Liaison Officers may be understood as ‘social brokers’ that bridge together stakeholders who often possess diverging viewpoints and whose relationships are impacted by social barriers. Second, Supporter Liaison Officers are perceived as possessors of what is conceptualised here as a ‘supporter gaze’. Whilst contributing to the literature on supporter engagement and dialogue, these arguments also matter because if we understand the Supporter Liaison Officer implementation as influenced by supporter activism in Europe, then this article speaks to how outcomes of supporter pressure mature over time and their implications on football's supporter and security cultures.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-08-21T05:31:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231195569
       
  • Who counts as a woman' A critical discourse analysis of petitions against
           the participation of transgender athletes in women's sport

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      Authors: Honorata Jakubowska
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to analyze the organizational anti-trans discourse on the presence of transgender athletes in women's sport. To achieve this, the petitions published from 2019 to 2022 on the websites of three US organizations (Save Women's Sports, Independent Council on Women's Sports, and the Women's Sports Policy Working Group) were analyzed. The analysis addressed the research questions of how this discourse defines trans women and trans bodies and reproduces the indispensability of sex segregation in sport competitions. The research revealed that the petitions’ authors identified trans athletes as biological males who have an advantage over cis women. The organizations demand that the protection of women's sport from trans women's participation and women's rights be based on the sex (assigned at birth) category. The article emphasizes that members and allies of these organizations perceive biomedical science as providing objective arguments for the sex dichotomy and the exclusion of trans women from sport competitions. At the same time, the petitions’ authors ignore sociocultural factors that influence the perception of gender dichotomy and athletic performance.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-08-14T05:27:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231194570
       
  • Using panopticism to theorize the social role of the body in competitive
           gaming and electronic sport

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      Authors: Paolo Riatti, Ansgar Thiel
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      The role of the body is a common topic for discussions concerning competitive gaming, also known as electronic sport (esport). In esport, the focus on the body shifts from its physical presence towards digitality and therefore differs significantly compared to traditional sports. It is therefore questionable whether disciplinary mechanisms typical for sport that originate from the physical body being surveyed can be observed in competitive gaming as well. This conceptual paper uses Michel Foucault's concept of panopticism to theorize what consequences of deviant or normative behaviour can be derived from a (partially) absent physical corporeality in esport. Our approach reveals that esport and competitive gaming are lacking disciplinary mechanisms typical for traditional sports. We introduce the term dysopticon as a concept where players are not exposed to surveillance like in traditional sports, because of a perceived absence of the players’ physical bodies while competing. This can result in arbitrariness and deviant behaviour but also be an opportunity for inclusion or self-expression regardless of hegemonic corporeal norms and standards. Stakeholders, including players, clubs, associations, and corporations, can build upon these insights to develop and promote esport beneficially for sport and society.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-07-12T06:16:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231187322
       
  • Erratum to Refugee footballers’: A socioecological exploration of forced
           migrants in the Italian and German elite football system

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      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-07-07T06:46:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231188194
       
  • ‘Refugee footballers’: A socioecological exploration of forced
           migrants in the Italian and German elite football system

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      Authors: Alessio Norrito, Richard Giulianotti, Carolynne Mason, Enrico Michelini
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Against the background of the recent European ‘refugee crisis’ and its long-term consequences, this article investigates the research question ‘how do footballers with a refugee background experience the process of accessing top-level football'’, using ethnographic material and interviews with competitive footballers with a refugee background in Italy and Germany from two studies. The material was examined using qualitative content analysis and interpreted through the ecological systems theory. The results show that inclusion to professional football is complex for refugee footballers who are faced with the additional hurdles and consequences of a forced migration. Moreover, refugees build their networks within the process of resettlement, without a clear path for inclusion to elite football. Those who ‘make it’ have relied on key enablers within their microsystem and on mesosystemic interactions, further emphasizing the importance of networks for professional development. In contrast, exosystemic and macrosystemic factors further hinder the possibility of a sport career in football, on top of the existing difficulties of a forced migration. The process of seeking inclusion in competitive football however has been identified as a positive element that can provide direction in resettlement and opportunities for socialisation.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-06-14T07:16:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231179071
       
