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  Subjects -> SPORTS AND GAMES (Total: 199 journals)
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Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.95
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2157-3905 - ISSN (Online) 2157-3913
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • Centralizing forced immigrant male youths’ stories in the development of
           socially just and inclusive community sport programs.

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      Abstract: Sport is often touted as a context that can foster the development of positive relationships between people from diverse cultures. Researchers seeking to develop knowledge about how integrative sport programs may be developed have rarely recognized the agency and expertise of asylum seeking and refugee (i.e., forced immigrant) youth. Our focus stems from a community-based participatory action research (CBPAR) project conducted with forced immigrant youth aimed at centralizing their stories around how socially just and integrative sport contexts which sustain their engagement can be developed. Storytelling relationships developed through arts-based conversational interviews and a reflexive thematic analysis, grounded in social constructionism, culminated in the collaborative writing of a polyphonic vignette featuring three composite characters. Scene 1 is used to portray how forced immigrant youth initially engaged informally in sport in the host community. The story transitions in the second scene to youths’ engagement in formal, organized sport programs available in the host community. Scene 3 concludes with descriptions of the relationships the youth developed through community sport programs and the corresponding influence on their (sustained) engagement. We then discuss the importance of broadening the focus on individual development and performance that underpin many community sport programs in North America to helping youth feel a sense of connectedness and belonging to their community. We conclude with methodological and practical considerations to affirm the expertise of forced immigrant youth in the development of socially just and integrative sport contexts. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 07 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Mental skills in the armed forces: A scoping review.

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      Abstract: As mental performance strategies have been used effectively in a variety of elite sport settings, the purpose of this scoping review was to understand the applications of mental skills within an armed forces population. Furthermore, this review sought to uncover what types of programs have been established, and who the programs are designed to benefit. Beyond programs specifically, the review was designed to uncover additional forms of psychological skills training received. A scoping review method was employed to provide an overview of the type of programs or training received, targeted populations, and foci of mental performance applications in English speaking armed forces with particular attention toward the Canadian landscape. Of 52 studies reviewed, only three represented a Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) perspective; most programs were oriented toward supporting active duty members, and 15 studies did not present a specific program. There was significant overlap amongst the 52 studies with certain programs represented in several articles, and others mentioned only one time. Findings of this review identify a need for more programming tailored toward the needs of families of serving armed forces members, seeking to provide them with adequate skills implemented directly within the family system as opposed to a delivery of skills via the active member. This review also identifies the need for more psychological skills research within the CAF landscape. It is unclear if there is simply a lack of programming offered in the Canadian context, or whether the problem lies with a lack of research to understand the efforts that do exist. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 29 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Collegiate athlete mental health: Comparing treatment-seeking
           student-athletes and nonathletes on service utilization, clinical
           presentation, and outcomes.

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      Abstract: Objective: This study informs the limited findings on student-athlete mental health by comparing student-athletes and nonathletes receiving psychological services at University Counseling Centers (UCCs) on (a) UCC utilization rates, (b) clinical presentations and historical treatment experience, and (c) treatment outcomes. Method: Using naturalistic data from a large practice-research network (PRN) spanning 2017–2019, the following analyses were conducted: paired t-tests to examine UCC utilization rates in aggregate and by athletic division (Aim 1; UCC N = 104 & 110); Nested multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and logistic regression to compare presenting symptomatology and historical treatment experiences (Aim 2; N = 7,730); and Nested Residualized MANOVA and Univariate Nested analysis of variance (ANOVAs) to assess pre- to post-treatment symptom changes (Aim 3; N = 2,563) within and between student-athletes and nonathletes. Results: Compared to nonathletes, student-athletes utilized UCC services at slightly lower rates (i.e., small to moderate effect sizes) overall, though they use services at equal or greater rates within Division I institutions; tended to present with lower levels of distress across several psychological domains; and benefitted equally or more from treatment, particularly in areas of depression, generalized and social anxiety. Conclusions: Study findings provide unique insight on the experiences of treatment-seeking student-athletes by demonstrating a significant, positive responsiveness to treatment, as well as novel comparisons between student-athletes and nonathletes receiving services within UCC settings. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Successful motor performance of a difficult task: Reduced cognitive-motor
           coupling.

