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  Subjects -> SPORTS AND GAMES (Total: 199 journals)
Showing 1 - 3 of 3 Journals sorted by number of followers
European Journal of Sport Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 54)
American Journal of Sports Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Sports Science & Coaching     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
ACTIVE : Journal of Physical Education, Sport, Health and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Exercise Science     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Exercise Science & Fitness     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sports Science     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Sport and Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Sport Psychology in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Kinesiology and Sports Science     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of the History of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Human Kinetics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Human Sport and Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Physical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Sport Sciences and Fitness     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Sociology of Sport Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Sport Science Review     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
International Sport Coaching Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Turfgrass Society Research Journal     Free   (Followers: 13)
Soccer & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Sport History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sport Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
The Sport Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Sport Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Annals of Applied Sport Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Sport in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Isokinetics and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Science and Cycling     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sport History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Biomedical Human Kinetics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Health Promotion & Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Physical Culture and Sport. Studies and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sport, Business and Management : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Sport Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Perceptual and Motor Skills     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sport & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Philosophy of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sport and Fitness Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Physical Education and Sports     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Sport Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Sports Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Berkeley Journal of Entertainment and Sports Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Athletic Enhancement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Recreation and Sports Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Science in Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Physician and Sportsmedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Intercollegiate Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Sport Management Education Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Sport Management: Research that Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Physical Education and Sport Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Sports Coaching Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Laisvalaikio Tyrimai     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part P: Journal of Sports Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asia Pacific Journal of Sport and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Kinesiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
NINE : A Journal of Baseball History and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Facta Universitatis, Series : Physical Education and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Computer Science in Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Sport, Exercise & Training Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Sports and Active Living     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Physical Activity Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Baltic Journal of Sport and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Football(s) : Histoire, Culture, Économie, Société     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Footwear Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sports Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Strategies : A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Sports Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Seton Hall Journal of Sports and Entertainment Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
UNLV Gaming Research & Review Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
PALAESTRA : Adapted Sport, Physical Education, and Recreational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Facultatis Educationis Physicae Universitatis Comenianae     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Amateur Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport & Tourism Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Tourism, Hospitality and Sports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sports Medicine International Open     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Journal for Sport and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Physical Education and Sports Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Athlete Development and Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
German Journal of Exercise and Sport Research : Sportwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sportverletzung · Sportschaden     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Podium Sport, Leisure and Tourism Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sporting Traditions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Arena-Journal of Physical Activities     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Timisoara Physical Education and Rehabilitation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sport and Art     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physical Education Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
SPORTIVE : Journal Of Physical Education, Sport and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sports Law and Governance Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indonesian Journal of Sport Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Managing Sport and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
College Athletics and The Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Movement & Sport Sciences : Science & Motricité     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Sportpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cultura, Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Golf Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Educación física y deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Kinesiologiae Universitatis Tartuensis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Internacional de Medicina y Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte : International Journal of Medicine and Science of Physical Activity and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jeffrey S. Moorad Sports Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Marquette Sports Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sportis. Scientific Journal of School Sport, Physical Education and Psychomotricity     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Sports Medicine and Allied Health Sciences : Official Journal of the Ohio Athletic Trainers Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Sport Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kinesiology : International Journal of Fundamental and Applied Kinesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Hacettepe Journal of Sport Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Translational Journal of the American College of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Corpoconsciência     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for the Measurement of Physical Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Global Sport Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science and Medicine in Football     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arquivos em Movimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Video Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forum Kinder- und Jugendsport : Zeitschrift für Forschung, Transfer und Praxisdialog     Hybrid Journal  
eJRIEPS : Ejournal de la recherche sur l'intervention en éducation physique et sport     Open Access  
SPORT TK-Revista EuroAmericana de Ciencias del Deporte     Open Access  
Juara : Jurnal Olahraga     Open Access  
Arrancada     Open Access  
Al-Rafidain Journal For Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Al.Qadisiya journal for the Sciences of Physical Education     Open Access  
New Approaches in Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Forum for Idræt, Historie og Samfund     Open Access  
Cerdas Sifa Pendidikan : Sport Education     Open Access  
Quality in Sport     Open Access  
Journal of Motor Learning and Development     Hybrid Journal  
Sri Lankan Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine     Open Access  
Sport i Turystyka : Środkowoeuropejskie Czasopismo Naukowe     Open Access  
Revista Intercontinental de Gestão Desportiva     Open Access  
Open Sports Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Ágora para la Educación Física y el Deporte     Open Access  
Journal of Physical Education and Human Movement     Open Access  
Journal of Sports Medicine and Therapy     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Sport and Exercise     Open Access  
Gelanggang Pendidikan Jasmani Indonesia     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira do Esporte Coletivo     Open Access  
International Journal of Science Culture and Sport     Open Access  
SIPATAHOENAN : South-East Asian Journal for Youth, Sports & Health Education     Open Access  
Research on ٍEducational Sport     Open Access  
Conexões     Open Access  
Ulusal Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Journal of National Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Türkiye Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Sports Science     Open Access  
Spor Eğitim Dergisi     Open Access  
Spor Bilimleri Araştırmaları Dergisi     Open Access  
Spor ve Performans Araştırmaları Dergisi / Ondokuz Mayıs University Journal of Sports and Performance Researches     Open Access  
Jurnal Keolahragaan     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y el Deporte     Open Access  
Physical Education of Students     Open Access  
Jendela Olahraga     Open Access  
Jurnal Abdimas     Open Access  
Retos : Nuevas Tendencias en Educación Física, Deportes y Recreación     Open Access  
Martial Arts Studies     Open Access  
Sportphysio     Hybrid Journal  
Citius, Altius, Fortius     Open Access  
Слобожанський науково-спортивний вісник     Open Access  
Educación Física y Ciencia     Open Access  
RBFF - Revista Brasileira de Futsal e Futebol     Open Access  
Materiales para la historia del deporte     Open Access  
FairPlay, Revista de Filosofia, Ética y Derecho del Deporte     Open Access  
Revista de Artes Marciales Asiáticas     Open Access  
mensch & pferd international     Full-text available via subscription  
RICYDE. Revista Internacional de Ciencias del Deporte     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología del Deporte     Open Access  
MHSalud : Movimiento Humano y Salud     Open Access  
Polish Journal of Sport and Tourism     Open Access  
Therapeutic Recreation Journal     Full-text available via subscription  

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Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.935
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 15  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2325-9671 - ISSN (Online) 2325-9671
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Comparison of Conventional Dose Versus Superdose Platelet-Rich Plasma for
           Knee Osteoarthritis: A Prospective, Triple-Blind, Randomized Clinical
           Trial

    • Authors: Sandeep Patel, Shivam Gahlaut, Tarkik Thami, Devendra Kumar Chouhan, Ashish Jain, Mandeep Singh Dhillon
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Confusion persists regarding the ideal dosage of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection for knee osteoarthritis (OA).Purpose/Hypothesis:The purpose of the study was to compare the efficacy of 2 different single-injection PRP dosages in patients with early knee OA—a conventional 4 mL dose and a superdose of 8 mL. It was hypothesized that 8 mL of PRP would be superior to 4 mL of PRP in this patient population.Study Design:Randomized clinical trial; Level of evidence, 1.Methods:Patients with early knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence grades 1 and 2) who met the inclusion criteria were randomly divided into 2 groups: Group A (n = 50 knees) received a 4-mL PRP injection, and group B (n = 49 knees) received an 8-mL PRP injection, both prepared using the same procedure. Patients were evaluated at the baseline, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the WOMAC-Pain subscale, the visual analog scale for pain, the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, and patient satisfaction, and results were compared between the groups.Results:The baseline characteristics of the 2 groups were comparable (group A: mean age, 51.96 ± 6.93 years; group B: mean age, 49.12 ± 9.8 3 years). Leucocyte-depleted PRP with 3.5 times concentration (final product platelet concentration, 706.74 × 103–μL) was injected. The mean absolute platelet count injected was 2.82 ± 0.0012 billion in group A and 5.65 ± 0.0022 billion in group B. All patient-reported outcome scores improved significantly in both groups from the baseline to the final follow-up (P < .001), with overall trends and results significantly better in group B than in group A (P < .001). Patient satisfaction at the 6-month follow-up was also better in group B (96%) compared with group A (68%). Short (2 to 7 days) self-limiting complications, such as pain and stiffness, occurred more often in group B (P < .001).Conclusion:Patients with early knee OA had significantly better improvement in pain and function when treated with an 8-mL injection of PRP compared with a 4-mL injection of PRP. The larger dose of PRP had approximately twice the number of platelets.Registration:CTRI/2020/02/023403 (Clinical Trials Registry-India identifier).
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-26T10:07:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241227863
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Outcomes and Return to Sport After Knee Osteochondral Allograft Transplant
           in Professional Athletes

    • Authors: Sachin Allahabadi, Ryan Quigley, Landon Frazier, Kaitlyn Joyce, Brian J. Cole
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Limited data are available on the outcomes and return-to-sport rates after osteochondral allograft transplant in professional athletes.Purpose:To evaluate the experience of a single senior surgeon in treating professional athletes with osteochondral allograft transplant, including analyzing clinical outcomes and return to sport.Study Design:Case series; Level of evidence, 4.Methods:The authors performed a retrospective review of professional athletes treated with primary osteochondral allograft to the knee between January 1, 2001, and January 1, 2021, by a single surgeon. Athletes were required to play at the professional level in their sport and have a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. Return-to-sport rates and timing were evaluated. Patient-reported outcomes were assessed preoperatively and at final follow-up. Reoperations and failures were also tabulated.Results:The study included 15 professional athletes who represented a variety of sports, with follow-up at a mean of 4.91 ± 2.2 years (range, 2.0-9.4 years). The majority (8 athletes; 53%) had undergone prior surgeries to the operative knee. Eleven (73%) returned to sport at a mean of 1.22 ± 0.4 years (range, 0.75-2 years), and of the 8 undergoing isolated osteochondral allograft, 7 (87.5%) returned at 1.28 ± 0.3 years. Ten athletes (66.7% of total; 90.9% of those who returned) returned to sport at the same level or higher compared with before surgery. Significant improvements were seen in each assessed patient-reported outcome score at final follow-up. Two of the 3 (66.7%) patients who underwent concomitant meniscal allograft transplant were able to return to sport at the same level or higher than presurgery. Three (20%) underwent second-look arthroscopy, 1 (6.7%) of whom underwent cartilage debridement of the osteochondral allograft.Conclusion:Osteochondral allograft transplant in professional athletes can result in a high rate of return to play at a similar or higher level as presurgery, even when performed with concomitant procedures such as meniscal allograft transplant. High-level athletes should expect significant postoperative improvement in clinical outcomes.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-26T10:06:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241226738
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Factors Associated With a Lateral Ankle Sprain in Young Female Soccer
           Players: A Prospective Cohort Study

    • Authors: Shuji Taketomi, Kohei Kawaguchi, Yuri Mizutani, Seira Takei, Ryota Yamagami, Kenichi Kono, Ryo Murakami, Tomofumi Kage, Takahiro Arakawa, Sayaka Fujiwara, Sakae Tanaka, Toru Ogata
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Previous studies have attempted to determine if certain risk factors can predict the occurrence of a lateral ankle sprain (LAS) in female soccer players. Unfortunately, there is limited evidence with regard to risk factors associated with an LAS in female soccer players.Purpose:To identify intrinsic risk factors for an LAS among young female soccer players.Study Design:Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2.Methods:Participants were 161 young female soccer players in Japan who were evaluated for LAS risk factors during a preseason medical assessment. The assessment included anthropometric, joint laxity, joint range of motion, muscle flexibility, muscle strength, and balance measurements. Each athlete’s history of LASs was also collected. The participants were monitored during a single-yearseason for LASs, as diagnosed by physicians.Results:There were 26 instances of an LAS in 25 players (15.5%) during the season. Injured players were significantly more likely to have sustained a previous ankle sprain (P = .045) and demonstrated significantly worse balance than their peers without an LAS during the double- and single-leg balance tests (P = .008 for both). Athletes with lower hamstring-to-quadriceps muscle strength ratios were also significantly more likely to sustain an LAS (P = .02).Conclusion:Poor balance, a low hamstring-to-quadriceps ratio, and a history of ankle sprains were associated with an increased risk of LASs in young female soccer players in the current study. These findings may be useful for developing a program to prevent LASs in this population.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-26T10:06:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231221481
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Return-to-Golf Rate After Shoulder Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review and
           Meta-analysis

