A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> SPORTS AND GAMES (Total: 199 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Perceptual and Motor Skills
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.349
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0031-5125 - ISSN (Online) 1558-688X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • “Feeling Good” After Exercise During a Weight Loss Program: Subjective
           Well-Being in Support of a Hedonic Paradigm

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bonnie G. Berger, Lynn A. Darby, David R. Owen, Robert A. Carels
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      A large portion of the U.S. population desires to lose weight, but only a small portion maintains a desirable body weight. We examined weight loss success and the psychological benefits of exercise among men and women who were obese and initially sedentary (N = 33). These participants completed anthropometric assessments and psychological inventories before and after graded exercise tests (GXTs) at the beginning and end of their enrollment in a 6-month behavioral weight loss program (BWLP). Participants significantly decreased their body weight, body mass index (BMI), and % body fat; they also increased their aerobic capacity and exercise time. They reported long-term increases in their stage of change, self-efficacy, exercise enjoyment and processes of change. They also reported immediate changes toward more positive affect, as measured with pre-to post-GXTs on both the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and State Anxiety Subscale (A-State) at the beginning and again at end of the BWLP. Mood benefits were reported on the POMS subscales of Tension, Depression, Anger, Vigor, and Confusion. At the end of the BWLP, Fatigue and Confusion continued to improve after a 20-min post-GXT recovery period. Finally, reductions in Depression and Fatigue after the first GXT were correlated with program success, as indicated by decreases in BMI, percent body fat, and body weight. Initial scores on trait enjoyment were associated with decreased BMI and body weight. Psychological benefits of exercise may help individuals who are obese and sedentary change their behavior and exercise perceptions from something they “should do” to something they “want to do.” Feeling good during weight loss efforts is an important pathway to change and should be an explicit component goal of BWLPs.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-09-30T04:10:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221130444
       
  • Evaluation of Predictive Motor Control With Two Touchscreen Tablet-Based
           Tests: Reliability and Validity in School-Aged Children

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rudolf Psotta, Daniel Dostál, Javad Sarvestan, David Prycl, Ondřej Kašpar, Ivana Křížová
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      As predictive motor control is an important index of neuromotor development and maturation, we developed two touchscreen tablet-based tests of this function. Our aim was to investigate the reliability and validity of both a rapid manual interception test and a pursuit tracking test, using a sample of 124 children (62 boys and 62 girls) from two age groups (7-8-year-oldss and 9–10-year-olds). Participants performed both tablet tests with a stylus (sample rate 100 Hz) with both a visible and a temporarily invisible moving target. Confirmatory factor analyses and omega coefficients showed that both tests were univariate methods that provided a reliable assessment of the latent factor related to predictive visuomotor control. As would be expected, compared to younger children, older children performed better on both manual interception and pursuit tracking. The correlations between the latent factors of the two tests at 95% confidence intervals (−.276, −.608) suggested shared variance. Thus, the touchscreen-tablet based tests of rapid manual interception and manual pursuit tracking appear psychometrically suitable for assessing the neuromotor ability of predictive control in 7-10-year-old children.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-09-28T03:35:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221130815
       
  • New Methods for Unraveling Imitation Accuracy Differences Between Children
           with Autism and Typically Developing Peers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura Sparaci, Domenico Formica, Francesca Romana Lasorsa, Luigi Raiano, Paola Venuti, Olga Capirci
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      This study applies methods used in sign language and gesture research to better understand reduced imitation accuracy (IA) of actions and gestures in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and we addressed contrasting theories on IA in ASD and the role of objects and meanings in imitation. Eight male children with ASD with a mean chronological age (CA) of 86.76 months (SD = 10.74, range 70.5–104.4) and 22 male and female peers with typical development (TD) and a mean CA of 85.44 months (SD = 7.95, range 73.4–96.7) imitated videos of an adult performing actions with objects, representational gestures, conventional gestures and meaningless gestures. We measured accuracy as ability to effectively reproduce features (handshape, palm orientation, location, movement direction and type) and timing (speed) of observed actions/gestures, after ruling out cases of specular (i.e., mirror-like) versus anatomical imitation. Results highlighted significantly lower feature and timing accuracy in children with ASD with respect to the TD group across tasks, and these findings supported sensory-motor theories of IA in ASD. Our data also showed the different impact of objects and meanings within groups. Overall, these results suggest validity to our assessment method and suggested the importance of considering both discreet variables (i.e., variables describing action/gesture feature accuracy, e.g. handshape, movement direction) and continuous variables (i.e., kinematic variables, e.g. speed) in evaluating IA in autism.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-09-24T05:53:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221126215
       
  • Pupil Dilation Reflects Emotional Arousal Via Poetic Language

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Keiyu Niikuni, Ming Wang, Michiru Makuuchi, Masatoshi Koizumi, Sachiko Kiyama
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      We investigated pupillary responses to the world’s shortest fixed verses, Japanese haiku as aesthetic poetry (AP) and senryu as comic poetry (CP), in comparison with non-poetry control stimuli (NP) comprised of slogans that had the same rhythm patterns. Native Japanese speakers without literary training listened to these stimuli while we recorded their pupil diameters. We found that participants’ pupils were significantly dilated for CP compared to NP in an early time window. While AP also evoked larger dilations than NP, the latency for AP-related pupil dilation was relatively long. Thus, lay people experience quick and intense arousal in response to funny and humorous words, while aesthetic properties of words may also elicit intense but slower changes in listeners’ arousal levels, presumably because they evoke more implicit and subtle emotional effects. This study is the first to provide evidence that poetic language elicits human pupillary dilation. A better understanding of the cognitive and neural substrates for the sensitive awareness of pleasures expressed via poetic language will provide insights for improving mental and physical health. Hence, pupillometry can act as a useful convenient measurement to delineate the sympathetic activation of emotional contexts via language.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-09-24T05:15:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221126778
       
