Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1397 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (30 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (52 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (65 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (28 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (23 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (161 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (23 journals)
    - LAW (843 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (11 journals)

CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 160 of 160 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Criminologica : Southern African Journal of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Cement Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 360)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Annual Review of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 404)
Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 348)
Biometric Technology Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Boletín Criminológico     Open Access  
Brill Research Perspectives in Transnational Crime     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 398)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Graduate Journal of Sociology and Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice / La Revue canadienne de criminologie et de justice pénale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 256)
Champ pénal/Penal field     Open Access  
Computer Fraud & Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 281)
Computer Law & Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Contemporary Challenges : The Global Crime, Justice and Security Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Justice Review: Issues in Criminal, Social, and Restorative Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Corrections : Policy, Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Crime & Delinquency     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Crime and Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Crime Prevention and Community Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 109)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Crime Science     Open Access   (Followers: 57)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Crime, Security and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Criminal Justice and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Criminal Justice Matters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Criminal Justice Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Criminal Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Criminal Law Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Criminocorpus, revue hypermédia     Open Access  
Criminological Studies     Open Access  
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Criminology and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Crítica Penal y Poder     Open Access  
Critical Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Cryptologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Datenschutz und Datensicherheit - DuD     Hybrid Journal  
Delito y Sociedad : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Derecho Penal y Criminología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Detection     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
EDPACS: The EDP Audit, Control, and Security Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
Estudios Penales y Criminológicos     Open Access  
EURASIP Journal on Information Security     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 269)
European Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
European Journal of Probation     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Polygraph     Open Access  
European Review of Organised Crime     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Feminist Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Forensic Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358)
Forensic Science International : Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forensic Science International: Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 282)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Homicide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
IEEE Security & Privacy Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Incarceration     Full-text available via subscription  
Information Security Journal : A Global Perspective     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Annals of Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
International Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Criminal Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Applied Cryptography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Criminology and Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Information and Coding Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Police Science and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 312)
International Journal of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Victimology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Journal of Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Computer Virology and Hacking Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Correctional Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Criminal Justice Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 126)
Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Criminology and Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 288)
Journal of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 367)
Journal of Gender-Based Violence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Illicit Economies and Development     Open Access  
Journal of International Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Penal Law & Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Perpetrator Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 410)
Journal of Quantitative Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Strategic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Justice Evaluation Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Justice Research and Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Kriminologia ikasten : Irakaskuntzarako aldizkaria     Open Access  
Kriminologisches Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Innovation and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Nordic Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Occasional Series in Criminal Justice and International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Police Journal : Theory, Practice and Principles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 317)
Police Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 297)
Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292)
Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 324)
Policy & Internet     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Política Criminal     Open Access  
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Punishment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Research and Reports in Forensic Medical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Arbitrada de Ciencias Jurídicas y Criminalísticas Iustitia Socialis     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Criminalística     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Jurídicos y Criminológicos     Open Access  
Revista de Movimentos Sociais e Conflitos     Open Access  
Revista Digital de la Maestría en Ciencias Penales     Open Access  
Rivista di Studi e Ricerche sulla criminalità organizzata     Open Access  
Science & Global Security: The Technical Basis for Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation Initiatives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Security Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
South African Crime Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Theory and Practice of Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Trends in Organized Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 372)
URVIO - Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios de Seguridad     Open Access  
Women & Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 277)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2199-4641 - ISSN (Online) 2199-465X
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Correction to: Can Persistent Offenders Help Us Understand Desistance from
           Crime'

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      PubDate: 2022-06-27
       
  • From Childhood System Contact to Adult Criminal Conviction: Investigating
           Intersectional Inequalities using Queensland Administrative Data

