A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> SPORTS AND GAMES (Total: 199 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Translational Journal of the American College of Sports Medicine
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2379-2868 - ISSN (Online) 2379-2868
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • Program Barriers and Facilitators in Virtual Cancer Exercise
           Implementation: A Qualitative Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gorzelitz; Jessica S.; Bouji, Nour; Stout, Nicole L.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction/Purpose Because of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, many in-person cancer exercise and rehabilitation programs necessarily transitioned to virtual formats to meet the needs of individuals living with and beyond cancer. The purpose of this study was to qualitatively assess program-level facilitators and barriers to virtual exercise program implementation and to identify preferred strategies to overcome implementation barriers.Methods U.S.-based virtual cancer exercise and rehabilitation programs were recruited from professional networks via an e-mailed screening questionnaire. Eligible programs identified a point of contact for a one-on-one semistructured interview to discuss program-level barriers and facilitators to implementing virtual exercise programs. Interview transcript analysis was conducted via inductive coding techniques using NVivo software. Barriers were categorized according to the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, and a prioritized list of strategies to support implementation was created by mapping barriers to a list of Expert Recommendations for Implementing Change.Results Of the 41 unique responses received, 24 program representatives completed semistructured interviews. Interviewees represented individual programs, community-based programs, and hospital-based cancer exercise/rehabilitation programs. Analysis showed high correlation between facilitators and barriers by program type, with both program- and individual-level strategies used to implement exercise programs virtually. Strategies that ranked highest to support implementation include promoting program adaptability, building a coalition of stakeholders and identifying program champions, developing an implementation blueprint, altering organizational incentives and allowances, providing education across stakeholder groups, and accessing funding.Conclusions Learning from the transition of cancer exercise and rehabilitation programs to virtual formats due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we identify program-level barriers and facilitators encountered in the implementation of virtual programs and highlight implementation strategies that are most relevant to overcome common barriers. We present a roadmap for programs to use these strategies for future work in virtual exercise and rehabilitation program implementation.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Health Fitness Professionals’ Perceptions to Offering a Cancer Exercise
           Program: A Qualitative Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: DeScenza; Victoria R.; Chaplow, Zachary L.; Bowman, Jessica; Sutherland, Sue; Focht, Brian C.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction/Purpose The purpose of this study is to qualitatively investigate fitness professionals’ perceptions of barriers and enablers to offering community-based exercise programs targeting cancer survivors at their fitness and/or community centers.Methods A qualitative case study approach incorporating Web-based survey and semistructured interview components was used to evaluate community-based fitness professionals’ programming perceptions.Results A total of seven subjects completed a semistructured interview. Data analysis using content analysis and the constant comparative method process revealed three primary domains with 11 underlying themes: 1) program barriers (education and awareness, physician referral, cost, and care along the cancer continuum); 2) program enablers (champion advocacy, sponsor/funding, personnel, and propositional solutions); and 3) program perceptions (social support, gym atmosphere, and cancer-specific modifications).Conclusions Findings from this qualitative study identified multiple domains and themes articulating health and fitness professionals’ perceptions of key barriers, enablers, and programmatic aspects in offering community-based exercise cancer programming. These results have important implications for guiding the design and delivery of community-based exercise programs for cancer survivors and represent an advance in the current literature surrounding implementation strategies in a clinic-to-community translational model of exercise-based supportive cancer care.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Impact of a Fundamental Motor Skill Intervention on Low-Income
           Preschoolers’ Body Composition

