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Journal of New Studies in Sport Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)

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Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.999
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 39  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1050-642X - ISSN (Online) 1536-3724
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [330 journals]
  • A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Investigating Head Trauma in Boxing

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      Authors: Donnelly; Robert R.; Ugbolue, Ukadike Chris; Gao, Yang; Gu, Yaodong; Dutheil, Frédéric; Baker, Julien S.
      Abstract: imageObjectives: Although physical trauma has been reported in boxing since its inception, boxing still appeals to athletes and spectators. This systematic review and meta-analysis assess both acute and chronic neurological and neuropsychological effects that boxing has on the brain. Further assessments in terms of comparisons of the concussion ratio in boxing to other combat sports, as well as the efficiency of wearing headguards, are also performed.Data Sources: This systematic review and meta-analysis used the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The outcomes incorporated included physical chronic abnormalities of the brain, neuropsychiatric, and neurological disorders sustained in amateur or professional boxing, in addition to the safety benefits of boxing headguards. Odds ratios, descriptive statistics, and inferential statistics are also reported.Main Results: From the 84 articles reviewed, the 35 included articles suggested that boxers have a significantly elevated risk of sustaining a concussion compared with other combat sports (risk ratio [RR]: 0.253 vs RR: 0.065, P < 0.001). From the 631 amateur and professional boxers analyzed, 147 (23.30%) had cavum septum pellucidum, whereas 125 of 411 amateur and professional boxers (30.41%) presented with some form of brain atrophy. Dementia or amnesia was observed in 46 of 71 boxers (61.79%), 36 of 70 (51.43%) had various forms and severities of cognitive disorders, and 57 of 109 (52.29%) displayed abnormal computed tomography or electroencephalogram scan results. Utilization of headguards significantly increased the risk for stoppages in amateur bouts, compared with boxers not wearing a headguard (OR: 1.75 vs 0.53, P < 0.050).Conclusions: Boxing is a hazardous sport that has the potential to have fatal and negative life-changing results. Because of the limited reliable data regarding the efficiency of boxing headguards, future research should focus on the overall significance that headguards may have for reducing head trauma.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Incidence of Concussions in Elite Female Water Polo: A Retrospective
           Analysis

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      Authors: Croteau; Félix; Leclerc, Suzanne; Moroz, Mickey
      Abstract: imageObjective: Current evidence for concussions is mixed in water polo players. Surveys suggest rates as high as 36%, whereas surveillance studies at international competitions often fail to report them at all. The goal of this study was to examine the incidence of concussions in elite female water polo players from surveillance tools implemented longitudinally.Design: Retrospective chart analysis of 10 years spanning between 2012 and 2022.Setting: National teams or professional sports.Participants: Female players from the Canadian senior national water polo teams that participated in international competitions and trained more than 10 hours per week in a competitive environment.Assessment of Risk Factors: Included player position, recurrence, and time loss before full return to play.Main Outcome Measures: Prevalence of concussion diagnosis.Results: Forty-three concussions were identified over the 10 years observed at a median count of 3 concussions per year. Cumulative days lost spanned between 25 and 348 days per team*year. Altogether, this produced a median rate of 14.3 injuries per 100 player*years. Goalkeepers in the sample suffered the highest rates of concussion (25.8%), compared with players in other positions (22.8% of centers and 16.7% of drivers).Conclusions: This study found evidence for prevalence of concussions in elite female water polo players. Improved guidelines preceded a significant reduction in time loss after the year 2017. This adds to a body of knowledge suggesting that improved surveillance methods are needed to detect and care for concussions in this population.
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A Pilot Study: Do Children Who Run Marathons Have More Osteoarthritis in
           the Lower Extremities as Adults

