Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1397 journals)
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    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (161 journals)
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    - LAW (843 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (11 journals)

CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 160 of 160 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Criminologica : Southern African Journal of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Cement Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 362)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Annual Review of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 406)
Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 351)
Biometric Technology Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Boletín Criminológico     Open Access  
Brill Research Perspectives in Transnational Crime     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 399)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Graduate Journal of Sociology and Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice / La Revue canadienne de criminologie et de justice pénale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 258)
Champ pénal/Penal field     Open Access  
Computer Fraud & Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 286)
Computer Law & Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Contemporary Challenges : The Global Crime, Justice and Security Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Justice Review: Issues in Criminal, Social, and Restorative Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Corrections : Policy, Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Crime & Delinquency     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Crime and Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Crime Prevention and Community Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 110)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Crime Science     Open Access   (Followers: 56)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Crime, Security and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Criminal Justice and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Criminal Justice Matters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Criminal Justice Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Criminal Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Criminal Law Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Criminocorpus, revue hypermédia     Open Access  
Criminological Studies     Open Access  
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Criminology and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Crítica Penal y Poder     Open Access  
Critical Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Cryptologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Datenschutz und Datensicherheit - DuD     Hybrid Journal  
Delito y Sociedad : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Derecho Penal y Criminología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Detection     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
EDPACS: The EDP Audit, Control, and Security Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
Estudios Penales y Criminológicos     Open Access  
EURASIP Journal on Information Security     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 271)
European Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
European Journal of Probation     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Polygraph     Open Access  
European Review of Organised Crime     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Feminist Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Forensic Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 361)
Forensic Science International : Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forensic Science International: Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 283)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Homicide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
IEEE Security & Privacy Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Incarceration     Full-text available via subscription  
Information Security Journal : A Global Perspective     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Annals of Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
International Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Criminal Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Applied Cryptography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Criminology and Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Information and Coding Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Police Science and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 313)
International Journal of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Victimology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Journal of Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Computer Virology and Hacking Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Correctional Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Criminal Justice Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 126)
Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Criminology and Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292)
Journal of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 369)
Journal of Gender-Based Violence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Illicit Economies and Development     Open Access  
Journal of International Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Penal Law & Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Perpetrator Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 417)
Journal of Quantitative Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Strategic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Justice Evaluation Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Justice Research and Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Kriminologia ikasten : Irakaskuntzarako aldizkaria     Open Access  
Kriminologisches Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Innovation and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Nordic Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Occasional Series in Criminal Justice and International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Police Journal : Theory, Practice and Principles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 320)
Police Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 298)
Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 296)
Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 327)
Policy & Internet     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Política Criminal     Open Access  
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Punishment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Research and Reports in Forensic Medical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Arbitrada de Ciencias Jurídicas y Criminalísticas Iustitia Socialis     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Criminalística     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Jurídicos y Criminológicos     Open Access  
Revista de Movimentos Sociais e Conflitos     Open Access  
Revista Digital de la Maestría en Ciencias Penales     Open Access  
Rivista di Studi e Ricerche sulla criminalità organizzata     Open Access  
Science & Global Security: The Technical Basis for Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation Initiatives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Security Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
South African Crime Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Theory and Practice of Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Trends in Organized Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 374)
URVIO - Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios de Seguridad     Open Access  
Women & Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 282)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Police Science and Management
Number of Followers: 313  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1461-3557 - ISSN (Online) 1478-1603
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Effects of empathy and question types on suspects’ provision of
           information in investigative interviews

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bianca Baker-Eck, Ray Bull
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      The current study examines the relationship between the extent of, and various types of, empathy and of questions on suspects’ provision of information in 16 real-life police interviews. Multiple linear regressions were conducted to: predict suspects’ information provision in relation to (a) open questions, (b) the extent of displayed empathy and (c) each of the empathy types. Verbatim transcriptions of police interviews with suspects of sexual offences were coded for: (a) the extent and types of interviewer empathy, (b) the proportionality of interviewer open versus closed questions, and (c) suspects’ information provision. It was found that the proportion of open (versus closed) questions and the amount of empathy demonstrated by interviewers had a positive relationship with suspects’ information provision. The latter supports a recent finding by the authors involving a different sample of police interviews. Whereas in a growing number of countries the training of police interviewers has been emphasizing use of open questions, the current study aids weight to the small amount of research literature on the importance of interviewer empathy. Indeed, the effectiveness of open questions might be influenced by the amount of interviewer empathy in an interview.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-07-18T03:53:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221106073
       
