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  Subjects -> SPORTS AND GAMES (Total: 199 journals)
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Journal of Sport History
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.391
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0094-1700 - ISSN (Online) 2155-8455
Published by U of Illinois Press Homepage  [16 journals]
  • House of Cards: Leisure, Freedom, Authority, Revolution, and the Diary of
           Landon Carter

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      Abstract: Landon Carter's rage hissed and bubbled and burst. The Virginia planter fumed that his adult son, Robert Wormeley Carter, again was consumed by the pleasures of gambling. On the Saturday evening of April 6, 1776, Landon tried to assert his patriarchal authority. He "publickly declared against any more Card Playing." But when he retired to bed, Robert and his friends stayed at the card table. Landon grew disgusted. In his diary, he called his son a "Behemoth" and a "monster." His son's companions, he wrote, "must have in them some species of the Devil." He decried the sallow complexions and sullen demeanors of the hedonistic late-night gamblers, and he fumed that these young men exploited the hospitality of his ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Race around the Mountain: Competitive Cycling among the Coloured
           Communities of Greater Cape Town, 1930–1960

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      Abstract: At the outset of his groundbreaking 1970 book Only the Ball was White, Robert Peter-son notes that there were many baseball fans who had no idea that several generations of all-star quality Black baseball players existed prior to Jackie Robinson's entry into the big leagues.1 It is not an exaggeration to make the same claim regarding Coloured bicycle racing around Cape Town. In 1983, Elrick Kulsen of Paarl medaled at the South African track championships and became the first Coloured senior racer awarded Springbok national colors (several others had done it as juniors).2 While interracial cycling events had occurred for at least a decade prior to this achievement, Kulsen's Springbok jersey became a milestone for ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Spurs Fandom in San Antonio: The Baseline Bums and HemisFair Arena,
           1973–1993

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      Abstract: San Antonio boasts one of North America's most successful professional sports franchises, the National Basketball Association's Spurs. Since 1973, the Spurs have had the backing of their official supporters' group, the Baseline Bums. George Valle, former president of the Bums, explained, "Spurs basketball is the only thing I live for. I just want to see them win one championship before I die. Then I can leave this world happy."1 Although some scholars think of sports fandom as an obscene and dehumanizing obsession, fandom subcultures can cultivate meaningful experiences and relationships—the things that make us human. There is no denying the business of sport values capital above all things. However, fans have the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • One Night in Miami dir. by Regina King, and: Blood Brothers: Malcolm X
           & Muhammad Ali dir. by Marcus A. Clarke, and: Muhammad Ali dir. by Ken
           Burns et al. (review)

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      Abstract: In the beginning moments of each of these films, which explore the life of boxing legend Muhammad Ali, it is difficult to miss the cameras. The journalists ringside snapping photos of his 1963 fight against Henry Cooper. Malcolm X with a camera around his neck at the Hampton House playfully looking over Ali's shoulder. The throngs of fans taking pictures and screaming Ali's name as he moves through the crowd while cradling his young daughter, Hana. Each frame serves as a reminder that Ali is both himself and for public consumption, an athlete and a celebrity, both man and symbol. Depending on the lens, he is also a hero or a villain.Ali is not new to scrutiny, by the press, artists, or scholars. In the over sixty ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • King Richard dir. by Reinaldo Marcus Green (review)

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      Abstract: Toward the end of King Richard, the camera follows Venus Williams as she walks down a hallway in the Oakland Coliseum Arena. The scene invites viewers to focus their full attention on Venus as she prepares to take part in her first professional tennis tournament at the age of fourteen. By placing her at the center of the frame, the attention is not only on her calm confidence, but her signature look: braided hair adorned with beads, a style rooted in Black girl aesthetics. Years later, at a 1999 match at the Australian Open, an umpire would call Venus Williams's beaded hair a "distraction"—a word Venus, her sister Serena, and father Richard Williams understood all too well as they navigated a predominately white ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Heartland (2007–2021 and ongoing) (review)