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      Authors: Roberts; William O.; Kucera, Neal S.; Miner, Michael H.
      Abstract: imageObjective: To compare self-reported osteoarthritis of the knee and hip in adults who ran at least 1 marathon as a child with adults who ran high-school cross country (HSCC).Design: Subject self-recall retrospective survey.Setting: Electronic survey.Participants: 319 adults who either ran a marathon under age 18 or ran HSCC recruited from running clubs, marathon participants, and on-line interest groups.Interventions: Survey.Main Outcome Measures: Self-reported history of osteoarthritis (OA), joint pain, anterior cruciate ligament injury, still running or running marathons, and number of marathons as an adult.Results: One hundred twenty-three respondents ran a marathon under age 18 (26% female) and were 40 years old (sd 16) and 196 ran HSCC (53% female) and were 36 years old (sd 13). The mean age of first marathon was 15 (sd 2.3, range 5-17); 50% ran 1% and 50% ran>1 marathon. Child marathoners reported a family history of OA in knees or hips (26%) or a joint replacement (30%) compared with 24% and 28% of HSCC runners. 10% of child marathoners and 7% of HSCC reported OA and 24% and 21% reported daily or weekly joint pain. 91% of all respondents are still running; 78% of child marathoners (mean 17, range 1-91) and 80% HSCC ran ≥1 marathons as adults (mean 10, range 1-80).Conclusions: Adults who ran marathons as children compared with adults who ran HSCC self-report similar rates of the knee and hip OA, chose to participate of their own accord, continue to run as adults, played other sports, and did not “specialize” in marathons.
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Higher Triad Risk Scores Are Associated With Increased Risk for
           Trabecular-Rich Bone Stress Injuries in Female Runners

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      Authors: Roche; Megan; Nattiv, Aurelia; Sainani, Kristin; Barrack, Michelle; Kraus, Emily; Tenforde, Adam; Kussman, Andrea; Olson, Emily Miller; Kim, Brian; Fahy, Katherine; Miller, Emily; Diamond, Elyse; Meraz, Sonya; Singh, Sonal; Nattiv, Aurelia; Fredericson, Michael
      Abstract: imageObjective: Bone stress injuries (BSIs) in trabecular-rich bone are associated with greater biological risk factors compared with cortical-rich bone. We hypothesized that female runners with high Female Athlete Triad (Triad)-related risk would be at greater risk for trabecular-rich BSIs than runners with low Triad-related risk.Design: Prospective cohort study.Setting: Two NCAA institutions.Participants: Female runners were followed prospectively for up to 5 years.Intervention: The intervention consisted of team nutrition presentations focused on optimizing energy availability plus individualized nutrition sessions. Triad Cumulative Risk Assessment (CRA) categories were assigned yearly based on low-energy availability, menstrual status, age of menarche, low body mass index, low bone mineral density, and prior BSI.Main Outcome Measures: The outcome was the annual incidence of trabecular- and cortical-rich BSI. Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE, to account for the correlated nature of the observations) with a Poisson distribution and log link were used for statistical modeling.Results: Cortical-rich BSI rates were higher than trabecular-rich BSI rates (0.32 vs 0.13 events per person-year). Female runners with high Triad-related risk had a significantly higher incidence rate ratio of trabecular-rich BSI (RR: 4.40, P = 0.025) and cortical-rich BSI (RR: 2.87, P = 0.025) than women with low Triad-related risk. Each 1-point increase in Triad CRA score was associated with a significant 26% increased risk of trabecular-rich BSI (P = 0.0007) and a nonsignificant 14% increased risk of cortical-rich BSI (P = 0.054).Conclusions: Increased Triad CRA scores were strongly associated with increased risk for trabecular-rich BSI. Incorporating Triad CRA scores in clinical care could guide BSI prevention.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Ease of Use and Usefulness of a Newly Developed Mobile App to Monitor Pain
           and Adherence Among Individuals With an Achilles Tendinopathy Engaged in a
           Rehabilitation Program