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      Abstract: Abstract It is well known that youth justice contact is associated with criminal conviction in adulthood. What is less well understood is whether ‘cross-over’ children, who have contact with both child welfare and youth justice systems, experience relatively worse outcomes and, if so, whether these outcomes vary by important demographic factors, such as sex and race. Criminal careers scholars have examined patterns of adult convictions for different groups, but attempts to understand intersectional variation in these outcomes have been constrained by limitations of standard statistical analysis. Using administrative data from the Queensland Cross-sector Research Collaboration, we adopt a flexible regression model specification to explore the cumulative effects of both child welfare and youth justice contact on adult conviction trajectories, and how these associations vary by sex and Indigenous status. We find clear evidence across all demographic groups that contact with both justice and welfare systems in childhood is associated with increased likelihood and severity of conviction trajectories in adulthood. The cumulative effect of cross-over status results in greater equity of negative outcomes across groups, although the conviction profile is worst for Indigenous men. Evidence of an additional inequality is present only for non-Indigenous women, who have the lowest likelihood of conviction overall. We conclude that while cross-over children are at elevated risk of conviction in adulthood, the nature and seriousness of their conviction pathways is conditional on pre-existing intersectional inequalities. The model specification used is a promising method by which to explore the existence of such inequalities.
      PubDate: 2022-06-04
       
  • Cohort Profile: Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods and
           Its Additions (PHDCN+)

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      Abstract: Abstract The Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) began in the mid-1990s, using an accelerated longitudinal design and drawing a representative sample of over 6200 children from a total of seven birth cohorts (ages 0 to 18) living in Chicago. Participants were followed for a second and third wave of data collection ending in 1998 and 2002, respectively. Independent surveys and observations on Chicago neighborhoods were also conducted. In 2012, a random subsample from cohorts 0, 9, 12, and 15 was selected for further follow-up, resulting in 1057 wave 4 interviews. In 2021, a fifth wave was launched to locate and survey wave 4 respondents, resulting in 682 responses. The extension to waves 4 and 5, termed the PHDCN+, is the main focus of this cohort profile. Survey data were collected from many domains including, but not limited to, family relationships, exposure to violence and guns, neighborhood context, self-reported crime, encounters with the police, attitudes toward the law, health, and civic engagement. In addition, official criminal records were collected for 1995–2020. The resulting PHDCN+ data includes five waves of comprehensive survey data, residential histories, neighborhood contextual data, and criminal histories extending over 25 years for four cohorts differing in age by up to 15 years. The research design, measures, key findings from the cohort sequential design, and data access opportunities are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Can Persistent Offenders Help Us Understand Desistance from Crime'

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      Abstract: Abstract There is abundant evidence that desistance from crime is a process rather than an event and that it is often linked to specific life events (e.g., marriage, employment) and shifts in cognition and identity (Giordano et al., 2002; Loughran et al., 2017; Maruna, 2001; Sampson & Laub, 1993). The processual nature of desistance acknowledges that fact that individuals don’t immediately quit committing crimes but rather they can slow down, and even have relatively long periods abstaining from crime, before offending again (Laub & Sampson, 2003, p. 54; Bushway et al., 2001). Given this heterogeneity in offending patterns, we seek to determine what processes are responsible for an upturn in offending when an individual seems to be committed to long-term desistance' What are the immediate life circumstances and subjective appraisals that underpin a resurgence in offending' Using a sample of persistent offenders, we aim to shed new light on desistance research by considering how offenders depicted their own cognitive shifts that suggested they were on the road to recovery and the factors that caused them to fail to achieve it.
      PubDate: 2022-05-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00205-y
       
  • Co-offending and Criminal Careers in Organized Crime

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      Abstract: Abstract The growing research on co-offending over the life course is based on relatively small, general offending samples, followed for a short period, and from a limited set of countries. This study expands current knowledge by examining the relation of co-offending with age, criminal experience, crime type, and crime seriousness in a large sample of Italian serious organized crime offenders with criminal careers spanning between age 14 and late adulthood. The sample includes 160,262 offenses by 10,530 Italian mafia offenders. After preliminary descriptive statistics, random-effects logistic regressions estimate how age, criminal experience, crime type, and seriousness are independently related to the co-offending probability. Co-offending decreases only moderately with both the age and criminal experience of organized crime offenders, while more prolific offenders exhibit a stable co-offending prevalence as their experience increases. Co-offending varies significantly by crime type, and it is more frequent for more serious offenses. In line with previous research, co-offending has a relevant functional component even for organized crime offenders: results suggest it is instrumental to perpetrating specific offense types and more serious offenses. However, results also show that specific social and criminal contexts promote co-offending among older and more experienced offenders.
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00202-1
       