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      Abstract: Heartland is set in the province of Alberta, and the location—a cattle ranch—looks out at the spectacular, soaring, snow-covered peaks of the Rockies. The ranch owner and patriarchal centerpiece of the fictional drama—based on a twenty-five-volume series written by Lauren Brooke—is Jack Bartlett, a former all-round rodeo champion. His son-in-law, Tim Fleming, is also a one-time star rodeo performer forced into an early retirement as a result of serious injuries incurred in steer wrestling. Tim Fleming finds himself only able to compete if he takes heavy doses of painkillers. His excessive use of these substances results in him becoming an addict and having to undergo years of counseling, self-help, and group ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The History of American College Football: Institutional Policy, Culture,
           and Reform by Christian K. Anderson, and Amber C. Falluca (review)

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      Abstract: The History of American College Football informs us that a 1925 Harvard Crimson editorial wrote, "The present evil of football is in its overemphasis in the college. It is in the college, therefore, that remedies must be sought and found" (76). Colleges and universities have faced this conundrum since football's rise to prominence in the late 1800s and continue to struggle with the place of football in their institutions.This collection of ten chapters by ten separate authors examines how academic institutions, both individually and collectively, have struggled with finding the precise limits and roles of football teams within their broader academic mission. One contributor notes, "Over time, the tension between ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Passing the Baton: Black Women Track Stars and American Identity by Cat.
           M. Ariail (review)

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      Abstract: Passing the Baton frames the intersectionality of femininity and athleticism through an examination of the challenges experienced by Black women who compete in track and field. Sport historians will appreciate Cat Ariail's use of a historical timeline of Black women's accomplishments in track and field to express the golden age of athletic competition. Another bonus to this book is the notes section at the end of the book. The notes could be used as a guide toward continuing research on Black women in track and field, as the author thoughtfully provided thorough details on each section of the book.Insightfully, the introduction grabs the attention of the reader through teasing topics like boundaries of belonging ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Black Athlete in West Virginia: High School and College Sports from
           1900 through the End of Segregation by Bob Barnett et al. (review)

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      Abstract: As of 2021, West Virginia's two Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Bluefield State and West Virginia State, are the only two in the country that have a majority white student body. Both compete today in NCAA Division II intercollegiate sports and receive much less funding than the state's largest public colleges, Marshall University and West Virginia University. Despite such demographic and financial changes in the past fifty years of West Virginia higher education, there is a rich history of African American colleges and high schools in the state, and this is especially true for African American athletic achievement. For example, the Pittsburgh Courier voted Bluefield State in 1927 and 1928 and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Idea of Sport in Western Culture from Antiquity to the Contemporary by
           Saverio Battente (review)

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      Abstract: Saverio Battente's book is a bold, fascinating, and too often exasperating investigation into the longue durée links between Greek, Roman, and modern European sport. He aims to "reflect on the idea of sport in the contemporary era through synchronic and diachronic comparisons among various locations and time periods, attempting to identify longues durées as well as original and innovative aspects" (ix). Battente argues that there are significant continuities in the way that Europeans used sport to educate elites and popular classes, prepare for war, and as leisure. He considers how sportspeople across the continent played with these continuities and ruptures to continually redefine sport and its purposes.Battente's ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Fastest Game in the World: Hockey and the Globalization of Sports by
           Bruce Berglund (review)

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      Abstract: In a cultural climate where sports figures are both castigated and lauded for appearing overtly political, Bruce Berglund demonstrates that "arena gates cannot lock out the forces of political and economic tumult" (82). Berglund's book, The Fastest Game in the World, is a captivating read: altogether a history of the development of hockey locally and globally; a comparison of international styles; an exploration of the role of hockey in world history; and an examination of the growth of the hockey community, from the professional leagues such as the National Hockey League and the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL) (and their fans) to youth hockey in North America (and its parents). Berglund examines the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • From Football to Soccer: The Early History of the Beautiful Game in the
           United States by Brian D. Bunk (review)

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      Abstract: The United States women's national soccer team claimed four FIFA World Cup trophies and four Olympic gold medals from 1991 through 2021, a three-decade run of success unmatched in international association football tournaments by any other women's or men's national team. Major League Soccer celebrated a quarter-century of continuous operation in 2020, showing that professional soccer can exist and thrive in American communities. Television networks pay billions of dollars each year for the rights to broadcast European domestic leagues and UEFA Champions League matches to American audiences. Yet the perception that the United States remains a disinterested exception among a world of soccer-mad nations, advanced most ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Degrees of Difficulty: How Women's Gymnastics Rose to Prominence and Fell
           from Grace by Georgia Cervin (review)

