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Perceptual and Motor Skills
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.349
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0031-5125 - ISSN (Online) 1558-688X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Traditional Chinese Exercises for Cardiovascular Diseases: A Bibliometric
           Analysis

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      Authors: Ruiting Zhu, Yirou Niu, Haiyan Xu, Saikun Wang, Jing Mao, Yangyang Lei, Xuance Xiong, Wei Zhou, Lirong Guo
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Traditional Chinese exercises (TCEs) have great value in the prevention and effective treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Our purpose in this study was to summarize present research trends and future directions regarding the link between TCEs and CVD by bibliometrics analysis. We searched the Web of Science Core Collection (WoSCC) for all original articles and reviews on TCEs for CVD published in English before August 7, 2022 using CiteSpace 5.8.R3 and Microsoft Excel 2019 software, and we displayed the results in the form of network maps, line graphs, and tables. We initially obtained 725 articles. Our results showed that the United States was the most influential country in this line of research, with Harvard University the most prolific institution in the field, and, Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine was the most productive journal for these articles. The highest-frequency keywords in this research area were Tai Chi, exercise, blood pressure, quality of life, and older adult. Additionally, important research topics included heart rate variability, quality of life, meta-analysis, Baduanjin exercise, and breathing exercise. In addition, our results revealed that among all the TCEs, Tai Chi, Baduanjin, and Qigong emerged as the most extensively studied. However, it’s important to note our exclusive focus on literature published in English may have led to our missing important results. Future investigators should broaden their search to include other databases and languages to present a still more comprehensive overview of this field.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T04:57:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241230599
       
  • Correlations between Trunk Control and Balance in Children with Bilateral
           Spastic Cerebral Palsy

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      Authors: Sapna Tiwari, Pratiksha Tilak Rao, Suruliraj Karthikbabu
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Impairments of postural responses are a salient feature of children with cerebral palsy (CP). While the systems approach describes balance in seven components, the relationship between trunk control and balance in children with CP has not been previously examined with all seven of these components. In this study, we aimed to identify correlations between trunk control and all seven systems approach balance components in children with bilateral spastic CP. Our participants were 30 children (M age = 11.83, SD = 2.32 years) with CP having a Gross Motor Function Classification System level ranging from I to III. We assessed trunk control with the Trunk Control Measurement Scale, including static and dynamic balance (selective voluntary control and reaching). Balance in standing was assessed using Kids-Mini-BESTest involving four domains: anticipatory, reactive, sensory orientation and stability in gait. We used Spearman’s rank correlations to correlate trunk control and balance, and we obtained a moderate correlation between the trunk control measurement scale and the Kids-Mini-BESTest in children with both bilateral spastic CP (rs = .618, p < .001) and spastic diplegic CP (rs = .52, p = .02). Analysis of the correlations between separate domains of the Kids-Mini-BESTest and the trunk control measurement scale subscales revealed moderate correlations between the static sitting balance subscale and all four domains of the Kids-Mini-BESTest. The dynamic selective motor control subscale of the trunk control measurement scale moderately correlated with the anticipatory domain of the Kids-Mini-BESTest. The dynamic reaching subscale also correlated moderately with anticipatory and stability in gait domains. This correlation was statistically significant in the 13 to 17-year-old age group and was strong among females, whereas the correlation was moderate in males. Trunk control was moderately associated with balance considering all the systems theory components of balance in children with bilateral spastic cerebral palsy.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T05:27:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231226297
       
  • Myopia: Its Status and Environmental Correlations Among School Students in
           Fushun, China

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      Authors: Ming-Zhu Huo, Jia-Xin Liu, Hong-Ning Shao, Wen-Hui Li
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our objective was to investigate the status and influence of myopia among primary school students in Fushun, Liaoning Province, China. We aimed to provide a theoretical and epistemological basis for implementing myopia prevention initiatives. We employed cluster sampling and surveyed 5216 primary school students from grades 1–6 across eight primary schools in Fushun City. Our participants included 2606 males and 2610 females whose average age was 9.25 (SD = 1.76) years. The rate of myopia among these primary school students was 29.54%, with statistically significant differences among students of different genders and grades. Logistic regression analysis further identified several possible protective factors, including appropriate reading distance, adequate home lighting, regular breaks between classes, conscientious eye exercises, and daily outdoor physical activity. Conversely, the associated risk factors were being female, being in a higher grade level, spending more than 4 hours on homework, occasionally reading while lying down, and having one or both parents with myopia. Overall, our results indicated a high incidence of myopia, highlighting the need for scientifically controlled interventions to manage and mitigate the occurrence and progression of myopia in this population.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T03:32:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241230764
       
  • Effect of the Visual Illusion on Stepping-Over Action and Its Association
           with Gaze Behavior

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      Authors: Ryota Sakurai, Kentaro Kodama, Yu Ozawa, Kimi Estela Kobayashi-Cuya
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      An adequate foot clearance height while stepping over an obstacle is important for safety in daily life. In the present study, we examined whether visual illusions affect foot clearance during a stepping-over action, and whether this is further influenced by gaze behavior. Twelve participants stepped over an obstacle placed four meters away under conditions of three different obstacle characteristics: white, horizontal, or vertical lines. We measured the participants’ foot clearances during the step-over action and their gaze behavior during the approaching phase. Participants stepped significantly higher over the obstacles in the vertical lines (illusion) condition. The duration of gaze fixation on the obstacle positively correlated with increased foot clearance in the vertical condition, suggesting that the effect of the visual illusion on foot clearance was enhanced by prolonged gaze fixation. Conversely, prolonged fixation negatively correlated with foot clearance in the white (control) condition, implying that a cautious perception of an obstacle may contribute to efficient stepping-over action.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-01-29T03:42:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241230194
       