  • Crime, Families and the Economy: Micro-conditions as Moderator of
           Macro-effects

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      Abstract: Abstract Since the early 1990s, increasing attention is being paid to the impact of life course transitions on criminal behavior. However, individuals’ life courses do not evolve in a vacuum but rather in the broad context of societal characteristics and developments. In this paper, we analyze whether there is an effect of macroeconomic circumstances on individuals’ criminal careers and whether this effect is conditional on marital status and parenthood. We employ micro-level data from a Dutch large-scale longitudinal study and enrich these with macro-level data. Using logistic panel data models for criminal behavior, we distinguish three types of effects: the macro-effect of experiencing declining economic times, the micro-effect of family composition and the interaction effect, indicating whether the effect of economic decline is differentiated by marital status and parenthood. We quantify economic decline either as an increase in the unemployment rate (objective and backward-looking measure) or as a decrease in consumer confidence (subjective and forward-looking). First, we find that an increase in the unemployment rate has no effect on criminal careers, but a decrease in the consumer confidence is associated with an increase in individual-level crime. Next, we confirm earlier results that marriage has a negative effect on crime, while parenthood has no effect. Finally, our results indicate that the detrimental effect of decreasing consumer confidence on criminal behavior is nullified for married individuals.
      PubDate: 2022-04-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00191-1
       
  • The Converging Effects of Psychopathic Traits and Victimization on
           

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      Abstract: Abstract Although Agnew recently extended general strain theory (GST) to explain variation in reactions to strain, only a few studies have examined this thesis, finding limited support. Relying on a justice-involved sample, cross-lagged dynamic panel models are employed to examine the combined effects of psychopathic traits (reflecting criminal propensity) and victimization (as a key strain) on violent and property offending. Results show the independent impacts of psychopathic traits and victimization on criminal coping as well as the interactive effects of psychopathic traits and victimization on offending. These findings highlight the importance of criminal propensity and criminal victimization in criminal coping and provide evidence for the converging effects of both. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-03-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00201-2
       
  • Examining the Influences of Early Childhood Impulsivity and Intelligence
           on Global Functioning in Adolescence Among a Sample of High-Risk American
           Youth

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      Abstract: Abstract Children’s impulse control and intelligence are important for health and social functioning later in life, but the degree to which they impact later outcomes via common vs. unique pathways is still unclear, particularly in high-risk samples. The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (n = 4,898; 48% female; 18% White) was used to examine the plausibility of common or “global” dimensions of health problems and antisocial behavior at approximately age 15, as well as to examine the possible roles of impulsivity and intelligence in their etiologies. To this end, we employed structural equation modeling, controlled for covariates, and leveraged ratings from parents, teachers, observers, and children. Findings suggest that childhood impulsivity forecasted higher levels on dimensions of health problems and antisocial behaviors in adolescence, whereas with impulsivity controlled, childhood intelligence forecasted greater general risk for age-typical antisocial behavior and did not significantly predict global health. Future studies aiming to elucidate the degree to which adolescent outcomes emerge via common pathways will benefit from the use of latent variable modeling.
      PubDate: 2022-03-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00199-7
       
  • Correction to: Cohort Profile: The Zurich Project on the Social
           Development from Childhood to Adulthood (z-proso)

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      PubDate: 2022-03-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00200-3
       
  • Examining the Relation Between Estimated Life Expectancy and Delinquency
           Across Development: an Examination of Adolescent Males Following Their
           First Arrest

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      Abstract: Abstract Adolescents who anticipate a shorter lifespan are more likely to engage in reckless behavior, but few studies consider whether an adolescent’s estimated life expectancy (ELE) demonstrates change across development. This study examined whether ELE changes over time, and if these changes are associated with within-person changes in delinquency in 1147 males who had been arrested for the first time. An accelerated cohort design provided data for youth aged 14–21. Estimated life expectancy showed linear change, suggesting that adolescents grow more optimistic about their life expectancy as they age. Within person, increases in ELE were associated with decreased offending, a pattern consistent across development. These findings support the utility of ELE as a target for intervention in reducing adolescent crime.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-021-00177-5
       
