Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1397 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (30 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (52 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (65 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (28 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (23 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (161 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (23 journals)
    - LAW (843 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (11 journals)

CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 160 of 160 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Criminologica : Southern African Journal of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Cement Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 360)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Annual Review of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 404)
Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 348)
Biometric Technology Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Boletín Criminológico     Open Access  
Brill Research Perspectives in Transnational Crime     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 398)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Graduate Journal of Sociology and Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice / La Revue canadienne de criminologie et de justice pénale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 256)
Champ pénal/Penal field     Open Access  
Computer Fraud & Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 281)
Computer Law & Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Contemporary Challenges : The Global Crime, Justice and Security Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Justice Review: Issues in Criminal, Social, and Restorative Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Corrections : Policy, Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Crime & Delinquency     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Crime and Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Crime Prevention and Community Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 109)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Crime Science     Open Access   (Followers: 57)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Crime, Security and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Criminal Justice and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Criminal Justice Matters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Criminal Justice Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Criminal Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Criminal Law Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Criminocorpus, revue hypermédia     Open Access  
Criminological Studies     Open Access  
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Criminology and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Crítica Penal y Poder     Open Access  
Critical Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Cryptologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Datenschutz und Datensicherheit - DuD     Hybrid Journal  
Delito y Sociedad : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Derecho Penal y Criminología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Detection     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
EDPACS: The EDP Audit, Control, and Security Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
Estudios Penales y Criminológicos     Open Access  
EURASIP Journal on Information Security     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 269)
European Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
European Journal of Probation     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Polygraph     Open Access  
European Review of Organised Crime     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Feminist Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Forensic Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358)
Forensic Science International : Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forensic Science International: Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 282)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Homicide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
IEEE Security & Privacy Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Incarceration     Full-text available via subscription  
Information Security Journal : A Global Perspective     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Annals of Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
International Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Criminal Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Applied Cryptography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Criminology and Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Information and Coding Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Police Science and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 312)
International Journal of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Victimology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Journal of Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Computer Virology and Hacking Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Correctional Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Criminal Justice Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 126)
Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Criminology and Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 288)
Journal of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 367)
Journal of Gender-Based Violence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Illicit Economies and Development     Open Access  
Journal of International Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Penal Law & Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Perpetrator Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 410)
Journal of Quantitative Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Strategic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Justice Evaluation Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Justice Research and Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Kriminologia ikasten : Irakaskuntzarako aldizkaria     Open Access  
Kriminologisches Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Innovation and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Nordic Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Occasional Series in Criminal Justice and International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Police Journal : Theory, Practice and Principles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 317)
Police Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 297)
Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292)
Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 324)
Policy & Internet     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Política Criminal     Open Access  
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Punishment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Research and Reports in Forensic Medical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Arbitrada de Ciencias Jurídicas y Criminalísticas Iustitia Socialis     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Criminalística     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Jurídicos y Criminológicos     Open Access  
Revista de Movimentos Sociais e Conflitos     Open Access  
Revista Digital de la Maestría en Ciencias Penales     Open Access  
Rivista di Studi e Ricerche sulla criminalità organizzata     Open Access  
Science & Global Security: The Technical Basis for Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation Initiatives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Security Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
South African Crime Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Theory and Practice of Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Trends in Organized Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 372)
URVIO - Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios de Seguridad     Open Access  
Women & Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 278)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Criminology and Criminal Justice
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.962
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 51  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1748-8958 - ISSN (Online) 1748-8966
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Towards a criminology of public inquiries: From cautious optimism to
           contestation in the Brook House Inquiry

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      Authors: Raphael Schlembach, Emily Luise Hart
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Although UK public inquiries garner huge amounts of public attention, there have been few systematic studies of their role in scrutinising and reforming criminal justice policy and practice. This is despite a growing number of inquiries, held under the Inquiries Act 2005, into critical matters relating to policing, justice and home affairs. This article explores the contested nature of statutory inquiries as mechanisms for accountability and opportunity for policy reform. We suggest that inquiries provide fertile grounds for criminological analysis, if we understand them as sites of contestation where political priorities compete over questions of procedure, scope and participation. Our focus is on the Brook House Inquiry into the mistreatment of detainees in a British immigration removal centre. The analysis shows a tension between the public-facing nature of inquiries and their legalistic processes.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-08-06T07:30:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221115797
       
  • Policing and social media: The framing of technological use by Canadian
           newspapers (2005–2020)