    • Authors: Youssef Galal, Mihir Sheth, Evan Lederman, Anup Shah
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:With advancements in the technology, techniques, and biomechanical understanding of shoulder arthroplasty, higher rates of postoperative return to various sports have been seen in the past decade.Purpose:To observe the return-to-golf rate after various types of shoulder arthroplasty (anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty [TSA], hemiarthroplasty [HA], and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty [RSA]) and also to review the protocols for return to golf.Study Design:Scoping review; Level of evidence, 4.Methods:The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines were followed in a search of PubMed, JSTOR, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, and CORE using the keywords “return to sport,”“shoulder arthroplasty,”“golf,”“TSA,”“shoulder arthroplasty,”“hemiarthroplasty,”“reverse shoulder arthroplasty,”“RSA,”“sports,” and “athlete.” Of 145 preliminary results, 10 retrospective studies (n = 178 patients) published between 1998 and 2021 were included in the final analysis.Results:The mean patient age was 65 years. Of the 172 patients with reported return-to-sport rates, the mean return-to-golf rate was 75.8% for all types of shoulder arthroplasty. Of these 172 patients, 107 patients were categorized by type of procedure: Anatomic TSA had the highest return-to-golf rate at 77.6% (49/107), followed by HA at 64.3% (14/107) and RSA at 59.1% (44/107). Four studies commented on return to the full 18 holes of golf, with a return-to-sport timeline ranging from 5 to 6 months postoperatively. One study specified the return-to-golf timeline based on the type of shot and reported the mean number of weeks before putting, chipping, and returning to the course as 20, 22, and 27 weeks, respectively. Two studies that reported on golf playing frequency noted an increase from before to 1 year after TSA, from a mean of 1.6 and 0.7 times per week to 2.0 and 1.7 times per week, respectively. Only 1 study, published in 1998, provided a comprehensive return-to-golf protocol.Conclusion:The return-to-golf rate after shoulder arthroplasty was highest after anatomic TSA (78%) compared with HA (64%) and RSA (59%). The most commonly reported duration before returning to a full 18 holes was 5 to 6 months, but patients returned to putting and chipping earlier.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-23T10:50:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241230080
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Association of Head-Neck Rotation With History of Pitching-Related Elbow
           Pain in Youth Baseball Players

    • Authors: Masumi Yoshimoto, Masashi Kawabata, Toru Miyata, Yosuke Sato, Daichi Naoi, Mitsuaki Ashihara, Nobuyuki Suzuki, Chihiro Ikoma, Hiroaki Tatsuki, Ryota Kuratsubo, Hiroyuki Watanabe, Yohei Kusaba, Daiki Watanabe
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Prevention of pitching-related elbow pain in youth baseball players is important. Overhead pitching involves a whole-body motion, including head-neck rotation. A limited range of motion of head-neck rotation may cause inefficient pitching motion; however, this association is unclear.Purpose:To determine whether the range of motion of head-neck rotation is associated with the history of pitching-related elbow pain in youth baseball players.Study Design:Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.Methods:A total of 311 youth baseball players were selected and asked to complete a questionnaire survey about their age, weight, height, sex, baseball experience, main position, pitching side, and previous/current elbow pain during pitching. The range of motion of the upper and lower limb joints, head-neck rotation, and thoracic kyphosis angle were measured. Binomial logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with the history of elbow pain related to pitching.Results:There were 101 players with a history of pitching-related elbow pain (history group) and 142 players with no pitching-related elbow pain (no-history group). The history group had significantly lower values than the no-history group regarding the range of motion of head-neck rotation on the nondominant side (74.9°± 9° vs 77.7°± 9.6°; P = .02) and overall head-neck rotation (150.6°± 14.7° vs 154.9°± 18.4°; P = .04). Binomial logistic regression analysis identified head-neck rotation on the nondominant side (odds ratio [OR], 0.97 [95% CI, 0.94-1.00]), shoulder horizontal adduction on the dominant side (OR, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.96-1.00]), height (OR, 1.04 [95% CI, 1.00-1.08]), and playing position (pitcher) (OR, 0.40 [95% CI, 0.21-0.76]) as factors associated with a history of pitching-related elbow pain.Conclusion:Our cross-sectional analysis demonstrated that youth baseball players with a history of pitching-related elbow pain had limited head-neck rotation range of motion on the nondominant side, and this was a significant factor associated with the history of pitching-related elbow pain.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-23T10:50:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241229079
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Systematic Review of Bracing After Proximal Hamstring Repair

    • Authors: Phillip B. Wyatt, Tiffany D. Ho, Haleigh M. Hopper, James R. Satalich, Conor N. O’Neill, John Cyrus, Alexander R. Vap, Robert O’Connell
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Traditionally, postoperative rehabilitation protocols after proximal hamstring repair (PHR) for avulsion of the proximal hamstring tendon from its ischial insertion recommend bracing the hip and/or knee to protect the fixation. However, because of the cumbersome nature of these orthoses, recent studies have investigated outcomes in patients with postoperative protocols that do not include any form of postoperative bracing.Purpose:To synthesize the current body of evidence concerning bracing versus nonbracing postoperative management of PHR.Study Design:Systematic review; level of evidence, 4.Methods:Using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, we conducted a thorough search of the PubMed/Medline, Cochrane, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), and Embase (OVID) databases on March 24, 2023. We analyzed complication rates, reoperation rates, patient satisfaction, return to sport, and patient-reported outcomes of studies that used postoperative bracing versus studies that used no postoperative bracing after PHR with at least 12 months of follow-up. A total of 308 articles were identified after initial search.Results:In total, 25 studies were included in this review: 18 studies (905 patients) on bracing and 7 studies (291 patients) on nonbracing after PHR. The overall complication rate in the braced patients was found to be 10.9%, compared with 12.7% in nonbraced patients. The rate of reoperation due to retear of the proximal hamstring was found to be 0.05% in braced patients and 3.1% in nonbraced patients. Patient-reported outcome measures were found to be higher at the final follow-up in braced versus nonbraced patients, and patient satisfaction was found to be 94.7% in braced studies compared with 88.9% in nonbraced studies. The rate of 12-month return to sport in athletic patients was 88.4% with bracing and 82.7% without bracing.Conclusion:The findings of this review demonstrated lower complication and reoperation rates, higher patient-reported outcome scores, higher patient satisfaction, and a higher rate of return to sport in braced patients compared with nonbraced patients.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-23T10:49:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241230045
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Differences in Lumbopelvic Alignment in Adolescent Male Soccer Players
           With Bilateral and Unilateral Lumbar Bone Stress Injuries: An MRI
           Evaluation

    • Authors: Toshiharu Tsutsui, Toshinao Kamikubo, Wataru Sakamaki, Seira Takei, Toshihiro Maemichi, Suguru Torii
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Differences in the physical characteristics of bilateral and unilateral lumbar bone stress injuries (BSIs) are unknown.Purpose:To compare bilateral and unilateral lumbar BSIs in adolescent male soccer players, with a focus on lumbopelvic alignment.Study Design:Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.Methods:A total of 78 players (age range, 12-15 years) from a local soccer club who had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evaluations were included in the study. Lumbopelvic alignment and lumbar BSI were evaluated using short-tau inversion recovery and 3-dimensional LAVA on 3-T MRI; lumbar BSI was defined as the presence of bone marrow edema and/or the complete and incomplete fracture in the pars region on the MRI. Pelvic tilt (PT) and pelvic outflare angles were assessed on the kicking and pivoting sides, and asymmetry for each parameter was calculated by subtracting the kicking side from the pivoting side. In addition, the lumbar lordosis (LL), sacral slope (SS), and SS relative to LL (calculated by subtracting LL from the SS) were assessed. One-way analysis of variance was performed to compare lumbopelvic alignment in players with bilateral BSI, unilateral BSI, or no abnormal findings (controls).Results:No significant differences were found regarding lumbopelvic alignment between the players with bilateral versus unilateral lumbar BSI. PT asymmetry was significantly greater in both players with bilateral lumbar BSI and unilateral lumbar BSI compared with controls (P = .018 and P = .016, respectively). In addition, SS relative to LL was significantly greater in players with bilateral lumbar BSI compared with controls (P < .001).Conclusion:Although there were no significant lumbopelvic alignment differences between bilateral and unilateral BSI, players with bilateral BSI exhibited increased sacral anterior tilt relative to the LL, and the pelvis was more posterior on the pivoting side than on the kicking side in both players with bilateral BSI and unilateral BSI. Our results suggest that lumbopelvic alignment assessment may contribute to the management strategy for players with lumbar BSI and to the identification of players at high risk of lumbar BSI.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T01:32:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241229692
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Validity of Material Related to the Anterior Cruciate Ligament on TikTok

    • Authors: Riccardo D’Ambrosi, Timothy E. Hewett
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Video material is one of the most common types of digital information on social media platforms.Purpose:To assess the validity and informational value of TikTok videos with regard to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL).Study Design:Cross-sectional study.Methods:Using the terms “anterior cruciate ligament” AND/OR “ACL,” 420 TikTok videos were retrieved, of which 100 videos were included in the analysis. The video duration and the number of likes, shares, and views were recorded. Videos were categorized based on the source (private user, physical therapist, surgeon, and researcher), subject type (patient experience, physical therapy, injury mechanism, anatomy, clinical test, and surgical technique), content (patient experience/testimony, education, and rehabilitation), and any background audio (music or voice). Video quality assessments were conducted using the DISCERN instrument, The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark criteria, and the Global Quality Score (GQS). Associations between quantitative variables were tested using the Spearman rank correlation. One-way analysis of variance or Mann-Whitney test was performed to assess whether video quality differed by video characteristics.Results:A total of 41 videos were published by private users (41%), 34 by physical therapists (34%), 23 by surgeons (23%), and 2 by researchers (2%). Most of the information regarded patient experience (34%), followed by physical therapy (20%), injury mechanism (19%), anatomy (11%), clinical test (9%), and surgical technique (7%). The mean video length was 40.55 ± 41.58 seconds. The mean number of views was 151,084.39 ± 487,150.02, while the mean numbers of comments, likes, and shares were 72.80 ± 249.68, 6781.49 ± 29,163.96, and 98.71 ± 307.76, respectively. The mean DISCERN, JAMA, and GQS scores were 15.73 ± 1.44, 0.19 ± 0.39, and 1.16 ± 0.37, respectively, indicating the poorest quality on all 3 indices. The number of views, likes, shares, comments, and video lengths were all positively correlated with DISCERN (except the number of shares), JAMA, and GQS scores (P < .05). A significant difference was found in DISCERN scores between videos by private users and those by surgeons (15.37 ± 0.98 vs 16.22 ± 1.57; P = .007).Conclusion:Our analysis has demonstrated that the educational value of these videos on the ACL on TikTok is poor. Given the rapid growth of TikTok, further research is needed.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T01:31:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241228543
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma at Different Initiation Times on Healing of
           the Bone-Tendon Interface of the Rotator Cuff in a Mouse Model