  • The Function of the Proprioceptive, Vestibular and Visual Systems
           Following Fatigue in Individuals With and Without Chronic Ankle
           Instability

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nili Steinberg, Gal Elias, Aviva Zeev, Jeremy Witchalls, Gordon Waddington
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      To maintain postural balance, the proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual systems continuously provide body position and movement data to the central nervous system. In this study, our main aim was to examine, for the first time, the influence of anaerobically or aerobically induced fatigue on these separate functions in persons with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI). We obtained assessments pre- and post-fatigue protocols from 60 physical education students (Mage = 24.3, SD = 3.4) Twenty-seven students had CAI, and 33 students did not have CAI). To measure proprioception, we used the AMEDA device; for vision, we used near point of convergence (NPC); and, for vestibular function, we used subjective visual vertical (SVV). We found a pre-post proprioception (AMEDA) effect in the aerobic group (p < .001), and a visual (NPC) effect in both anaerobic and aerobic participant groups (both p < .001). There were no visual system (NPC) fatigue effect differences among aerobic or anerobic participants who had or did not have CAI (p = .047); there was a significant aerobic fatigue effect on proprioception (AMEDA) (p = .010) that favored participants without CAI. There was a significant interaction effect between time of testing and CAI for visual (NPC) (p = .003) in the aerobic group only. In both the anaerobic and aerobic groups, post-fatigue vestibular function (AMEDA) was significantly lower for those with than those without CAI (anaerobic: p = .030; and aerobic: p =.016). Thus, post-fatigue, participants with CAI showed worse proprioceptive, visual, and vestibular function than those without CAI. Future investigators should further examine each movement sense system in individuals with CAI.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T03:43:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221128634
       
  • Gait and Sit-To-Stand Motor Compensation Strategies in Children and
           Adolescents With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mariana De Abreu Rays Dazzi, Cristina Dos Santos Cardoso De Sá
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), the most common form of muscular dystrophies, is characterized by progressive and generalized muscle weakness. The weakness of the trunk and other muscle groups leads these patients to perform motor compensation strategies to maintain their lower limb functionality for gait quality and for tasks such as getting up from a sitting position. In this cross-sectional observational study, we described and quantified trunk, gait, and sit-to-stand motor compensation strategies in different stages of this disease. Thirty-one ambulatory 5–18-year-old children and adolescents with a diagnosis of DMD, underwent cognitive assessment with the Mental Mini-Examination (MMSE) and motor assessment with the Vignos scale, Segmental Assessment of Trunk Control (SATCo-BR), Timed Up and Go test (TUG Test), and 10-m walk test. We found strong correlations between trunk and gait compensations, and identified motor compensation strategies characteristic of certain DMD classifications. Also, these lower limb and trunk compensations related to disease staging (Vignos) such that compensations were fewer for patients at relatively better disease staging.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-09-19T11:59:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221128129
       
  • Adaptation and Validation of the Arabic Version of the Mindfulness
           Inventory for Sport

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Manel Ben Salha, Laurence Kern, Fatah Abdelatif, El Hassane Nabli, Abderrahim Baria, Jean F. Fournier
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our goal for this study was to adapt the Mindfulness Inventory for Sport (MIS) into written Arabic that would be easily understood in North African countries (Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco or TAM). Assessment tools in Arabic, such as this MIS-TAM version, are rare but essential for evaluating the effectiveness of sport psychology interventions. We adopted a committee approach to obtain a first Arabic version of the MIS. We asked a team of translators to adapt the items to the level of understanding of 13-year-old athletes by selecting words common to the culture of the three countries. The validation process underwent three phases. In Study 1, we tested MIS-TAM for clarity and deemed it acceptable. In Study 2 we tested the construct validity of two different models with confirmatory factorial analyses. These analyses confirmed that the structure of the 15-item MIS-TAM was psychometrically similar to the original version; it had a first order model encompassing three dimensions: Awareness, Non-Judgement and Refocusing. Analyses also found the internal consistency of the MIS-TAM acceptable. We assessed convergent validity in Study 3 with the Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale, but no correlations between the two instruments were significant. In conclusion, the MIS-TAM has acceptable psychometric properties, though further work is needed regarding convergent validity. The rigorous work of translation and adaptation focused on shared linguistics in three target countries, and this questionnaire will also prove useful in other countries where Arabic is the main language.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-09-17T12:59:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221127513
       
  • Reliabilities of the Two-Point Discrimination Test and the Two-Point
           Estimation Test for Use in the Lumbar Spine Area in Healthy Young Adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Koterba Jakub, Saulicz Oskar, Saulicz Mariola, Sikora Damian, Saulicz Edward
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Two-point discrimination (TPD) testing and two-point estimation (TPE) methods are often used to determine tactile acuity, but their reliability is uncertain. Our aim in this study was to assess the reliability of TPD and TPE measurements in the same lumbar spine region of healthy young adults. Participants were 37 young adults (16 females and 21 males; age range: 20–27 years – M age = 21.65, SD = 1.9), who received two tests (TPD and TPE) to determine their tactile acuity. The tests were performed in the lumbar spine area, at the level of the L3 segment, bilaterally, with a 10-minute interval between the measurements. The first test session assessed the reliability of measurements performed by two examiners (inter-rater reliability); and, after 7 days, another examiner repeated the measurements (intra-rater reliability). The reliability of both tests was evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC), and results revealed high intra-rater, and inter-rater repeatability for immediate administration of TPD and TPE tests (i.e, after 10 minutes) and moderate repeatability when they were performed at a 7-day interval. Thus, we confirmed high reliability of TPD and TPE assessments of tactile acuity repeated at a short time interval and moderate reliability after 7 days. There was slightly higher reliability for the TPE method.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-09-17T02:54:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221127775
       