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      Abstract: This study characterized the adaptive attentional allocation that occurs during motor preparation. The specifications of task-relevant and task-irrelevant neural processes are key processes that facilitate successful performances by skilled athletes under difficult task conditions. Previous sport psychophysiology studies have used event-related desynchronization/synchronization analysis and electroencephalography (EEG) power analysis to distinguish the types of neuroelectric activity that occur during effortful but functional performance and effortful but dysfunctional performance. However, the dynamics of cortico-cortical communication in both performance states remain unclear. This study linked the simple model of attention allocation and the psychomotor efficiency hypothesis with EEG coherence analysis to specify the dynamics of cortico-cortical communication during successful performance. A within-subjects design was used. Inter-site phase coherence (ISPC) and imaginary ISPC were used to compute 8–13 Hz EEG connectivity from EEG recordings obtained before successful and unsuccessful performances (i.e., 40 skilled golfers; 40%–60% putting success rate as individual task difficulty). Successful performance was characterized by (a) lower 8–13 Hz ISPC and imaginary ISPC (imISPC) at T7–Fz in the −2,000 to −1,000 ms time window and (b) lower 8–13 Hz imISPC at T7–Cz in the −1,000 to 0 ms time window. This study suggests that successful performance is characterized by reduced communication between verbal–analytical and motor planning processes, followed by decreased communication between verbal–analytical and motor control processes before putting initiation. Our findings not only characterize the dynamic neuromotor processes between successful performance and unsuccessful performance of a difficult task, but also provide practical guidelines for interventions such as neurofeedback training. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Emotion dysregulation mediates the relationship between psychological
           distress, symptoms of exercise addiction and eating disorders: A
           large-scale survey among fitness center users.

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      Abstract: In several theoretical models, exercise addiction is linked to emotion regulation and eating disorders. However, to date, the role of emotion regulation in exercise addiction is poorly understood. The present study aimed to examine the relationship between the risk of exercise addiction and emotion regulation by exploring the mediating role of emotion dysregulation and eating disorders between psychological distress and exercise addiction. Based on an online survey of 1,790 regular fitness center attendees, the results revealed that emotion dysregulation is positively related to the risk of exercise addiction. Exercisers who report more symptoms of exercise addiction exhibit elevated levels of psychological distress. The results also demonstrate for the first time that difficulty in emotion regulation is a mediator between psychological distress and exercise addiction; the associated model explains approximately 53% of the variance. However, gender differences also emerged. The mediation role of emotion dysregulation in the relationship between psychological distress and exercise addiction was statistically significant and explained 75.3% of the total indirect effect in men, but it was not significant in women. The difficulties in emotion regulation mediated the relationship between psychological symptoms and eating disorders in women and explained 52.7% of the total indirect effect compared to 17.3% in men. These findings support the affect regulation models of exercise addiction, such as the “cognitive appraisal hypothesis,” the “affect regulation hypothesis,” and the “interactional model.” (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Facilitating student-athletes’ dual career transition: A
           Scandinavian university case study.

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      Abstract: This study combines the holistic ecological and holistic developmental approaches through a mixed methods intrinsic case study with a convergent design to explore how a dual career (DC) development environment (DCDE) facilitated student-athletes’ transition to a Scandinavian university. The case was explored through multiple sources of data inspired by the research methodology in the holistic ecological approach and the DC-Environment Success Factors (DC-ESF) working model. Semistructured interviews, with student-athletes and support providers, and documents analysis were complemented by a quantitative monitoring of the student-athletes’ transition experiences. Findings are presented in a joint display by merging the qualitative and quantitative data in an empirical version of the DC-ESF model. The empirical model summarizes the case by situating the environment in student-athletes’ development and showing a challenging transition with athletic and nonathletic demands and a well-coordinated and supportive environment with a mission of a balanced and synchronized whole and targeting empowerment of the whole person. The student-athletes developed their DC competences and a holistic attitude to development, improved in sport and study, and in their ability to balance their DC. This study contributes to the literature by bridging the gap between transition and environment research. By integrating the two approaches, the study explicitly shows the fit between the student-athletes’ needs and the environment’s support leading to the conclusion that effective DCDEs works to meet student-athletes’ needs by helping them to develop DC competencies to create and maintain an optimal DC balance. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • More than carrying a bag' The role of the caddie in facilitating a
           golfer’s psychological performance.