    • Authors: Yundong Peng, Luyu Diao, Juan Wang, Guanglan Wang, Shaohui Jia, Cheng Zheng
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has demonstrated beneficial effects on healing of the bone-tendon interface (BTI).Purpose:To determine the optimal initiation time for PRP application after rotator cuff repair in an animal model.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:A total of 136 C57BL/6 mice were included; 40 mice were used to prepare PRP, while 96 mice underwent acute supraspinatus tendon (SST) repair. The animals were randomly divided into 4 groups: a control group and 3 groups in which PRP was injected into the injury interface immediately after surgery, on the 7th postoperative day (PRP-7d), and on the 14th postoperative day. At 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, the animals were sacrificed, blood was collected by eyeball removal, and samples of the SST-humerus complex were collected. Histological, imaging, immunological, and biomechanical data were compared among the groups using 1-way analysis of variance with the Bonferroni post hoc test.Results:Histological analysis revealed that the fibrocartilage layer at the BTI was larger in the PRP-7d group compared to the other groups at both 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively. Moreover, the PRP-7d group exhibited improved proteoglycan content and distribution compared to the other groups. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results demonstrated that at 4 weeks postoperatively, higher concentrations of transforming growth factor–β1 and platelet-derived growth factor–BB (PDGF-BB) were seen in the PRP-7d group versus the PRP-14d and control gruops (P < .05), and at 8 weeks postoperatively, the concentration of PDGF-BB was higher in the PRP-7d group versus the control group (P < .05). Biomechanical testing at 4 weeks postoperatively revealed that the failure load and ultimate strength of the SST-humerus complex were superior in the PRP-7d group compared to the other groups (P < .05), at 8 weeks, PRP-7d group was superior to the control group (P < .05). Additionally, at 8 weeks postoperatively, the PRP-7d group exhibited a greater trabecular number and trabecular thickness at the BTI compared to the PRP-14d and control gruops (P < .05).Conclusion:PRP promoted healing of the BTI after a rotator cuff injury at an early stage.Clinical Relevance:A PRP injection on the 7th postoperative day demonstrated superior therapeutic effects compared with injections at other time points.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T01:28:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231219812
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Clinical Outcomes and Tendon Healing After Arthroscopic Isolated
           Subscapularis Tendon Repair: Results at Midterm Follow-up

    • Authors: Ali Ihsan Kilic, Nicholas A. Zuk, Javier Ardebol, Theresa Pak, Mariano E. Menendez, Patrick J. Denard
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Few studies have reported clinical outcomes and tendon healing rates after arthroscopic isolated subscapularis (SSC) repair (AISR).Purpose/Hypothesis:The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes and tendon healing after AISR. It was hypothesized that AISR would result in satisfactory clinical outcomes along with a high rate of tendon healing at the midterm follow-up. The secondary purpose was to assess the influence of tear size and muscle atrophy on SSC tendon healing and patient-reported outcomes. It was hypothesized that both would be negatively correlated with healing but would have no effect on clinical outcomes .Study Design:Case series; Level of evidence, 4.Methods:A retrospective analysis was conducted on prospectively collected data for 77 patients who underwent primary AISR between 2011 and 2021 at a single institution, with a minimum 2-year postoperative follow-up for all patients. Functional outcomes were assessed using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, the Subjective Shoulder Value (SSV), and the visual analog scale for pain. Repair techniques and concomitant procedures were also collected. SSC tendon healing was evaluated via ultrasound at the final follow-up. Linear regression analysis was performed to determine factors affecting SSC healing.Results:The mean follow-up was 58.1 ± 3.3 months. ASES scores significantly improved from 41.5 to 81.6, and the SSV improved from 38.2 to 80.5 (P < .01 for both). Among the 40 patients (51.9%) who underwent postoperative ultrasound, 87.5% showed complete tendon healing. There were no significant differences in outcome scores between healed and unhealed tendons. Increased muscle atrophy and larger tears were correlated with failure of SSC healing (β = −0.285 [P = .015] and β = −0.157 [P = .045], respectively).Conclusion:Improved clinical outcomes and an overall high rate of tendon healing were seen at the midterm follow-up after AISR. Smaller tear sizes with less muscle atrophy were correlated with improved tendon healing. However, even when the tendon incompletely healed, the procedure improved functional outcomes.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T10:03:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241229429
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Validating the Glenoid Track Concept Using Dynamic Arthroscopic Assessment

    • Authors: Mustafa S. Rashid, Saho Tsuchiya, Kristie D. More, Justin LeBlanc, Aaron J. Bois, Cory A. Kwong, Ian K.Y. Lo
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Failure after isolated Bankart repair has led surgeons to consider when to address the Hill-Sachs lesion, which is thought to be a contributor to recurrent instability. One approach utilizes the glenoid track concept to determine whether a Hill-Sachs lesion is classified as “off-track,” suggesting that the addition of a remplissage procedure may aid stability. However, the accuracy and reliability of using this approach require validation using an appropriate reference.Purpose:To determine the accuracy and reliability of using the glenoid track concept against dynamic arthroscopic assessment of Hill-Sachs lesion engagement.Study Design:Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3.Methods:A total of 49 patients undergoing arthroscopic Bankart repair surgery for recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability were enrolled in this diagnostic validation study. Shoulders were classified as on-track or off-track using 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) and static arthroscopic measurements. These classifications were compared with dynamic arthroscopic assessment (engagement of the Hill-Sachs lesion on the anterior glenoid rim in the ‘athletic position’) to determine their accuracy and reliability.Results:The 3DCT-based measurements to determine glenoid track status had a higher positive predictive value (66% vs 42%), higher specificity (47% vs 42%), and higher accuracy (65% vs 59%) compared with static arthroscopic measurements. Static arthroscopic measurements to determine glenoid track status had a higher negative predictive value (96% vs 64%) and higher sensitivity (96% vs 81%) compared with 3DCT-based measurements. Interrater reliability (Krippendorff α) was ‘fair’ for determining the glenoid track status using 3DCT (0.368; 95% CI, 0.217-0.519) and ‘moderate’ for static arthroscopic measurements (0.523; 95% CI, 0.364-0.666). Intrarater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] 3,k) was ‘moderate’ for 3DCT measurements (0.660; 95% CI, 0.444-0.798) and ‘good’ for static arthroscopic measurements (0.769; 95% CI, 0.629-0.862).Conclusion:Determining glenoid track status using either 3DCT or static arthroscopic measurements yielded moderate accuracy and reliability. Surgeons using the glenoid track concept to aid surgical decision-making in traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability should utilize 3DCT or static arthroscopic measurements with caution.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T10:02:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241226943
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Concussion Rates in Youth Lacrosse Players and Comparison With Youth
           American Football

    • Authors: Brandon Macknofsky, Clyde K. Fomunung, Shimron Brown, Jessica V. Baran, Alessia C. Lavin, Vani Sabesan
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:There has been little focus on concussions in youth lacrosse players in the United States.Purpose:To provide a descriptive analysis of the epidemiology and incidence of concussions in youth lacrosse and compare the results with well-documented analyses of concussions in youth American football.Study Design:Descriptive epidemiology study.Methods:Data on concussions in pediatric patients playing lacrosse from 2006 to 2019 were collected using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). Weighted calculations and combined participation data obtained from membership in USA Lacrosse were used to estimate injury incidence. A comparison dataset was created using the NEISS data on youth football-related concussions. The cause of concussion was categorized into player-to-player, player-to-stick, player-to-ball, or player-to-ground contact.Results:A total of 37,974 concussion injuries related to lacrosse were identified in players with a mean age of 14.5 ± 3.5 years; 70% of concussions occurred in boys. National participation in lacrosse increased from 2006 to 2011 by a mean of 10.3% annually, followed by a lower annual growth rate of 2.5% from 2012 to 2019. The overall incidence of concussion injuries increased over the study period (r = 0.314), with the incidence rate in boys being greater than that of girls from 2009 to 2013. The most common cause of concussion was player-to-ground contact for boys and player-to-ball or player-to-stick contact for girls. The mean annual concussion incidences in youth lacrosse and youth football were 443 and 355 per 100,000 participants, respectively.Conclusion:Over the study period, 16% of lacrosse injuries were diagnosed as concussions, a higher mean annual incidence per 100,000 participants than that of youth football (443 vs 355). The cause of concussion was different based on sex, with higher rates of player-to-ball or player-to-stick contact in female players versus player-to-ground contact in male players.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T10:02:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231223169
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Association of Quadriceps Tendon Harvest for ACL Reconstruction With
           Development of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Patella in Pediatric
           Patients

    • Authors: Sofia Hidalgo Perea, Danielle E. Chipman, Frank A. Cordasco, Kenneth M. Lin, Danielle Gorelick, Lori A. Asaro, Daniel W. Green
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:There are various reported complications after primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) necessitating additional surgery in skeletally immature patients, regardless of technique and autograft type.Purpose:To analyze the rate and type of complications encountered with soft tissue quadriceps tendon autograft (QTA) for ACLR in patients ≤18 years as well as the overall rate of second surgery, unrelated to the use of the QTA.Study Design:Case series; Level of evidence, 4.Methods:A total of 141 patients ≤18 years who underwent ACLR with a QTA and had minimum 6-month follow-up were included. All patients underwent ACLR by utilizing a full-thickness soft tissue QTA. Complications associated with the QTA harvest site and use of QTA were reported.Results:The mean age of the included cohort (84 men, 57 women) was 14.8 ± 1.6 years. The average follow-up was of 2.0 ± 1.2 years. A total of 30 (21%) patients had a subsequent complication that required surgical intervention; in 11 (8%) patients, the complication was specifically associated with the use of a QTA, whereas in 19 (13%) patients, the complication was related to the ACLR. In addition, 13 (9%) patients underwent a contralateral ACLR procedure. Of the QTA-related complications, 2 patients developed osteochondritis dissecans (OCD)-like lesions in the superior aspect of the patella, 2 patients had injured their quadriceps extensor mechanism and required surgical repair, and 8 patients had a subsequent procedure to remove nonabsorbable sutures used for donor site quadriceps tendon closure. One of the patients who underwent the removal of nonabsorbable sutures also had an arthroscopic debridement of patellar chondral damage.Conclusion:We reported complications encountered with soft tissue QTA for ACLR. The complication rate for QTA harvest was 8%. However, given that the removal of nonabsorbable sutures from the donor site was caused by the surgical technique used, the revised nonsuture-related complication rate for QTA graft harvest was 2%. Although the use of a QTA has recently gained popularity due to its high return-to-sport and low graft-failure rates, surgeons should be aware of the complications associated with using this graft type.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T10:22:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231219712
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Outcomes of Isolated Endoscopic Gluteal Tendon Repair Compared With
           Concomitant Endoscopic Gluteal Tendon Repair and Arthroscopic Hip Labral
           Repair: A Propensity-Matched Analysis With Minimum 2-Year Follow-up

    • Authors: Jordan H. Larson, Christopher M. Brusalis, Sachin Allahabadi, Thomas W. Fenn, Reagan S. Chapman, Robert B. Browning, Daniel J. Kaplan, Shane J. Nho
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Both gluteal and labral tears are common sources of hip pain, but no studies have evaluated how concomitant arthroscopic labral repair and correction of femoroacetabular impingement syndrome (FAIS) affect outcomes after endoscopic gluteus/minimus repair.Purpose:(1) To compare patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and clinically significant outcomes achievements between patients who underwent endoscopic gluteus medius/minimus and arthroscopic hip labral repair with correction of FAIS versus endoscopic gluteus medius/minimus repair without labral repair and (2) to define threshold scores required to achieve the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) and the Patient Acceptable Symptom State (PASS) for the Hip Outcome Score–Activities of Daily Living, Hip Outcome Score–Sports Specific, modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), 12-item international Hip Outcome Tool, and visual analog scale for pain in these patients.Study Design:Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3.Methods:Patients who underwent primary endoscopic gluteus medius/minimus repair between 2012 and 2020 were identified. Those who underwent concomitant arthroscopic labral repair and correction of FAIS with femoroplasty or acetabuloplasty as indicated were propensity matched in a 1 to 1 ratio by sex, age, and body mass index to patients who underwent gluteus medius/minimus repair without labral repair. Patients who completed the study PROs were assessed preoperatively and at 2 years postoperatively. Threshold scores required to achieve the MCID and PASS thresholds were calculated.Results:A total of 32 patients who underwent simultaneous gluteal and labral repair (G+L) were matched to 32 patients who underwent gluteal repair without labral repair (G); 75% of patients in the G cohort underwent labral debridement, while 25% in this cohort received no labral treatment. A significant difference was observed between groups in preoperative mHHS scores (G+L, 54.4 ± 12.9 vs G, 46.3 ± 14; P = .048) but no differences in any other PRO scores (P≥ .207). The MCID/PASS thresholds were as follows: Hip Outcome Score–Activities of Daily Living (11.14/83.82), Hip Outcome Score–Sports Specific (16.07/59.72), mHHS (11.47/70.95), 12-item international Hip Outcome Tool (13.73/45.49), and visual analog scale for pain (14.30/22). There were no significant differences in MCID or PASS achievement rates between the 2 groups (P≥ .108).Conclusion:Patients who underwent combined G+L demonstrated comparable PROs and clinically significant outcomes achievement rates to patients who underwent G, highlighting sustained successful outcomes for patients with gluteal tendon pathology and concomitant FAIS and labral tears.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T10:21:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231215340
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Biomechanical Comparison Between Double-Row Repair and Soft Tissue
           Tenodesis for Treatment of Proximal Rectus Femoris Avulsions