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      Abstract: Since the late twentieth century, gymnastics has been "must-see" television during the summer Olympics, alongside swimming and track and field. All three sports garner huge ratings and, not coincidentally, feature American excellence. This is particularly true for gymnastics; Sunisa Lee's performance in the 2020 Tokyo games made her the fifth American woman in a row to win gold in the individual all-around. However, as Georgia Cervin reminds readers in Degrees of Difficulty: How Women's Gymnastics Rose to Prominence and Fell from Grace, the popularity of gymnastics and American dominance are not only of recent origin but came at great cost to both the athletes and the sport.Gymnastics gained prominence during the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Critical Reflections on Physical Culture at the Edges of Empire ed. by
           Francois Johannes Cleophas (review)

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      Abstract: Francois Johannes Cleophas has assembled an engaging and compelling anthology in Critical Reflections: On Physical Culture at the Edges of Empire. Through twelve chapters, established, independent, and early career scholars attend to numerous ways of knowing the imperial project. It is a wide decolonial perspective on the marginalized and the oppressed in African, European, Pacific, Australian, and Asian contexts founded upon the idea that any "gains made" (or when people "set up for failure succeed" [91]) cannot be divorced from the "baggage of coloniality" (1). The centering of the marginal is at the core of the anthology. An important contribution here is how contributors work from the notion (articulated by ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sport, Film and National Culture ed. by Seán Crosson (review)

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      Abstract: Sport, Film and National Culture, edited by Seán Crosson, provides fourteen contributions to the discussion of how sport has been used within film as a tool to promote national culture. As Crosson notes in his introduction, "[S]port films are rarely primarily about sport" (3). He argues that sport films typically lack global impact but make up for this at the national level. Be that as this may, filmography featuring sport can help promote national cultures on a global level—if nothing else, educating and providing insight of a particular national culture to a global audience.The book is split into three parts: "Sport, Cinema, and National Culture in the USA," "The European Experience," and "Beyond Hollywood and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • More than Medals: A History of the Paralympics and Disability Sport in
           Postwar Japan by Dennis J. Frost (review)

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      Abstract: Tokyo enjoys a unique privilege in Paralympic history, becoming the first city to host two summer Paralympic games: one in 1964 and the other in 2020/2021. But between these periods is a rich legacy of disability sport in Japan, which has received little attention in English-language academic study. Dennis J. Frost's recent publication, More than Medals, addresses this gap, presenting an ambitious look at a variety of disability sports events in the country between 1964 and 2020—including the two aforementioned summer Paralympic games, the 1998 winter Paralympics in Nagano, the annual Ōita Wheelchair Marathon, and the pan-Asian FESPIC (Far East and South Pacific) games. Yet, Frost's analysis is much broader in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sport History: The Basics by Gerald R. Gems (review)

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      Abstract: The Routledge series of guidebooks aims to offer "an overview of the fundamental principles of a subject area in a jargon free and undaunting format" (front matter). Sport History: The Basics is one of the latest in this series. Its author, Gerald Gems, is a respected and prolifically published scholar in the field of sport history.The extensive bibliographic materials make a significant contribution to the field. Each chapter contains content-specific materials, and, at the conclusion, there is an exhaustive bibliography surveying the historical literature well beyond the scope of the book. The only limitation of these materials comes from the lag time between completion of the manuscript and the publication ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Sports Revolution: How Texas Changed the Culture of American Athletics
           by Frank Andre Guridy (review)

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      Abstract: Texas is usually at the center of United States history. Whether it was as one of the causes for the Mexican–American War or the setting for the landmark ruling of Roe vs. Wade, which legalized abortion, the state has played and continues to play a significant role in the shaping of the nation. As Perry Como's 1942 hit tune begins, "The stars at night are big and bright (fast clap 4 times) deep in the heart of Texas!" In Frank Andre Guridy's book, The Sports Revolution: How Texas Changed the Culture of American Athletics, the sports stars were indeed big and bright. Add the emergence of the commercialization of sport, the economic investments, and the pioneering visionaries in Texas in the 1960s and 1970s, and the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Faster, Higher, Stronger, Comrades! Sports, Art, and Ideology in Late
           Russian and Early Soviet Culture by Tim Harte (review)