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      Authors: Lavigne; Alexandre; Lamontagne, Martin; Mares, Christopher; Gagnon, Dany H.
      Abstract: imageObjective: Assess the perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of a newly developed mobile app.Design: Descriptive survey study.Setting: Home-based rehabilitation program.Participants: A group of 31 adults with a symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy.Intervention: A mobile app was developed to support the deployment of the 12-week active exercise-based rehabilitation program and facilitate the monitoring of exercise adherence twice daily and the assessment of localized Achilles tendon pain using a numeric pain rating scale on a weekly basis.Main Outcome Measures: Results of an online survey encompassing 10 questions, each rated on a 5-point Likert scale (5 = strongly agree; 1 = strongly disagree).Results: Nearly all participants agreed that the mobile app was easy to install (96.4%) and easy to use (100%). Most participants confirmed that no technical issues were encountered (96.4%). The instructional videos were deemed helpful in properly performing the recommended exercises (85.7%), whereas the prompts sent via text message were found to promote adherence (88.9%). The design and appearance of the mobile app were appreciated by a lower percentage of participants (75%).Conclusion: Participants confirmed the ease of use and usefulness of the newly developed mobile app and demonstrated a positive attitude toward its use.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Ultrasonographic Finding of Contralateral Achilles Tendon in Patients With
           Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Prospective Observational Study

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      Authors: Park; Young Hwan; Kim, Woon; Choi, Jung Woo; Kim, Hak Jun
      Abstract: imageObjective: Although the incidence of contralateral Achilles tendon in patients with Achilles tendon rupture is higher than in the general population, there are no studies evaluating the status of the contralateral Achilles tendon. The aim of this study was to investigate the status of the contralateral Achilles tendon in patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture.Design: Prospective observational cohort study.Setting: University hospital foot and ankle clinic.Participants: Seventy-five patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture who met the inclusion criteria.Intervention: Ultrasonography performed by an orthopedic surgeon who had 8 years of experience in musculoskeletal ultrasonography.Main Outcome Measures: Ultrasonographic abnormalities of the contralateral Achilles tendon at the time of diagnosis of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Abnormalities were categorized as intratendinous lesions, peritendinous lesions, changes in retrocalcaneal bursa, and Achilles tendon thickening.Results: The maximal Achilles tendon thickness had a mean of 4.8 ± 1.0 mm. Nine patients (12%) showed ultrasonographic abnormalities on the contralateral Achilles tendon, and the presence of exertional pain was the sole associating variable with ultrasonographic abnormalities.Conclusion: The prevalence of ultrasonographic abnormalities in the contralateral Achilles tendon shown in this study was not higher than that reported in healthy or asymptomatic Achilles tendon. Therefore, routine evaluation of the contralateral Achilles tendon is unnecessary at the time of acute Achilles tendon rupture.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Effects of Motor Control Exercises in Patients With Chronic Nonspecific
           Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Capel-Alcaraz; Ana M.; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida M.; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A.; Antequera-Soler, Eduardo; Lara-Palomo, Inmaculada C.
      Abstract: imageObjective: The primary objective of this systematic review is to assess whether motor control exercises consisting of the methodology described by Richardson and Hodges improve the pain and disability of patients with nonspecific low back pain.Design: Systematic review and a meta-analysis.Setting: A literature review was conducted using PubMed, PEDro, Scielo, CINAHL, Web of Science, Dialnet, Scopus, and MEDLINE from inception to November 2021.Patients: Patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain.Interventions: Randomized controlled trials assessing motor control exercises versus inactive control, placebo or minimal intervention, and other exercises.Main Outcome Measures: Pain intensity, disability, and physical activity were considered as primary outcomes.Results: Eighteen studies with 1356 patients were finally included in the systematic review, of which only 13 randomized clinical trials could be meta-analyzed. Statistically significant results were found in favor of the motor control group for the comparison with other exercises in disability at postintervention term (Mean Difference, 95% Confidence Interval [CI], −3.13 [−5.87 to −0.38], P = 0.03); for the comparison with inactive control, placebo, or minimal intervention in pain at postintervention term (MD, 95% CI, −18.10 [−30.79 to −5.41], P = 0.008); and for comparison with general exercises (MD, 95% CI, −12.70 [−20.80 to −4.60], P = 0.002).Conclusions: Moderate-quality evidence regarding the effectiveness of motor control exercises to reduce pain intensity and disability exists, but the reduction should be interpreted with caution.
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Outpatient Runners Clinic Visit Trends and Injury Characteristics Among
           392 Child and Adolescent Patients: A 10-year Chart Review