    • Authors: Haruki Nishimura, Kohei Yamaura, Vera M. Stetzelberger, Alexander R. Garcia, Justin R. Brown, Justin F.M. Hollenbeck, Mitchell S. Mologne, Soshi Uchida, Marc J. Philippon
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Some patients with proximal rectus femoris (PRF) avulsions require surgical treatment after failed nonoperative treatment. There is no consensus on the superiority of suture anchor repair with the suture-bridge repair (SBR) technique versus tenodesis repair (TR) for PRF avulsions.Purpose:To compare the failure load and elongation at failure between SBR and TR and to compare the stiffness of these 2 repair techniques versus the native state.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:Seven pairs of human cadaveric hemipelvises were dissected to the PRF and sartorius origins. Each specimen underwent preconditioning followed by a distraction test to determine the stiffness of the native specimen. One specimen of each pair received one of the repair methods (SBR or TR), while the other specimen in the pair received the other repair technique. After repair, each specimen underwent preconditioning followed by a pull to failure. The failure load, elongation at failure, stiffness, mode of failure, and stiffness as a percentage of the native state were determined for each repair.Results:The SBR group exhibited a stronger failure load (223 ± 51 N vs 153 ± 32 N for the TR group; P = .0116) and significantly higher stiffness as a percentage from the native state (70.4% ± 19% vs 33.8% ± 15.5% for the TR group; P = .0085). While the stiffness of the repair state in the SBR group (41.5 ± 9.4 N/mm) was not significantly different from that of the native state (66.2 ± 36 N/mm), the stiffness of the repair state in the TR group (20.3 ± 7.5 N/mm) was significantly lower compared with that of the native state (65.4 ± 22.1 N/mm; P < .001) and repair state in the SBR group (41.5 ± 9.4 N/mm; P = .02). The SBR group primarily failed at the repair site (71%), and the TR group primarily failed at the suture-sartorius interface (43%) and at the muscle (29%).Conclusion:SBR and TR specimens were significantly weaker than the native tendon. The stiffness of the SBR was equivalent to that of the native tendon, while TR was significantly less stiff than the native tendon. The SBR was superior to TR in terms of failure load, stiffness, and percentage stiffness from the native state.Clinical Relevance:SBR may be a better surgical option than TR to optimize failure load and stiffness for PRF avulsions.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T10:20:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231213864
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Association of Use of a Mobile Tackling Dummy During College Football
           Practice With Reduced Sport-Related Concussion: Results of a Pilot
           Investigation

    • Authors: Stephen L. Aita, Rohan Muchintala, Advith Suresh, Suraj Patel, Benjamin Schuler, Jonathan D. Lichtenstein
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Considering the multifaceted consequences of improperly managed sport-related concussions (SRCs) in American football, identifying efficacious prevention measures for enhancing player safety is crucial.Purpose:To investigate the association of primary prevention measures (no-tackle practices and using a mobile tackling dummy in practice) with the frequency of SRCs within college football programs in the United States.Study Design:Descriptive epidemiology study.Methods:In this pilot study, we analyzed the frequency of new SRCs recorded during various settings (total, in preseason, in season, in practice, and game) across 14 seasons (2007-2019 and 2021) for Dartmouth College and across 7 seasons (2013-2019) for the 7 other teams in the Ivy League men’s athletic football conference. Trends between seasons and the number of SRCs sustained were examined using correlations and basic descriptive statistics. We also examined SRC frequency in relation to primary prevention measures (no-tackle practices, use of mobile tackling dummies during practice) in the Dartmouth College football program, and we compared SRCs with regard to the no-tackle practice policy in the other Ivy League teams.Results:There was a statistically significant reduction in the number of SRCs over the seasons studied, with the strongest finding observed for Dartmouth College in-game SRCs (r = −0.52; P = .029). Relatedly, the strongest between-season effect was seen for the Dartmouth College practice policy on in-game SRCs (η2 = 0.510; P = .01). The use of mobile tackling dummies was found to be independently associated (adjusting for no-tackle practice) with a lower number total (β = −0.53; P = .049), in-season (β = −0.63; P = .023), and in-game (β = −0.79; P = .003) SRCs. While seasons with the no-tackle practice were not meaningfully associated with SRCs for Dartmouth College, stronger trends were observed in the other Ivy League teams, such that seasons with this policy were associated with lower SRC prevalence.Conclusion:Our data indicate that the use of the mobile tackling dummy in practice was related to the reduced number of SRCs sustained at multiple settings during the football season. To a lesser extent, the no-tackle practice policy was also associated with a reduced number of SRCs.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T07:24:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241228316
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Effect of Compressive Shoulder Draping With Adhesive Incise Drape on Soft
           Tissue Swelling in Shoulder Arthroscopy: A Prospective Randomized Trial

    • Authors: Ofir Uri, Liad Alfandari, Ram Yaron, Amir Kettanie, Gil Laufer, Eyal Behrbalk
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Soft tissue swelling in shoulder arthroscopy is common and may lead to complications. Measures aimed at reducing this phenomenon are routinely used with limited efficacy.Purpose/Hypothesis:The purpose of the study was to assess (1) soft tissue swelling of the shoulder (the operated site) and (2) soft tissue swelling of the neck, chest, and arm (the surrounding tissue) in patients with versus without compressive draping during shoulder arthroscopy. It was hypothesized that compressive draping of the shoulder with adhesive incise drape would reduce soft tissue swelling during shoulder arthroscopy.Study Design:Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1.Methods:A total of 50 patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were prospectively randomized to either the study group (in which the shoulder was draped with adhesive incise drape tightened around the shoulder) or the control group (in which a standard shoulder arthroscopy drape was used). The circumferences of the shoulder, arm, chest, and neck were measured preoperatively and postoperatively and compared between the groups.Results:The shoulder circumference in the standard draping group increased by 16% during the procedure (from 21.2 ± 1.5 cm preoperatively to 24.5 ± 1.7 cm postoperatively) compared with only 6% in the compressive draping group (from 21.0 ± 1.3 cm preoperatively to 22.3 ± 1.1 cm postoperatively) (P < .01). No serious postoperative complications were observed in either group.Conclusion:Compressive shoulder draping with adhesive incise drape was effective in reducing soft tissue swelling around the shoulder in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair compared with standard arthroscopic draping and was not associated with any adverse reactions.Registration:NCT03216590 (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier).
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T10:45:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241229736
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Risk Factors Associated With Poor Outcomes After Quadriceps Tendon Repair

    • Authors: Carlo Coladonato, Adeeb Jacob Hanna, Neel K. Patel, John Hayden Sonnier, Gregory Connors, Matthew Sabitsky, Emma Johnson, Donald W. Mazur, Shyam Brahmabhatt, Kevin B. Freedman
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Ruptures of the quadriceps tendon present most frequently in older adults and individuals with underlying medical conditions.Purpose:To examine the relationship between patient-specific factors and tear characteristics with outcomes after quadriceps tendon repair.Study Design:Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3.Methods:A retrospective review was conducted on all patients who underwent quadriceps tendon repair between January 1, 2016, and January 1, 2021, at a single institution. Patients 6 weeks to surgery) were excluded. Information was collected regarding patient characteristics, presenting symptoms, tear characteristics, physical examination findings, and postoperative outcomes. Poor outcome was defined as a need for revision surgery, complications, postoperative range of motion of (ROM) 5°.Results:A total of 191 patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients were aged 58.5 ± 13.2 years at the time of surgery, were predominantly men (90.6%), and had a mean body mass index (BMI) of 32.2 ± 6.3 kg/m2. Patients underwent repair with either suture anchors (15.2%) or transosseous tunnels (84.8%). Postoperatively, 18.5% of patients experienced knee flexion ROM of 5°, 8.5% had complications, and 3.2% underwent revision. Increasing age (odds ratio [OR], 1.03 [95% CI, 1.004-1.07]) and female sex (OR, 3.82 [95% CI, 1.25-11.28]) were significantly associated with postoperative knee flexion of 5°. Current smoking status (OR, 15.44 [95% CI, 3.97-65.90]) and concomitant retinacular tears (OR, 9.62 (95% CI, 1.67-184.14]) were associated with postoperative complications, and increasing age (OR, 1.05 [95% CI, 1.02-1.08]) and greater BMI (OR, 1.08 [95% CI, 1.02-1.14]) were associated with risk of acquiring any poor outcome criteria.Conclusion:Patient-specific characteristics—such as increasing age, greater BMI, female sex, retinacular involvement, and current smoking status—were found to be risk factors for poor outcomes after quadriceps tendon repair. Further studies are needed to identify potentially modifiable risk factors that can be used to set patient expectations and improve outcomes.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T10:44:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241229105
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Optimal Limb Position for the Stress Ultrasound Evaluation of Elbow Valgus
           Laxity in Baseball Players

    • Authors: Ryuhei Michinobu, Takeshi Ogawa, Yuichi Yoshii, Akira Ikumi, Kazuhiro Ikeda, Hiromitsu Tsuge, Shotaro Teruya, Yuki Hara, Masashi Yamazaki
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:The optimal limb position during stress ultrasound (SUS) evaluation of elbow valgus laxity has not been standardized.Purpose:To compare 2 elbow positions (at 90° and 30° of flexion) and report which position method better represents the increased valgus laxity characteristics of baseball players.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:Eighteen college baseball players with no history of elbow pain or elbow disorders who belonged to a college baseball club between April and November 2021 participated in this study. The medial elbow joint space (MEJS) was recorded by ultrasonography at rest and under valgus stress, and the difference in MEJS between the conditions was considered the valgus laxity. For all participants, the MEJS was recorded at 90° and 30° of elbow flexion. In the 90° of flexion position, the participant was positioned in the supine position with abduction and external rotation of the shoulder, and 2.5 kgf of valgus stress was applied proximally to the wrist. In the 30° of flexion position, the participant was positioned in the sitting position with abduction and external rotation of the shoulder, and 3.0 kgf of valgus stress was applied to the ulnar head. Valgus laxity on the throwing and nonthrowing sides was compared between the 2 elbow positions using paired t tests or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests after checking the normality.Results:There was a significant difference in valgus laxity on the throwing side between the 90° and 30° of flexion positions (1.9 vs 1.1 mm, respectively; P = .002), whereas no significant difference between positions was seen on the nonthrowing side (P = .06).Conclusion:SUS with the elbow flexed at 90° more clearly detected valgus laxity in the study participants than the 30° of flexion position.Clinical Relevance:The quantitative evaluation of valgus laxity is important for baseball players to assess the risk of ulnar collateral ligament injury.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T10:43:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231221523
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Decreased Effective Patellar Tendon Length following Distalization Tibial
           Tubercle Osteotomy without Patellar Tendon Tenodesis

