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  Subjects -> SPORTS AND GAMES (Total: 199 journals)
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NINE : A Journal of Baseball History and Culture
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1188-9330 - ISSN (Online) 1534-1844
Published by U of Nebraska Homepage  [32 journals]
  • The Cheap Seats: A Note from the Editor

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      Abstract: I originally started writing this introduction to the journal on my flight back to Nashville from Phoenix, where we’d just wrapped up the twenty-ninth annual NINE Spring Training Conference in early March 2022. After a year of Zoom presentations, we were back in person for the conference, comprised of three days of presentations on all things baseball. It began with an opening night session showcasing two amazing artists who shared their insights on baseball and visual arts: illustrator and author Anika Orrock and photographer Jean Fruth. Three nights later we closed out the conference, as we usually do, with SABR presenting the Seymour Medal to the best book of baseball history or biography from the previous year. ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Diamond Quotes

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      Abstract: “Baseball is a simple game. If you have good players, and if you keep them in the right frame of mind, then the manager is a success. The players make the manager; it’s never the other way.”sparky anderson“People who write about spring training not being necessary have never tried to throw a baseball.”sandy koufax“If you aren’t happy in one place, chances are pretty good you won’t be happy in another place.”ernie banks“Good is not good when better is expected.”vin scully“Pitchers did me a favor when they knocked me down. It made me more determined.”frank robinson“Tragedy offers you a different perspective on life. There are far more important things than wins and losses.”tommy john“Everything is possible to him who ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Baseball Boys of Onionville: A Personal Reflection on the Rise and
           Fall of Small-Town Ball in a New York Village

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      Abstract: All go to one place; all come from dust, and all return to dust.I’m seven years old and playing left field for the great Florida, New York, Legion Post 1250 team in the Orange-Ulster County Baseball League, an adult league. My team is in the midst of a long winning streak spanning a couple of summers and several championships. It’s 1965, and our opponent on a hot Sunday ball field is the Monroe Eagles. Standing in outfield grass tall enough to hide my cleatless sneakers, I’m flanked by young men (including my father, the manager) who are my heroes. In the bottom of the third inning, a fly ball finally comes my way . . .Once upon a time, small-town baseball played in the rural backdrop of America vanished without ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Statistical, Scientific, and Sensory Proof of Teddy Ballgame’s
           Mammoth Shot

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      Abstract: For a large segment of the Red Sox Nation, the horrendous 1883 explosion of Krakatoa in Indonesia, which killed over thirty-five thousand people, pales by comparison to the storm stirred up and still continuing about Ted Williams’s mammoth home run struck in 1946 at Fenway Park in Boston. The main reason seems to be that no one looking at the lonely red seat high in the right-field bleachers marking where the ball landed can believe a baseball can be hit that far, including Ian Kinsler, but we’ll get to that.I was fifteen in 1946, an avid Red Sox and Splendid Splinter fan, and lucky to be seated in the center-field bleachers on June 9 with a sideways view of Ted’s man-made volcano. I guess you had to be there. In ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Foul Balls

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      Abstract: That final text, “Our relationship is no longer sustainable,” made me realize I was about to be single. To dull the pain of the breakup, I immediately threw myself into writing a baseball article about Red Sox Hall of Famer Carl Yastrzemski, something I had been putting off for a while. The bitterness of the breakup still stuck to me like a wet T-shirt a month later as I drove through the outskirts of Fort Meyers, Florida. Red Sox pitching great Bill “Spaceman” Lee called me earlier that week after he got my letter asking if I could interview him about Yaz. After he said yes, I told him I’d be happy to drive up to his home in Vermont after I returned from Florida so we could talk. He told me he was going to be in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • From Brooklyn to Hollywood to Seattle: How Danny Kaye Became an Owner of
           the Mariners

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      Abstract: Hans Christian Andersen. The Court Jester. The Five Pennies. White Christmas. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.Danny Kaye may be beloved for his movies, but Seattle baseball fans hold him in higher esteem for his integral efforts to revive the city’s major league status in the mid-1970s. Seattle had seen its Major League Baseball (MLB) experience truncated when the Pilots’ owners left for Milwaukee after one season (1969) and changed the team’s name to the Brewers.Joining a group of investors—including Lester Smith, his partner in Pacific Northwest radio and television stations1—Kaye had the opportunity to blend his passion for baseball with a business prospect. They sought to capitalize on the city’s connection to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Changing Understandings of the Dodgers’ Move to Los Angeles and the
           Value of Archival Sources