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      Abstract: Psychological factors affecting golfing performance have been widely researched within the sport psychology literature. Although there is a general consensus on these, the sport offers a unique environment whereby at the highest level golfers compete with a caddie. Despite the proximity and potential influence on the golfer, the role and perspective of the caddie have been overlooked. This study therefore sought to ascertain caddies’ perceptions of their role in facilitating a golfer’s psychological performance. One semistructured interview was conducted with seven male active caddies (Mage = 35.57, SD = 9.78), working across six professional tours. Caddies reported a mean experience of 9.25 years (SD = 8.39) and 1.7 years with their current player (SD = 1.09). Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Three themes were identified: (a) it is more than carrying a bag, (b) caddying, it is a people thing, and (c) confidence is a two-way street. The study provides an insight to the role of the caddie, the specific processes employed, and the factors which influence their ability to facilitate a golfer’s psychological performance. It is intended that findings and implications for practice will enhance understanding for professionals and sport psychologists working within golf. In addition, educational tools are warranted to develop the knowledge and subsequent evidence-based practice of aspiring and currently active caddies. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Effects of mental fatigue and monetary incentives on exercise intensity
           decision-making and performance.

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      Abstract: Mental fatigue affects choice between exercise and nonexercise tasks. Provision of financial or monetary incentives biases decision-making in favor of exercise behaviors. The present study examined the effects of mental fatigue and monetary incentives on exercise intensity decision-making and physical performance. Using a 2 [higher fatigue (HF) vs. lower fatigue (LF)] × 2 [incentive ($) vs. no incentive] between-groups design, recreationally active participants (N = 77, Mage = 20.14 ± 2.16 years) completed a 12-min manipulation designed to create higher and lower levels of mental fatigue and then chose between moderate-intensity and vigorous-intensity exercise protocols. Participants in the incentive groups were offered $2.00 CAD or $4.00 CAD for the moderate or vigorous-intensity options, respectively, and participants were required to perform their chosen exercise task. Mental fatigue in the HF groups was significantly higher than the LF groups. Analyses revealed an overall greater frequency of selecting vigorous-intensity versus moderate-intensity exercise with no difference in choice frequency between the HF and LF groups. Paired comparisons showed a significantly greater frequency of selecting the vigorous-intensity option in the LF$ group compared to the LF group, and a nonsignificant, medium-sized effect showing a slight bias toward the vigorous-intensity option for people in the HF$ group compared to the LF group. No differences were observed between groups in physical work performed during exercise. Findings suggest a disproportionate influence of incentives over mental fatigue on exercise intensity decision-making and no effect of mental fatigue on self-selected, self-paced exercise. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Prolonged cognitive activity increases perception of fatigue but does not
           influence perception of effort, affective valence, or performance during
           subsequent isometric endurance exercise.

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      Abstract: Performance of a cognitively demanding task has previously been reported to impair subsequent physical endurance performance, an effect attributed to sensory processes influencing the perceived effort required to maintain performance. However, there is uncertainty regarding the robustness of these performance effects and their putative mechanisms. The present study examined two hypotheses: (a) that prior cognitive activity impairs subsequent physical endurance performance and (b) that the perception of fatigue arising from sustained cognitive performance is associated with the level of effort and affective valence reported during a subsequent physical endurance task. Eighteen participants completed a high (HIGH; a modified version of the Stroop task) and low (LOW; watching a documentary) cognitively demanding task before performing an exhaustive, submaximal (20% maximal voluntary contraction, MVC) isometric contraction of the right knee extensor muscles. The perception of fatigue was elevated and cognitive task accuracy reduced in the HIGH condition. However, physical endurance performance, perception of effort, and affective valence reported during the physical endurance task were not affected. In the HIGH condition, the perceptions of effort and affect were related to endurance time, while significant correlations were found between perceptions of fatigue and both perceived effort and affective valence when assessed across both conditions. The findings indicate that performing a demanding cognitive task does not impair subsequent physical endurance performance nor influence perceived effort and affective valence during a submaximal isometric contraction performed to task failure. The observed relationships offer some support to the idea that fatigue perception may influence affective valence and effort perception. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
 
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