  • Impact of Interventions for At-Risk and Criminally Involved Youths and
           Adults on Premature Mortality over the Life-Course: a Systematic Review
           and Meta-analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Premature mortality represents an important outcome for crime and violence prevention and related social interventions, but little is known about premature mortality in relation to these interventions. This article assesses the impact of interventions for at-risk and criminally involved youths and adults on premature mortality over the life-course. Systematic review methods are used, including comprehensive search strategies to identify, screen, and code eligible studies. Meta-analytic techniques are used to assess the impact of interventions on premature mortality, the influence of key moderators, and cause of mortality (natural vs. unnatural). A total of 11 studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies originated in five countries and were reported in the last two decades. Sample size can be considered large (> 500 participants) for all but two of the studies. Analysis of pooled effects showed a non-significant impact of interventions on premature mortality (OR = 0.89; 95% CI: 0.46, 1.74). Life-course stage, intervention type, and evaluation design did not moderate the mean effect. Of the nine studies that reported cause of mortality, interventions were associated with an increased likelihood of death by unnatural causes (OR = 1.78; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.39; p = .03). We conclude that greater attention needs to be paid to evaluating and understanding premature mortality over the life-course as part of the study of the effectiveness of crime and violence prevention interventions, and research opportunities exist to make an immediate contribution to this body of knowledge.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-021-00185-5
       
  • Cohort Profile: The Incarcerated Serious and Violent Young Offender Study

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      Abstract: Abstract In this profile, we describe how the Incarcerated Serious and Violent Young Offender Study (ISVYOS) leveraged detailed administrative data to create a prospective longitudinal study. We also discuss the research and policy context at the time the ISVYOS was initiated, its methodology, and what has been learned so far. The ISVYOS includes 1,719 participants who were incarcerated in adolescence and followed through adulthood. Between 1998–2002 (Cohort I) and 2005–2011 (Cohort II), male and female youth were recruited for interviews that measured various risk and protective factors, experiences in custody, and attitudes towards the justice system. Follow-up data include measures of justice system involvement, risk assessment data, and social network data. Participants were an average age of 30.57 (SD = 4.65) as of December 2019. Over 90% of the sample was involved in the adult justice system. So far, research using ISVYOS data has addressed the reliability and validity of measures of psychopathy in adolescence, justice system criminal careers, risk factors for chronic and persistent offending, and the adult offending outcomes of youth involved in serious offenses (e.g., sexual offenses and homicide offense). Inquiries regarding data access should be sent to the first author.
      PubDate: 2022-02-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00194-y
       
  • Examining Mate Similarity for Chronic and Non-chronic Criminal Behavior

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      Abstract: Abstract A growing amount of research suggests that members of a mating couple tend to be similar to each other across a range of phenotypes. Mating couples, for instance, often evince similar levels of antisocial, violent, and aggressive behaviors. Whether this type of similarity extends across measures of chronic and non-chronic forms of criminality has been considerably less scrutinized. This study examines whether persistent offenders seek out mates who engage in higher levels of offending. All 180,379 officially registered couples of which both partners were born in the Netherlands between 1984 and 1990 were included in the sample. Data drawn from the Dutch Police were used to examine suspected criminal behavior between the ages of 12 and 30 years old. Individuals belonging to certain offender groups were more likely to select partners from that same group. Moreover, the timing, frequency, and nature of criminal behavior of couples correlated positively. Results further revealed support for both assortative mating and behavioral contagion as explanations for mate similarity in criminality. We discuss the implications of our work for the study of intergenerational and life-course study of criminal behavior.
      PubDate: 2022-02-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00197-9
       
  • Maternal Low Self-Control, Maternal Attachment Toward Children, Parenting
           Practices, and Adolescent Low Self-Control: a Prospective 15-Year Study