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      Authors: James P Walsh, Victoria Baker, Brittany Frade
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      As digital platforms that expand opportunities to create, distribute, and access content online, social media are transforming the policing landscape. While scholars have considered social media’s contradictory effects on police services’ public image and operational capacity, less is known about how patterns of technological use are reported within the mainstream press. Employing a mixed-methods content analysis, this article assesses how Canadian newspapers framed the policing-social media relationship over a 15-year period, and how such representations can affect public opinion and policy. It finds, despite minor fluctuations over time and across outlets, news organizations prioritized police perspectives and offered overwhelmingly favourable assessments with social media being constructed as a valuable tool of crime prevention and control. The broader implications of these findings for perceptions of law enforcement and relations between the news media and institutional power are provided.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-08-06T07:28:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221114254
       
  • Surviving on the frontline: Retail security guards and their
           self-protection behaviours

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      Authors: Benjamin Koeppen, Matt Hopkins
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the rapid expansion of private security guarding over the past 30 years, the reactions of guards to working in situations where violence is a constant possibility are seldom discussed. This article analyses how retail security guards respond to the threat of, and the actual experience of, violence through their adaptation of self-protection measures. We identify that a range of measures are adapted, broadly compromising of the ‘proactive’ that prepare guards for potential future confrontation and those described as ‘inactive’ where guards may use avoidance tactics or methods of withdrawal for their own safety. The article considers motivational factors that drive the adaptation of proactive and inactive measures and develops a novel explanatory framework outlining how fears around violence can generate both functional and dysfunctional forms of worry in security guards. Finally, some implications of these findings for the private security sector are outlined.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T09:24:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221114250
       
  • Conflicting institutional logics in the control of crime and disorder: The
           double strategy of administrative and criminal law

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      Authors: Renze Salet, Jan Terpstra
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      The management of crime and disorder is increasingly based not only on criminal law, but also on administrative law. This paper deals with the question of how this double strategy can be understood from the perspective of institutional logics. This analysis is based upon a study in the Netherlands about the use of administrative powers in relation to criminal law. Special attention is paid to the relations between local government and the police. The study concentrates on three different administrative powers: the area ban, the closure of premises, and the power to refuse or revoke subsidies and permits if there is a risk that these may facilitate criminal activities. The study shows that the two logics may conflict, but also that new combinations of logics are created. These may create new tensions that result, in particular, from the dominance of criminal law over the administrative logic.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T10:05:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221112061
       
  • UK victim-survivor experiences of intimate partner spiritual abuse and
           religious coercive control and implications for practice

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      Authors: Natasha Mulvihill, Nadia Aghtaie, Andrea Matolcsi, Marianne Hester
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      This study extends existing scholarship on coercive control within an intimate relationship by exploring how some perpetrators use spiritual abuse as part of their control repertoire and how others harness belief and doctrine to exercise a totalising ‘religious coercive control’ over their victims. The analysis in this article draws on two multi-faith datasets: secondary data analysis of 27 semi-structured interviews and primary data collected through an online anonymous survey eliciting 24 qualitative responses, supplemented by 4 follow-up interviews with victim-survivors. Thematic analysis demonstrates the experience and longer-term impact of coercive control on victim-survivors and the barriers to help-seeking, including complicity at familial, community and leadership levels. We articulate their recommendations for change within places of worship and the implications for criminal justice practitioners.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T10:46:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221112057
       
  • Prison ethnography by correspondence'

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      Authors: Cara Jardine
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Prison ethnography offers researchers a unique vantage point from which to explore the relationships, power dynamics, degradations, solidarities and sensory assaults which occur within the prison walls. Yet, despite the valuable insights to be gained from this methodological approach, prison ethnographies can be extremely challenging to conduct. Institutional pressures arising from both the prison and the contemporary University pose considerable obstacles for researchers, and the outbreak of Covid-19 has heightened these barriers further still. This article will argue that the methodology of cultural probes can preserve at least some of the ethos of ethnographic research when conducting research by correspondence. It will reflect on the methodological and ethical challenges of this approach, and critically discuss its potential to offer a more participatory and less extractive means for researching the nuances of prison life while collecting data from a distance.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-07-21T10:33:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221111502
       
  • Mass shootings, fatality thresholds and defining by numbers: Political and
           social consequences