  • Is There a Relationship Between Birth Quartile and Vertical Jump
           Performance Among Young Male Elite Volleyball Athletes'

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      Authors: Henrique de Oliveira Castro, Ricardo Franco Lima, Lucas Savassi Figueiredo, Vivian de Oliveira, Leonardo Alexandre Peyré-Tartaruga, Luiz Fernando Martins Kruel, Lorenzo Iop Laporta, Gustavo De Conti Teixeira Costa, Guilherme Pereira Berriel
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Vertical jump is an important skill that influences volleyball performance. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between vertical jump performance and birth quartile of Brazilian male youth volleyball players. We calculated chi-square goodness-of-fit tests to compare the athletes’ birthdate distributions in quarters of their birth years (Q1, Q2, Q3, and Q4) according to player age categories (U17, U18, U19, and U21). We calculated one-way ANOVAs to compare spike jump and block jump heights of players born in different quarters of the same year. Overall, we found a relative age effect (i.e., more players with birth dates early in the birth year) in U17 (p < .001), U18 (p < .001), U19 (p < .001), and U21 (p = .04). Regarding vertical jump performance, U18 athletes born in Q2 reached higher spike jump heights (p = .006) and block jump heights (p = .002) than athletes born in Q4, and U19 athletes born in Q1 reached higher block jump heights than athletes born in Q3 (p = .049). There were no significant differences in vertical jump performance across birth quartiles among U17 and U21 athletes. Thus, a relative age effect was present in all age categories but not always reflected in vertical jump performance. Volleyball coaches and policymakers are still advised to employ strategies to ensure fairer opportunities for players born later in the year of their eligibility dates, as we found RAE to be sometimes, but not always, related to higher spike or block jump heights even among these older adolescents and young adult athletes.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T06:37:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241230427
       
  • Simulating Local Biases in Visual Attention in Neurocognitive Performance

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      Authors: Benjamin A. Berry, Gregory J. Meyer, Emily T. O’Gorman, Manali Roy, Larson E. Sholander, Joni L. Mihura
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Typical visual perception includes an attention bias toward right hemisphere mediated global, holistic cortical processing. An atypically local, detail-oriented focus of attention is characteristic of left hemisphere processing and is often observed in patients whose field of attention is restricted by certain types of neurocognitive impairment. We designed the present pair of studies to induce a local attentional focus to observe its consequences on neurocognitive measures of visuospatial processing. In Experiment I, participants wore glasses mimicking simultanagnosia, a disorder of visual attention, to induce a narrowed, atypical attentional style while they completed visual neuropsychological tasks. This simulation impaired participants’ capacities to visually synthesize and efficiently reproduce Complex Figure stimuli as measured with the Boston Qualitative Scoring System (BQSS), and it induced an atypical attentional style on Rorschach Performance Assessment System (R-PAS) responses. In Experiment II, participants wore glasses designed to provoke differential hemispheric activation, also hypothesized to influence style of visual attention; but this manipulation did not influence neurocognitive task performance. We discuss implications for the interpretation of BQSS and R-PAS scores and offer directions for future research.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T01:59:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241228128
       
  • Psychosocial and Environmental Correlates of Physical Activity in Korean
           Adults

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      Authors: Jonghwa Lee, Dojin An, Chatkamon Singnoy, Youngho Kim
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Using hypothesized structural equation modeling, we investigated contributions to physical activity (PA) from psychological, social, and environmental variables. Participants were 768 adults aged 30 years or older (men = 353, women = 415; Mage = 42.51, SD = 10.21 years) living in Jungrang-gu, Seoul. To assess psychological, social, and environmental variables, respondents completed scales measuring self-efficacy, decisional balance, social support, physical environment, and leisure time exercise. We found that psychological, social, and environmental variables had a statistically significant effect on PA, with psychological variables mediating the effects of social and physical environmental variables on PA. These findings lend support to the assumed internal and external validity of the social ecological model (SEM) as an explanation for PA.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T05:58:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241229877
       
  • Self-Reported Mood and Lifestyle-Related Physical Activity of Young Adults
           With Major Depressive Disorder

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      Authors: Vagner Deuel de O. Tavares, Geovan Menezes de Sousa, Felipe B. Schuch, Stephany Campanelli, Jacob Meyer, Raissa Nóbrega de Almeida, Pedro Moraes Dutra Agrícola, Leonardo Alves, Maria Luiza Gurgel, Kaike Thiê da Costa Gonçalves, Scott Patten, Jerome Sarris, Walter Barbalho, Emerson Nunes Arcoverde, Nicole Leite Galvão-Coelho
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      We investigated whether mood and lifestyle-related indicators of physical health are differentially expressed according to self-reported levels of depressive symptoms among young adults with a current episode of major depression. In a cross-sectional study, we recruited 94 young adults (females = 67, 71.3%; males = 27, 28.7%; aged 18–35 years) with a current episode of major depression. We assessed their mood with the Profile of Mood States (POMS), and Beck Anxiety Inventory-(BAI), sleep with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), physical activity with the Simple Physical Activity Questionnaire (SIMPAQ), and their cardiorespiratory fitness. Participants’ depression levels were classified as follows using established cut-points: (a) Mild Depressive Symptoms (MIDS, BDI-II 14-19 points, n = 17), (b) Moderate Depressive Symptoms (MODS, BDI-II 20–28 points, n = 37) or (c) Severe Depressive Symptoms (SEDS, BDI-II 29–63 points, n = 40). As expected, we found that young adults with SEDS, when compared to those with MODS and MIDS, showed higher depressive mood on the POMS, and they exhibited greater anxiety symptoms, lower reported ‘vigor’ on physical activity measures, worse sleep quality as expressed by their global score sleep; daytime dysfunction; and sleep disturbance, and they showed lower cardiorespiratory fitness. Those with moderate depressive symptoms only differed from those with mild symptoms with respect to hostility, fatigue and mood disturbance. Although there was a gradient whereby worse mental and physical health indicators were more closely related to the SEDS depression categorization, while healthier indicators were associated with the MIDS category, some parameters were not different between the MDD severity groups, particularly when comparing MIDS and MODS. Clinicians treating patients with MDD should consider these factors when designing lifestyle-based interventions.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T02:44:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241226997
       