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      Authors: DeJong Lempke; Alexandra F.; Whitney, Kristin E.; Stracciolini, Andrea; Ackerman, Kathryn E.; d’Hemecourt, Pierre A.; Willwerth, Sarah B.; Meehan, William P. III
      Abstract: imageObjective: To evaluate clinic visits and running-related injury (RRI) characteristics among child and adolescent runners seeking care at an outpatient clinic over a 10-year time frame.Design: Retrospective chart review.Setting: Outpatient hospital-affiliated Injured Runners Clinic.Patients: Children and adolescent runners (6-17 years) with RRIs.Independent Variables: We examined electronic medical records (EMRs) among child and adolescent patients in the hospital database from 2011 to 2021 to obtain RRI characteristics and key demographic factors.Main Outcome Measures: We assessed volume and frequency of patient visits to the clinic by RRI characteristics. Chi square analyses were used to compare the proportion of clinic visits over time and injury trends by body region and diagnosis.Results: There were 392 patients (sex: 277 F; mean age: 16.1 ± 1.3 years) and an average of 5 clinic visits per diagnosis (5 ± 4 visits; min: 1 visit, max: 31 visits). Number of visits generally increased over time up to 2016 but declined most drastically during the years of the pandemic (2020-2021; χ2 = 644, P < 0 .001). Of the 654 new injury diagnoses, 77.68% were attributed to repetitive stress. Bone stress injuries to the tibia were the most common RRI (χ2 = 1940, P < 0 .001; N = 132; 20.2% of all injuries) and constituted most of the clinic visits (χ2 = 9271, P < 0 .001; N = 591; 25.4% of all visits).Conclusion: We identified that adolescents with overuse injuries, particularly bone stress injuries to the tibia, constituted most of the visits to the outpatient healthcare setting. Clinicians should emphasize injury prevention efforts in clinical practice to reduce RRI burden.
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Excellent Clinical Outcomes and Return to Dance of 6 Active, Professional
           Ballet Dancers Aged Younger Than 40 Years at Total Hip Arthroplasty
           Through Direct Anterior Approach With a Custom Stem: A Case Report

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      Authors: Nogier; Alexis; Tourabaly, Idriss; Ramos-Pascual, Sonia; Barreau, Xavière; Baraduc, Elodie; Saffarini, Mo; Courtin, Cyril
      Abstract: imageObjective: To report clinical outcomes and return to dance after total hip arthroplasty (THA) by direct anterior approach (DAA) using custom stems in young, active, professional ballet dancers.Design: Case report.Setting: Tertiary.Patients: Six active, professional ballet dancers younger than 40 years who intended to resume ballet after THA.Interventions: Primary THA by muscle-sparing DAA using custom stems.Main Outcome Measures: Return to dance, Oxford hip score (OHS), forgotten joint score (FJS), and satisfaction with surgery and pain using numeric rating scale (NRS). CTs were acquired 2 days after surgery to assess implant position. Descriptive statistics were used.Results: The cohort comprised 4 women and 2 men aged 15 to 39 years. At 2.5 to 5.1 years of follow-up, all patients returned to professional ballet dance. Time to return to dance was 3 to 4 months for 3 patients and 12 to 14 months for 3 patients. Clinical scores were excellent, except for FJS in 1 patient who had considerable pain at her spine and ipsilateral foot. All patients were satisfied with surgery (NRS = 10). There were no complications, reoperations, or revisions. CTs confirmed that stems and cups were correctly positioned.Conclusions: All 6 young, active, professional ballet dancers who underwent THA by muscle-sparing DAA using custom stems returned to professional ballet dance and were completely satisfied with surgery. At>2 years of follow-up, 5 patients had excellent clinical outcomes and reported their dancing level to be as expected or better, whereas 1 patient had a lower FJS and was unable to return to her expected dance level.
      PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome Is Associated With Chronic Disease and
           Allergies in 60‚ÄČ997 Distance Runner Race Entrants: SAFER XXX Study