  • A Meta-Analysis of Social Ecological Correlates of Physical Activity Among
           Koreans

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jonghwa Lee, Youngho Kim
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      From the viewpoint of behavioral medicine, analyzing various factors that determine physical activity (PA) is necessary to promote PA participation. In this study we aimed to identify the impact of constructs within the social ecological model (SEM) on PA within the Korean population. We reviewed journal articles and dissertations published between February 2012 and May 2022 in this meta-analysis. We searched the Korean Education Research Information Service (KERIS), Korean Information Service System (KISS), National Digital Library (NDL), PubMed Central (PMC), SCOPUS, and Web of Sciences; and we located 13 studies to include in this review. Collectively, these studies indicated that most SEM constructs were significantly correlated with PA. Self-efficacy was most strongly correlated (0.67), followed by perceived benefits (0.48), quality of exercise facilities (0.37), accessibility of exercise facilities (0.33), friend support (0.29), and family support (0.23). These data provide practical information for basing a PA promotion strategy on SEM to enhance community health through behavioral psychology.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T03:08:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221126775
       
  • Ankle Inversion Proprioception Impairment in Persons with Chronic Ankle
           Instability Is Task-Specific

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jia Han, Zonghan Yang, Jeremy Witchalls, Charlotte Ganderton, Roger Adams, Gordon Waddington
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      While investigators have often compared ankle proprioception between groups with and without chronic ankle instability (CAI), findings have been inconsistent. Possibly this is because ankle proprioceptive impairment in this population is task-specific. Thus, we aimed to compare ankle inversion proprioception in individuals with and without CAI in two task conditions: (i) when standing (not challenging) and (ii) when on a step-down landing (minimally-challenging). Ankle inversion proprioception was measured in both conditions for 38 recreational sport player volunteers with CAI (n = 19) and without CAI (n = 19). We used the Active Movement Extent Discrimination Apparatus (AMEDA) for the standing condition and the Ankle Inversion Discrimination Apparatus-Landing (AIDAL) for step-down landing. From analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests, CAI and non-CAI participants performed equally well on the AMEDA when standing; but the CAI group performed significantly worse than the non-CAI group on the AIDAL step-down landing task (p = 0.03). Within the non-CAI group, the AIDAL proprioceptive scores, as area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC), were significantly higher than their AMEDA AUC scores (p = 0.03), while there was no significant difference between AIDAL and AMEDA AUC scores in the CAI group. Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool CAIT scores were significantly correlated with AIDAL scores (Spearman’s rho = 0.391, p = 0.015), but not with the AMEDA scores; and there was no significant correlation between the AIDAL and AMEDA scores. Thus, an ankle inversion proprioceptive deficit was evident for persons with CAI on the step-down AIDAL, and in a dose-response way, but not evident on the standing AMEDA, suggesting that ankle proprioceptive impairment is task-specific. Selected proprioceptive tests must present some minimal degree of challenge to the ankle joint in a functional task in order to differentiate CAI from non-CAI participants.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-09-14T09:23:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221125608
       
  • A Feasibility Study of Bilateral Wrist Sensors for Measuring Motor Traits
           in Children With Autism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jeffrey Konrad, Natasha Marrus, Catherine E. Lang
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Direct, quantitative measures of hyperactivity and motor coordination, two motor characteristics associated with impairment in autism, are limited. Wearable sensors can objectively index real-world movement variables that may relate to these behaviors. Here, we explored the feasibility of bilateral wrist accelerometers for measuring upper limb activity in 3–10-year-olds with autism (n = 22; 19 boys, 3 girls; M age = 5.64, SD = 2.73 years) and without autism (n = 26; 15 boys, 11 girls; M age = 6.26, SD = 2.47 years). We investigated the relationships between movement characteristics related to duration, intensity, complexity, and symmetry on the one hand and parent-reported hyperactivity and motor coordination on the other. Participants with and without autism wore the sensors for 12-hour periods. Sensor variables varied by age but not sex, with movement intensity and complexity moderately related to motor coordination. These findings lend preliminary support to wearable sensors as a means of providing ecologically-valid metrics of motor characteristics that impact adaptive function in children with autism.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-09-06T09:08:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221125275
       
  • Bilateral Training Improves Agility and Accuracy for Both Preferred and
           Non-Preferred Legs in Young Soccer Players

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ahmed Ben Kahla, Yousri Elghoul, Achraf Ammar, Liwa Masmoudi, Khaled Trabelsi, Jordan M. Glenn, Riadh Dahmen
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      As laterality of the lower limbs is regarded as a relevant influence on soccer performance, we assessed whether a bilateral training program for both the preferred leg (PL) and non-preferred leg (NPL) would improve soccer players’ lateral asymmetry, agility, and accuracy. Sixty right-foot-dominant young soccer players were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (EXP) that underwent bilateral training or a control group (CONT) that performed their usual training schedule without bilateral exercise. We assessed the players’ lateral asymmetries before and after training on four soccer skill tasks: a zigzag test with and without a ball, a receiving and direct volley-shooting accuracy test, and a passing accuracy test. Results showed post-test versus pre-test performance improvements for the EXP group on the index of technical skills and agility (p < .001). A post-hoc analysis further revealed a pre-test to post-test performance improvement on shooting and passing accuracy with both legs only for the EXP group (p < .001). These results support the role of bilateral practice in improving lateral asymmetries, agility, and accuracy.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T05:30:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221124373
       