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      Abstract: Around the globe, sports have dominated the twenty-first century in many ways, and the seeds for this cultural sports takeover were sewn by the dawn of the Cold War. While historians and sports fans are familiar with the athletic realms in the US and probably some other nations as well, not many quite understand the twentieth-century origins of sports as a sociocultural phenomenon in Russia. Thankfully, Bryn Mawr provost Tim Harte—in his academic capacity as a professor of Russian in Comparative Literature—provides tremendous insight and analysis with the publication of his latest book, Faster, Higher, Stronger, Comrades! Sports, Art, and Ideology in Late Russian and Early Soviet Culture. Harte argues athletics (as ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The History of Physical Culture in Ireland by Conor Heffernan (review)

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      Abstract: Conor Heffernan's The History of Physical Culture in Ireland explores the rise of physical culture in the Emerald Isle in the late nineteenth century and traces its uniquely nuanced and, at times, fractured development over the following four decades, as the small island nation transitioned from a single state to one partitioned. In doing so, the author unpacks how the wider global phenomenon of physical culture manifested itself in the Irish context by looking at how physical culture reflected and influenced Irish social, cultural, and political realities and through examining the intersection between local and global physical culture practices in the areas of military, policing, education, and recreation.Drawing ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Disability, the Media and the Paralympic Games by Carolyn Jackson-Brown
           (review)

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      Abstract: In the past few decades, the proliferation of scholarly writing involving the past and present of the Paralympic Games and disability athletics has extended sport historians' horizons. However, the representation of disabled bodies in the cultural history of sport has rarely been discussed in detail. British media scholar Carolyn Jackson-Brown's newest monograph, Disability, the Media and the Paralympic Games, takes an inspiring and informative perspective on the issue. Her research casts light on the cooperation and competitions between multiple parties, including media professionals, national authorities, private sectors, and disabled people, in the production and meanings of normalized and super-humanized ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sports and Politics: Commodification, Capitalist Exploitation, and
           Political Agency ed. by Frank Jacob (review)

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      Abstract: Not since the 1960s have sports and politics been so intertwined in the public consciousness. Protests connected to the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement and the horrifying revelations within women's gymnastics, to name just two, have advanced the profile of athletes and the causes they represent like never before. As such, this is a propitious time for the publication of Frank Jacob's edited volume Sports and Politics: Commodification, Capitalist Exploitation, and Political Agency. The collection aims not only to show the intersection of sports and politics but also to highlight the ways that exploitation and corruption have shaped sports both past and present.Section I focuses on the role of political corruption ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Before March Madness: The Wars for the Soul of College Basketball by Kurt
           Edward Kemper (review)

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      Abstract: Kurt Kemper's history on the rise of college basketball is a valuable addition to the University of Illinois Press's "Sport and Society" series. Kemper has thoroughly researched the archives of the various institutions that have governed intercollegiate sports. It is a complicated story of competing regions, schools, conferences, tournaments, and governing bodies. Kemper writes for an academic audience, and some of the minutiae of bureaucratic infighting might bog down the general reader. Nonetheless, he clearly delineates the important milestones in the evolution of the men's college basketball system, dominated today by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).The villain in the story is the NCAA ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Women's Artistic Gymnastics: Socio-Cultural Perspectives ed. by Rosly Kerr
           et al. (review)

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      Abstract: In recent years, media coverage of women's artistic gymnastics (WAG) has increased immensely. On the one hand, a reason for this is its rising popularity in many countries; tickets for international championships sell out quickly, and TV ratings also indicate that WAG enjoys a large, stable fan base. On the other hand, WAG has stirred enormous controversy. The conviction of Larry Nassar, the US gymnastics team doctor, for sexually abusing female gymnasts, and the suicide of the team's former coach, John Geddert, generated both increased public awareness of the sometimes problematic coach–athlete relationship in this sport and a new, stronger self-confidence among athletes to come forward and resist sexism and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Power and Politics in World Athletics: A Critical History by Jörg
           Krieger (review)

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      Abstract: The International Amateur Athletics Federation (IAAF) has escaped the kind of scholarly attention that has been given to the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA) and the International Olympic Committee (IOC). This is surprising because, as Jörg Krieger discusses in this monograph, elements of the organizational histories of the IOC and the IAAF overlap. Nonetheless, Krieger has now rectified this historiographical gap. The picture is not always a pretty one, and without Kreiger's work we may never have seen it at all. As the author discusses in the introduction, the IAAF was tetchy about offering access to its archives in the first place.Krieger's thesis is that the IAAF has been autocratically ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Age of Fitness: How the Body Came to Symbolize Success and Achievement
           by Jürgen Martschukat (review)