    • Authors: Tyler J. Uppstrom, Connor F. Fletcher, Daniel W. Green, Andreas H. Gomoll, Sabrina M. Strickland
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Distalization tibial tubercle osteotomy (TTO) is an effective treatment for improving patellar height in patients with patella alta associated with patellofemoral instability and cartilage lesions. The addition of a patellar tendon tenodesis has been suggested; nonetheless, concerns exist regarding possible increased patellofemoral cartilage stresses.Purpose:To evaluate pre- and postoperative patellar tendon length and alignment parameters on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) after distalization TTO without patellar tendon tenodesis.Study Design:Case series; Level of evidence, 4.Methods:Twenty skeletally mature patients who underwent distalization TTO with or without anteromedialization at our institution between December 2014 and August 2021 were included. All patients underwent pre- and postoperative MRIs of the affected knee. The Caton-Deschamps index (CDI), the axial and sagittal tibial tubercle–trochlear groove (TT-TG) distances, the distances from the tibial plateau to the patellar tendon insertion and the tibial tubercle, and the patellar tendon length were assessed. PROMs included the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form, the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score–Quality of Life subscale, the Kujala Anterior Knee Pain Scale, and the Veterans RAND 12-Item Health Survey mental and physical component scores.Results:The mean patient age at surgery was 27.4 years (range, 14-42 years). Radiographic parameters demonstrated improved patellar height (CDI decreased from 1.36 to 1.11; P < .001) after distalization TTO. The distance from the tibial plateau to the patellar tendon insertion significantly decreased from 20.1 mm preoperatively to 17.9 mm postoperatively (P < .020), and the patellar tendon length decreased from 53.4 mm preoperatively to 46.0 mm postoperatively (P < .001). The patellar tendon insertion was not distalized after distalization TTO, likely because of scarring of the patellar tendon proximal to the osteotomy site. Patients demonstrated significant pre- to postoperative improvements on all PROMs (P≤ .024 for all ). There were 4 (20%) complications—2 cases of arthrofibrosis, 1 postoperative infection, and 1 osteotomy delayed union.Conclusion:Distalization TTO without patellar tendon tenodesis was associated with improved radiographic outcomes and PROMs. It provides an additional tool for surgical management of patellofemoral pathology with associated patella alta.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T09:53:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241227201
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Association of Remaining Anterior Knee Laxity With Inferior Outcomes After
           Revision ACL Reconstruction

    • Authors: Lena Eggeling, Tobias Claus Drenck, Stephan Breer, Karl-Heinz Frosch, Ralph Akoto
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:The relationship between remaining anterior knee laxity and poorer clinical outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) may be underrated, and the criteria for failure of revision ACLR have not been defined.Purpose/Hypothesis:To evaluate a possible association between remaining knee laxity and functional scores in patients after revision ACLR. We hypothesized that a postoperative side-to-side-difference (SSD) in knee laxity of ≥6 mm will be an objective parameter for failure.Study Design:Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3.Methods:A total of 200 patients (77 women and 123 men; mean age, 30.8 ± 11 years; range, 18-61 years) who underwent revision ACLR between 2016 and 2019 were evaluated; The mean follow-up period was 30.2 ± 9 months (range, 24-67 months). Patients were divided into 3 groups according to postoperative SSD (
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T01:58:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231219695
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Reliability of Manual Measurements Versus Semiautomated Software for
           Glenoid Bone Loss Quantification in Patients With Anterior Shoulder
           Instability

    • Authors: Katrin Karpinski, Doruk Akguen, Henry Gebauer, Alp Paksoy, Mattia Lupetti, Viktoria Markova, Oliver Zettinig, Philipp Moroder
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:The presence of glenoid bone defects is indicative in the choice of treatment for patients with anterior shoulder instability. In contrast to traditional linear- and area-based measurements, techniques such as the consideration of glenoid concavity have been proposed and validated.Purpose:To compare the reliability of linear (1-dimensional [1D]), area (2-dimensional [2D]), and concavity (3-dimensional [3D]) measurements to quantify glenoid bone loss performed manually and to analyze how automated measurements affect reliability.Study Design:Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3.Methods:Computed tomography images of 100 patients treated for anterior shoulder instability with differently sized glenoid defects were evaluated independently by 2 orthopaedic surgeons manually using conventional software (OsiriX; Pixmeo) as well as automatically with a dedicated prototype software program (ImFusion Suite; ImFusion). Parameters obtained included 1D (defect diameter, best-fit circle diameter), 2D (defect area, best-fit circle area), and 3D (bony shoulder stability ratio) measurements. Mean values and reliability as expressed by the intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]) were compared between the manual and automated measurements.Results:When manually obtained, the measurements showed almost perfect agreement for 1D parameters (ICC = 0.83), substantial agreement for 2D parameters (ICC = 0.79), and moderate agreement for the 3D parameter (ICC = 0.48). When measurements were aided by automated software, the agreement between raters was almost perfect for all parameters (ICC = 0.90 for 1D, 2D, and 3D). There was a significant difference in mean values between manually versus automatically obtained measurements for 1D, 2D, and 3D parameters (P < .001 for all).Conclusion:While more advanced measurement techniques that take glenoid concavity into account are more accurate in determining the biomechanical relevance of glenoid bone loss, our study showed that the reliability of manually performed, more complex measurements was moderate.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T12:30:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231222938
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Assessment of Risk Factors and Rate of Conversion to Total Hip
           Arthroplasty Within 2 Years After Hip Arthroscopy Utilizing a Large
           Database of Commercially Insured Patients in the United States

    • Authors: Justin Tiao, William Ranson, Renee Ren, Kevin C. Wang, Ashley M. Rosenberg, Michael Herrera, Nicole Zubizarreta, Shawn G. Anthony
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:The conversion rate of hip arthroscopy (HA) to total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been reported to be as high as 10%. Despite identifying factors that increase the risk of conversion, current studies do not stratify patients by type of arthroscopic procedure.Purpose/Hypothesis:To analyze the rate and predictors of conversion to THA within 2 years after HA. It was hypothesized that osteoarthritis (OA) and increased patient age would negatively affect the survivorship of HA.Study Design:Cohort study; Evidence level, 3.Methods:The IBM MarketScan database was utilized to identify patients who underwent HA and converted to THA within 2 years at inpatient and outpatient facilities between 2013 and 2017. Patients were split into 3 procedure cohorts as follows: (1) femoroacetabular osteoplasty (FAO), which included treatment for femoroacetabular impingement; (2) isolated debridement; and (3) isolated labral repair. Cohort characteristics were compared using standardized differences. Conversion rates between the 3 cohorts were compared using chi-square tests. The relationship between age and conversion was assessed using linear regression. Predictors of conversion were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. The median time to conversion was estimated using Kaplan-Meier tests.Results:A total of 5048 patients were identified, and the rates of conversion to THA were 12.86% for isolated debridement, 8.67% for isolated labral repair, and 6.76% for FAO (standardized difference, 0.138). The isolated labral repair cohort had the shortest median time to conversion (isolated labral repair, 10.88 months; isolated debridement, 10.98 months; and FAO, 11.9 months [P = .034). For patients>50 years, isolated debridement had the highest rate of conversion at 18.8%. The conversion rate increased linearly with age. Factors that increased the odds of conversion to THA were OA, having an isolated debridement procedure, and older patient age (P < .05).Conclusion:Older patients and those with preexisting OA of the hip were at a significantly increased risk of failing HA and requiring a total hip replacement within 2 years of the index procedure. Younger patients were at low risk of requiring a conversion procedure no matter which arthroscopic procedure was performed.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T12:29:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231217494
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Correlation Between Improvement in Pain After Ultrasound-Guided
           Intra-articular Hip Injection and Outcomes After Arthroscopy in Patients
           With Femoroacetabular Impingement

    • Authors: Ya-Juan Shuang, Yi Mao, Kang-Kang Yu, Chun-Bao Li, Ming-Bo Zhang
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:An accurate and objective criterion is needed to determine candidates who are suitable for hip arthroscopy in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI).Purpose:To determine whether improvement in pain after ultrasound (US)-guided intra-articular hip injection during standardized examinations can be used to predict the outcomes of hip arthroscopy in patients with FAI.Study Design:Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3.Methods:We enrolled 119 patients with FAI who underwent US-guided intra-articular hip injection of local anesthesia during standardized examinations, carried out from May 2018 to February 2020 (within 2 weeks before hip arthroscopy). All patients had undergone a minimum of 6 months of nonoperative treatment without remission and had 2-year follow-up data. Pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores (0-10) were recorded for 7 different physical examination tests, and a total score (0 [best] to 70 [worst]) was obtained. In addition, International Hip Outcome Tool–12 (iHOT-12) and modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS) scores were recorded before hip arthroscopy and at final follow-up. According to whether patients achieved the substantial clinical benefit (SCB) on the iHOT-12, they were divided into SCB and non-SCB groups, and the improvement in VAS pain scores from preinjection to postinjection (ΔVAS pain) was compared between the 2 groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to predict the achievement of SCB, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to estimate the accuracy of the prediction.Results:There was a significant pre- to postoperative increase in iHOT-12 (31.6 points; P < .001) and mHHS (20.0 points; P < .001) scores, and 84 (70.6%) patients achieved the SCB. The ΔVAS pain score was significantly greater in the SCB versus the non-SCB group (16.0 vs 7.0 points; respectively; P < .001). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated an optimal cutoff value of 8.5 points for ΔVAS pain (AUC, 0.772; 95% CI, 0.687-0.858). For patients with more severe symptoms (total preinjection VAS pain score of>10 out of 70), the accuracy of the prediction for ΔVAS pain had a better evaluation value (AUC, 0.834; 95% CI, 0.676-0.992).Conclusion:Improvement in pain after US-guided intra-articular hip injection predicted the outcomes of hip arthroscopy in patients with FAI in this study, especially for patients with more severe pain.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T03:02:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231224497
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Influence of Subchondral Cysts on the Outcomes of Surgical Treatment for
           

    • Authors: Jiayao Zhang, Kaiwen Zheng, Wufeng Cai, Xihao Huang, Qi Li
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Limited literature is available regarding the effect of subchondral cysts on the surgical outcomes for treatment of osteochondral lesion of the talus (OLT).Purpose:To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies comparing surgical outcomes between OLTs with and without cysts.Study Design:Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4.Methods:Following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, the authors searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant studies published up to January 7, 2023. The 4375 retrieved studies were screened, and 9 articles (level of evidence, 2-4) were included, which comprised 165 patients with OLT and subchondral cysts (cyst group) and 223 without cysts (noncyst group). After data extraction, mean differences in outcome scores (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [AOFAS] Ankle Hindfoot Scale, visual analog scale [VAS] score for pain) and adverse events were compared between the groups.Results:Functional scores improved after surgery in both groups, with the cyst group having a significantly higher AOFAS score than the noncyst group (P = .005; I2 = 0%); subgroup analysis revealed that this difference was attributable to the size of the osteochondral lesion and the type of surgical procedure. No significant difference was found between the cyst and noncyst groups in VAS pain scores (P = .77; I2 = 0%) or postoperative adverse events (P = .35; I2 = 0%).Conclusion:The results of this review indicated that patients with subchondral cysts improved with surgical treatment of OLT. A relatively low level of evidence was available to indicate that surgical treatment for small OLTs with subchondral cysts will result in better clinical outcomes compared with OLTs without cysts.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T03:01:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241226719
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Evaluating the Morphology of Unique Superficial Fissured Cartilage Lesions
           at the Femoral Head-Neck Junction in Patients with Femoroacetabular
           Impingement Syndrome