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      Authors: Marandure; Tsungai Tirivashe; Schwellnus, Martin P.; Grant, Catharina; Jansen van Rensburg, Audrey; Jordaan, Esmè; Boer, Pieter
      Abstract: imageObjective: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a common running-related injury. Independent risk factors associated with PFPS have not been described in a large cohort of distance runners.Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional study.Setting: 21.1 and 56 km Two Oceans Marathon races (2012-2015).Participants: 60 997 race entrants.Assessment of risk factors: Participants completed a compulsory prerace medical screening questionnaire (history of PFPS in the past 12 months, n = 362; no injury history, n = 60 635). Selected risk factors associated with a history of PFPS were explored using univariate & multivariate analyses: demographics, training/running variables, history of chronic diseases (composite chronic disease score), and any allergy.Main Outcome Measures: Prevalence ratios (PRs, 95% confidence intervals).Results: Risk factors associated with PFPS (univariate analysis) were increased years of recreational running (PR = 1.09; P = 0.0107), older age (>50 years), and chronic diseases (PR> 2): gastrointestinal disease (PR = 5.06; P < 0.0001), cardiovascular disease (CVD) (PR = 3.28; P < 0.0001), nervous system/psychiatric disease (PR = 3.04; P < 0.0001), cancer (PR = 2.83; P = 0.0005), risk factors for CVD (PR = 2.42; P < 0.0001), symptoms of CVD (PR = 2.38; P = 0.0397), and respiratory disease (PR = 2.00; P < 0.0001). Independent risk factors (multivariate analysis) associated with PFPS (adjusted for age, sex, and race distance) were a higher chronic disease composite score (PR = 2.68 increased risk for every 2 additional chronic diseases; P < 0.0001) and a history of allergies (PR = 2.33; P < 0.0001).Conclusions: Novel independent risk factors associated with PFPS in distance runners are a history of multiple chronic diseases and a history of allergies. Identification of chronic diseases and allergies should be considered as part of the clinical assessment of a runner presenting with a history of PFPS.
      PubDate: Fri, 30 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Gender Disparities Among Professional Team Sports Medicine Physicians

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      Authors: Schick; Sam; Chandler, Kelly; Kasprow, Sarah; Sisk, Morgan; Elphingstone, Joseph; Wing, Judson; Evely, Thomas; Casp, Aaron; Ponce, Brent; Brabston, Eugene; Momaya, Amit M.
      Abstract: imageObjective: Although recent trends from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) present encouraging growth of female representation in sports medicine, the field is still lagging behind other specialties. This study investigates gender disparities among physicians providing care for professional sports teams in male and female sports leagues.Design: Information regarding physicians providing sports medicine care to professional teams obtained by database queries (May 2021). Chi-square analysis compared gender data of orthopaedic team physicians with American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) membership, residency, and fellowship census data. Primary care sports medicine physicians were compared with American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) and primary-care sports medicine fellowship census data.Setting: Professional sports health care.Study Population: Professional league physicians.Interventions: None.Main Outcome Measures: Gender, residency, and fellowship training of professional league physicians.Results: Among a total of 608 team physicians, 572 (93.5%) were male and 40 (6.5%) were female. Orthopedic surgeons comprised 64.7% of the physicians. Fourteen (3.6%) team orthopedic surgeons were female. Thirty-five percent of team physicians were primary care sports medicine physicians. Twenty-six primary care sports medicine physicians (11.6%) were female. Orthopaedic female team physician representation overall was comparable with AOSSM and AAOS membership but significantly less than orthopaedic surgery residents and sports medicine fellows (P < 0.01). Women's National Basketball Association orthopaedic team physicians were more represented than female membership among AOSSM, AAOS, and orthopaedic sports medicine fellows (P < 0.01). Except for the WNBA, Premiere Hockey Federation, National Women's Soccer League, and United States Football League, female primary care sports medicine physicians were underrepresented in professional sports compared with AMSSM membership and primary care sports fellows (P < 0.01).Conclusion: Overall, female representation is poor among orthopaedic surgeons and primary care physicians providing sports medicine care to professional teams. Leagues encompassing female athletes tend to have better representation of female physicians.Level of Evidence: IV.
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Comparing Short-Term Knee-Related Quality of Life and Associated Clinical
           Outcomes Between Youth With and Without a Sport-Related Knee Injury