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      Abstract: In the wake of several books published over the last decade on the history of United States fitness, historian Jürgen Martschukat offers an international examination of the subject by considering German and American fitness cultures in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Originally published in German in 2019, Martschukat's volume synthesizes a broad array of primary and secondary literature in chapters that, while not organized strictly chronologically, provide a multilayered narrative and advance critical perspectives on several themes in contemporary Western fitness. Chapters such as "Working," "Having Sex," and "Fighting" follow introductory sections that establish context for recent historical ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Fighting Visibility: Sports Media and Female Athletes in the UFC by
           Jennifer McClearen (review)

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      Abstract: In writing Fighting Visibility: Sports Media and Female Athletes in the UFC, Jennifer McClearen brings together her positionality as a feminist media scholar and as an athlete practicing martial arts for fourteen years within a community that includes MMA fighters and fans. Her research takes into account the surprising inclusion of women in the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) while also exploring how UFC functions as a millennial sports media brand. Central to McClearen's study is her concept of "branded difference," denoting the marketing strategies used to brand particular UFC fighters on the basis of their visible and articulated differences of gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.Branded difference ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Racing for America: The Horse Race of the Century and the Redemption of a
           Sport by James C. Nicholson (review)

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      Abstract: Racing for America covers the events and the lives of the characters leading up to the "International Race," a 1923 horse race held in New York that had the largest purse in horse racing history at the time: $100,000. The two-horse race, or "match race," was between the 1923 American Kentucky Derby and Belmont Stakes winner Zev and 1923 British Derby winner (referred to throughout the book as the "Epsom Derby" or "English Derby" to lessen confusion with the Kentucky Derby) Papryus. Both were considered the top horses in their countries at the time. The title "Racing for America" comes from a quote from Zev's owner Harry Sinclair, emphasizing the importance of the nationality of the horse to American pride, while ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Egypt's Football Revolution: Emotion, Masculinity, and Uneasy Politics by
           Carl Rommel (review)

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      Abstract: Carl Rommel, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Helsinki, has written an intriguing anthropological study on Egyptian football and politics set against the background of the 2011 Egyptian revolution. Using media analysis, interviews, and fieldwork, this study reveals how prevailing political and emotional attitudes toward the game changed after Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak's fall. Rommel's central argument revolves around what he refers to as an "emotionally charged and highly politicized 'bubble'" (2): the intertwining of Egyptian football with the Mubarak family's political agenda, with hegemonic masculinity, and with an outpouring of uncontrolled emotion. When the regime fell and the bubble ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Myth of the Amateur: A History of College Athletic Scholarships by
           Ronald A. Smith (review)

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      Abstract: Amateurism in American college athletics never existed. From the earliest intercollegiate sports contests in the middle of the nineteenth century, athletes were compensated. The payment might have come as money, prizes, food, tuition, or in other forms, but it was always there. Within a decade of the initial competitions, coaches were paid to lead teams, often earning more for seasonal work than full-time professors or even college presidents made in a year. The myth of a pristine era when American college students played competitive sport for the sheer joy of participation never existed, but it did create an obvious discrepancy between that ideal and the professional reality that continues today.As with his other ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Racism, Activism, and Integrity in College Football: The Bates Must Play
           Movement by Donald Spivey (review)

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      Abstract: This book focuses on the massive student protest at New York University (NYU) in 1940–41 against the administration's refusal to allow the football team's African American star, Leonard Bates, to accompany it to play at the University of Missouri, which did not admit Blacks. It was standard practice for northern universities to withdraw their Black athletes from competitions at southern schools. If the southern school requested the withdrawal when they were the visiting team up north, their northern opponent often complied. In this case study, Donald Spivey provides insight into racist practices in college sports and how a student movement challenged them in the period and emerged as a potent force.Spivey's ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Emergence of Football: Sport, Culture and Society in the Nineteenth
           Century by Peter Swain (review)

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      Abstract: Peter Swain's monograph The Emergence of Football: Sport, Culture and Society in the Nineteenth Century makes an important contribution to one of the major ongoing debates within the historiography of soccer. This centers on the significance afforded to the public schools and their former pupils in the codification of the game, its spread, and the extent to which forms of folk football had died out by the 1830s. The book is structured around ten chapters. Following the introduction, chapter 1 examines the earliest evidence for football in Britain. Swain carefully chronicles its presence from (possibly) the twelfth century onward, mainly through evidence of government legislation and rulers' attempts to curtail its ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sport and the Home Front: Wartime Britain at Play, 1939–45 by
           Matthew Taylor (review)