  • ‘If I’m not police, then who am I'’: About belonging and
           identity in the police

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      Authors: Cathrine Filstad
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates senses of belonging and the interrelation between belonging and identity in policing. We use Snap Log images and text of police leaders’ own interpretations of belonging at work. Belonging is relational, cultural, material and embedded in collective engagement, and is about being equals where everyone contributes. Engagement creates a strong emotional attachment to an idea of ‘us’ and of being part of something bigger than oneself. Belonging represents imaginations of the police mission and being proud to be part of that. It is about the ‘here and now’ and about taking care of each other when things are tough. The link between belonging and identifying with policing is further amplified through materiality and symbols, as commonly used in police leaders’ images. The sense of belonging to the police when wearing the same uniform and using the same artefacts and symbols becomes important for a person’s identity as a police officer.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T03:53:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221106099
       
  • The diffusion of police innovation: A case study of problem-oriented
           policing in England and Wales

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      Authors: Karen Bullock, Aiden Sidebottom, Gloria Laycock, Nick Tilley
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      There is significant evidence demonstrating that when done well, problem-oriented policing is associated with meaningful reductions in crime and public safety concerns. And yet, history shows that the implementation and delivery of problem-oriented policing is challenging, and that police organisations have generally not adopted it and even when they try to it is often rejected over time. This article draws on the concept of ‘diffusion of innovation’ (Rogers, E. (2003) Diffusion of Innovations, 5th edn. New York: Free Press) to unpick aspects of the processes through which problem-oriented policing has been adopted or otherwise among police forces in England and Wales. This article shows how factors related to the nature of problem-oriented policing – notably its incompatibility with prevailing norms and values of the police service, its complexity and unobservability – have influenced its adoption. Implications are also discussed.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:32:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221106084
       
  • From the aspirational to the tangible: Mapping key performance indicators
           in Australian policing

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      Authors: Kelly A Hine, Katelyn Davenport-Klunder
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      Police performance is particularly difficult to measure. Most police agencies tend to rely on traditional metrics of effectiveness (such as crime statistics and public surveys) which are recognised as being problematic by researchers and policing authorities. Policing too has shifted in recent times with a move away from reactive policing approaches towards more desirable proactive and community-orientated styles of policing. Subsequently, there is a growing body of research which proposes new and alternative methods of measuring police performance that addresses some of the problematic validity and reliability issues of the traditional metrics and incorporates these new policing styles. This study maps the key performance indicators reported by Australian policing agencies. It aims to identify what is being measured and how it is being measured. To do this, Australian policing agency annual reports were analysed both quantitatively with descriptive analysis and qualitatively using thematic analysis. Overall, the study found that although there are some attempts at incorporating new alternative metrics, policing agencies in Australia mostly rely on traditional metrics for reporting effectiveness. These findings are discussed in terms of opportunities to enhance or expand current reporting practices.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T06:17:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221106083
       
  • Why stay with the police' How meaningfulness in life moderates the
           mediated effects of role stressors’ appraisals on anxiety and intention
           to leave the State Brazilian Police

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      Authors: Cláudio V. Torres, Sharon Glazer, Francisco Guilherme L. Macedo, Thiago G. Nascimento
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      Brazilian police officers’ increasing levels of work anxiety and intention to leave the job are consistent with other police forces around the world. Among the important variables that appear to be antecedents of these unwanted organizational outcomes are increasing role stressors associated with police work. We conjecture that how police officers appraise stressors would affect whether adverse outcomes prevail. Specifically, stressors appraised as challenges result in weaker adverse outcomes compared with stressors appraised as hindrances. We also anticipate that a boundary condition that might further attenuate adverse outcomes is having meaningfulness in life (MIL). Likewise, having low MIL can intensify the potential adverse outcomes of stressors appraised as hindrances. This study aims to investigate how role stressors appraised as either challenges or hindrances may influence anxiety and intention to leave among state police officers in the Brazilian Federal District (DF), as well as implications of MIL as a moderator variable of these relationships. Our hypotheses supported the mediating effect of role stressors’ appraisals in their prediction of police officers’ anxiety and intention to leave their job, and the moderator effects of MIL in these same relationships. Findings are discussed in terms of changes in police regulations and training programs aimed at increasing officers’ MIL and coping strategies to redirect how they appraise role stressors as challenges rather than as hindrances, which may lead to a healthier work experience for DF State Police officers.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T02:18:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221089564
       