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      Abstract: Walter O’Malley, the Dodgers’ owner who in 1957 moved his franchise from Brooklyn to Los Angeles, is one of the most influential figures in all of American sport. His reputation, however, is varied. Some authors, particularly in the decades after the move, cast him as one of the sport’s most greedy villains because, in their eyes, he stole a profitable team away from Brooklyn to make even more money in Los Angeles. More recently others argued O’Malley wanted to stay in New York but was stymied by government officials like Robert Moses who refused to help him acquire his choice site for a new ballpark.1 There was not a single moment in which the understanding of the move shifted; as early as the 1970s, some writers ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Ladies’ Day: Changing Views of Female Fandom and the Chicago Cubs,
           1919–69

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      Abstract: LADIESWhen your husband comes home in the evening in laughing, jovial mood and tells that he was out at Cubs Park and saw those same Cubs whale this or that team, did you ever attempt to picture in your own mind just what scenes he has witnessed'Well, don’t try. Come out on Friday afternoon as the guest of the Cubs and see with your own eyes the scenes that have such a fascination for your husbands, your brothers, your sons, your sweethearts.With this newspaper advertisement, the Chicago Cubs invited women to the first Ladies’ Day promotion of the season at Cubs Park on June 6, 1919. Neither Cubs management nor the thousands of female fans who joined in Ladies’ Days that season could have imagined how the Cubs ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • How the 1962 Amazin’ Mets Mended the Broken Heart of a Brooklyn
           Dodgers Fan

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      Abstract: The 1962 Mets lost 120 games on the field. We fans had a love affair with the team, and the team loved us back. I attended at least twenty games that season. Going to a 1962 Mets game was an experience, not just a pleasant day at the ballpark. Only in that 1962 season did fans spontaneously begin chanting “Let’s go Mets.” The chant rallied the team and was probably the impetus for the major league level’s first Banner Day. Pressures were placed on Major League Baseball (MLB) to expand the number of teams and restore National League (NL) baseball to New York. The most notable was the formation of the Continental League headed by Branch Rickey, the former Brooklyn Dodger executive who signed Jackie Robinson to a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Satchel & the Yastrzemskis: A Long Island Narrative

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      Abstract: In his final major league game, Leroy Robert Paige—better known to the world as Satchel Paige—produced yet another impressive outing to add to the multitude he had collected over his long and illustrious career. It was September 25, 1965, and a then fifty-nine-year-old Paige had made his way back to a major league mound after an absence of twelve years. Paige was pitching for the Kansas City Athletics, a fitting tribute and reminder of his days as a star pitcher for the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues. However, what was meant to be a celebration of Paige’s past had suddenly turned into an admiration of his present career. Fans marveled as the former Negro Leagues’ star player—who had been kept out of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Boy of Summer: The Art and Anger of Roger Kahn

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      Abstract: In the summer of 1970, the future came to America’s pastime. It arrived in the form of, of all things, a book. This one was titled Ball Four, and its renegade author, Jim Bouton, used it as the medium by which he intended to shake a game that had grown stale out of its seemingly perpetual doldrums. Reaction to it was swift and extreme, with much of it coming weeks before the book even hit the shelves. This was largely the result of the work of his editor, former newspaperman Leonard Shecter, who placed an advance, titillating excerpt of it in Look magazine, making sure to include as many spicy scenes as he could shoehorn into it to juice sales of the forthcoming book through conversation, debate, outrage, and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Before Brooklyn: The Unsung Heroes Who Helped Break Baseball’s Color
           Barrier by Ted Reinstein (review)

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      Abstract: The year 2022 marks seventy-five years since Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier and played Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Today, on April 15 of each season, professional players and coaches wear Robinson’s famous jersey, number 42. No other major league ballplayer will ever wear the number 42 again. The story is as American as apple pie. However, in Ted Reinstein’s book Before Brooklyn: The Unsung Heroes Who Helped Break Baseball’s Color Barrier, readers learn that, despite Robinson’s heroic (and dangerous) act, the color barrier had already been broken nearly thirty-five years before Robinson was even born.Throughout the book, Reinstein shares story after story of baseball players who ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • COVID Curveball: An Inside View of the 2020 Los Angeles Dodgers World
           Championship Season by Tim Neverett (review)