  • Temperament Affected Visuospatial Orienting on Discrimination Tasks

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      Authors: Jacek Bielas, Damian Przybycień, Łukasz Michalczyk
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In the Posner cueing paradigm, the early attentional capture and subsequent inhibition of return (IOR) of attention to the same location, although they are microscale phenomena measured in milliseconds, seem to encapsulate the interaction between two fundamental dimensions of behavior - engaging in and sustaining activity versus withdrawing from and inhibiting activity. In the field of differential psychology, the dynamics of reciprocal relations between these behavioral dimensions have been thought to be determined by central nervous system properties that constitute an individual’s temperament. Yet the research on any differential effects of temperament on visuospatial orienting is rather sparse and has produced ambiguous results. Here, we used saccadic responses to measure whether individual differences in reactivity as a temperamental trait might affect orienting of visuospatial attention on discrimination cueing tasks. Our results suggested that, in individuals with lower reactivity, attentional capture took place at a short stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), producing a facilitatory cueing effect, which was not the case in those who were higher in reactivity. We explain and discuss these results with the Regulative Theory of Temperament.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-01-10T02:03:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241227070
       
  • Benefits of a Light-Painting Technique for Learning to Write New
           Characters: A Proof of Concept With Adults

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      Authors: Jean-François Connan, Marianne Jover, Manon Luigi, Alexandrine Saint-Cast, Jérémy Danna
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Learning to write relies on the effective integration of sensory feedback and a transition from motor control based on written tracings to motor control based on expert writing movements. This study aimed to test whether the photographic technique of light painting (LP) would facilitate this transition. To achieve this, we conducted two experiments using different LP setups. LP involves moving a light source in a dark environment while taking a long-exposure photograph. LP entails both a real-time reduction of product-related visual information and a post-trial addition of process-related visual information. In the first experiment, we conducted a pre-test, training, and post-test in which 16 adults wrote four new characters with the non-dominant hand. During the training sessions, participants stood and wrote in a vertical frame (1 × 1.2 m) two characters in the control condition (with a marker on the vertical support) and two characters in the LP condition (with a flashlight in the air). In the test phases, participants were seated at a table and copied the four characters into a square (4 cm * 4 cm) on a fixed sheet of graphics paper. As in-air writing strongly differs from classical handwriting situations, we performed a second LP experiment. The aim was to implement LP training in a condition closer to writing. Sixteen new participants followed the same protocol but sat at a table and wrote in a horizontal square (20 cm * 20 cm). In both experiments, participants who trained with the LP method wrote faster and with less pressure than those trained in the control condition. We also observed an improvement in spatial accuracy in Experiment 2, whatever the training condition. LP seemed to have led participants to focus on the writing process, probably because it modified the nature and timing of the visual information used for writing. LP may be a promising technique for remediating writing difficulties.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-01-08T03:37:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231215724
       
  • Effects of Cervical Mobilization on Balance and Gait Parameters in
           Individuals With Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

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      Authors: Aziz Dengiz, Emre Baskan
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Stroke is a significant health problem that may result in long-term functional deficits. Balance and walking problems are among the most common post-stroke deficits, and they may negatively affect quality of life. Our aim in this study was to investigate the effects of cervical mobilization on balance and gait parameters after stroke. Participants were 24 adults (aged 30–65 years), who scored 24 or above on the Standardized Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) and no more than 3 on the Modified Rankin scale. Participants were randomly assigned to either an experimental Bobath therapy and cervical mobilization group (n = 12) or a control group who received Bobath therapy and a sham application (n = 12). Both groups received 60 minutes of Bobath therapy three times a week for four weeks; additionally, the experimental group received 15 minutes of cervical mobilization in each session, while the control group received 15 minutes of spinal sham mobilization each session. Pre and post treatment, we assessed all participants’ demographic characteristics, gait parameters, balance parameters, and forward head posture values using a clinical data assessment form, spatiotemporal gait analysis (LEGSystm), portable computerized kinesthetic balance device (SportKAT 550), and craniovertebral angle (CVA), respectively. The groups showed no significant differences in their initial demographic and clinical characteristics (age, sex, stroke duration and disability levels.). In comparing changes on variables of interest, we observed significant experimental versus control group improvements in balance parameters except for their left side balance score (right side, left side, forward, backward and total balance scores were significant at p = .003, p = .089, p < .001, p = .022, p < .001, respectively), gait parameters (stride number, stride length, stride time, stride velocity, cadance at p = .007, p = .019, p = .013, p = .005, p = .001, respectively) and CVA (p < .001). Also, there were findings in favor of the experimental group on the modified timed up and go test on walk out, mid turn, walk back and total times (p = .028, p = .001, p = .016, and p = .001, respectively),but not for sit-to-stand time or stand-to-sit time. Clinicians involved in stroke rehabilitation should assess and treat the cervical region to enhance rehabilitation effectiveness.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-01-03T01:42:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231226039
       