  • Perceptions of police performance in a rapid-growth community

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      Authors: Carol M Huynh
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to assess citizens’ perceptions of police performance in a small, rural community that is experiencing rapid population growth. This unique setting differs from other cities and towns because of the pressure that it places on local police to respond quickly and effectively to rapid social changes. A multi-stage random sampling technique was used to gather 380 surveys completed by residents living in Williston, North Dakota during the fall of 2015. The findings revealed that, in general, residents believed that the police were doing a good job addressing community concerns; however, the analysis also revealed that such views were impacted by previous victimization experiences and fear of victimization. In addition, the results indicated that participant sex was significantly related to the perceived ability of police to maintain order on the streets, whereas marital status and the frequency of reading the regional newspaper were significantly related to the perceived ability of police to control crime in the neighborhood.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T08:57:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221089559
       
  • Due process in police-led prosecutions: Views of Ghanaian police
           prosecutors

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      Authors: Moses Agaawena Amagnya
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      Criminal prosecutions led by police officers are integral to justice delivery in some common-law countries. The cooperation and participation of interested parties, particularly victims and witnesses, are important for successful prosecutions because most police prosecutors are not lawyers. Prosecutors adherence to due process when handling cases can secure parties’ willing cooperation and participation. However, is due processes followed during police-led prosecutions of criminal cases' This study uses interview data from police prosecutors to explore police-led prosecutions in Ghana. Results show that police prosecutors do not pay significant attention to pre-trial conferencing with disputed parties. In addition, prosecutors non-adherence to due process is aggravated by irregular training and professional development, inadequate professional competence, and lack of pre-trial procedural uniformity and clarity. Finally, the article discusses the implication of the results for theory and police prosecution policies.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T06:32:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221089562
       
  • The effectiveness of standardized investigative tactics in clearing
           non-fatal shooting investigations

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      Authors: Scott W Phillips, Greg M Drake, Irshad Altheimer
      First page: 239
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      Much research explores the correlates of clearing fatal shooting incidents. It is suggested that common investigative resources and tactics, such as the number of detectives and witness interviews, may be associated with clearing both fatal and non-fatal shooting cases. This study examines the effect of a standardized list of investigative tools in the clearing of non-fatal shooting incidents. For this study, detectives from the Buffalo Police Department's Gun Violence Unit completed an “Investigative Checklist” for non-fatal shootings that occurred between November 2019 and December 2020 (N = 234 usable cases). Bivariate correlation analysis shows a strong association between uncooperative victims and a detective conducting multiple canvases as part of the investigation. Logistic regression shows that examining a suspect's social media information, and detectives accessing patrol car reports, contributed to successfully clearing a non-fatal shooting case. An uncooperative victim was negatively associated with clearing a case. Police practitioners should be aware, based on the findings of this and other research, that a small number of investigative techniques contribute to non-fatal shooting case clearance rates. It may be necessary for police agencies to construct detective units, and focus on a narrow set of investigative tactics, in a way that improved clearance rates in non-fatal shootings.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T04:31:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221074986
       
  • Physical fitness standards: An assessment of potential disparate impact
           for female state police applicants

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      Authors: Frederick A Williams, George E Higgins
      First page: 250
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      To improve diversity in hiring, this quantitative study examines the applicant physical fitness testing standards of the Kentucky State Police (KSP) to determine whether the test or specific events have a disparate impact for female state police applicants. A sample of 427 state police applicants was collected from applicant fitness testing conducted by the KSP between 2014 and 2019. Bivariate analysis was used to compare the output of males and females. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors for passing fitness testing. The results show a potential disparate impact based upon significant performance differences in three of the five fitness events: bench press, 300-meter run, and push-ups. Predictors for passing applicant fitness testing were being male, having a lower body weight and having 2 years of military service. Sex was found to be a predictor for passing push-ups and 300-meter run. Recommendations suggest amending the fitness events, establishing equitable scoring criteria based upon sex without averaging, and reassessment and evaluation. Provisions for evaluation were provided.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T09:47:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221074984
       
  • Revisiting the Ferguson effect: Law enforcement perception of recruitment
           in the post George Floyd era

