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  Subjects -> SPORTS AND GAMES (Total: 199 journals)
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Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.95
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2157-3905 - ISSN (Online) 2157-3913
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • The effect of descriptive norms on exercise output and exertion during a
           video-guided workout.

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      Abstract: Evidence suggests that messages targeting descriptive norms (people’s perceptions of the typical behaviors of others) can enhance physical activity participation. However, no research has examined whether descriptive norms can be harnessed to improve people’s exercise output and exertion during specific and popular exercise tasks. We examined the effect of manipulating descriptive norms on objective indicators of participants’ exercise output and exertion during a video-guided workout. Participants (N = 102) first completed a baseline trial in which they were asked to complete a workout to the best of their ability. Then, prior to and during Trial 2, participants in the experimental group were presented with normative feedback, which indicated that the number of exercise repetitions they completed during Trial 1 was below average. Participants in the control group received no normative feedback. Experimental group participants improved their repetition count to a significantly greater extent than control group participants during Trial 2: by an average of 11% compared to 0.5%. Experimental group participants also demonstrated increases in their maximum and average heart rate from Trial 1 to Trial 2, while control group participants demonstrated reduced exertion. Moderation and mediation analyses showed that the effect of the norm messages on participants’ exercise output and exertion was (a) greater to the extent that participants strongly identified with the norm reference group and (b) underpinned by increases in participants’ task motivation. Findings suggest that highlighting descriptive norms might be a fruitful way for exercise professionals to motivate exercisers to maximize their exertion and output during exercise sessions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/spy0000329
       
  • Coaches’ experiences of job crafting through organizational change
           in high-performance sport.

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      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore coaches’ experiences of job crafting through a climate of organizational change in high-performance sport environments. Semi-structured interviews (Mduration = 83.86 min, SD = 26.28 min) were conducted with seven coaches (MExperience = 22 years, SD = 7.55) who had experience of coaching sport performers at international, Olympic, and professional levels. Guided by interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA), the findings revealed that “the climate of organizational change” for these coaches encapsulated “job turnover” at various stages of organizational change and “working in a vacuum and losing sight of the process.” Four subordinate themes were generated to highlight coaches’ experience of “crafting the job in a climate of change.” These themes included “motives for job crafting,” “appraising and reappraising aspects of the job,” “mobilizing social and structural resources,” and “withdrawal from aspects of the job.” The findings advance job crafting theory by demonstrating how organizational change can both constrain and stimulate coaches’ job crafting efforts in particular ways. Identifying opportunities for autonomy and support resources to craft their jobs helped coaches to maintain enthusiasm and job satisfaction and continue in their jobs. To our knowledge, this is the first study in sport psychology literature to explore coaches’ experiences of job crafting within a climate of organizational change in sport. We conclude by outlining some recommendations on how job crafting may be optimized to improve well-being and performance in the elite sport working context. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/spy0000328
       
  • Crank it up: Utilizing exercise to combat acute fatigue and pain in
           individuals with probable posttraumatic stress disorder.

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      Abstract: Evidence has emerged highlighting the beneficial effects of exercise in reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but often fails to address the effects of exercise on other disabling symptoms. As such, examining changes in fatigue and pain following an acute bout of moderate-intensity continuous aerobic exercise (MICE) and a bout of high-intensity functional exercise (HIFE), relative to a no-exercise control (SED), in participants with PTSD seems warranted. Participants (N = 21) fatigue and pain were assessed before (Pre), immediate after (post0), 20-min after (Post20), and 40-min after (Post40) each condition. During HIFE, fatigue and pain increased from Pre to Post0 (Cohen’s d = 0.77 and Cohen’s d = 0.62; respectively) and both returned to baseline by Post40 (P = 0.55 and P = 0.76, respectively). Fatigue was significantly reduced at Post20 (Cohen’s d = 0.64) and marginally reduced at Post40 (Cohen’s d = 0.36) relative to Pre during MICE. Pain was not different at any time during MICE. While no adverse events occurred during MICE or HIFE, overall MICE resulted in reduced fatigue relative to HIFE (Cohen’s d = 0.67) without increasing pain. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/spy0000327
       
  • A qualitative exploration of coaches’ perceptions of performance
           under pressure in sport.

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      Abstract: The concept of clutch performance (improved or successful performance under pressure) has gained traction in both research and the media in recent years, with notable, high-profile sporting moments occurring more frequently. As athletes inherently experience pressure when competing in sporting events, researchers and sport practitioners aim to work with athletes to help facilitate performance under these pressure circumstances. While research in the field has aimed to explore how clutch performances occur in sport, there remains some conceptual confusion regarding the definition of clutch performance itself. In light of this, 12 semielite/elite sporting coaches took part in a career-based, semistructured interview, to offer insight into when, and how, clutch performances occur. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim, and data were analyzed using reflexive thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke, 2006, 2019). Two themes were generated: (a) the performance level required for clutch performance is context-dependent and (b) clutch performances may occur at multiple temporal levels. These themes suggest that the performance requirements to achieve a clutch performance vary depending on the context of the event, and further, clutch performances were considered to occur as either specific clutch moments throughout an event or as an extended performance over the course of an entire event. These findings provide support for a refined definition of clutch performance, wherein the context of the situation and duration of the performance are considered. Implications are discussed, and recommendations are made for future research. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/spy0000324
       
  • The scientific structure and evolution of trust within
           performance-oriented teams research: A citation network analysis and
           critical review.

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      Abstract: Trust is a key ingredient for the effective functioning of performance-oriented teams. Despite the advancements made pertaining to our understanding of trust, this field has also been described as fragmented at best, with competing schools of thought leading to conceptual confusion. To consolidate this field, exploring the evolution of trust within performance-oriented teams research that has shaped our perspectives to date is worthwhile. A two-phase systematic review process was undertaken. First, a citation network analysis (CNA) was conducted to identify the most prominent authors, articles, and journals. Both descriptive and knowledge structures (i.e., conceptual, intellectual, and social perspectives) of the field were explored. Second, a critical review of the most influential articles identified in the CNA was examined in relation to conceptual contributions. The main themes of the critical review included: (a) dominant trust perspectives, (b) the over-engagement in conceptual developments, (c) early considerations guiding future trust research, and (d) embracing the complexities of trust. Altogether, these findings reinforce the importance of cross-discipline collaboration and purposeful exploration of trust across team contexts, as researchers seek to develop a unified pathway for future trust within performance-oriented teams research. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/spy0000326
       
 
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  Subjects -> SPORTS AND GAMES (Total: 199 journals)
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