  • Spaces of football and belonging for people seeking asylum: Resisting
           policy-imposed liminality in Italy

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      Authors: Federico Genovesi
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      As radical right parties capitalise on the salience of immigration among the Italian public, this paper explores solidarity grassroots football as a unique lens to investigate how people seeking asylum resist the effects of policies and discourses of exclusion, and develop senses of belonging in the microscale of their day-to-day lives. Sport and migration studies researchers have primarily considered policy-based questions (e.g. how can sport facilitate integration'). In shifting the focus from integration to belonging, this ethnographic study engages with the embodied and affective experiences of individuals seeking asylum. Employing the analytical framework for the study of belonging advanced by Yuval-Davis and integrated by Antonsich, four themes are discussed: the agency of people seeking asylum in appropriating football to nurture a positive sense of self; the emergence of the material environment of sporting activities as a space of belonging; the negotiation of belonging within and beyond the team; and the local neighbourhood as possible trait d’union between sport-specific attachments and belonging to the wider community. The article contends that involvement in solidarity grassroots football can provide people seeking asylum with opportunities for belonging that go beyond the momentary, and play a vital role in resisting the liminality imposed by autochthonic politics of belonging.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-06-12T10:23:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231179624
       
  • Enclaved non-heteronormativity and pragmatic acceptance. The experiences
           of Polish female football players

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      Authors: Natalia Organista, Radosław Kossakowski
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this article is to discuss how Polish non-heterosexual female football players cope with institutionalised normative heterosexuality, which functions in Poland on several levels. The study is based on 25 in-depth interviews with professional Polish female football players. The interviewed women experienced heteronormativity within Polish society, which precluded negotiating the status of homosexuality in the broader social context. The processes of de-normalisation of heteronormativity are also difficult in the field of football. Although many football coaches and club managers display ‘pragmatic acceptance’ of non-heterosexual female players, this attitude is not always accompanied by respect for different sexual orientations. The ways in which female football players deal with such circumstances resulted in creating a safe space of ‘enclaved non-heteronormativity’ within the team. It is a space which protects from socially dominant compulsory heterosexuality. We discuss the role of this enclave and its potential for social change in football cultures in Poland.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-06-05T05:42:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231180402
       
  • Fan responses to ownership change in the English Premier League: Motivated
           ignorance, social creativity and social competition at Newcastle United
           F.C.

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      Authors: Ian Jones, Andrew Adams, Joanne Mayoh
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Over recent years there has been a significant increase in foreign ownership within the English Premier League, with ‘sportswashing’ being identified as a key motive for some new club owners. Whilst the effects of changes of ownership have received considerable focus, especially in terms of their impacts upon the club, less attention has been paid to the status of the owners themselves, how any perceived sportswashing strategy impacts upon fans, and how that impact is managed, especially in terms of the strategies that are used by fans to maintain a sense of identification. This paper focuses on the takeover of one Premier League football club, Newcastle United, and explores fan responses to its high-profile and controversial takeover by the Saudi Arabian Public Investment Fund (PIF). The paper explores the identity-maintenance strategies used by fans to maintain a positive association with the club using existing frameworks related to social creativity and social competition, as well as through the application of a novel strategy that has yet to be explored within the sport fan literature, that of motivated ignorance. The results demonstrate that whilst social creativity and social competition strategies are evident, motivated ignorance also provides an additional mechanism through which social identities may be protected from identity threat.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-06-05T05:41:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231179067
       
  • Drafting behind LGB: Transgender athletes in the sport of cycling

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      Authors: Jack Hardwicke, Charlie J Roberts, Eric Anderson, Rory Magrath
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      Using data from an online survey of 211 heterosexual and 148 sexual and gender minority-identifying cyclists, this article examines the attitudes of both sexual and gender majorities towards sexual and gender minorities as well as the experiences of sexual and gender minorities in relation to each other, within the sport of cycling. The results show a culture of acceptance for LGB athletes with heightened antipathy towards transgender cyclists. However, this variance is not as large as might be expected given the media attention on transgender athletes in cycling, and sport more broadly. It therefore appears that the transgender social movement is drafting closely behind LGB inclusion within this sport.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-05-30T11:49:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231178613
       