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      Abstract: There is a scene in the Steven Spielberg biopic Lincoln that comes to mind whenever I think of how we have had to come to terms with what the COVID-19 pandemic wrought. The president talks about the urgency to pass the Emancipation Proclamation with an eye toward ending the Civil War. He is trying to win over an influential congressman who worries that the country isn’t prepared for what the Thirteenth Amendment would bring: the freedom of millions of slaves. “We’re unready for peace too, ain’t we'” Lincoln responds. “When it comes, it’ll present us with conundrums and dangers greater than any we’ve faced during the war, bloody as it’s been. We’ll have to extemporize and experiment with what it is when it ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Just Like Me: When the Pros Played on the Sandlot by Kelly G. Park
           (review)

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      Abstract: Kelly G. Park was interested in the stories professional baseball players told about their youth baseball and softball experiences. But finding that such a collection did not exist, Park set out to do the work himself and interviewed members of the Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball, the Negro Leagues, and the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. These interviewed players include Boog Powell, Phil Roof, Hawk Taylor, Jim Hickman, Bill Greason, Lois Youngen, Katie Hortsman, Jim Kaat, Lou Pinella, Jim Zapp, Lou Whitaker, Steve Blass, Whitey Herzog, Doug Flynn, Fergie Jenkins, Willie Blair, Willie Horton, and Charlie Loyd. Park asked them questions a player or fan would want to know: Why did you pick ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Memories from the Microphone: A Century of Baseball Broadcasting by Curt
           Smith (review)

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      Abstract: Sixty-five years later the mental picture of that lone magnolia tree standing proudly just beyond the center-field fence at Ponce de Leon Park in Atlanta is as fresh as the days I sat in the grandstand, glove in hand, waiting vainly for a foul ball from one of my beloved Atlanta Crackers. Over five hundred feet from home plate, that tree remained in play for many years until a new owner decided to move the outfield fence in by fifty feet.No doubt Ernie Harwell, fresh out of the marines, had fun with that magnolia while calling Crackers games briefly before heading on to bigger cities and greener fields. Ernie’s brief stint in Atlanta was a little before my time, but that surprising fact and many others like it, I ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Forgotten 1970 Chicago Cubs: Go and Glow by William S. Bike (review)

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      Abstract: The portmanteau “nostalgiamentary” comes with a whiff of pejorative connotation that diminishes a topic’s serious historical discussion while overplaying its sentimentality. In William S. Bike’s tale about “the best damn team never to win a pennant,” readers are treated to a pleasant look back, for better and worse (12). In this slender volume the audience gets a solid dose of reliving the Chicago Cubs’ 1970 season shaded with the author’s personal reminiscences, an accounting of the Northsiders’ travails during the baseball campaign. Then a curious coda as to the possible fortunes of this team had the planets and stars aligned so that the Curse of the Billy Goat would not have lasted until well into the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Extra Innings: Fred Claire’s Journey to City of Hope and Finding a World
           Championship Team by Tim Madigan (review)

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      Abstract: This book is a biography of Fred Claire and his career in baseball. In addition to well-written tales of his time with the Dodgers, it tells the story of his journey with cancer treatment at the City of Hope. As a book, it is anecdotal, rich with quotes and detailed accounts of his career with the Dodgers as the public relations director, executive vice president, and finally general manager (GM). Over the thirty years with the team, the final position was the most abrupt and challenging. In the wake of Al Campanis’s intemperate remarks on national television in 1987, Claire was asked to take and accepted the position of GM with the proviso that he have total and complete responsibility for baseball operations. He ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Resisters: A Novel by Gish Jen (review)

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      Abstract: Gish Jen’s dystopian fifth novel, The Resisters, is set in a country known as AutoAmerica, where the citizenry has passively accepted an intrusive authoritarian government known as “Aunt Nettie” that uses advanced forms of artificial intelligence and the internet to control the lives of individuals. Jen imagines this nation segregated into two main groups: the “Netted” who have “angelfair” skin and the “Surplus” who are mostly “coppertoned.”Due to climate change much of AutoAmerica is now under water. The Netted live in houses on high ground, while the Surplus live in swampland or on houseboats. If they abuse the rules of society or threaten the power structure, the Surplus can be “Cast Off ” and allowed to drift ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Gathering Crowds: Catching Baseball Fever in the New Era of Free Agency by
           Paul Hensler (review)

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      Abstract: Every few years an author produces a work that sets a baseline for all future research on a subject. Gathering Crowds: Catching Baseball Fever in the New Era of Free Agency by Paul Hensler is that book on the socioeconomic issues surrounding Major League Baseball from 1977 to 1989.Gathering Crowds is Hensler’s third work on baseball in the late twentieth century and the second that provides a sweeping review of the off-field issues that shaped the game. The work, which draws its name from the theme of the generational touchstone This Week in Baseball, begins in the earliest days of free agency in baseball when the California Angels and others would reshape the economics of the game with the signing of the first ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Maris & Mantle: Two Yankees, Baseball Immortality, and the Age of
           Camelot by Tony Castro (review)