  • Effects of Different Sources of Low-Dose Caffeine on Mood/Arousal and
           Cognitive Performance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christopher Irwin, Danielle McCartney, Gary Grant, Nathan Delang, Karly Bartrim, Gregory R Cox, Ben Desbrow
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In this study we investigated the effects of variously derived sources of low-dose caffeine on mood/arousal and cognitive performance. Twenty-two participants (15 men, 7 women; M age: 28.2, SD = 9.0 years) undertook five randomized, crossover trials in which they consumed either a water control (CON) or 80 mg of caffeine from one of four sources (coffee [COF], energy drink [END], capsule [CAP], and dissolvable mouth strip [STR]). We measured the participants’ perceived efficacy of these varied caffeine sources pre-treatment; and we measured mood/arousal at pre-treatment, and again at 15 and 45 minutes post-treatment. We also measured choice reaction-time at 15 and 45 minutes post-treatment, and participants completed the psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) 45 minutes post-treatment. Caffeine increased participant ratings of alertness and decreased their ratings of tiredness irrespective of source (p’s < .05), and all sources of caffeine decreased reaction time on the PVT (p’s < .05), with ex-Gaussian distributional analysis localizing this to the tau-parameter, indicating lower variability. However, only the COF source was associated with improved ‘overall mood’ (p’s < .05). Participants expected to perform better on the PVT with COF compared to CON, but there were no other significant associations between source expectancy and performance. In sum, a modest dose of caffeine, regardless of source, positively impacted mood/arousal and cognitive performance, and these effects did not appear to be influenced by expectations.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T12:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221124369
       
  • Can Prolongate Use of Social Media Immediately Before Training Worsen High
           Level Male Volleyball Players’ Visuomotor Skills'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Leonardo S. Fortes, Guilherme P. Berriel, Heloiana Faro, Carlos G. Freitas-Júnior, Leonardo A. Peyré-Tartaruga
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our aim was to analyze the effect of mental fatigue caused by prolonged social media use on high-level volleyball players' visuomotor skills. Eighteen high-level male young volleyball players participated in this randomized, counterbalanced, crossover design. All participants underwent a 2-week experiment in which we measured their response times when performing a visuomotor task with and without mental fatigue inducement through repeated use of social media immediately before training sessions. In the control condition, participants watched TV for 30-minutes, and in the social media condition, they used a social media app (Instagram®) on smartphones for 30-minutes. We found a significant Condition x Time interaction on visuomotor task response time (p = 0.03), but there was no significant main effect of either Time or Condition. Mental fatigue, induced by repeated app-based social media use for 30-minutes immediately before training sessions, affected elite male volleyball players’ visuomotor skills.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-08-27T05:29:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221123635
       
  • Acute Effects of a Haptic Anchor System on Postural Sway of Individuals
           with Parkinson’s Disease: A Preliminary Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Thanielle S. S. Brito, Luciane A. P. S. de Souza, Gustavo J. Luvizutto
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Some investigators have demonstrated that an anchor system can improve postural control in elderly persons during balance tasks, but none have reported on the use of this approach in individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effect of an anchor system on postural sway in elderly individuals with (n = 13) and without (n = 14) PD. In this cross-sectional study, we measured postural sway with a force platform based on the Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction of Balance (CTSIB). We calculated center of pressure (COP) parameters, as a function of time, based on the ellipse sway area (cm2) and evaluated self-efficacy for postural control based on the degree of difficulty in each task. With the anchor system (i.e., handheld ropes attached to weights on the floor), we observed a significant reduction in the ellipse sway area in the semi-tandem position among individuals with PD (p = .04). For participants without PD, there was no significant difference in sway with or without the anchor system in all positions. Also, for participants with PD, there was an improvement in self-efficacy for postural control associated with the anchor system in several positions while there was only a self-efficacy improvement with the anchor system in the semi-tandem position for those without PD. Acute use of a haptic anchor system reduced postural sway in the semi-tandem position in individuals with PD, and the anchor system generally improved postural control self-efficacy for body sway in individuals with PD.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-08-23T01:10:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221121184
       
  • Conflict Adaptation Effect on Numerical Inductive Reasoning: An ERP Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Luming Zheng, Shangqing Yuan, Xiaofei Wu, Tie Sun
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Conflict adaptation is of particular importance to human information processing, as it assists in efficient responding when confronted with inconsistent information. Past investigators have focused on the role and mechanisms of conflict adaptation effects in cognitive control tasks, but there have been few studies of conflict adaptation effects in numerical inductive reasoning. In this study we adopted identical, perceptual mismatch and rule violation conditions to investigate conflict adaptation in numerical inductive reasoning. Behaviorally, we found shorter response times on trials following our experimental condition, as compared to pre-trials. In our event-related potential (ERP) electroencephalogram (EEG) results, N2 reflected the improvement in processing efficiency of rule violations in numerical inductive reasoning. Thus, these data suggest the presence of a conflict adaptation effect in high-level processing.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-08-15T01:07:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221121185
       