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      Abstract: Abstract Research surrounding the intergenerational transmission of self-control has expanded recently. Yet, findings are mixed, and key limitations regarding the inclusion of distinct measures of parental attachment toward children and parenting practices within a longitudinal framework remain. We seek to address these limitations by providing a longitudinal test of serial mediation linking maternal low self-control, maternal attachment toward children, maternal parenting practices, and adolescent low self-control. We employed structural equation modeling to examine direct and indirect effects between maternal low self-control measured when children were 6 months old, maternal attachment toward children measured when target children were 7 years old, maternal parenting practices assessed when children were 12 years old, and adolescent low self-control when children were 15 years old. Findings partially support assertions from self-control theory in that maternal low self-control was positively related to later adolescent low self-control indirectly via maternal attachment toward children and, in turn, maternal parenting practices. However, direct associations between maternal low self-control and maternal parenting practices and, even more, between maternal low self-control and adolescent low self-control were also observed. Limitations and implications of our findings are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-02-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00198-8
       
  • Cohort Profile: The Zurich Project on the Social Development from
           Childhood to Adulthood (z-proso)

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      Abstract: Abstract The Zurich Project on the Social Development from Childhood to Adulthood (z-proso) began in 2004 in response to the need for a better evidence base to support optimal child social development and prevent crime and violence. Since then, the study has tracked the development of a diverse sample of youths (N = 1,675 in the target sample; ~50% female) from age 7 (n = 1,360) to age 20 (n = 1,180), with primary data collection waves at ages 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 17, and 20. The study uses a multi-method, multi-informant design that combines teacher, youth, and parent reports with observational and behavioural measures, biosampling, functional imaging, and ecological momentary assessment. Analyses of the data have contributed important evidence to a diversity of topics in child and adolescent development, illuminating the developmental roots of crime and aggression, the impacts of exposure to different forms and combinations of victimisation, and trajectories of mental health and neurodevelopmental symptoms.
      PubDate: 2022-02-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00195-x
       
  • Age-Graded Salience of Exposure to Violence as Predictive of Dual Systems
           Model Development: Examining Direct Victimization vs. Witnessed Violence

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      Abstract: Abstract The dual systems model is a developmental cognitive framework found to have utility for explaining engagement in antisocial behavior. Centered on differential development of sensation-seeking and impulse control, the theory has risen to prominence. Despite this, there is limited understanding of how exposure to violence may drive development in these outcomes. Specifically, knowledge is limited in terms of how different forms of exposure to violence (direct victimization, witnessed violence) may influence development of these constructs differently and whether the age at which exposure occurs matters in this regard. The present study utilized the Pathways to Desistance data to examine these relationships. Mixed effects modeling was used to analyze the data. Findings indicated that both direct victimization and witnessed violence predicted change in both dual systems constructs. However, the salience of witnessed violence for predicting sensation-seeking declined in a linear manner as participants got older. Implications are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-02-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00196-w
       
  • Are Late Bloomers Real' Identification and Comparison of Late-Onset
           Offending Patterns from Ages 14–40

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      Abstract: Abstract Numerous studies have identified a late-onset pattern of offending, yet debate remains over whether this pattern is real or attributable to measurement error. The goal of the present study is to identify whether this late-onset trajectory exists. We used prospective longitudinal data from the Rochester Youth Development Study and group-based trajectory modeling to identify distinct developmental patterns in self-reported incidence of general delinquency from approximately ages 14 to 31. We then examined and compared the means of general, violent, street, and property offending for individuals belonging to late bloomer, chronic, and low-level offending trajectories across three periods: (1) pre-onset (ages 14–17), (2) post-onset (ages 29–31), and (3) for a subset of participants participating in a follow-up study, post-trajectory (ages 32–40). Results confirmed the existence of a distinct late bloomers offending trajectory characterized by low rates of delinquency throughout adolescence and high levels throughout adulthood. Furthermore, late bloomers had similar mean levels of delinquency as low-level offenders and they were considerably lower than chronic offenders in the pre-onset period and similar means of offending as chronic offenders that were considerably higher than low-level offenders in the post-onset and post-trajectory periods. Comparisons of these three groups on adolescent risk and protective factors indicated that late bloomers were more similar to individuals in the low-level trajectory and had fewer risk and more protective factors than individuals following a chronic trajectory. Contrary to prior work which attributes late-onset offending to reliance on official data which fails to detect adolescent offending, late bloomer offending appears to be a genuine phenomenon. These results lend greater support to dynamic theories of crime.
      PubDate: 2022-02-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00189-9
       