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      Authors: Christopher Copeland, Alex del Carmen, Olga B. Semukhina
      First page: 261
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      Mainstream media have argued that prolonged and harsh criticism of police officers prompted by death of Michael Brown at the hands of Ferguson police has had a major negative effect on the US law enforcement community. This phenomenon, known as the “Ferguson effect”, was exacerbated in the following years by the availability of other violent public–police interactions propagated through social media. The academic literature found almost no evidence that the Ferguson effect had any impact on crime rates and only limited evidence that it resulted in de-policing in the United States. Missing from this conversation is research on how the Ferguson effect impacted the ability of police departments to maintain staffing levels and recruit new officers nationwide. This article fills this gap in the research literature by examining levels of officer retention and recruitment from an organizational perspective. Police chiefs in Texas were surveyed about their perceptions of the Ferguson effect on department recruitment and retention efforts. The results found that the Ferguson effect is related to increased difficulty in officer recruitment but its impact is relatively small when compared with traditional recruitment challenges such as limited budgets and competitive job markets. The findings also reported no impact of the Ferguson effect on police departments’ retention issues. This article discusses these findings within the scope and context of George Floyd's death and current civil rights issues in the United States.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T09:48:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221074988
       
  • Factors that predict the referral of adult Modern Day Slavery cases to the
           UK's National Referral Mechanism

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      Authors: Freya O’Brien, Sasha Palmer, Victoria Blinkhorn
      First page: 273
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      There is a high drop-out or attrition rate of Modern Day Slavery (MDS) cases in the Criminal Justice System although there has been a paucity of academic research examining the factors that could be related to this attrition. Similar work has been carried out examining attrition in rape cases (Feist A, Ashe J, Lawrence J et al. (2007) Investigating and detecting recorded offences of rape. Home Office Online Research Report, 18/07. London: Home Office). The aim of this study was to examine whether factors of MDS cases were associated with and could predict referral to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM) (either by the police or other agencies). Two hundred and sixteen suspected cases of MDS were examined, 29 of which had been referred to the NRM. Content analysis was used to extract variables from the cases. These pertained to aspects of the offence (e.g. types of exploitation, offender strategies), the victim (e.g. gender, ability to speak English), and the offender (e.g. details on any recruiter, transporter and exploiter). Cases were more likely to be referred when the victim was locked, controlled or had their movement restricted, not recruited in the UK, when the trafficking flow was non-domestic, when debt bondage had occurred and when the recruiter was not in the UK when they recruited the victim. Cases were less likely to be referred when sexual exploitation was suspected, there was more than one victim and when the exploitation was thought to be occurring/have occurred in a brothel, massage parlour and or via a website. These findings may indicate that certain victims are more likely to come forward and/or that the cases are more likely to be considered MDS by those investigating the cases. Recommendations for practice include a consideration of the best way to handle suspected cases of sexual exploitation, considering adopting investigative strategies from domestic violence investigations, proactively addressing the gaps in the data and better linking of data. Limitations and future research ideas are discussed.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-02-17T04:39:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221074989
       
  • Is the blue wall of silence a fallacy in cases of police sexual
           misconduct'

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      Authors: Fay Sweeting, Terri Cole, Peter Hills
      First page: 285
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      Police sexual misconduct encompasses a range of behaviours: from sexually inappropriate language directed towards colleagues or members of the public to engaging in sexual relationships with vulnerable members of the public. All types of police misconduct are thought to be under-reported, in part because of the ‘blue wall of silence’ where police officers fail to report colleagues’ wrongdoing for reasons of loyalty and a fear of retribution. A sample of 382 English police officers were invited to assess eight fictional police sexual misconduct scenarios to ascertain whether the scenario was a breach of the Code of Ethics, the expected level of discipline and if they would report the officer. Reporting likelihood was increased when officers perceived the scenario to be a breach of the Code of Ethics and worthy of a higher level of discipline. Female officers were more likely to report sexual misconduct than male officers, and scenarios involving direct colleagues were less likely to be reported. Non-reporting was greatest for sexual harassment between colleagues and the seriousness of this behaviour was minimised as justification for non-reporting. Use of confidential reporting was minimal with direct reporting to a line manager to be the preferred option.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T08:24:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221085504
       
  • Operating outside the spirit of the law: How police employ “legal”
           standards to justify questionable searches and seizures

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      Authors: Esther Nir, Siyu Liu
      First page: 298
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      The Fourth Amendment protects individuals against unreasonable searches and seizures. Over the years, court precedents have guided determinations of reasonableness and provided a legal structure for police to follow. In two influential decisions, the Supreme Court validated pretextual traffic stops in which the motorist committed a minor traffic violation (Whren v United States, 1996), and established the standard of reasonable suspicion for brief investigatory stops and limited weapon searches (Terry v Ohio, 1968). Using 42 suppression motions filed in a US state, we examine whether and how police apply these legal parameters to case patterns to justify stops, searches and seizures. We find that police use pretexts to justify traffic stops, and often rely on conclusory and laconic descriptions to support determinations of reasonable suspicion. Although often upheld by courts, these applications of the law are contrary to the spirit of the Fourth Amendment.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-03-14T03:04:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221085499
       