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      Authors: Sarah Watson
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Mass shootings are one example of a focusing event that has particular significance for firearms legislation. Mass shootings shock, disturb and provoke enormous and controversial debate, often causing significant public and media resonance, becoming the subject of intense discussion politically. At times providing an impetus for legislative amendments, often in distinct ways that routine gun violence does not. If certain events highlight the need for reform, policy change becomes more likely. Cases with the lowest number of victims are likely to generate the least amount of attention and are most likely to be missed in data collection, rendering them the least noteworthy, least important in terms of lethality and social and political consequence. Various problems come to the attention of people in and around government, necessitating an understanding of why such problems occupy officials’ attention and appear to be more ‘deserving’ of attention.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-07-19T10:28:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221110812
       
  • Community perspectives of terrorism and the Nigerian government’s
           counterterrorism strategies: A systematic review

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      Authors: Tarela Juliet Ike, Georgios A Antonopoulos, Danny Singh
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Terrorism and insecurity pose significant global concern and Nigeria has been bedevilled by Boko Haram – a terrorist group deemed one of the deadliest terrorist groups in the world. While the Nigerian government have adopted concerted counterterrorism approaches to tackle terrorism, very limited success seems to have been achieved and the synthesis of community perspectives of government interventions appears lacking. This study makes an original and significant contribution by adopting a systematic review approach to synthesise existing studies on community perspective on the drivers of involvement in terrorism and on Nigerian government’s responses. Six databases were searched, and 21 studies met the review criteria. Informed by thematic analysis principles and the conceptual framework of synthesis, the study finds a sense of disconnect between the government approach to counterterrorism and community perspectives. The study recommends a context-specific community informed response to insecurity towards improving existing counterterrorism measures.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-07-18T09:58:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221110009
       
  • From desistance narratives to narratives of rehabilitation: Risk-talk in
           groupwork for addressing sexual offending

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      Authors: Eve Mullins, Steve Kirkwood
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Risk has become a dominant focus in criminal justice practice. While this can improve the effectiveness of practices for reducing offending, it can also stigmatise and create barriers for those attempting to desist from crime. To explore this apparent dilemma, we applied conversation analysis and discursive psychology to examine risk-talk in 12 video-recorded sessions of a groupwork programme for addressing sexual offending. We found both practitioners and clients oriented to notions of risk in their talk. They drew on risk-talk as a resource to construct narratives that support desistance, emphasising awareness of risks, having control, and gaining hope and agency over the future. However, risk-talk was resisted when it challenged the client’s self-presentation. Building on previous empirical and theoretical work on desistance and criminal justice practice, we found it is possible for people to incorporate aspects of risk into their personal narratives in order to weave a narrative of rehabilitation.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T10:31:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221108830
       
  • Body-worn cameras: An effective or cosmetic policing response to domestic
           and family violence'

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      Authors: Naomi Pfitzner, Sandra Walklate, Jude McCulloch
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing together the literature on police body-worn cameras and video-recorded evidence in domestic and family violence matters, this article explores whether technology can ‘fix’ criminal justice responses to domestic and family violence. We argue that the use of police body-worn cameras and digitally recorded audio-visual evidence in domestic and family violence matters is not a cure-all for deficiencies in criminal justice responses to domestic and family violence. While the use of such technologies may alleviate some of the deficiencies highlighted in the Australian state of Victoria’s 2016 Royal Commission into Family Violence, it raises serious concerns about victim’s agency and privacy. We argue that the introduction of such technologies requires significant investment in training and education – for police to adapt to their changed role and for judicial officers, legal practitioners and potential jurors in understanding and interpreting victim survivor behaviour on film.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-07-02T07:15:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221108478
       
  • Prison reform and torture prevention under ‘compromised
           circumstances’

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      Authors: Andrew M Jefferson
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, drawing on two decades studying prisons and prison reform practices in (mostly) southern countries undergoing transition, I examine the challenges facing anti-torture professionals and prison reformers working in the global south and critically interrogate the assumptions of dominant models of reform. Rights and health-based entry points to the prevention of torture and inhumane treatment and prison reform are argued to be necessary but insufficient. I propose the concept ‘compromised circumstances’ to counter the structural biases that diminish and erase ordinary everyday experience. The ‘compromised circumstances’ of countries torn by conflict, inequality, poverty and mundane violence call for innovative interventions based on reflexive social scientific description and analysis. The inevitable sense of dizziness and uncertainty such circumstances induce must be embraced not denied. A dynamic, organic and relational entry point to reform is required.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T07:12:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221105442
       