  • Psychometric Validation of the Tactical Assessment Instrument in Football
           for Use in Physical Education and with Youth Sport Teams

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      Authors: Carmen Barquero-Ruiz, David Kirk, Lourdes Meroño, José L. Arias-Estero
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Recently, the Tactical Assessment Instrument in Football (TAIS) was developed to address football’s tactical requirements in terms of game phases, learners’ roles, and organizational levels of play. In this study, we sought to evaluate the psychometric properties of this existing instrument in the Physical Education (PE) context and for youth sport teams (ages 8–12 years). Our research design involved: (a) participants playing 37 football games, (b) assessing participants via observation with the TAIS and (c) conducting psychometric analysis on the obtained assessment data. For the psychometric analysis, we carried out our work in four phases: (a) a statistical analysis of the evaluation criteria, (b) analysis of the instrument’s structural dimensions, (c) internal item reliability analysis, and (d) provision of evidence for external validity. Participants were 592 children (156 girls, 436 boys; ages 8–12 years) from 74 PE classes or sport teams (from three institutional contexts - schools, community-based sports, and sports clubs) in Spain. We selected 12 tactical criteria and grouped them into four theoretical dimensions (appropriate attack, inappropriate attack, appropriate defense, inappropriate defense) to confirm the instrument’s structural dimensions. The Cronbach alpha and Omega McDonald coefficients were greater than .70. The TAIS discriminated between participants from the three institutional contexts, offering evidence of the instrument’s external validity. Thus, the TAIS now has sufficient psychometric support for assessing learning of football tactics in PE and youth sport teams. This instrument facilitates an ecological assessment of youth players’ understanding of football tactics through four theoretical tactical dimensions and 12 criteria involving information about four learners’ roles (both attack and defense, on- and off-the-ball) and three organizational tactical levels of play (whole team, small groups of learners, and individual learners).
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-12-30T03:56:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231225579
       
  • Advancing Auditory Processing by Detecting Frequency-Following Responses
           Through a Specialized Machine Learning Model

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      Authors: Fuh-Cherng Jeng, Katie Matzdorf, Kassy L. Hickman, Sydney W. Bauer, Amanda E. Carriero, Kalyn McDonald, Tzu-Hao Lin, Ching-Yuan Wang
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we explore the feasibility and performance of detecting scalp-recorded frequency-following responses (FFRs) with a specialized machine learning (ML) model. By leveraging the strengths of feature extraction of the source separation non-negative matrix factorization (SSNMF) algorithm and its adeptness in handling limited training data, we adapted the SSNMF algorithm into a specialized ML model with a hybrid architecture to enhance FFR detection amidst background noise. We recruited 40 adults with normal hearing and evoked their scalp recorded FFRs using the English vowel/i/with a rising pitch contour. The model was trained on FFR-present and FFR-absent conditions, and its performance was evaluated using sensitivity, specificity, efficiency, false-positive rate, and false-negative rate metrics. This study revealed that the specialized SSNMF model achieved heightened sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency in detecting FFRs as the number of recording sweeps increased. Sensitivity exceeded 80% at 500 sweeps and maintained over 89% from 1000 sweeps onwards. Similarly, specificity and efficiency also improved rapidly with increasing sweeps. The progressively enhanced sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of this specialized ML model underscore its practicality and potential for broader applications. These findings have immediate implications for FFR research and clinical use, while paving the way for further advancements in the assessment of auditory processing.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-12-28T11:23:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231225767
       
  • Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Malay-Translated Version
           of the Food Neophobia Scale for Malaysian Young Adults

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      Authors: See Meng Lim, Yue Xin Goh, Jyh Eiin Wong, Masaharu Kagawa, Bee Koon Poh
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      The Food Neophobia Scale (FNS) is a research instrument, originally developed in English, to assess an individual’s level of food neophobia. However, it has not yet been translated and validated for Malaysians. Therefore, we aimed to translate and validate a Malay-translated version of the FNS. Respondents were 200 young adults (mostly females, 73%; and students, 82.0%; M age = 22.3 years, SD = 2.3). We first translated the FNS into Malay using the forward-backward translation method, and a panel of nutrition and dietetics experts then reviewed it for item relevance, clarity, simplicity, and ambiguity. The translated FNS suggested good content validity with an item-level content validity index (I-CVI)> .8, a scale-level content validity index (S-CVI)/average = .8 and a S-CVI/universal agreement = .96. Principal component analysis revealed a two-factor model: (i) willingness and trust; and (ii) rejection and fear. Cronbach’s alpha for the Malay-translated FNS was .808, demonstrating high internal consistency and reliability among young Malaysian adults. Future investigators can now use this Malay-translated FNS instrument to determine levels of food neophobia among Malaysians.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-12-27T07:27:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231225022
       
  • Acute Effect of Kinesiology Taping on Muscle Activation, Functionality and
           Proprioception in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized
           Controlled Trial

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      Authors: Aylin Ataş, Ayşe Abit Kocaman, Şahika Burcu Karaca, Merve Kasikci Çavdar
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Data on the mechanism of kinesiology taping (KT) for providing mechanical support, facilitating or inhibiting muscles, and increasing functionality in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis (OA) have been contradictory, with no study evaluating acute muscle activation. Our aim in this study was to determine the acute effect of KT applied to the rectus femoris muscle on this muscle’s activation, functionality and proprioception in patients with knee osteoarthritis. We divided 40 individuals diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis into two groups: (a) KT group (taping with tension facilitation) and (b) a placebo group (taping with no tension facilitation). We applied taping to the participants’ left and right side rectus femoris muscles for 30 minutes, but with muscle facilitation in the KT group and without tension in the placebo group. We assessed participants for muscle activation with surface electromyography (sEMG), for functionality with the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), and for proprioception/joint sense with the Five Times Sit-to-Stand Test (5TSTS) before and after taping. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the groups before these interventions were similar (p> .05). Muscle activation did not change significantly in either group compared to before taping (p> .05), but there were improvements in both knees for proprioception/joint sense (p < .05). Both groups were similar in terms of functionality (5TSTS, TUG) results (p> .05). We concluded that KT applied bilaterally to the rectus femoris did not affect rectus femoris muscle activation and functionality in patients with knee OA, but it did improve proprioception.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-12-22T10:36:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231222816
       