  • Chunking in Visual Working Memory: Are Visual Features of Real-World
           Objects Stored in Chunks'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tianrui Luo, Mi Tian
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Are visual features of real-world objects stored as bound units' Previous research has shown that simple visual features (e.g., colored squares or geometric shapes) can be effectively bound together when forming predictable pairs in memory tasks. Through a “memory compression” process, observers can take advantage of these features to compress them into a chunk. However, a recent study found that visual features in real-world objects are stored independently. In the present study, we explored this issue by using drawings of fruits as memory stimuli, presenting four pictures of fruit in separate test trials in which we required observers to remember eight total features (i.e., four colors and four shapes). In the congruent trials, the color of the fruit matched its natural appearance (e.g., a red apple), while in incongruent trials, the color of the fruit mismatched its natural appearance (e.g., a red banana). We paired the shape of the fruits randomly with a color (without replacement). According to chunking theory, if visual features of real-world objects are stored in a chunk, the highest memory capacity should be accompanied by the longest response time in congruent trials due to an extra decoding process required from the chunk. We did find that participants had the highest memory capacity in the congruent condition, but their response times in the congruent condition were significantly faster than in the incongruent condition. Thus, observers did not undergo a decoding process in the congruent condition, and we concluded that visual features in real-world objects are not stored in a chunk.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T01:07:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221121228
       
  • Perceiving Body Height From Connected Speech: Higher Fundamental Frequency
           Is Associated With the Speaker’s Height

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julio González-Alvarez, Rosa Sos-Peña
      First page: 1349
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      To a certain degree, human listeners can perceive a speaker’s body size from their voice. The speaker’s voice pitch or fundamental frequency (Fo) and the vocal formant frequencies are the voice parameters that have been most intensively studied in past body size perception research (particularly for body height). Artificially lowering the Fo of isolated vowels from male speakers improved listeners’ accuracy of binary (i.e., tall vs not tall) body height perceptions. This has been explained by the theory that a denser harmonic spectrum provided by a low pitch improved the perceptual resolution of formants that aid formant-based size assessments. In the present study, we extended this research using connected speech (i.e., words and sentences) pronounced by speakers of both sexes. Unexpectedly, we found that raising Fo, not lowering it, increased the participants’ perceptual performance in two binary discrimination tasks of body size. We explain our new finding in the temporal domain by the dynamic and time-varying acoustic properties of connected speech. Increased Fo might increase the sampling density of sound wave acoustic cycles and provide more detailed information, such as higher resolution, on the envelope shape.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T01:36:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221110392
       
  • Planning and Executing Aiming Movements in Middle Childhood

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Danielle S. V. de Oliveira, Sandra R. Alouche, Sandra M. S. F. de Freitas, Gabriela H. Oba, Vivian F. Giangiardi, Cristina dos Santos C. de Sá
      First page: 1362
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Harmonious voluntary movements require efficiency in their planning and execution. Throughout middle childhood structural changes in the central nervous and musculoskeletal systems influence these processes and resultant motor behavior. In this study, we evaluated the characteristics of the motor planning and executing of aiming movements directed at targets located in different positions in space in children aged 7, 9, and 11 years. We divided 43 right-handed children, into three age groups and instructed them to perform aiming movements directed at targets using a stylus on a digital tablet. The children performed the movement with their dominant upper limbs from a starting point towards targets positioned ipsilaterally or contralaterally to this dominant limb. We analyzed temporal and spatial variables of motor performance. Younger (7-year-old) children made more errors in the initial movement direction and more frequently corrected their movements during task execution when compared to 9- and 11-year-old children who did not differ from each other. All age groups were similar in movement accuracy and precision. Movements toward contralateral targets were slower and more accurate than movements toward ipsilateral targets for all groups. These results show that performing aiming movements develop with the onset of middle childhood.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T01:31:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221112243
       
  • The Link Between Action Verb Processing and Action Observation: A
           Developmental Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christel Bidet-Ildei, Sophie-Anne Beauprez, Lucette Toussaint
      First page: 1381
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In this work we aimed to assess the typical link in human development between action observation and language. For this, we studied, in 68 children aged 5–11 years of age, how action verbs can prime action representation. While children 7–8 years of age benefited from a congruent action verb prime when they had to judge an image representing an action, this effect was not present in 5–6-year-olds. Thus, the link between language and action observation changes during development at about age 7. We discussed these findings in consideration of current theories proposed to account for the action-language link.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T01:43:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221112244
       
  • Does Skill Performance Influence Young Children’s Perceived Physical
           Competence'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jerraco L. Johnson, Danielle D. Wadsworth, Mary E. Rudisill, Jacqueline M. Irwin, Claire Bridges
      First page: 1396
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Children’s self-perceived competence is critical for their engagement in fundamental motor skills (FMS), although these perceptions are highly inaccurate until around age seven (grade 2). Moreover, FMS competence is highly correlated with physical activity engagement in childhood. In this study we examined: (a) if children’s perceptions of their FMS competence differed after they were allowed to perform the skill or observe their performance, and (b) if the accuracy of children’s perceived competence changed under those conditions. Child participants (N = 76; K-second grade) judged their own competence for three physical skills (running, skipping and dribble or hopping) on the Harter and Pike Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance under three conditions: (a) a no-performance baseline, (b) after performing each skill, and (c) after observing themselves performing the skill. A repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that their perceived competence differed across these conditions for running but not for skipping/hopping (p = .556) or for dribbling (p = .368). Spearman’s rho correlations showed that their perceived running competence scores better predicted their actual competence after observing their performance (rs = .25, p = .029) than after other conditions. Both performing and observing their performance were associated with changes in perceptions of running competence. Future research should focus on how and when children’s perceived competence is assessed and how perceptions relate to FMS and physical activity engagement.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-08-17T11:43:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221116756
       