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Wadsworth; Danielle D.; Spring, Katherine E.; Johnson, Jerraco L.; Carroll, Alexandra V.; Sassi, Julia; Suire, Kameron B.; Pangelinan, Melissa M.; Rudisill, Mary E.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction/Purpose Fundamental motor skills (FMS)—the building blocks of play, recreation, and sport—are deficient in overweight and obese children. FMS interventions may curb increasing childhood obesity rates. This randomized control trial aimed to determine the effect of an FMS intervention on fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM), and body mass index (BMI) in preschool-aged children (ages 3–5 yr) attending a low-income preschool. Researchers hypothesized that children in the intervention would have increased FFM.Methods Eleven preschool classes (n = 136; mean age, 4.3 yr; 74% Black) were randomly assigned to the intervention (6 classes) or control (5 classes) groups. Participants in the intervention group attended a 30-min FMS intervention two times per week for 9 months, whereas the control group simultaneously participated in outdoor-free play. FM and FFM were measured with foot-to-foot bioelectrical impedance before and after intervention. BMI was measured using height and weight.Results At baseline, the control group had significantly more FM (t76= −2.12, P = 0.04) and FFM (t76= −2.59, P = 0.01) than the intervention group. A mixed-effects analysis of variance examined differences in FM, FFM, and BMI with respect to group, sex, and time. Significant time by group interactions were found for FM (P = 0.05), FFM (P = 0.01), and BMI (P = 0.05). The intervention group increased FM, FFM, and BMI by 12.93%, 9.11%, and 0.75%, respectively, whereas the control group increased FM, FFM, and BMI by 23.60%, 12.75%, and 5.30%, respectively.Conclusions The findings of the current study suggest that an FMS intervention can delay additions of FM. It is further evident that increases in FM occurred at an alarming rate in primarily Black preschool children from a low-income center. The findings emphasize the importance of FMS in obesity prevention and measuring body composition in preschool children.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Physiological Effects of Single and Double Face Mask Use with Moderate and
           Vigorous Exercise

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: LaBotz; Michele; Stroshine, Karli; Dekker, Ellie; Visich, Paul
      Abstract: imageIntroduction/Purpose Exercise is associated with increased exhalation of infectious particles in respiratory disease, and face mask use has become routine during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to mitigate particle spread. As of February 2022, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) continues to recommend the use of double masking (i.e., cloth masks worn over a surgical mask) to minimize particle leakage seen with single-mask use. Studies to date have examined the effects of single masks on exercise safety and performance, but the potential added burden during exercise of an additional mask layer has not been evaluated. The purpose of our study was to compare the effects of single and double face mask use during moderate to vigorous exercise.Methods Fifteen healthy, physically active young adults (mean age = 21.1 ± 0.8 yr; 8 males and 7 females; V˙O2peak = 46.3 ± 11.5 mL·kg−1⋅min−1) completed the study. This included an initial assessment of V˙O2peak, with subjects returning for three exercise test sessions performed while wearing either a surgical face mask, a cloth face mask, or double masks (i.e., a cloth mask worn over a surgical mask) in a random order. Test sessions consisted of a progressive cycling protocol with 10-min stages at 40%, 60%, and 75% oxygen consumption reserve (VO2R). Assessments were performed after 5 and 10 min at each exercise intensity and included heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and ratings of perceived exertion and dyspnea.Results At exercise intensities from 40% to 75% VO2R, there were no significant differences between cloth masks, surgical masks, and double masking in the measured subjective and physiologic parameters.Conclusions When compared with surgical and cloth face masks in common use, for the outcomes measured in this study, double masking in accordance with CDC recommendations does not result in significant impairments during moderate to vigorous exercise up to 75% VO2R in healthy young adults.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Associations between Amount of Recess, Physical Activity, and
           Cardiometabolic Traits in U.S. Children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Clevenger; Kimberly A.; Belcher, Britni R.; Berrigan, David
      Abstract: imageIntroduction/Purpose In the United States, it is recommended that schools provide at least 20 min of daily recess, but the optimal amount for health benefits is unknown. We examined associations between amount of recess and health indicators using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; 2013–2016).Methods For this cross-sectional analysis, parents/guardians of 6- to 11-yr-olds (n = 738) reported recess provision which was classified as low (22.8%; approximately 10–15 min, 5 d·wk−1), medium (54.9%; approximately 16–30 min, 5 d·wk−1), or high (22.3%; approximately>30 min, 5 d·wk−1). Outcomes measured included parent/guardian-reported and accelerometer-measured physical activity (PA), blood pressure, cholesterol, grip strength, bone mineral content, weight status, percent body fat, vitamin D level, and C-reactive protein level. Linear and logistic regression compared outcomes by level of recess provision accounting for the NHANES complex survey design.Results The odds of meeting PA guidelines according to parent/guardian reports were 1.70 and 2.05 times higher in those with medium and high (respectively) versus low recess provision. Accelerometer-measured weekday activity was highest in those with high recess provision, whereas weekend activity was highest in those with low recess provision (Cohen's d = 0.40–0.45). There were no other significant associations.Conclusion At least 30 min of daily recess is associated with twofold greater odds of achieving recommended PA levels according to parent/guardian reports; accelerometer data suggest that this is through increased weekday activity. This finding suggests that current national recess recommendations are insufficient for PA promotion. More detailed data on the frequency and duration of recess are needed to quantify optimal provision more precisely.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Sport-Specific Crossover Point Differences during a Maximal Oxygen