  • Psychometric Support for a Brazilian Version of the Multidimensional
           Assessment of Teamwork in Sport (MATS-B)

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      Authors: Mayara Juliana Paes, Daniel Perez Arthur, Thais do Amaral Machado, Gabriel Jungles Fernandes, Desmond McEwan, Joice Mara Facco Stefanello
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we investigated psychometric support for a version of the Multidimensional Assessment of Teamwork in Sport (MATS) that would be suitable for Brazilian athletes. Four translators participated in the back-translation of this instrument from English to Portuguese, two specialists synthesized the Portuguese and English back-translation versions, and 10 experts assessed the questionnaire items and judged their content validity. To evaluate structural validity, we performed confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). We evaluated internal item reliability with a sample of 447 athletes who completed the adapted measure (the MATS-B). Finally, 202 other athletes completed both the MATS-B and a second measure of collective efficacy (CEQS-B) to provide external validity correlates. With these data, the MATS-B now provides valid and reliable data supporting its use with Brazilian athletes in an adapted assessment tool that aligns with the conceptual framework of teamwork in sports.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-12-19T11:01:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231222386
       
  • Goal Length (Short or Long Term) Interacts with Goal Scheduling Strategy
           (Clock Time or Event Time) for Optimal Achievement

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      Authors: Masato Nagamine, Li Tang, Shuhei Miwa, Ryo Kainuma, Miki Toyama
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      There are two strategies for scheduling personal goals: (i) clock-time, based on time passage; and (ii) event-time, based on the progress made. Neither strategy is always superior to the other; rather it is necessary to consider the environment and other conditions such as whether the goal is long or short term. We focused on goal lengthas an important factor for determining the best scheduling strategy, hypothesizing that clock-time and event-time strategies would differentially activate higher performance for long-term and short-term goals, respectively. Thus, we conducted a two-part laboratory experiment (Part 1: n = 63, Part 2: n = 86 ) in which we manipulated both goal length and scheduling strategy. Subsequently, we examined the effects of each combination of goal length and scheduling strategy on task performance (i.e., completion of a mathematical problem). Although our two studies were designed identically in most respects, they differed in the number of task problems, task time limits, and question content. Our data supported our hypothesis that clock-time scheduling was optimal for long-term goals while event-time scheduling was optimal for short-term goals.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-12-16T04:15:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231218067
       
  • On the Role of Academic Buoyancy and Self-Efficacy in Predicting
           Teachers’ Work Engagement: A Case of Chinese English as a Foreign
           Language Teachers

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      Authors: Ran Zhi, Yongxiang Wang, Ali Derakhshan
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      A plethora of scientific evidence has pinpointed that teaching English as a foreign or second language (EFL) is difficult, challenging, and emotionally burdensome. Nevertheless, most English language teachers remain committed to the teaching profession and actively engage in the instructional environment. This has inspired several scholars worldwide to explore what personal, emotional, and psychological factors motivate English language teachers to engage enthusiastically in their workplace. While a large body of studies have to date examined the personal, emotional, and psychological predictors of English language teachers’ work engagement, to our knowledge, no inquiry has investigated the role of academic buoyancy and self-efficacy in predicting EFL teachers’ work engagement. Furthermore, the potential impact of demographic variables on the interplay between EFL teachers’ academic buoyancy, self-efficacy, and work engagement has been disregarded. To bridge this gap, we examined the interplay of these three constructs among Chinese EFL teachers. To do so, we administered three pre-designed questionnaires to 242 EFL teachers working in Chinese schools and universities. The collected data were then analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The outcomes of SEM divulged positive and strong relationships between Chinese EFL teachers’ academic buoyancy, self-efficacy, and work engagement. The SEM results also indicated that academic buoyancy and self-efficacy could strongly and favorably predict Chinese EFL teachers’ work engagement. Additionally, the study outcomes disclosed that demographic variables, including gender, educational degree, and teaching experience, directly impacted the interplay between Chinese EFL teachers’ academic buoyancy, self-efficacy, and work engagement. These results may have significant implications for English teachers, teacher trainers, and educational principals.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-12-16T03:42:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231222398
       
  • Exploring the Dynamics of Athletes’ Enjoyment and Self-Determined
           Motivation, and of the Motivational Climate in Youth Football: A
           Longitudinal Perspective

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      Authors: Filipe Rodrigues, Diogo Monteiro, Rui Matos, Miguel Jacinto, Raúl Antunes, Nuno Amaro
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      We aimed to explore a short period longitudinal interplay between athletes’ enjoyment and their self-determined motivation and motivational climate in youth football. We recruited 109 youth football athletes (79 males, 30 females) through a convenient sampling method. We included individuals within the 12–17-year-old age range, with a mean age of 14.31 (SD = 1.46) years. To examine these proposed associations, we performed hierarchical multiple regression analyses and found that enjoyment at pre-season assessment (T1) and self-determined motivation and a task-involving sport climate at mid-season (T2) were significant predictors of mid-season enjoyment (at T2). However, self-determined motivation and task-involving climate at T1 did not significantly contribute to the model. These findings emphasize the importance of initial enjoyment and an evolved self-determined motivation, and task-involving climate in understanding later enjoyment in sport. Coaches, practitioners, and policymakers should prioritize strategies that enhance intrinsic motivation, provide opportunities for autonomy, and cultivate a supportive and growth-oriented environment.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T08:34:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231222152
       