  • Identity negotiation and subculture recognition: Exploration of a sexual
           minority group in a Chinese grassroots sport

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      Authors: Huan Xiong, Xinyi Guo
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      This case study delves into the experiences of a women's basketball team situated in Shenzhen, South China, comprised primarily of members of sexual minority groups. Utilizing qualitative research methods, including interviews and observation of team dynamics, this research examines how lesbian and bisexual female basketball players navigate societal norms and negotiate their sexual identities. It also highlights the team's unique strategies for dealing with social interactions, group membership, and power dynamics in resisting heteronormative norms. Team B exemplifies a form of queer resistance in Chinese society and sports that is distinct from the Western pride movements and political advocacy. This strategy involves avoiding confrontation and integrating the nonheteronormative subculture into mainstream sports and society to gain support from families, the general public, and local communities, thereby promoting sports inclusivity and gaining social recognition. This study argues, from a post-structural feminist perspective, that participation in a gender-inclusive sports group provides sexual minority individuals with a unique social position and an empowering means of destabilizing power relations and reducing sexual identity tensions. In addition, it demonstrates the capacity of sports subcultures to foster collective agency and resilience in the face of dominant cultural norms, despite the constraints posed by the unaltered macro-level structure of gender. This case study provides valuable insights into how gender-inclusive sports groups can challenge and reshape preconceived notions of gender and sexuality in Chinese society while serving as a platform for queer resistance.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-05-29T07:33:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231178610
       
  • Sensing inclusion among visually impaired and guide runners

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      Authors: Marit Hiemstra, Jasmijn Rana
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      People with visual impairments partake in recreational running with sighted guide runners. In the Netherlands, the Running Blind foundation enables blind and visually impaired runners and their guides to experience the social and physical benefits of outdoor recreation together. While sport policies and programs in the Netherlands call for more inclusive sport practices, it is often unclear what ‘inclusion’ means for the people involved. This article explores how a sense of inclusion is constituted, experienced and reflected on within guided running. Based on three months of immersive, sensory ethnographic fieldwork in guided running, we argue that merely integrating disabled sports practitioners into mainstream, that is, ableist sporting contexts does not increase inclusion for people with different abilities. Instead, guided running ensembles challenge ‘the language of inclusion’ by showing how a sense of inclusion evolves from an empathic engagement with the environment, the people and the tethered running bodies.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T08:53:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231172919
       
  • ‘I keep forgetting them’: Lacrosse, indigenous women and girls and
           reconciliation in Canada

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      Authors: Avery Holmes, Audrey R Giles, Lyndsay Hayhurst
      Abstract: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, Ahead of Print.
      In Canada, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) released its list of Calls to Action (CTA) in 2015, and five Calls were directly related to reconciliation and sport. Within these five sport-related CTA, there was no specific reference to gender. Lacrosse, as an Indigenous cultural practice that has been culturally appropriated by white settlers, is a complex site to investigate how the TRC's CTA is (or are not) being implemented and the ways in which these efforts are gendered. In this paper, we examined how staff at Canadian lacrosse organizations address the CTA and Indigenous women's and girls’ participation in lacrosse. Through the use of Indigenous feminist theory, feminist methodologies informed by the tenets of Indigenous methodologies, semi-structured interviews and reflexive thematic analysis, our findings demonstrate that Indigenous women and girls are commonly overlooked, and gender is typically an afterthought within the implementation of sport-related CTA by lacrosse organizing bodies in Canada – if they are implemented at all. As a result, we argue that there is a need to make gender a central organizing principle when lacrosse organizations within Canada implement the TRC's CTA.
      Citation: International Review for the Sociology of Sport
      PubDate: 2023-05-02T06:24:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10126902231172922
       
 
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Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
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Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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