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      Abstract: It may be safe to say no one knows more about Mickey Mantle than Tony Castro. He has previously written three books on Mantle, but this is his first time to include Maris with an in-depth look. Like Charles Dickens’s A Tale of Two Cities, this book is a tale of two vastly different players who were also teammates.Like many authors of the day writing about sports, Castro weaves the legends of Mantle and Maris with the history of the 1960s as the age of Camelot, ushered in under then president John F. Kennedy.Mantle and Maris were both baseball legends, but while each was blessed with tons of talent, especially as hitters, their approaches to the game, on and off the field, were total opposites.Castro reveals warts ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Forgotten Game: Game 5 2004 ALCS Yankees at Red Sox by John Vampatella
           (review)

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      Abstract: During the Major League Baseball broadcast of Game Five of the 2004 American League Championship Series, color commentator Dave O’Brien said of the game, “It’s gonna find its place among the great playoff games in Major League History.” To anyone watching, O’Brien’s statement seemed like an inevitable prediction. Game Five began fifteen hours and forty-five minutes after David Ortiz ended Game Four with a twelfth-inning home run. Five hours and fifteen minutes later he would walk off again, this time with a single in the fourteenth inning. It was, to that point, the longest postseason game ever played and certainly a game for the record books. In the collective memory of baseball, however, Game Five would be ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Our Team: The Epic Story of Four Men and the World Series That Changed
           Baseball by Luke Epplin (review)

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      Abstract: The year 1948 would prove to be a very special baseball year for those living in and around Cleveland, Ohio. Though residents didn’t know it at the time, it would be the last World Series win for their hometown club. Cleveland has gone to the Series four times since but has always fallen short of winning—the last time to the Cubs in 2016. Consequently, the Cleveland franchise has gone the longest of any major league team without winning the Series. In addition to Cleveland’s win in 1948, under the ownership of Bill Veeck and his brilliant marketing skills, the team drew well over 2.6 million fans—an attendance record that lasted for years. It also was a breakout year for Larry Doby, the first player to integrate ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • 1930: The Story of a Baseball Season When Hitters Reigned Supreme by Lew
           Freedman (review)

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      Abstract: The 1930 major league season, eleven years after the end of the low-scoring Deadball Era, produced an unprecedented display of hitting to cap a decade of steadily improving offense. The combined slugging percentage of the National League (NL) and American League (AL) jumped almost 40 percent from 1928. There were nearly 20 percent more runs scored than two years prior, many of them coming on the 1,565 home runs hit in 1930, more than 40 percent more than in 1928.As nine of the sixteen clubs had team batting averages of more than .300 (and the entire NL hit .303), many individual hitters rode that tide to their best career years. For some, when the tide receded in future seasons, 1930 was the best year they ever ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Curveball at the Crossroads by Michael Lortz (review)

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      Abstract: Most scholars of baseball literature agree that serious adult fiction, books with more complex characters and story arcs than found in the early twentieth-century “Baseball Joe” books by Lester Chadwick, began in 1952 with Bernard Malamud’s The Natural. By the end of that decade Mark Harris had published three of his four Henry Wiggen novels, including Bang the Drum Slowly. While some authors wrote the occasional baseball novel, it was not until Canadian writer W. P. Kinsella published Shoeless Joe in 1982 that an author became a preeminent writer of baseball fiction. More recently, writers like David James Duncan (The Brothers K) and Chad Harbach (The Art of Fielding) have released baseball novels to great ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Baseball 100 by Joe Posnanski (review)

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      Abstract: If there is anything baseball fans love more than the sound of a wood bat hitting a ball or the smell of hot dogs at the ballpark, it’s arguing. Fans will argue over whether a pitch was a ball or a strike. They’ll argue over which stadium is the best in the majors. They’ve been known to argue about which minor league team has the greatest mascot. And they have even argued over which suffered the most before finally winning a recent World Series, the Cubs or the Red Sox. In the introduction to The Baseball 100, commentator George F. Will begins by saying, “Baseball fans are an argumentative tribe” (1).And somewhere, probably in Cleveland, I can hear a fan respond, “No we aren’t!”If you are a reader who is looking ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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