  • Is Problematic Physical Activity (PPA) a Uni- or Multi-Dimensional
           Concept' A Bifactor Analysis of the Exercise Dependence Scale-Revised
           (EDS-R)

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      Authors: Laurence Kern, Lama Mattar, Gayatri Kotbagi, Lucia Romo, Yannick Morvan
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      The study of exercise dependence, or as we prefer, problematic physical activity (PPA), faces both theoretical and methodological challenges. Different factorial solutions were obtained for the widely used Exercise Dependence Scale-Revised (EDS-R), leading us to question both its latent underlying construct and the interpretation of its factor solutions. Through confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and the use of a bifactor model (BCFA), we assessed the dimensionality of a French version of the EDS-R. We recruited 745 students from Paris Nanterre University, but we removed 88 responses (16.8%) to retain only those who (a) engaged in a moderate to high levels of physical activity, according to the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ; N = 494; 9.5%), and (b) completed the EDS-R. We used a final sample of 435 students (58.4% of the total population) for a factorial analysis of the EDS-R. We conducted a three-step CFA in Mplus, producing three models: (a) unidimensional, (b) second-order, and (c) bi-factor (BCFA). The results of the BCFA indicated that most EDS-R items were better indicators of a general factor than their respective group factors, except for the second factor measuring a withdrawal construct. These results add to an ongoing debate in the field of behavioral addiction as to how to better conceptualize and measure exercise dependence or PPA. Withdrawal appears to have a special position in this debate, since our BCFA suggested that it is the only specific sub-dimension of the EDS-R scale.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-12-08T12:16:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231218745
       
  • Correlates of Toddlers’ Physical Activity Levels and Sedentary Behavior
           During Unstructured Outdoor Play in Early Childhood Education and Daycare
           Settings

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      Authors: Herminia Vega-Perona, Isaac Estevan, María del Mar Bernabé-Villodre, Patricia Segura-Martínez, Daniel Adyro Martínez-Bello, Vladimir E. Martínez-Bello
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Despite recent research showing that early childhood education and daycare settings (ECEC) have an important role in promoting toddlers’ physical activity (PA), crucial information gaps remain regarding toddlers' PA and sedentary behavior (SB) in these outdoor settings. We aimed in this study to: (a) analyze PA patterns and SB during unstructured outdoor play time in preschool and daycare environments using accelerometry and systematic observation; (b) provide concurrent accelerometry and observational data to help validate the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity in Children-Preschool Version (OSRAC-P); and (c) examine individual, social and environmental correlates of PA and SB during toddlers’ unstructured outdoor play time. We found that: (a) toddlers displayed high amounts of PA with no sex, BMI, and/or age differences in PA and SB levels,; (b) environmental variables (e.g., fixed equipment and playground density) were not associated with PA levels or SB intensity; (c) the OSRAC-P was a reliable and valid means of observing and analyzing toddlers’ PA patterns during unstructured outdoor play time; and (e) different social patterns between boys and girls did not impact PA levels or patterns. Combining different measurement methods permitted an improved understanding of unstructured outdoor play in preschool and daycare settings.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T09:52:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231218027
       
  • The Effects of Differential Learning on the Standing Broad Jump

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      Authors: Diego Rivera, Tanner Robinson, Adam C. King
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In this investigation, we examined the influence of two approaches of motor skill learning (differential learning and repetition-based) for an explosive motor skill. Twenty-seven individuals completed four training sessions of a standing broad jump task, presented with either differential training or a repetition-based approach. We collected pre-and post-training assessments that included maximal jump distances used to index performance and the recording of ground reaction forces to determine potential biomechanical changes (normalized vertical ground reaction force – GRFvert, rate of force development – RFD, and horizontal take-off velocity - Vhor). Results showed that differential training exhibited greater jump distances than repetition-based training (p < .001) but no training effect was found for jump distances between pre- and post-assessments for either training approach (p = .15). However, a significant increase occurred for Vhor with greater velocities achieved following training (p = .03). Overall, differential training failed to show the expected performance enhancements for a discrete, explosive motor task; this may be related to limited exposure and task specific demands of the movement. Further research is needed to better understand the task factors influencing skill acquisition from differential training.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-12-04T10:02:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231218465
       
  • Translation and Psychometric Evaluation of a Chinese Version of the
           Behavioral Regulation in Sport Questionnaire (BRSQ) with University Sport
           Athletes

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      Authors: Yan Luo, Kathleen T. Mellano, Elizabeth M. Mullin, Juan Zhong, Yi Zhou, Yanru Sha, Yingqiu Zhang, Shenyue Luo, Nan Guo
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our aim in this study was to translate and psychometrically evaluate a Chinese version of the Behavioral Regulation in Sport Questionnaire (BRSQ). Participants were Chinese collegiate athletes (N = 361) who were competitive in their respective sports. We examined the construct validity of the Chinese BRSQ using alternative structural equation models and evaluated convergent validity, factor score reliability, and measurement invariance of the optimal model. Due to insufficient score reliability for some subscales, our initial Chinese BRSQ was deemed problematic. A modified version of the questionnaire with a four-factor structure (amotivation, external regulation, introjected regulation, and autonomous motivation) demonstrated excellent construct validity, convergent validity, and score reliability. There was measurement invariance across athlete level and sex. This tool provides a valuable resource for practitioners and sport psychology researchers for assessing sport motivation among competitive university athletes in China.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-11-29T07:56:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231218188
       