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      Authors: Le; Christina Y.; Pajkic, Andrea; Losciale, Justin M.; Filbay, Stephanie R.; Emery, Carolyn A.; Manns, Patricia J.; Whittaker, Jackie L.
      Abstract: imageObjective: To compare short-term changes in knee-related quality of life (QOL) and associated clinical outcomes between youth with and without a sport-related knee injury.Design: Prospective cohort study.Setting: Sport medicine and physiotherapy clinics.Participants: Youth (11-19 years old) who sustained an intra-articular, sport-related knee injury in the past 4 months and uninjured youth of similar age, sex, and sport.Independent Variable: Injury history.Main Outcome Measures: Knee-related QOL (Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, KOOS), knee extensor and flexor strength (dynamometry), physical activity (accelerometer), fat mass index (FMI; bioelectrical impedance), and kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, TSK) were measured at baseline (within 4 months of injury) and at 6-month follow-up. Wilcoxon rank sum tests assessed between-group differences for all outcomes. Regression models assessed the association between injury history and outcome change (baseline to 6-month follow-up), considering sex. The influence of injury type, baseline values, and physiotherapy attendance was explored.Results: Participants' (93 injured youth, 73 uninjured control subjects) median age was 16 (range 11-20) years and 66% were female. Despite greater improvements in KOOS QOL scores (20; 95% confidence interval, 15-25), injured participants demonstrated deficits at 6-month follow-up (z = 9.3, P < 0.01) compared with control subjects, regardless of sex. Similar findings were observed for knee extensor and flexor strength and TSK scores but not for physical activity or FMI. Lower baseline values were associated with greater outcome changes in injured youth.Conclusions: Youth have worse knee-related QOL, muscle strength, and kinesiophobia early after a sport-related knee injury than control subjects. Despite improvements, deficits persist 6 months later.
      PubDate: Fri, 26 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Level of Overestimation Among Dutch Recreational Skiers: Unskilled
           Tourists in the Mountains

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      Authors: Luppino; Floriana; van Diepen, Merel; den Hollander-Gijsman, Margien; Bartlema, Kornelis; Dekker, Friedo
      Abstract: imageObjective: To examine the level of overestimation (LO), associated factors, and identify the group of severe overestimators, among recreational skiers.Design: Cross-sectional observational study.Setting: An intermediate difficulty slope in an artificial snow indoor ski hall, and one in the mountains (Flachau, Austria).Participants: Dutch recreational skiers.Independent Variables: Participants were asked to rate themselves (SRSS, self-reported skill score). While skiing downhill they were objectively evaluated by 2 expert assessors (OSS, observed skill score). Potential associated factors and predictors for severe overestimation were assessed by a questionnaire.Main outcome measures: The LO, calculated by subtracting the OSS from the SRSS, was categorized into “no,” “mild,” and “severe.” Potential differences between these groups were analyzed, and regression analyses were performed to identify the factors associated with severe overestimation. To construct a profile of severe overestimators, the dataset was stratified based on 3 variables.Results: Overestimation was largely present (79.8%), and was severe in 32%. The LO decreased toward the more skilled skiers. Severe overestimators were mainly male, skied the least hours per day, were more avoidant, and showed the highest proportions of beginners and slightly advanced skiers. The profile of “severe overestimator” is characterized by physically unprepared males, avoidant for certain weather circumstances.Conclusions: Overestimation among recreational Dutch skiers is largely present, particularly among physically unprepared males, avoidant of certain snow and weather conditions. These features may function as a proxy to identify “severe overestimators” in comparable populations. Preventive strategies should focus to increase awareness particularly among these subjects.
      PubDate: Fri, 26 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Exploration of the Golf-Specific Low Back Pain Questionnaire