    • Authors: Kohei Yamaura, Haruki Nishimura, Joseph J. Ruzbarsky, Benjamin D. Kuhns, Michael T. Mullen, Victoria R. Duke, Kelsey M. O’Hara, Jarrod M. Brown, Spencer M. Comfort, William S. Hambright, Chelsea S. Bahney, Johnny Huard, Marc J. Philippon
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:While an association between femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and osteoarthritis (OA) has been reported, the mechanistic differences and transition between the 2 conditions is not fully understood. In FAI, cartilage lesions at the femoral head-neck junction can sometimes be visualized during hip arthroscopy.Purpose/Hypothesis:The purpose of this study was to describe a unique dimpled pattern of superficial fissured cartilage lesions on the femoral head-neck junction at impingement site in patients with FAI syndrome (FAIS) and to evaluate the clinical, histological, and genetic phenotype of this cartilage. We hypothesized that the cartilage lesions may indicate risk for, or predict occurrence of, OA.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:Six hips (6 patients; mean age, 34.2 ± 12.9 years; range, 19-54 years) with dimpled or fissured cartilage were included among patients who underwent hip arthroscopy for treatment of FAIS from October 2020 through December 2021. This affected cartilage (dimple-pattern group) and normal cartilage (control group) on the femoral head-neck junction were collected from the same patients and evaluated for histological quantification by Mankin scores and expression of proteins related to cartilage degeneration (eg, matrix metalloproteinase [MMP]-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-10, and MMP-12, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase [TIMP]-1 and TMP-2, aggrecan neopepitope CS846, and hyaluronic acid [HA]) with the use of Milliplex Multiplex Assays.Results:All 6 hips were of the mixed FAI subtype. Preoperatively, 4 of 6 hips had Tönnis grade 1 radiographic changes, which was associated with greater femoral head chondral damage visualized intraoperatively. Mankin scores for the normal cartilage group and the dimple-pattern group were 0.67 ± 0.82 and 3.3 ± 0.82, respectively. Dimple pattern fissured cartilage showed a significant increase in Mankin score (P = .031) and a significant increase in protein expression of CS846 (P = .031) compared with normal cartilage. There were no significant differences in MMPs, TIMPs, or HA levels between the 2 groups.Conclusion:The dimple pattern fissured cartilage, compared to normal cartilage, showed histologically significant cartilage degeneration and a significant increase in protein expression of CS846, a biomarker for early OA.Clinical Relevance:This lesion serves as helpful visual indicator of early degeneration of the cartilage of femoral head-neck junction caused by FAIS.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T10:13:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231219217
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Hip and Pelvis Movement Patterns in Patients With Femoroacetabular
           Impingement Syndrome Differ From Controls and Change After Hip Arthroscopy
           During a Step-Down Pivot-Turn Task

    • Authors: Thomas D. Alter, Daniel M. Wichman, Thomas W. Fenn, Derrick M. Knapik, Alejandro Espinoza Orias, Shane J. Nho, Philip Malloy
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Alterations in hip kinematics during functional tasks occur in positions that cause anterior impingement in patients with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome. However, tasks that do not promote motions of symptomatic hip impingement remain understudied.Purpose:To compare movement patterns of the hip and pelvis during a step-down pivot-turn task between patients with FAI and controls as well as in patients with FAI before and after hip arthroscopy.Study Design:Controlled laboratory study.Methods:Three-dimensional motion capture was acquired in 32 patients with FAI and 27 controls during a step-down pivot-turn task. An FAI subsample (n = 14) completed testing 9.2 ± 2.0 months (mean ± SD; range, 5.8-13.1 months) after hip arthroscopy. Statistical parametric mapping analysis was used to analyze hip and pelvis time series waveforms (1) between the FAI and control groups, (2) in the FAI group before versus after hip arthroscopy, and (3) in the FAI group after hip arthroscopy versus the control group. Continuous parametric variables were analyzed by paired t test and nonparametric variables by chi-square test.Results:There were no significant differences in demographics between the FAI and control groups. Before hip arthroscopy, patients with FAI demonstrated reduced hip flexion (P = .041) and external rotation (P = .027), as well as decreased anterior pelvic tilt (P = .049) and forward rotation (P = .043), when compared with controls. After hip arthroscopy, patients demonstrated greater hip flexion (P < .001) and external rotation of the operative hip (P < .001), in addition to increased anterior pelvic tilt (P≤ .036) and pelvic rise (P≤ .049), as compared with preoperative values. Postoperatively, the FAI group demonstrated greater hip flexion (P≤ .047) and lower forward pelvic rotation (P = .003) as compared with the control group.Conclusion:Movement pattern differences between the FAI and control groups during the nonimpingement-related step-down pivot-turn task were characterized by differences in the sagittal and transverse planes of the hip and pelvis. After hip arthroscopy, patients exhibited greater hip flexion and external rotation and increased pelvic anterior tilt and pelvic rise as compared with presurgery. When compared with controls, patients with FAI demonstrated greater hip flexion and lower pelvic forward rotation postoperatively.Clinical Relevance:These findings indicate that hip and pelvis biomechanics are altered even during tasks that do not reproduce the anterior impingement position.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T10:12:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231169200
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Association Between Social Media Activity and Ratings on Physician Review
           Websites Among Orthopaedic Surgeons With an Active Online Media Presence

    • Authors: Benjamin Kerzner, Suhas P. Dasari, Hasani W. Swindell, Obianuju A. Obioha, Zeeshan A. Khan, Parker M. Rea, Luc M. Fortier, Monique S. Haynes, Jorge Chahla
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Social media has the potential to play a substantial role in the decision-making of patients when choosing a physician for care.Purpose:The purpose of this study was to determine whether an association exists between physician social media activity and patient satisfaction ratings on physician review websites (PRWs) as well as number of reviews. It was hypothesized that there would be a significant association between physician social media utilization and patient satisfaction ratings.Study Design:Cross-sectional study.Methods:The American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine database was queried for the complete membership list. The online media profile and level of activity of the members were evaluated, and an online media presence score was calculated. The surgeons with the approximately top 10% of online media presence scores were compiled to assess the relationship between social media usage (Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and Facebook) and patient satisfaction ratings on the Google Reviews, Healthgrades, and Vitals PRWs. Bivariate analysis was performed to compare demographic variables and level of online presence.Results:A total of 325 surgeons were included in the analysis. The most common platform used was Facebook (88.3%). There was no significant relationship between active social media use and overall ratings on any of the PRWs. Active Twitter use was associated with a greater number of ratings on all review websites, a greater number of comments on Google Reviews and Healthgrades, and shorter patient-reported clinic wait times on Healthgrades. Active Instagram use was associated with a greater number of comments on Vitals. No relationships were observed for YouTube or Facebook.Conclusion:For the included sports medicine surgeons who were most active on social media, no significant relationships were found between social media use and overall ratings on PRWs. Of all the platforms assessed, active use of Twitter was the only significant predictor of more reviews on PRWs. Thus, when deciding which form of social media engagement to prioritize in building one's practice, Twitter may serve as a relatively low-demand, high-reward option.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T10:11:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231209794
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Immediate and Short-Term Effects of In-Shoe Heel-Lift Orthoses on Clinical
           and Biomechanical Outcomes in Patients With Insertional Achilles
           Tendinopathy

    • Authors: Nabeel Hamdan Alghamdi, Ryan T. Pohlig, Kayla D. Seymore, Jaclyn Megan Sions, Jeremy R. Crenshaw, Karin Grävare Silbernagel
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Physical therapists frequently employ heel lifts as an intervention to reduce Achilles tendon pain and restore function.Purpose:To determine the short-term effect of heel lifts on clinical and gait outcomes in participants with insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT).Study Design:Case series; Level of evidence, 4.Methods:Participants with IAT underwent eligibility screening and completed assessments at baseline and 2 weeks later. Primary outcomes included symptom severity (Victoria Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles [VISA-A]), gait analysis with the 10-m walk-test at 2 speeds (normal and fast), and pain during walking. Pain and gait analysis were assessed under 3 conditions: before fitting 20-mm heel lifts, immediately after heel-lift fitting, and after 2 weeks of wearing heel lifts. Ultrasound images and measurements at the Achilles insertion were obtained from prone and standing positions (with and without heel lifts). Spatiotemporal gait parameters and tibial tilt angles were evaluated at normal speed using inertia measurement units during the 3 study conditions. Differences between the conditions were analyzed using paired t test or analysis of variance.Results:Overall, 20 participants (12 female, 13 with bilateral IAT; mean age, 51 ± 9.3 years; mean body mass index 31.6 ± 6.8 kg/m2) completed all assessments. Symptom severity (VISA-A) of the more symptomatic side significantly improved at 2 weeks (60 ± 20.6) compared with baseline (52.2 ± 20.4; P 
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T02:26:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231221583
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Current Practices for Rehabilitation After Meniscus Repair: A Survey of
           Members of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

    • Authors: Ting Cong, Rajiv P. Reddy, Arielle J. Hall, Akhmad Ernazarov, James Gladstone
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:There is no consensus among sports medicine surgeons in North America on postoperative rehabilitation strategy after meniscus repair. Various meniscal tear types may necessitate a unique range of motion (ROM) and weightbearing rehabilitation protocol.Purpose:To assess the current landscape of how sports medicine practitioners in the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) rehabilitate patients after the repair of varying meniscal tears.Study Design:Cross-sectional study.Methods:A survey was distributed to 2973 AOSSM members by email. Participants reviewed arthroscopic images and brief patient history from 6 deidentified cases of meniscus repair—in cases 1 to 3, the tears retained hoop integrity (more stable repair), and in cases 4 to 6, the tear patterns represented a loss of hoop integrity. Cases were shuffled before the presentation. For each case, providers were asked at what postoperative time point they would permit (1) partial weightbearing (PWB), (2) full weightbearing (FWB), (3) full ROM, and (4) ROM allowed immediately after surgery.Results:In total, 451 surveys were completed (15.2% response). The times to PWB and FWB in cases 1 to 3 (median, 0 and 4 weeks, respectively) were significantly lower than those in cases 4 to 6 (median, 4 and 6 weeks, respectively) (P < .001). In tears with retained hoop integrity, the median time to PWB was immediately after surgery, whereas in tears without hoop integrity, the median time to PWB was at 4 weeks postoperatively. Similarly, the median time to FWB in each tear with retained hoop integrity was 4 weeks after surgery, while it was 6 weeks in each tear without hoop integrity. However, regardless of tear type, most providers (67.1%) allowed 0° to 90° of ROM immediately after surgery and allowed full ROM at 6 weeks. Most providers (83.3%) braced the knee after repair regardless of hoop integrity and utilized synovial rasping/trephination with notch microfracture—a much lower proportion of providers utilized biologic augmentation (9%).Conclusion:Sports medicine practitioners in the AOSSM rehabilitated meniscal tears differently based on hoop integrity, with loss of hoop stresses triggering a more conservative approach. A majority braced and utilized in situ adjuncts for biological healing, while a minority added extrinsic biologics.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-06T11:48:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231226134
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Change in Posterior Tibial Slope Angle After Displaced Pediatric Tibial
           Tubercle Fracture: A Model for Growth Modulation in the ACL-Deficient Knee
           