  • Adolescent Athletes’ Self-Presentations on Social Media and Their
           

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      Authors: Kyoungjin Yang, Sungho Kwon, Dojin Jang
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Social media has been an increasingly utilized communication tool, and it has gained popularity among adolescent athletes. Our aim here was to investigate whether a positive and honest self-presentation on social media increased adolescent athletes' self-esteem, and we examined the moderating effect of perceived responsiveness. After receiving informed consent of participants and their parents/legal guardians, we recruited 468 adolescent athletes/participants (244 males, 224 females; Mage = 15.39 years, SD = 1.61) through purposive sampling and engaged them in completing face-to-face or online self-report measures of their: (a) self-presentation on social media, (b) perceived responsiveness of others, and (c) Rosenberg self-esteem scales. Given the continuous nature of our moderating variable (i.e., perceived responsiveness), we conducted regression analysis using Hayes’s PROCESS macro in SPSS software. A positive self-presentation showed no significant relationship with self-esteem, except when the level of perceived responsiveness was high. Conversely, an honest self-presentation was positively related to higher self-esteem, and the relationship between honest self-presentation and self-esteem was moderated by perceived responsiveness. Our findings extend existing psychological theory into the online environment and have practical implications. These data highlight the link between social media self-presentation and self-esteem among adolescent athletes and illustrate the crucial role of perceived responsiveness in the social media context.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-11-27T06:33:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231216020
       
  • Spatial Response Discrimination May Elicit a Simon Effect on a
           Non-Complementary Task

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      Authors: Melanie Y. Lam, Romeo Chua
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      When paired participants are each assigned a complementary half of the Simon task, a joint Simon effect (JSE) has been observed. Co-representation, a cognitive representation of not only one’s own task but also that of the co-actor, has been one of several proposed mechanisms in the JSE. Using the response-discrimination hypothesis as a framework, we tested whether it was sufficient to highlight alternative task keys in a two-person setting in which a non-complementary task was completed to elicit a Simon effect (SE). In our design, the participant’s role was to perform the Go/No-Go Simon task and the co-actor’s role was to initiate each trial for the participant. In one two-person setting participant group (SK group), the same task key was assigned to both the participant and the co-actor; another group (OK) was assigned spatially opposite task keys. In a third group (joint setting, TS group), the standard joint Simon task was also completed to verify that a JSE could be replicated. We hypothesized that an SE would be elicited in the OK group, since opposite task keys would uniquely promote spatial coding. We found a weak but marginally significant SE in the OK group but not in the SK group. These results suggest that, on a non-complementary task, response discrimination may contribute to the emergence of a SE in a two-person setting, while it does not have the same impact as a complementary task completed in a joint setting (TS group) that may afford more robust response representations that reveal the enhanced so-called JSE.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-11-27T01:48:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231215854
       
  • Examining Single Session Peer-Teaching Instructional Approaches on
           Pre-Service Physical Education Teachers’ Throwing Techniques

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      Authors: Bradley Beseler, Mandy S. Plumb, Michael Spittle, Nicola F. Johnson, Jack T. Harvey, Christopher Mesagno
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      An important role of a Physical Education (PE) teacher is to assist students to develop the fundamental motor skills (FMS) that will allow them to participate in physical activities with competence and confidence. Thus, PE teachers require the knowledge and skills to carry out this crucial task. In the crowded curricula of Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) programs, there are limited opportunities for pre-service PE teachers to learn how to analyze and perform a large list of motor skills. Our purposes in this study were to determine whether a single session peer-teaching intervention could improve pre-service PE teachers’ short-term non-dominant hand overarm throwing performances and to examine these students’ perceptions of the interventions. We allocated 47 pre-service PE teaching students (24 males; 23 females) to one of three experimental groups: a Video Analysis Group (VAG; n = 17), a Verbal Group (VG; n = 19), and a Control Group (CG; n = 11), based on the class in which they were enrolled. VAG and VG participants worked with a partner of their choice in reciprocal peer-teaching to improve each other’s non-dominant hand throwing technique. VAG and VG interventions were identical except that VAG participants accessed video analysis technology. CG participants completed unrelated course work that involved no overarm throwing activities. A single 20-minute session of peer teaching with video analysis feedback during practice led to rapid enhancements in non-dominant hand overarm throwing skills. While all three groups improved their performance by retention testing, participants in the VAG group improved most quickly. Participants in both the VAG and VG groups reported that their respective interventions improved their throwing and Qualitative Movement Diagnosis (QMD) skills. Based on these results, we suggest that PETE programs integrate peer-teaching and video analysis sessions into fundamental movement courses to accelerate students’ motor skill acquisitions.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-11-24T11:21:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231214126
       
  • Differences Between Consistent and Inconsistent Handedness Remain
           Consistently Interesting: Ten Years of Research on the Consistency of
           Handedness With the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory

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      Authors: Eric C. Prichard, Evan M. Clarkson, Stephen D. Christman
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Almost 10 years ago Prichard et al. (2013) published a literature review on consistency of handedness. They described how consistency of handedness, typically measured by the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory (EHI), predicted outcomes in memory and decision-making paradigms better than direction of handedness. In the last 10 years, new research has extended these findings and added new theoretical perspectives. The goal of this short form review is to highlight and summarize some of these more intriguing findings and to encourage researchers in the fields of memory and decision making to incorporate handedness as a variable in future research.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-11-23T10:37:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231217624
       
  • Impact of Spectators, League and Team Ability on Home Advantage in
           Professional European Basketball