           Consumption Test

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stanzione; Joseph R.; Brooks, George A.; Bruneau, Michael L. Jr; French, Duncan N.; Nasser, Jennifer A.; Smith, Sinclair A.; Volpe, Stella L.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction/Purpose The crossover point occurs during exercise when one transitions energy substrates from fat to carbohydrate predominance. The crossover point varies in an intensity-dependent manner; however, less is known about its specificity in sports with varying metabolic demands. The purpose of our study was to determine if various sports yield differences in the time to crossover and heart rate and percentage of maximal oxygen consumption (V˙O2max) at crossover during a standardized exercise protocol.Methods A total of 77 athletes (39 women, 38 men; 39.1 ± 10.4 yr of age) were measured for respiratory exchange ratio during a modified Taylor V˙O2max treadmill test. Sports included running (n = 20), triathlon (n = 20), rowing (n = 20), and CrossFit (n = 17). A one-way ANOVA determined differences in time to crossover. A Kruskal–Wallis test was applied to determine differences between sport types for percent V˙O2max and heart rate at crossover. Bonferroni correction procedures were used to control the family-wise error rate and maintain alpha levels at P < 0.05.Results Average time to crossover for all athletes was 3:43 ± 1:12 min. Times to crossover for runners, triathletes, rowers, and CrossFit athletes were 4:16 ± 0:58, 3:28 ± 1:08, 4:00 ± 1:23, and 3:01 ± 0:58 min, respectively. Significant differences were observed between groups for time to crossover (P = 0.007) and percent V˙O2max at crossover (P = 0.01). Pairwise analyses revealed that runners had a significantly longer time to crossover compared with CrossFit athletes (P = 0.009). Triathletes’ percent V˙O2max at crossover was significantly lower than rowers (P = 0.04) and runners (P = 0.04).Conclusions We found significant differences in time to crossover between runners and CrossFit athletes, which suggests that substrate use may be dependent on sport type.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Physical Literacy and Physical Activity Across the Life Span: A Systematic
           Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dlugonski; Deirdre; Gadd, Noah; McKay, Chloe; Kleis, Rachel R.; Hoch, Johanna M.
      Abstract: imageContext Physical activity levels are low across the life span. Physical literacy has been proposed as a holistic construct to explain, predict, and increase physical activity. The purpose of this systematic review was to qualitatively describe and critically evaluate the current evidence that examines the relationship between physical literacy and physical activity across the life span.Design A systematic search of six databases was conducted with the search terms “physical activity” and “physical literacy.”Eligibility Criteria Peer-reviewed, English-language articles that included measures of physical literacy and physical activity and examined the relationship between these variables were selected for review.Study Selection Cross-sectional, prospective, and experimental studies were included.Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome variables were physical literacy and physical activity.Results A total of 17 studies were included in this review. Most studies were cross-sectional and focused on youth populations. Studies in this review used several different measurement tools to assess physical literacy and varied in the domains included within physical literacy.Conclusions There is a need for valid and reliable measurement tools to assess physical literacy as a holistic construct, as well as studies with prospective designs, to understand the strength of the relationship between physical literacy and physical activity across the life span.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Effects of Vinegar/Acetic Acid Intake on Appetite Measures and Energy
           Consumption: Systematic Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hasan; Faten O.; Hamilton, Kristen P.; Angadi, Siddhartha S.; Kranz, Sibylle
      Abstract: imageContext Research suggests that the active ingredient in vinegar, acetic acid, may reduce appetite, thereby reducing energy consumption.Objective This article aims to assess the effect of vinegar or acetic acid on appetite measures and subsequent food intake in humans.Design This was conducted as a systematic literature review adhering to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines.Eligibility Criteria All participants were considered, regardless of age or health status.Study Selection A search using MedLine (Ovid), PubMed, CINAHL Plus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library between January and April 2021 resulted in 12 studies.Main Outcome Measures Outcomes included appetite, measured using an appetite rating scale or visual analog scale; satiation, measured as food intake of intervention meal; and satiety, measured as the amount of food intake after vinegar or acetic acid consumption.Results Some short-term interventions indicate that vinegar containing at least 24.6 mmol acetic acid, when consumed alongside a meal containing solid foods, acutely suppresses appetite up to 120 min postprandially as well as ad libitum food intake 3 and 24 h after vinegar consumption. However, longer exposure vinegar interventions suggest that vinegar does not affect overall energy intake.Conclusions Further research is needed to determine whether oral vinegar consumption may lead to long-term appetite reduction, decrease energy intake, and aid in weight loss.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.237.27.159
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-