    • Authors: Rajiv S. Vasudevan, Andrew M. Zogby, Tyler Wilps, Tyer Paras, Andrew T. Pennock
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Increased posterior tibial slope angle (PTSA) has been shown to be an important risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. PTSA modulation is not utilized routinely to reduce risk of primary rupture or graft failure. Displaced tibial tubercle (TT) fractures in the skeletally immature are associated with potential growth arrest and may be used as a model to study PTSA changes in this setting.Purpose/Hypothesis:To quantify the change in PTSA (ΔPTSA) after operative treatment of displaced TT fractures in skeletally immature patients. It was hypothesized that there would be a progressive decrease in PTSA after TT injury and that rate of ΔPTSA would be highest during peak growth velocity.Study Design:Case series; Level of evidence, 4.Methods:Included were 22 patients (n = 23 knees; mean chronological and bone age at injury, 14 years; 86% male) who underwent surgery for displaced TT fracture. PTSA was measured on lateral radiographs at time of surgery and subsequent follow-up, and bone age at the time of injury was determined using radiographic standards. The rate of ΔPTSA for individual patient, total cohort, and sex-based subgroup trends were determined via linear regression (degrees per month; positive value indicates relatively anterior). Individual patient regression coefficients were averaged into bone age cohorts.Results:Average follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-52 months). The mean PTSA was -12°± 2.4° at the time of injury, and the mean ΔPTSA for the cohort was 0.30°± 0.31° per month (range, -0.27° to 0.97° per month). Linear regression demonstrated a significant relationship between months postfixation and PTSA, demonstrating a ΔPTSA of 0.31° per month (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24° to 0.38°; P < .001). The highest ΔPTSA was seen at bone age 14 years (mean, 0.58°± 0.44° per month). The mean absolute change in PTSA from injury to final follow-up was 4.1° (range, -3.4° to 21°).Conclusion:Our data suggested that PTSA becomes more anterior after operatively treated pediatric TT fractures and that ΔPTSA may be influenced by bone age. This concept may be useful in considering surgical modulation of excessive PTSA in the pediatric ACL-deficient knee.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-06T11:47:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231224498
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Trends in Meniscus-Related Publications in PubMed Since 1928: A
           Bibliometric Study

    • Authors: Srinivas B.S. Kambhampati, Riccardo D’Ambrosi, Karthik Vishwanathan, Abhishek Vaish, Raju Vaishya
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:As information on the meniscus accumulates in PubMed, it is possible to evaluate the trends in research on the topic over time.Purpose:To evaluate the major trends in meniscus-related publications in PubMed from the earliest publication to the present day.Study Design:Cross-sectional study.Methods:PubMed was searched on January 3, 2023, using the search strategy “menisc *”[All Fields] AND (“knee”[MeSH Terms] OR “knee”[All Fields] OR “knee joint”[MeSH Terms] OR (“knee”[All Fields] AND “joint”[All Fields]) OR “knee joint”[All Fields]) AND 1900/01/01:2022/12/31[Date - Publication]. This retrieved 15,569 human and animal studies. We determined the top 10 meniscus-related publications in terms of overall citations and citations per year, as well as the top 10 authors, journals, countries, and institutions of cited publications on the meniscus. In addition, we performed word-cloud analyses based on meniscus-related terms from different periods (before 1981, before 2000, after 2005, and in the past 5 years [2018-2022]), including the year of first appearance and the number of publications featured.Results:Since the first recorded publication on the meniscus in 1928, there was a steady growth in the number of articles until 2005, when there was an upsurge in publications from 254 in 2005 to 955 in 2022. Noyes was the author with the most citations (n = 3314), and a 2006 study by Caplan and Dennis had the most citations per year (n = 125). Arthroscopy published the most articles on the meniscus with 1118, whereas the Journal of Cellular Biochemistry had the most citations per article with 125.69. The most published countries and institutes were the United States and the Hospital for Special Surgery, respectively. Word-cloud analysis of article titles showed that “meniscectomy” had become less prominent, and “root,”“ramp,”“transplantation,” and “slope” had become more prominent.Conclusion:There has been an upsurge in publications on the meniscus since 2005, with word-cloud analysis indicating shifting interests in meniscus-related research.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T10:08:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231226326
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Cannabidiol for Postoperative Pain Control After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff
           Repair Demonstrates No Deficits in Patient-Reported Outcomes Versus
           Placebo: 1-Year Follow-up of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    • Authors: Michael J. Alaia, Zachary I. Li, Isabel Chalem, Eoghan T. Hurley, Kinjal Vasavada, Guillem Gonzalez-Lomas, Andrew S. Rokito, Laith M. Jazrawi, Kevin Kaplan
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Cannabidiol (CBD) has been shown recently to positively affect patient pain and satisfaction immediately after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR). However, it is unclear whether the addition of CBD to a perioperative regimen could affect postoperative outcomes.Purpose:To evaluate patient-reported outcomes among patients who underwent ARCR and received buccally absorbed CBD or an identical placebo for early postoperative pain management at 1-year follow-up.Study Design:Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2.Methods:Eligible patients had previously participated in a multicenter, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blinded trial that evaluated the analgesic effects of CBD in the immediate postoperative period after ARCR. The experimental group received 25 mg of CBD 3 times/day if 80 kg for 14 days, with the control group receiving an identical placebo. The following outcomes were assessed at minimum 1-year follow-up: visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and patient satisfaction. The rates of achievement of the Patient Acceptable Symptom State (PASS) were compared based on ASES at latest follow-up. Continuous and categorical variables were compared with the Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher exact test, respectively.Results:Follow-up was obtained from 83 of 99 patients (83.8%) who completed the original trial. There were no significant differences between the CBD and control groups with respect to age, sex, body mass index, rate of concomitant procedures, or number of anchors used intraoperatively. At 1-year follow-up, there were no significant differences between the CBD and control groups in VAS pain (0.8 vs 1.2, P = .38), ASES (93.0 vs 91.1, P = .71), SANE (87.6 vs 90.1, P = .24), or satisfaction (97.4 vs 95.4, P = .41). A majority of patients achieved the PASS (81.0% [CBD] vs 77.5% [control]; P = .79).Conclusion:Perioperative use of CBD for pain control among patients undergoing ARCR did not result in any significant deficits in pain, satisfaction, or patient-reported outcomes at 1-year postoperatively compared with a placebo control group. These findings suggest that CBD can be considered in a postoperative multimodal pain management regimen without detrimental effects on outcome.Registration:NCT04672252 (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier).
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T09:16:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231222265
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • French Version of the Short Anterior Cruciate Ligament–Return to Sport
           After Injury Scale: Development and Validation

    • Authors: Hichem Abid, Gregoire Rougereau, Yoann Bohu, Alain Meyer, Antoine Gerometta, Olivier Grimaud, Nicolas Lefevre, Alexandre Hardy
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:The 12-item Anterior Cruciate Ligament–Return to Sport after Injury (ACL-RSI) scale was developed to assess the psychological readiness of patients to return to sports after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). A short (6-item) English version was also developed, which has shown to have good reliability and validity.Purpose/Hypothesis:We aimed to develop and validate a French version of the short ACL-RSI scale. We hypothesized that the same questions would remain in the selection as the English version and that the French version of the scale would have the same psychometric properties.Study Design:Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3.Methods:The full 12-item French ACL-RSI scale was administered to 1000 patients who had undergone ACLR surgery. Reliability (Cronbach alpha) and factor analysis of the full scale were determined. Item selection and elimination process was conducted to develop a short (6-item) version. The same methodology was used to develop the English short ACL-RSI scale. A minimal (3-item) version was also developed and assessed.Results:Internal consistency of the full version of the French ACL-RSI was found to be high (Cronbach alpha = .95), suggesting item redundancy. The short (6-item) version was also found to have high internal consistency (Cronbach alpha = .92) and was strongly correlated with the full version (r = 0.98). The minimal (3-item) version was also found to have high internal consistency, as well as a strong correlation with the full version (r = 0.94).Conclusion:The French version of the short (6-item) ACL-RSI scale was valid, discriminant, consistent, and reproducible. The minimal (3-item) version was also found to be useful and more efficient to collect the information provided by the full ACL-RSI in a French-speaking population.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T08:44:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231220959
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Establishing the Minimally Important Difference for the KOOS–Joint
           Replacement and PROMIS Global–10 in Patients After Total Knee
           Arthroplasty

    • Authors: Tyler J. Spiering, Andrew D. Firth, Christos Mousoulis, Brian R. Hallstrom, Joel J. Gagnier
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Despite the overall prevalence and success of total knee arthroplasty (TKA), a significant portion of patients are dissatisfied with their outcomes.Purpose:To assess the responsiveness and determine the minimally important difference (MID) of 2 patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs)—the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score–Joint Replacement (KOOS-JR) and the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Global–10 (PROMIS 10)—in patients after TKA.Study Design:Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3.Methods:Included were patients who underwent TKA from August 2015 through August 2019 and completed baseline and postoperative KOOS-JR and PROMIS 10 surveys. The PROMIS 10 consists of 2 domains: physical health and mental health. Estimates for the reliable change index (RCI) and MID, using anchor-based and distribution-based methods, were calculated for each PROM. Regression modeling was used to determine whether patient and clinical factors predicted MID thresholds or MID achievement.Results:A total of 1315 patients were included. Distribution-based MIDs, calculated using various methods from baseline scores, ranged from 19.3 to 31 for the KOOS-JR, and the RCI was 4.38. Of these patients, 293 (22.3%) demonstrated small or moderate improvement, and this cohort was included in the calculation of anchor-based MIDs. The anchor-based MIDs were 16.9 and 24.3 at 3-month and 1-year follow-up, respectively, and 66% of patients achieved the MID at 12 months. Higher preoperative PROM score, male sex, non-White race, and current smoker status were predictive of failing to achieve the anchor-based MID for KOOS-JR at 1 year postoperatively (P < .05). Higher preoperative PROM score and any 90-day adverse event predicted lower thresholds of important change in anchor-based MIDs. Higher baseline PROM scores, younger age, male sex, non-White ethnicity, higher American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, preoperative narcotics use, not smoking, and longer hospital stay were all associated with lower odds of achieving the MID on the KOOS-JR or either of the PROMIS 10 subscales.Conclusion:The study results demonstrated relevant values for interpretation of the KOOS-JR and PROMIS 10. While patient demographics did not accurately predict which patients would achieve the MID, some potential factors predicting successful patient-reported outcomes after TKA were identified.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-02T04:21:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231218260
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Long-Term Functional Outcomes and Athletic Ability in Shoulder Sports
           After Anatomic Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction for Chronic Type 3
           and 5 Acromioclavicular Joint Injuries

    • Authors: Lukas N. Muench, Daniel P. Berthold, Marco-Christopher Rupp, Caitlin G. Dorsey, Benjamin Hawthorne, Maxwell T. Trudeau, John D. Wolf, Ian Wellington, Augustus D. Mazzocca
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:Promising short- and midterm outcomes have been seen after anatomic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction (ACCR) for chronic acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) injuries.Purpose/Hypothesis:To evaluate long-term outcomes and shoulder-related athletic ability in patients after ACCR for chronic type 3 and 5 ACJ injuries. It was hypothesized that these patients would maintain significant functional improvement and sufficient shoulder-sport ability at a long-term follow-up.Study Design:Case series; Level of evidence, 4.Methods:Included were 19 patients (mean age, 45.9 ± 11.2 years) who underwent ACCR for type 3 or 5 ACJ injuries between January 2003 and August 2014. Functional outcome measures included the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES), Rowe, Constant-Murley, Simple Shoulder Test (SST), and Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) scores as well as the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, which were collected preoperatively and at the final follow-up. Postoperative shoulder-dependent athletic ability was assessed using the Athletic Shoulder Outcome Scoring System (ASOSS). Shoulder activity level was evaluated using the Shoulder Activity Scale (SAS), while the Subjective Patient Outcome for Return to Sports (SPORTS) score was collected to assess the patients’ ability to return to their preinjury sporting activity.Results:The mean follow-up time was 10.1 ± 3.8 years (range, 6.1-18.8 years). Patients achieved significant pre- to postoperative improvements on the ASES (from 54.2 ± 22.6 to 83.5 ± 23.1), Rowe (from 66.6 ± 18.1 to 85.3 ± 19), Constant-Murley (from 64.6 ± 20.9 to 80.2 ± 22.7), SST (from 7.2 ± 3.4 to 10.5 ± 2.7), SANE (from 30.1 ± 23.2 to 83.6 ± 26.3), and VAS pain scores (from 4.7 ± 2.7 to 1.8 ± 2.8) (P < .001 for all), with no significant differences between type 3 and 5 injuries. At the final follow-up, patients achieved an ASOSS of 80.6 ± 32, SAS level of 11.6 ± 5.1, and SPORTS score of 7.3 ± 4.1, with no significant differences between type 3 and 5 injuries. Four patients (21.1%) had postoperative complications.Conclusion:Patients undergoing ACCR using free tendon allografts for chronic type 3 and 5 ACJ injuries maintained significant improvements in functional outcomes at the long-term follow-up and achieved favorable postoperative shoulder-sport ability, activity, and return to preinjury sports participation.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-01T03:46:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671241227224
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Correlation of Tibial Tubercle Overgrowth With Increased Posterior Tibial
           Slope: A Novel Radiographic Assessment