  • The protective role of self-esteem on burnout and depression symptoms
           among police officers: A path analysis approach

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      Authors: Georgios Pikoulas, Diana Charila, Tzavellas Elias
      First page: 313
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the effect of self-esteem on burnout symptoms and depression, using a path analysis approach. A total of 396 Greek police officers, 145 female and 251 male, with a mean age of 37.7 years, participated in the study. The questionnaire included: (a) social–demographic characteristics, (b) Rosenberg's self-esteem scale, (c) Zung's depression scale, and (d) Maslach's burnout scale. Analysis of variance was applied to find whether the demographic variables of gender, age and urban/rural location had a significant effect on the examined psychometric scales. A path model was then tested, aiming to quantify the direct and indirect effects of age, working location and self-esteem on depression and burnout symptoms. Emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment scores were found to have a direct effect on depression and completely explained the effect of urban area on depression. Self-esteem was found to be a significant regressor on depression and the three burnout subscales, while older and more experienced officers had significantly lower burnout symptoms. The findings of the study confirm the protective role of self-esteem. The findings also confirmed that police officers working in an urban environment are at a greater risk of developing burnout and depression symptoms, while the depressed feelings of police officers in an urban area are completely explained by increased feelings of burnout. The ability of police officers to counteract the psycho-emotional pressure of their profession as they age in service is demonstrated. The need for initiatives aiming to support young officers and police personnel working in large cities is indicated.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T06:35:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221089569
       
  • Police use of facial recognition technology: The potential for engaging
           the public through co-constructed policy-making

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      Authors: Dallas Hill, Christopher D O’Connor, Andrea Slane
      First page: 325
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Ahead of Print.
      In the face of rapid technological development of investigative technologies, broader and more meaningful public engagement in policy-making is paramount. In this article, we identify police procurement and use of facial recognition technology (FRT) as a key example of the need for public input to avoid undermining trust in law enforcement. Specifically, public engagement should be incorporated into police decisions regarding the acquisition, use, and assessment of the effectiveness of FRT, via an oversight framework that incorporates citizen stakeholders. Genuine public engagement requires sufficient and accurate information to be openly available at the outset, and the public must be able to dialogue and discuss their perspectives and ideas with others. The approach outlined in this article could serve as a model for addressing policy development barriers that often arise in relation to privacy invasive technologies and their uses by police.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T08:57:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557221089558
       
  • How the interplay between organisational ‘culture’ and ‘climate’
           shapes police officers’ perceptions of community policing

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      Authors: Liam Fenn, Karen Bullock
      Pages: 227 - 238
      Abstract: International Journal of Police Science & Management, Volume 24, Issue 3, Page 227-238, September 2022.
      This article draws on interview data and the concepts of organisational ‘culture’ and ‘climate’ to critically assess police officers’ perceptions of community policing in one English constabulary. In so doing, it considers the cultural, organisational and wider contextual determinants of officers’ alignment to this style of police work. With an emphasis on developing community partnerships and engaging in problem-solving, rather than enforcement of the criminal law, community policing has been seen a primary way of rendering officers more ‘responsive’ to the needs of citizens, improving police–community relations and driving down crime rates. An important reform movement in police organisations around the world, the success of community policing nonetheless depends on officers’ willingness and ability to deliver it. Accordingly, the generation of evidence about the ‘drivers’ of officers’ attitudes to inform strategies to promote the delivery of the approach is essential. Findings suggest that officers value community policing as an organisational strategy but that the approach maintains a low status and is undervalued compared with other specialisms within the organisation. This is born of an organisational culture that foregrounds law enforcement as the primary function of police work and an organisational climate that reinforces it. This has implications for community officers in terms of their perceptions of and attitudes towards the approach, self-esteem and sense of value and worth, perceptions of organisational justice, discretionary effort and role commitment. Recommendations for police managers are set out.
      Citation: International Journal of Police Science & Management
      PubDate: 2021-12-13T12:17:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14613557211064056
      Issue No: Vol. 24, No. 3 (2021)
       
 
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