  • The Association Between Adverse Childhood Experiences, Neuropsychological
           Deficits, and Experiences of Exclusionary Discipline in Early Childhood

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      Abstract: Abstract Recent policy briefs have drawn attention to the use of exclusionary discipline in early learning settings; however, little is known about child-level correlates associated with risk of exclusion. This omission is important, as early childhood education may reduce the likelihood of later delinquent and criminal behavior. Additionally, exclusion from early learning may label a child as deviant, contributing to an accumulation of disadvantage that may place the child at greater risk for delinquency and crime over the life-course. The current study applies Moffitt’s (1993) life-course theory to better understand child-level correlates associated with exclusionary discipline in early childhood. Using data from the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health (N = 5876), results indicate neuropsychological deficits in early childhood are associated with a 1.38 unit increase in odds of removal from early learning environments. Furthermore, in support of Moffitt’s (1993) interactional hypothesis, exposure to adverse experiences (ACEs) was found to moderate the association between neuropsychological deficits and odds of exclusion, such that children with more indicators of neuropsychological deficits and a greater number of ACEs were more likely to experience exclusion than those with fewer ACEs. Implications for policy and directions for future research are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-02-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00192-0
       
  • Using a Group-Based Trajectory Approach to Assess Theoretical Predictors
           of Teacher Victimization

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      Abstract: Abstract This research investigates the trajectory patterns of teacher victimization across time and predictors to explain distinctive patterns of victimization in the context of opportunity theories. Group-based trajectory modeling is adopted to estimate the latent trajectory groups of teacher victimization with four waves of the study sample. Seven different types of teacher victimization by students at school are measured and six key individual-level measures of the presence of capable guardianship, motivated offender, target vulnerability, and target antagonism are included. The findings show that group-based trajectory modeling identifies five distinct groups for teacher victimization trajectories and a substantial proportion of the sample was found belonging to the mid-stable and high-stable groups, indicating students’ aggression toward teachers is a serious and pervasive problem, continuously affecting many teachers over time, across a variety of victimization types. The findings provide some support of opportunity theory’s applicability in explaining distinctive patterns of teacher victimization trajectories as several theoretically informed factors were found to be related to class membership. Overall, the findings have demonstrated the importance of understanding heterogeneity and distinctive trajectories of teacher victimization over time in order to inform the development and implementation of comprehensive anti-teacher victimization interventions and counseling programs specifically targeted to mid/high-stable victimized groups.
      PubDate: 2022-01-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-022-00187-x
       
  • Revisiting the Experiential Effect: How Criminal Offending Affects
           Juveniles’ Perceptions of Detection Risk

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      Abstract: Abstract Perceptual deterrence research has consistently found that criminal offending is inversely related to subsequent perceptions of the risk of being caught or arrested. This inverse relationship has been dubbed an “experiential effect,” reflecting the idea that people learn by committing (undetected) crimes that the detection or arrest risk is lower than first feared. The current study explores the validity of this experiential argument. It relies on self-report data from 3,259 adolescent participants in the panel study Crime in the modern City (Duisburg, Germany). We computed detection rates and risk perceptions, and used fixed effects models to investigate the proposed experiential learning process. Most findings support the experiential argument: (1) juvenile offenses were rarely detected by the police, (2) juveniles (especially those inexperienced with crime) tended to overestimate the detection risk, (3) juveniles reduced their risk perceptions when they committed crimes, (4) this reduction occurred primarily among those who overestimated the detection risk in periods when they were not committing crimes. However, the study also produced the surprising finding that the experiential effect seems to be short-lived: people appeared to return to initial risk perception levels when they stopped committing crimes. Overall, the results corroborate the experiential argument. However, they also indicate that the argument may need revision to account for the potential short-term nature of the experiential effect. This “ephemerality effect” is good news for policy, as lowered risk perceptions will in most cases only temporarily increase the likelihood of future delinquency.
      PubDate: 2021-12-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s40865-021-00186-4
       
 
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