  • Association Between Cross-Limb Transfer and Practice Organization

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lidiane A. Fernandes, Tércio Apolinário-Souza, Enzo G. Azevedo, Joana A. R. Pinto, Guilherme Menezes Lage
      First page: 1413
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Although the importance of practice has been evidenced in early studies of cross-limb transfer, the association between cross-limb transfer and practice organization remains unknown. The two primary means of organizing practice are constant practice (CP) and variable practice (VP). When the same generalized motor program governs the motor responses, VP produces better transfer than CP. Thus, we hypothesized that VP would generate a higher cross-limb transfer level than CP. We assigned 40 participants to CP or VP groups and conducted an experiment consisting of three phases: pre-test, practice, and transfer test. At pre-test, all participants practiced eight trials of a sequence key-pressing task with the non-dominant hand (NDH). After the pre-test, all participants performed a practice phase of 72 trials with the dominant hand, but CP and VP groups underwent their different practice schedules (CP or VP) such that the CP group practiced a sequence key-pressing task in one sequence, and the VP group practiced four different sequences randomly. On the transfer test all partcipants completed eight trials with the NDH 24 hours after the practice phase. The CP group showed better performance than the VP group on the transfer test, and we concluded that the effects of practice organization in cross-limb transfer are distinct from intra- and inter-task transfer such that the specificity of practice explained the benefits of CG.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-08-16T12:51:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221119136
       
  • Adapting the Short Grit Scale with Exploratory Structural Equation
           Modeling for Portuguese College Students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Roberta Frontini, Diogo Monteiro, Filipe Rodrigues, Rui Matos, Raúl Antunes
      First page: 1428
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      The Short Grit Scale (Grit–S) is a self- and informant-report version of the longer Grit Scale, and it retains the 2-factor structure of the original scale. Our purpose in this research was to measure trait-level perseverance and passion for long-term goals by translating and validating the Grit-S for Portuguese respondents. Our participants were 572 college students (135 female, 437 male; age range 18–30 years, M age = 21.47, SD = 2.29 years) from twelve Portuguese universities. Our data confirmed the scale’s two-factor structure (“consistency of interests” and “perseverance of effort”) and demonstrated appropriate adjustment values (CFI = 0.999, TLI = 0.981, SRMR = 0.017, RMSEA = 0.001, CI90%= 0.000–0.041). We found the adapted scale to be invariant for sex. Use of the scale confirmed an association between grit and well-being. These results imply that other investigators and practitioners interested in this scale may now apply it with Portuguese young adults.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-06-04T07:31:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221107140
       
  • Comparison of Dynamic Balance Performances of Adult Runners With
           Intellectual Disability Versus Their Sedentary Peers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ghada Jouira, Selim Srihi, Fatma Ben Waer, Haithem Rebai, Sonia Sahli
      First page: 1443
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our aim in this study was to compare the dynamic balance between runners (100 sprint) and non-runners with intellectual disability (ID). Our participants were 36 healthy male adults with ID aged 17–29 years, divided into runners (n = 18) and sedentary non-runners (n = 18). We assessed dynamic balance in these participants, using the Y-Balance Test (YBT), the Expanded-Timed Up and Go Test (ETUGT) and the Functional Reach Test (FRT). Runners with ID had significantly better balance scores than their sedentary counterparts on YBT (p < .001), the two walking phases of the ETUGT (p < .05) and the FRT (p
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-08-27T04:05:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221116609
       
  • Analysis of Trunk Neuromuscular Activation During Equine-Assisted Therapy
           in Older Adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Edneia C. de Mello, Luanna H. Diniz, Janaine B. Lage, Mariane F. Ribeiro, Domingos E. Bevilacqua Junior, Rodrigo C. Rosa, Fabrizio Antônio G. Cardoso, Alex A. Ferreira, Mara Lúcia F. Ferraz, Vicente de Paula A. Teixeira, Ana Paula Espindula
      First page: 1458
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      The three-dimensional movement of the horse in physical therapy is a valuable kinesio-therapeutic phenomenon that simultaneously affects several body systems, including particularly the neuromuscular system. However, the effects of equine-assisted services (EAS) on neuromuscular activation patterns in older adults have not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we evaluated the impact of a 10-weeks EAS program on trunk muscles in older adults who used a saddle and placed their feet in stirrups for the first 15 minutes and out of stirrups for the remaining 15 minutes of 30-minute EAS sessions. We gathered electromyographic (EMG) data of the trunk muscles five times each on the first, fifth, and 10th sessions: pre-EAS and post-EAS on a stationary horse and at 1-minute, 15-minutes, and 30-minutes on a horse in motion. Participants were 20 adults, aged 60–79 years. We analyzed normalized EMG data with 5 (session time) by 3 (session number) analyses of variance (ANOVAs) with repeated measures and with Bonferroni’s testing (p ≤ .05). There was a significant difference over the number of interventions for the right thoracic paravertebral muscle (p = .025) and session time effect for the left trapezius (p = .042), right thoracic paravertebral (p < .001), right and left multifidus (p < .001), and right and left rectus abdominis muscles (p < .001). Thus, trunk muscles in older adults showed complex neuromuscular activation synchronized with the horse’s movement, which was influenced by session time and number of interventions. The practical implication of these findings is that EAS can reduce fall risk among elderly adults of both sexes.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T01:24:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221112249
       
  • Executive Functions, Physical Abilities, and Their Relationship with
           Tactical Performance in Young Soccer Players