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      Abstract: The Second World War continues to occupy an important position in Britain's collective memory and national mythology. During the so-called people's war, Britons united to support the war effort and defend the nation and its values. As COVID-19 brought Britain—and the world—to a standstill, it was, therefore, no surprise to see public figures call for the "blitz spirit" or to read ventilators described as spitfires and private laboratories as "Dunkirk little ships." Nevertheless, as Matthew Taylor observes in the introduction to Sport and the Home Front: Wartime Britain at Play, 1939–45, scholars have been slow to explore the war's sporting history. Even as historians of the conflict turned to culture and leisure to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Discredited: The UNC Scandal and College Athletics' Amateur Ideal by Andy
           Thomason (review)

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      Abstract: This second book on the early twenty-first century athletic-academic scandal at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill follows that of UNC history professor Jay Smith and whistleblower Mary Willingham, who in 2015 published Cheated: The UNC Scandal, the Education of Athletes, and the Future of Big-Time College Sports. Discredited: The UNC Scandal and College Athletics' Amateur Ideal is authored by journalist Andy Thomason, a Chapel Hill graduate, a former editor of the UNC student newspaper, and presently an assistant managing editor at the Chronicle of Higher Education. Both books focus on the fraudulent African and Afro-American studies program used to keep athletes eligible principally in the two ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Strength Coaching in America: A History of the Innovation That Transformed
           Sports by Jason Shurley et al. (review)

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      Abstract: Debates about strength training as a means of improving health and augmenting sport performances remain to this day a topic of popular conversation and scientific inquiry. How much muscle is too much muscle' Is augmenting strength to achieve maximum athletic performance through the use of performance-enhancing drugs safe and healthy' These are the types of questions that drive conversations online and throughout the pages of popular health-and-fitness magazines, documentaries, videos, and academic research journals.In the second half of the twentieth century, college athletic departments around the country placed an emphasis on strength conditioning programs to gain advantage. In Strength Coaching in America, the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sir Stanley Rous and the Growth of World Football: An Englishman Abroad by
           Alan Tomlinson (review)

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      Abstract: When the growth of a sport is discussed, it is often addressed in the context of seminal games and/or players that helped elevate said sport to its current status in the national or international collectiveness. In Sir Stanley Rous and the Growth of World Football: An Englishman Abroad, sport historian Alan Tomlinson tells the story of a man who rose from modest roots to climb football's governing ladder and become the president of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), where he helped launch the World Cup from a notable quadrennial event to the global phenomenon it is today. Tomlinson notes, "This book is about much more than Rous himself, as all individuals are both made by and makers of places ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Athlete as National Symbol: Critical Essays on Sports in the
           International Arena ed. by Nicholas Villanueva Jr. (review)

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      Abstract: This diverse collection of nine essays, written mostly by sociologists and anthropologists, covers a wide variety of sporting activities and geographical spaces. According to the editor, the book "hopes to provide critical thinking about sport and its place in society," especially its relationship to nationalism (1). All the essays certainly meet this minimum aspiration expressed in the volume's subtitle, but only some deal directly with its central theme of athletes as national symbols. As often happens with edited publications, the articles vary somewhat in quality, depth of research, and sophistication, although most pay homage to Benedict Anderson's and Eric Hobsbawm's theoretical insights concerning imagined ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Memphis Hoops: Race and Basketball in the Bluff City, 1968–1997 by
           Keith B. Wood (review)

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      Abstract: Modern college basketball fans can be forgiven if they associate the hoops history of the University of Memphis (formerly Memphis State) with Anfernee "Penny" Hardaway or Derrick Rose instead of Larry Finch. But in the early 1970s, as Keith Wood explains in Memphis Hoops, Memphians saw Finch, a star player for the Tigers, as a hometown hero able to unite a racially divided community. White and Black fans alike cheered on Finch and his teammates as they advanced to the 1973 NCAA title game, where they lost to the powerhouse UCLA Bruins squad. This biracial coalition, however, was short-lived and could not be replicated by other local basketball teams in the 1970s or 1980s as city leaders struggled with issues of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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