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      Authors: Skibski; Andrew; Goetschius, John; Mangum, L. Colby
      Abstract: imageObjective: The primary purpose of this study was to determine internal consistency and concurrent validity of the Golf-specific Low Back Pain questionnaire (GLBP).Design: Cross-sectional study.Setting: Online questionnaire.Participants: Fifty-two adult golfers with a history of LBP.Interventions: GLBP, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI).Main Outcome Measures: Cronbach alpha values for the GLBP and its 3 subscales. Pearson correlations between the ODI, GLBP, and the GLBP subscales.Results: Cronbach alpha for the GLBP was 0.94. Cronbach alpha for the 3 GLBP subscales ranged from 0.85 to 0.91. All Pearson correlations were significant at P < 0.05. The correlation between the ODI and GLBP was −0.64, and correlations between the ODI and GLBP subscales ranged from −0.53 to −0.63. Mean GLBP score was 72.01% ± 16.15%, and mean ODI score was 12.00% ± 7.98%.Conclusions: The GLBP has excellent concurrent validity to quantify LBP in golfers. The GLBP total and each individual subscale have excellent internal consistency and a moderate inverse relationship with the ODI. The GLBP offers a more sport-specific patient-reported outcome measure for this population. The GLBP may more adequately quantify LBP-related disability, especially at lower levels of disability. Findings provide initial evidence that the GLBP may be a valid tool to quantify LBP symptoms and dysfunction in golfers.Clinical Relevance: Clinicians should consider using sport-specific outcome measures when evaluating for LBP-related disability.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Evaluating Risk Factors for Biceps Tendon Injuries in Softball Players: A
           Systematic Review

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      Authors: Stamm; Michaela A.; Brahmbhatt, Purav S.; Brown, Symone M.; Miskimin, L. Cadence; Mulcahey, Mary K.
      Abstract: imageObjective: Softball players commonly suffer overuse injuries due to the demands of repetitive throwing. The biceps tendon plays an important role in stabilizing the shoulder during the windmill pitch. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the measures used to identify and study biceps tendon pathology in softball players.Design: This was a systematic review.Setting: PubMed MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE, and EMBASE were searched.Participants: Studies that investigated biceps tendon injuries in softball players.Interventions: None.Main Outcome Measures: Range of motion (ROM), strength, and visual analog scale data were collected.Results: Of 152 search results, 18 were included. A total of 536 of 705 athletes (76%) were softball players (average age 14-25 years). Five of 18 articles (27.7%) studied changes in external rotation with the shoulder at 90 degrees of abduction, and 4 of 18 (22.2%) studied internal rotation. Two of 18 studies (11.1%) examined ROM or strength changes in forward flexion.Conclusions: While researchers agree that the windmill pitch places significant stress on the biceps tendon, our study finds that the metrics used to evaluate shoulder pathology in these players primarily evaluate the rotator cuff without isolating the biceps tendon. Future studies should include clinical tests and biomechanical metrics more specific to identifying biceps and labral pathology (eg, strength, fatigue, and ROM in glenohumeral forward flexion, elbow flexion, and forearm supination) and attempt to clarify differences in pathology between pitchers and position players to better characterize the frequency and severity of biceps tendon pathology in softball players.
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Youth Sport Specialization and Risk of Injury: A General Review

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      Authors: Strosser; Stephen
      Abstract: imageObjective: The purpose of this literature review was to analyze, understand, and disclose prior empirical findings about the injury risks associated with youth sport specialization.Data Sources: Articles were included in this review if they examined the association between youth sport specialization status and injury. Nine articles from 5 journals met these criteria. All articles summarized the findings of cross-sectional (N = 5) or cohort studies (N = 4).Main Results: Each article included in this review indicated that specialized youth athletes are more susceptible to injury. Only 5 studies assessed the injury risks linked to specialization independent of sport training volume. These studies produced contradictory results.Conclusions: Although specialized youth athletes are more prone to injury, future research is needed to determine the independent and inherent injury risk associated with specialization. Nevertheless, youth athletes should refrain from specialization until at least adolescence.
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Characterizing the Practices of Canadian Orthopedic Surgeons in the
           Management of patients With Anterior Glenohumeral Instability