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Daniel Carnevale, Marije Elferink-Gemser, Alberto Filgueiras, Barbara Huijgen, Caique Andrade, Julia Castellano, Davi SiIva, Fabrício Vasconcellos
      First page: 1477
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      While tactical performance in soccer is associated with the players’ and teams’ collective actions in the context of game stimuli, how tactical performance relates to players’ executive functions (EFs) and physical abilities should be examined. In this study, we examined these relationships among 81 Under-15 male soccer players who underwent tactical evaluation (FUT-SAT), EF tests (i.e.,(Stop-Signal Test and Design Fluency Test)), and physical tests (i.e.,(Maturity Offset, Yoyo Endurance Test II, Sargent Jump Test, and Sprint Test)). Multiple linear regression modeling with the stepwise method showed that approximately 48% of overall game tactical performance variance was explained by inhibitory control, biological maturation, and sprint capacity (p = .004; d = .54; r2 = .479), whereas 35% of offensive tactical performance variance was explained by the same dimensions (p = .001; d = .91; r2 = .353). In addition, approximately 28% of defensive tactical performance variance was explained by cognitive flexibility and aerobic resistance (p = .007; d = .39; r2 = .280). These results reflect the combined importance of EFs and physical abilities for tactical performance in young soccer players, suggesting that these abilities may be targets for training when trying to improve young players’ performance.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T03:43:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221112236
       
  • Self-Perceived and Self-Tested Endurance: Associations with Objective
           Measures

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anders Aandstad
      First page: 1492
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Use of self-report (questionnaires) is often the most realistic means of screening physical fitness in large participant samples because this method is quicker and cheaper than objective testing. Yet, previous studies have reported equivocal validity to reports of self-perceived fitness. A hybrid self-report variant is the use of self-administered/reported objective measurement. We sought to investigate the relative validity of this variant method compared to self-perception reports. In total 26,452 young Norwegian men and women participated in this study. We collected data during obligatory selection for military conscript service. Approximately half of the participants were asked to rate their endurance level on a five-point Likert scale in an online questionnaire. The other half performed a self-administered 3000 m run and reported the result online. Within 18 months, all participants completed an objective maximal treadmill test at a conscript selection center. We used Spearman correlations (rs) and analyses of variance (ANOVAs) to investigate the relationships between these two self-report methods and the observed objective treadmill performance. Self-perceived and self-tested endurance were both identically correlated with the other-observed treadmill run for men (rs = 0.59; p < .001) and for women (rs = 0.50, p < .001); and ANOVAs revealed significant effects of self-perceived and self-tested endurance on treadmill run time, with higher self-reported endurance related to higher treadmill run time. In conclusion, self-perceived and self-tested endurance produced the same correlation coefficients with objectively measured treadmill run time. While there was a moderate relationship between self-reported and objectively measured endurance at the group level, there was substantial individual measurement error that should be considered for individual reports.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T07:27:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221107852
       
  • Practice—Not Task Difficulty—Mediated the Focus of Attention Effect on
           a Speed-Accuracy Tradeoff Task

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Masahiro Yamada, Keith R. Lohse, Christopher K. Rhea, Randy J. Schmitz, Louisa D. Raisbeck
      First page: 1504
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      External focus (attention to the movement effect) has been found effective in motor performance and learning. However, while some investigators have suggested that the effect of attentional focus varies with task difficulty, others reported external focus benefits regardless of difficulty. We hypothesized that attentional focus effects would vary with practice, due to changes in the individual’s processing efficiency. We had three 20-person participant groups (external focus instructions, internal focus instructions, control) practice three difficulty levels of a Fitts reciprocal tapping task over two days. Participants in the external/internal focus groups were instructed to “mentally focus on moving the pen/your hand as fast and accurately as possible,” while control participants were instructed to “mentally focus only on doing your best to achieve the task goal.” We then analyzed the effect of attentional focus by task difficulty at the initial performance (the beginning of the practice) and after learning (the retention/transfer phase), using movement time (MT) and number of error taps (Err) as performance measures. The internal focus group made more errors than the control group only at the retention/transfer phase. We found no error differences between the external and internal focus groups, and there were no MT differences between any groups. Our primary hypothesis about the differential effect of attentional focus by practice was supported. The attentional focus effect on Err differed in the retention/transfer phase from the immediate phase, suggesting that practice mediated the attentional focus effect. We discuss how information theory may supplement understanding of attentional focus interventions in motor skill acquisition.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T02:08:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221109214
       
  • The Effect of Using Goggles and Snorkel for Aquatic Skills Acquisition in
           Youth Learn-to-Swim Programs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fatmir Misimi, Tanja Kajtna, Jernej Kapus
      First page: 1525
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our purpose in this study was to examine the effects of using goggles and snorkel during a learn-to-swim program on the aquatic skills of young non-swimmers with fear of water. 40 children volunteered to participate in the study and were randomly divided into two groups: one that used goggles and snorkel (GS) and one that did not (NGS). After four weeks (five sessions per week) of learn-to-swim interventions, both groups improved aquatic skills, but improvements in water entry, back gliding, and prone swimming were greater for the GS than for the NGS group. In contrast, the intervention effect on a blowing bubbles skill was smaller for the GS than for the NGS group. Thus, the use of goggles appears to be more beneficial in a learn to swim program for young swimmers with a fear of water than not using goggles for all lessons other than blowing bubbles.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T03:01:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221112258
       
  • Reducing Big Data to Principal Components for Position-Specific Futsal
           Training