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      Authors: Enrique Alonso Pérez-Chao, Rubén Portes, Carlos Ribas, Alberto Lorenzo, Anthony S. Leicht, Miguel Ángel Gómez
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our aim in this study was to examine the impact of fans (vs. no fans), geographical location of league, and team ability on home winning percentage (HW%) or home advantage (HA) in professional European basketball. Data were collected from five prestigious professional, national basketball leagues within Europe (Spain, Germany, Italy, Greece and Israel) across 16 regular seasons (2005-2006 to 2020-2021). We conducted comparisons between matches with and without fans, location of leagues, team ability (High, Medium, Low), and combinations of these factors via non-parametric tests (e.g., Mann-Whitney tests, Kruskal-Wallis). We found significantly greater HA during matches with fans for leagues in Germany (p = .001), Italy (p = .012) and Spain (p = .002). For matches with fans, HA and HW% were significantly different between several, but not all, leagues for high (p < .05), medium (p < .05) and low (p < .02) team abilities. In conclusion, HA and HW% were enhanced by spectator attendance, with this phenomenon varying by location/region and team ability. Consideration of these multiple contextual factors may assist coaches and sport organizations to develop key strategies for enhanced team success.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-11-23T09:10:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231215710
       
  • Motor Processing in Children With Cochlear Implants as Assessed by
           Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

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      Authors: Razieh Alemi, Jace Wolfe, Sara Neumann, Jacy Manning, Lindsay Hanna, Will Towler, Caleb Wilson, Alexander Bien, Sharon Miller, Erin Schafer, Jessica Gemignani, Nabin Koirala, Vincent L. Gracco, Mickael Deroche
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Auditory-motor and visual-motor networks are often coupled in daily activities, such as when listening to music and dancing; but these networks are known to be highly malleable as a function of sensory input. Thus, congenital deafness may modify neural activities within the connections between the motor, auditory, and visual cortices. Here, we investigated whether the cortical responses of children with cochlear implants (CI) to a simple and repetitive motor task would differ from that of children with typical hearing (TH) and we sought to understand whether this response related to their language development. Participants were 75 school-aged children, including 50 with CI (with varying language abilities) and 25 controls with TH. We used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to record cortical responses over the whole brain, as children squeezed the back triggers of a joystick that vibrated or not with the squeeze. Motor cortex activity was reflected by an increase in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (HbO) and a decrease in deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration (HbR) in all children, irrespective of their hearing status. Unexpectedly, the visual cortex (supposedly an irrelevant region) was deactivated in this task, particularly for children with CI who had good language skills when compared to those with CI who had language delays. Presence or absence of vibrotactile feedback made no difference in cortical activation. These findings support the potential of fNIRS to examine cognitive functions related to language in children with CI.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-11-17T11:27:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231213167
       
  • Relationship Between Athletes’ History of Stressors and Sport Injury: A
           Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Theresa Chyi, Frank J. H. Lu, Yun-Che Hsieh, Ya-Wen Hsu, Diane L. Gill, Bin-Bin Fang
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      A history of stressors in athletes represents psychosocial factors that may lead to sport injury. However, empirical studies have provided varying results for the relationship between stress history and sport injury. We examined prior literature on the stress history - sport injury relationship within a systematic review and, by meta-analysis, we offered a pooled estimate of the strength of this relationship. We searched seven major academic databases (Sportdiscus, Psyinfo, Academic Search Premier, Ovid, Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed) from January 2000 to September 2023 and identified 19 empirical studies that examined injuries in sports contexts for meta-analysis. In 19 empirical studies of moderate to high publication quality, we found moderate heterogeneity (Q(17) = 98.61; p < .001), low sensitivity (I2 77.82–83.77), and low publication bias (Z-value = 7.74; p < .001). Further, using a random effect estimate-r, we found a low but significant correlation between stress history and sport injury, yielding a small overall effect size (ES) of r = .12. Furthermore, moderation analyses found adolescents (r = .14), contact-sport athletes (r = .09), non-elite athletes (r = .13), and non-European athletes (America r = .16; Asia r = .14; Oceania r = .14) to have a relatively higher ES than their counterparts in this stress history/sport injury relationship. We concluded that inevitable life stressors may lead to many negative consequences for athletes, such that sports professionals should provide stress management educational programs to enhance athletes’ health and well-being.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-11-15T12:29:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231216329
       
  • Relationships Between Task Constraints, Visual Constraints, Joint
           Coordination and Football-Specific Performance in Talented Youth Athletes:
           An Ecological Dynamics Approach

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      Authors: Pieter Heuvelmans, Stefano Di Paolo, Anne Benjaminse, Laura Bragonzoni, Alli Gokeler
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Individual performance in team sports is a multifactorial reflection of how well a player can cope and accomplish tasks in varied playing situations. Thus, performance analysis should not only focus on outcomes, but also on underlying mechanisms of those outcomes. We adopted principles of the ecological dynamics approach (EDA) to investigate the effect of introducing constraints on players’ joint coordination responses for a football-specific performance drill outcome. Seventeen talented youth football (soccer) players performed a football-specific drill under different conditions: basic constraints, additional defender dummies, stroboscopic glasses, and a combination of the latter two constraints. We recorded these players’ execution time, passing accuracy, and lower extremity joint kinematics. We calculated joint coordination for hip-knee, knee-ankle, and trunk-hip couplings. The added constraints negatively affected execution time and passing accuracy, and caused changes in joint coordination. Furthermore, we identified a relationship between execution time and joint coordination. This study serves as an example how the EDA can be adopted to investigate mechanisms that underlie individual performance in team sports.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2023-11-10T07:10:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125231213124
       
 
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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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