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      Authors: Hemstock; Riley; Sommer, Micah; McRae, Sheila; MacDonald, Peter; Woodmass, Jarret; Ogborn, Dan
      Abstract: imageObjective: To determine the practice patterns of Canadian orthopedic surgeons in the management of patients with anterior glenohumeral instability (AGHI).Design: Cross-sectional survey.Setting: Canada.Patients or Other Participants: Canadian orthopedic surgeons with membership in the Canadian Orthopedic Association or Canadian Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon group who had managed at least 1 patient with AGHI in the previous year.Interventions: A survey including demographics and questions on the management of patients with AGHI was completed. Statistical comparisons (χ2) were completed with responses stratified using the instability severity index score (ISIS) in practice, years of practice, and surgical volumes.Main Outcome Measures: Summary statistics were compiled, and response frequencies were considered for consensus (75%). Case series responses were stratified on use of the ISIS in practice, years of experience, and annual procedure volumes (χ2, P < 0.05).Results: Eighty orthopedic surgeons responded, with consensus on areas of diagnostic workup of AGHI, nonoperative management, and operative techniques. There was no consensus on indications for soft tissue and bony augmentation or postoperative management. There was no difference in practices based on the use of ISIS, years in practice, or surgical volumes.Conclusions: Canadian orthopedic surgeons manage AGHI consistently with consensus achieved in preoperative diagnostics and operative techniques, although debate remains as to the indications for soft tissue and bony augmentation procedures.
      PubDate: Wed, 26 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Physical Contact and Suspected Injury Rates in Female versus Male Youth
           Ice Hockey: A Video-Analysis Study

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      Authors: Williamson; Rylen A.; Cairo, Alexis L.; Heming, Emily E.; Kolstad, Ash T.; Hagel, Brent E.; Emery, Carolyn A.
      Abstract: imageObjective: Canada's national winter sport of ice hockey has high youth participation; however, research surrounding female ice hockey is limited and the injury burden remains high. This study compared rates of head contact (HC), body checking (BC; high-intensity player-to-player contact), and suspected concussion between female and male youth ice hockey.Design: Cross-sectional.Setting: Game video-recordings captured in Calgary, Canada.Participants: Ten female (BC prohibited) and 10 male (BC permitted) U15 elite AA (13-14-year-old) game video-recordings collected in the 2021 to 22 seasons and 2020 to 21, respectively.Assessment of Risk Factors: An analysis of player-to-player physical contact and injury mechanisms using video-analysis.Main Outcome Measures: Videos were analyzed in Dartfish video-analysis software and all physical contacts were coded based on validated criteria, including HCs (direct [HC1], indirect [HC2]), BC (levels 4-5 on a 5-point intensity scale), and video-identified suspected concussions. Univariate Poisson regression clustering by team-game offset by game-length (minutes) were used to estimate incidence rates and incidence rate ratios (IRR, 95% confidence intervals).Results: The female game had a 13% lower rate of total physical contacts (IRR = 0.87, 0.79-0.96) and 70% lower rate of BC (IRR = 0.30, 0.23-0.39). There were however no differences in the rates of direct HC (IRR = 1.04, 0.77-1.42) or suspected concussion (IRR = 0.42, 0.12-1.42) between the cohorts. Although prohibited in the female game, only 5.4% of HC1s and 18.6% of BC resulted in a penalty.Conclusions: The rates of HC1s and suspected concussions were similar across youth ice hockey. BC rates were lower in the female game, yet still prevalent despite being prohibited.
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Concussion in Canadian Youth Ice Hockey: What Is Needed to Decrease the
           Burden'

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      Authors: Williamson; Rylen A.; Emery, Carolyn A.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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