    • Authors: Reece M. Rosenthal, Collin D.R. Hunter, Devin L. Froerer, Joseph Featherall, Allan K. Metz, Justin J. Ernat, Travis G. Maak, Stephen K. Aoki
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:An elevated posterior tibial slope (PTS) is associated with an increased risk for anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal injury. Recent evidence suggests that the PTS is elevated in patients with Osgood-Schlatter disease.Purpose:To determine whether there is an association between objective measures of anterior tibial tubercle growth and PTS.Study Design:Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3.Methods:A total of 100 radiographs were randomly selected from a sample of patients who had received a lateral knee radiograph that captured at least 15 cm of the tibia distal to the knee joint line at a single institution between December 2020 and March 2022. The PTS was measured, and tibial tubercle growth was quantified with 2 novel measurements. For these measurements, a line was drawn on the radiograph from the most anterosuperior point on the tibia to the point on the anterior cortex of the tibia 10 cm distal from the starting point. The tibial tubercle height (TTH) was measured as the perpendicular distance from this line to the most prominent portion of the anterior tibia. The anterior tibial tubercle angle (TTA) was measured as the angle between the endpoints of the line made previously and the most prominent portion of the tibial tubercle, with a more acute angle indicating a more prominent tibial tubercle. The relationship between TTA, TTH, and PTS was evaluated using a univariate linear regression model.Results:The mean patient age was 33.1 ± 14.1 years. The mean TTA was 158.6°± 4.7°, the mean TTH was 8.8 ± 2.0 mm, and the mean PTS was 9.7°± 2.6°. A significant correlation was found between PTS and TTA (r = −0.46; β = −0.46; P < .001) as well as TTH (r = 0.43; β = 0.43; P < .001).Conclusion:Objective measures of anterior tibial tubercle overgrowth correlated with an elevated PTS. Every 2.2° of anterior TTA deviation from the mean and every 2.3 mm in TTH deviation from the mean correlated with a 1° difference in the PTS. This suggests a link between the development of the tibial tubercle and PTS, and it potentially helps to explain why the PTS is elevated in certain patients.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-01T03:46:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231225660
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Primary Versus Revision ACL Reconstruction Using Quadriceps Autograft: A
           Matched-Control Cohort Study

    • Authors: Amit Meena, Luca Farinelli, Christian Hoser, Elisabeth Abermann, Caroline Hepperger, Mohit Kumar Patralekh, Mirco Herbort, Christian Fink
      Abstract: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Volume 12, Issue 2, February 2024.
      Background:The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is increasing, and quadriceps tendon (QT) autograft is gaining popularity for both primary and revision ACL reconstruction.Purpose:To evaluate the differences in the patient-reported functional outcomes, concomitant injuries, and graft failure in primary versus revision ACL surgery using QT autograft.Study Design:Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3.Methods:A total of 376 patients with primary ACL reconstruction and 138 patients with revision ACL reconstruction were retrospectively retrieved from a prospectively collected ACL registry. A minimally invasive technique was used for QT autograft harvesting. The surgical procedure and rehabilitation protocol were identical in both groups. To maintain a homogeneous cohort for the study, the groups were matched by age, sex, and preinjury outcome scores (Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity level, and visual analog scale [VAS] for pain). Initial baseline assessments of outcome scores were compared with scores collected at the 2-year postoperative mark.Results:The mean age of the primary group and revision group was 32.9 ± 10.2 years (range, 18-55 years) and 32.3 ± 9.9 years (range, 19-55 years) respectively. Significant preinjury to postoperative improvements were noted in Lysholm (88.2 ± 16.4 vs 83.5 ± 15.0; P = .007) and VAS pain (0.9 ± 1.3 vs 1.5 ± 1.6; P = .001) scores after primary ACL reconstruction compared with revision reconstruction. However, no significant difference was found in Tegner activity level (6.7 ± 1.8 vs 5.9 ± 1.8; P> .430). Primary ACL injury was associated with significantly higher concomitant medial collateral ligament injuries (P = .019), while the revision group was associated with significantly higher concomitant cartilage (P = .001) and meniscal (P = .003) injuries. A significantly higher graft failure rate was noted in the revision group compared with the primary ACL reconstruction group (13.0% vs 5.6%; P = .005).Conclusion:Both primary and revision ACL reconstruction with QT autograft had acceptable functional outcomes. The primary group had better outcomes than the revision group, possibly due to the lower prevalence of meniscal and cartilage injuries in the primary group compared with the revision group. The revision group was associated with higher graft failure than the primary group. QT autograft is a viable graft choice for both primary and revision ACL reconstruction.
      Citation: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
      PubDate: 2024-02-01T03:45:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/23259671231224501
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 2 (2024)
       
 
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  Subjects -> SPORTS AND GAMES (Total: 199 journals)
Showing 1 - 3 of 3 Journals sorted by number of followers
European Journal of Sport Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 54)
American Journal of Sports Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 53)
International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Sports Science & Coaching     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
ACTIVE : Journal of Physical Education, Sport, Health and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Performance Analysis in Sport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Exercise Science     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Exercise Science & Fitness     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
International Journal of Sports Science     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Sports Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Review for the Sociology of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Sport and Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Sport Psychology in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Kinesiology and Sports Science     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of the History of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Human Kinetics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Human Sport and Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Physical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Sport Sciences and Fitness     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Sociology of Sport Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Sport Science Review     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
International Sport Coaching Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Turfgrass Society Research Journal     Free   (Followers: 13)
Soccer & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Sport History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Sport Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
The Sport Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Sport Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Annals of Applied Sport Science     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Sport in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Isokinetics and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Science and Cycling     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Sport History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Biomedical Human Kinetics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Health Promotion & Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Curriculum Studies in Health and Physical Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Physical Culture and Sport. Studies and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Sport, Business and Management : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Sport Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Perceptual and Motor Skills     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sport & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Philosophy of Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Sport and Fitness Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Physical Education and Sports     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Sport Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Sports Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Berkeley Journal of Entertainment and Sports Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Athletic Enhancement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Recreation and Sports Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Science in Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Physician and Sportsmedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Intercollegiate Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Sport Management Education Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Sport Management: Research that Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Physical Education and Sport Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Sports Coaching Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Laisvalaikio Tyrimai     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sports Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers Part P: Journal of Sports Engineering and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asia Pacific Journal of Sport and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Kinesiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
NINE : A Journal of Baseball History and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Pace Intellectual Property, Sports & Entertainment Law Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Facta Universitatis, Series : Physical Education and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Computer Science in Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Sport, Exercise & Training Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Sports and Active Living     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Physical Activity Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Baltic Journal of Sport and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Football(s) : Histoire, Culture, Économie, Société     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Footwear Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sports Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Strategies : A Journal for Physical and Sport Educators     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Sports Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Seton Hall Journal of Sports and Entertainment Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
UNLV Gaming Research & Review Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
PALAESTRA : Adapted Sport, Physical Education, and Recreational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Acta Facultatis Educationis Physicae Universitatis Comenianae     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Amateur Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport & Tourism Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Tourism, Hospitality and Sports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sports Medicine International Open     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Journal for Sport and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Physical Education and Sports Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Athlete Development and Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
German Journal of Exercise and Sport Research : Sportwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sportverletzung · Sportschaden     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Podium Sport, Leisure and Tourism Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sporting Traditions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Arena-Journal of Physical Activities     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Timisoara Physical Education and Rehabilitation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sport and Art     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physical Education Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
SPORTIVE : Journal Of Physical Education, Sport and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sports Law and Governance Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indonesian Journal of Sport Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Managing Sport and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
College Athletics and The Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Movement & Sport Sciences : Science & Motricité     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Sportpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cultura, Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Golf Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Educación física y deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Kinesiologiae Universitatis Tartuensis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Internacional de Medicina y Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte : International Journal of Medicine and Science of Physical Activity and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jeffrey S. Moorad Sports Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Marquette Sports Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sportis. Scientific Journal of School Sport, Physical Education and Psychomotricity     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Sports Medicine and Allied Health Sciences : Official Journal of the Ohio Athletic Trainers Association     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Sport Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Kinesiology : International Journal of Fundamental and Applied Kinesiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Hacettepe Journal of Sport Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Translational Journal of the American College of Sports Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Corpoconsciência     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for the Measurement of Physical Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Global Sport Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science and Medicine in Football     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Arquivos em Movimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Video Journal of Sports Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forum Kinder- und Jugendsport : Zeitschrift für Forschung, Transfer und Praxisdialog     Hybrid Journal  
eJRIEPS : Ejournal de la recherche sur l'intervention en éducation physique et sport     Open Access  
SPORT TK-Revista EuroAmericana de Ciencias del Deporte     Open Access  
Juara : Jurnal Olahraga     Open Access  
Arrancada     Open Access  
Al-Rafidain Journal For Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Al.Qadisiya journal for the Sciences of Physical Education     Open Access  
New Approaches in Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Forum for Idræt, Historie og Samfund     Open Access  
Cerdas Sifa Pendidikan : Sport Education     Open Access  
Quality in Sport     Open Access  
Journal of Motor Learning and Development     Hybrid Journal  
Sri Lankan Journal of Sports and Exercise Medicine     Open Access  
Sport i Turystyka : Środkowoeuropejskie Czasopismo Naukowe     Open Access  
Revista Intercontinental de Gestão Desportiva     Open Access  
Open Sports Sciences Journal     Open Access  
Ágora para la Educación Física y el Deporte     Open Access  
Journal of Physical Education and Human Movement     Open Access  
Journal of Sports Medicine and Therapy     Open Access  
Turkish Journal of Sport and Exercise     Open Access  
Gelanggang Pendidikan Jasmani Indonesia     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira do Esporte Coletivo     Open Access  
International Journal of Science Culture and Sport     Open Access  
SIPATAHOENAN : South-East Asian Journal for Youth, Sports & Health Education     Open Access  
Research on ٍEducational Sport     Open Access  
Conexões     Open Access  
Ulusal Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Journal of National Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Türkiye Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Turkish Journal of Sports Science     Open Access  
Spor Eğitim Dergisi     Open Access  
Spor Bilimleri Araştırmaları Dergisi     Open Access  
Spor ve Performans Araştırmaları Dergisi / Ondokuz Mayıs University Journal of Sports and Performance Researches     Open Access  
Jurnal Keolahragaan     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y el Deporte     Open Access  
Physical Education of Students     Open Access  
Jendela Olahraga     Open Access  
Jurnal Abdimas     Open Access  
Retos : Nuevas Tendencias en Educación Física, Deportes y Recreación     Open Access  
Martial Arts Studies     Open Access  
Sportphysio     Hybrid Journal  
Citius, Altius, Fortius     Open Access  
Слобожанський науково-спортивний вісник     Open Access  
Educación Física y Ciencia     Open Access  
RBFF - Revista Brasileira de Futsal e Futebol     Open Access  
Materiales para la historia del deporte     Open Access  
FairPlay, Revista de Filosofia, Ética y Derecho del Deporte     Open Access  
Revista de Artes Marciales Asiáticas     Open Access  
mensch & pferd international     Full-text available via subscription  
RICYDE. Revista Internacional de Ciencias del Deporte     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología del Deporte     Open Access  
MHSalud : Movimiento Humano y Salud     Open Access  
Polish Journal of Sport and Tourism     Open Access  
Therapeutic Recreation Journal     Full-text available via subscription  

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