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Markel Rico-González, Jordi Illa, Fabio Yuzo Nakamura, José Pino-Ortega
      First page: 1546
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Since training/competition loads must be quickly assessed and interpreted to inform exercise prescription, big data should be simplified through multivariate data analysis. Our aim in the present research was to highlight which variables from big data analyses provided the most relevant information for describing the behavior of top-level futsal players in their different playing positions (i.e., goalkeeper, defenders, wingers, and forwards). We collected data from four top-level Spanish teams that participated in the final rounds of a national tournament. Through principal component analysis (PCA) we grouped 6–9 variables in 3–4 PCs that explained 62–81% of total variance, depending on playing positions. The most relevant variables explaining goalkeepers’ performance were accelerations per minute, maximum acceleration (m/s2), 5–8 impacts per minute, and < 3 takeoffs per minute. Defenders’ behavior was best explained by absolute distance covered from 6-12 km/h (m/min) and from 18-21 km/h (m/min), from 5-8 landings per minute, and> 8 landings per minute. Wingers’ and pivots’ performances were mainly explained by accelerations and decelerations, together with a high level of aerobic endurance (especially for wingers). These findings allow for individualized training and game analysis.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-07-13T06:02:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221115014
       
  • Predicting Perceived Sport Performance via Self-Determination Theory

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: João Lourenço, Bartolomé J. Almagro, José Carmona-Márquez, Pedro Sáenz-López
      First page: 1563
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Sport performance depends in part on psychological factors. Self-determination theory emphasizes that the satisfisfaction of basic psychological needs and autonomous motivation may be linked to positive behavioral results and positive perceptions of performance. Our main objective in this study was to analyze the predictive power of such variables as perceived autonomy support, the satisfaction of psychological needs, and autonomous motivation on perceived sport performance. We recruited 447 young Portuguese athletes/participants (340 males, 107 females; Mage = 15.72 years, SD = 1.8). We had participants complete Portuguese sport versions of the Perceived Autonomy Support Exercise Climate Questionnaire, the Basic Psychological Needs in Exercise Scale, the Behavior Regulation Sport Questionnaire and the Perceived Performance in Sport Questionnaire. A gender invariant structural equation model showed that the coach’s autonomy support significantly predicted the satisfaction of psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. The satisfaction of these three psychological needs predicted autonomous motivation. Satisfying the need for competence positively predicted perceived sport performance, but autonomous motivation was not significantly related to perceived performance.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-08-27T05:35:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221119121
       
  • Longitudinal Stability and Change in Young Students’
           Mastery-Approach Goals for Running

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ping Xiang, Jiling Liu, Weidong Li, Jianmin Guan
      First page: 1581
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In the present study, we examined the longitudinal stability and change in mastery-approach goals for running as offered in regularly scheduled physical education (PE) and athletics classes in the United States. There were five waves of data collection from 806 students (431 boys; 375 girls) who were tracked from fourth to eighth grade while participating in running activities in PE or athletics classes. We assessed the participants’ mastery-approach goals using four items on a 5-point scale. We found acceptable longitudinal construct validity, measurement invariance, and scale reliability for the scores of mastery-approach goals, and we found these goals to have moderate stability across this 5-year period. Latent growth modeling revealed a linear decline in mean mastery-approach goal scores over the five school years. We concluded that the assessment of mastery-approach goals over time was both valid and reliable and that these running mastery-approach goals were stable in most respects but became less intense over time.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T02:50:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221118469
       
  • Postural Balance in Young Tennis Players of Varied Competition Levels

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Selim Srihi, Ghada Jouira, Fatma Ben Waer, Haithem Rebai, Amal Majdoub, Sonia Sahli
      First page: 1599
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of young tennis players’ expertise on their postural balance (PB) under sensorial conditions with eyes open (EO) and with eyes closed (EC). Our participants were 75 healthy adolescents aged 15–18 years, divided into three groups based on their skill levels: (a) national tennis players (NAT; n = 25), regional tennis players (REG; n =25), and a control group of non-sport practitioners (CG; n = 25). We recorded center of pressure area and mean velocity on a force platform while participants stood in bipedal and unipedal stances in EO and EC conditions for all three groups. Statistical analyses showed that NAT participants swayed less than CG participants in all conditions and less than REG participants in the bipedal stance with EC and in the unipedal stance, both with EO and EC. Thus, tennis practice/experience may have improved PB in this sample, as high-level tennis players had better PB compared to novices, especially in challenging conditions.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T03:39:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221108913
       
  • A Review and Meta-Analysis of Interactive Metronome Training: Positive
           Effects for Motor Functioning

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hyo Keun Lee, Hyun Joon Kim, Sang Bum Kim, Nyeonju Kang
      First page: 1614
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Interactive metronome training may be effective for improving motor performances through timing. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, 18 prospective studies met our eligibility criteria, and we summarized the effects of interactive metronome training protocols on motor functioning. We estimated effect sizes by quantifying differences in altered motor functions between participants in interactive metronome training and control groups. Two additional subgroup analyses determined whether the positive effects on motor function improvements were different among (a) three types of participants (i.e., athletes, healthy individuals, and patients with neurological disorders) and (b) two different training protocols (i.e., interactive metronome training only and interactive metronome training combined with an additional motor program). Random-effects model meta-analysis revealed moderate positive effects of interactive metronome training on motor function, with interactive metronome treatment effects significant across athletes, healthy individuals, and patients with neurological disorders. Interactive metronome training combined with additional motor programs showed comparable effects to those obtained after interactive metronome training alone. These findings suggest motor improvement benefits to strengthening or capitalizing on an individual’s motor timing.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T09:05:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125221110403
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.237.27.159
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-