  • Expressing uncertainty in criminology: Applying insights from scientific
           communication to evidence-based policing

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      Authors: Chris Giacomantonio, Yael Litmanovitz, Craig Bennell, Daniel J Jones
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars and practitioners who develop evidence-based crime policy debate on how best to translate criminological knowledge into better criminal justice practices. These debates highlight the counterpoised problems of over-selling the contribution of scientific evidence; or, alternately, overemphasizing the limitations of science. This challenge attends any attempt to translate research findings into practice; however, and problematically, in criminology this challenge is rarely approached in a theoretically coherent fashion. This article therefore seeks to theorize uncertainty in criminology by examining insights on communicating scientific uncertainty in other fields, and applying these insights specifically to the field of Evidence-Based Policing (EBP). Taking the position that all science is inherently uncertain, we examine the following four aspects of the field: the particular uncertainties of criminology, variance in receptivity to research, the lack of evidence regarding effective communication, and the boundaries of evidence. Building on this analysis, we set out the normative challenge of how researchers should characterize and balance the implications and limits of scientific findings in the decision-making process. Looking ahead, we argue for the need to invest in an empirical project for determining meaningful strategies to express research evidence to decision-makers.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T10:00:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221107325
       
  • Coping, aggression, perceived social support and demographic variables as
           predictors of prison adjustment among male incarcerated offenders

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      Authors: Codi Rogers, Jacques Jordaan, Karel Esterhuyse
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      The unique contextual attributes of the correctional environment and the frustrations, deprivations and challenges associated with it impact adjustment to incarceration. Offenders who cannot adjust to the correctional environment may experience behavioural and psychological challenges, including institutional misconduct, violence, aggression, withdrawal, anger, hostility, anxiety and depression. It is imperative to identify which variables are possible predictors of correctional adjustment among male incarcerated offenders in a private, maximum-security correctional centre in South Africa. In this quantitative study, 418 male maximum-security offenders were sampled. Questionnaire data were collected, and the results indicated that the combination of some variables (Friends, Avoidance and Problem-solving) predicted Internal Adjustment and (Anger, Friends and Verbal Aggression) predicted External Adjustment of the offenders. The results from this study could aid in the development of future programmes that assist offenders with adjusting to the correctional environment.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T09:58:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221106610
       
  • Merging the peer selection and peer influence effects: Can neutralization
           beliefs and cognitive impulsivity serve as links in the chain'

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      Authors: Glenn D Walters
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      The commonly cited connection between peer influence and peer selection effects was explored in an effort to understand whether cognitive distortion, as represented by neutralization beliefs and cognitive impulsivity, plays a role in linking the peer influence and peer selection effects to each other. Participants were 3568 children (51.3% female) enrolled in the longitudinal portion of the Gang Resistance Education and Training study. Data from five waves of Gang Resistance Education and Training were organized into a series of paths and subjected to multilevel multiple regression longitudinal analysis, where data were clustered by classroom. Two principal analyses were performed. In the first analysis, peer delinquency and participant delinquency were cross-lagged to form four prospective peer selection paths (delinquency → peer delinquency) and four prospective peer influence paths (peer delinquency → delinquency). These paths were then subjected to multilevel (complex sampling design) multiple regression analysis, controlling for age, sex, race, group status, and the most proximal prior measure of the outcome variable. Seven of the eight paths proved significant. In the second analysis, neutralization beliefs and cognitive impulsivity were included in the middle wave of the five-wave model, controlling once again for age, sex, race, group status, and the proximal autoregressive path of the outcome variable. The results of this second analysis revealed that both neutralization beliefs and cognitive impulsivity mediated the connection running from peer selection to peer influence, although neither mediated the peer influence-to-peer selection chain. The direct effects for delinquency and peer delinquency across the five waves were also significant. These findings suggest that the peer selection and influence effects are interdependent, reciprocal, and linked, in part, by cognitive distortion.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T09:56:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221105150
       
  • Invisible ghosts of care and penality: Exploring Canadian correctional
           workers’ perceptions of prisoner well-being, accountability and power

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      Authors: Matthew S Johnston, Rosemary Ricciardelli
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Much correctional work is generally misunderstood by the mainstream media and many public circles as solely punitive and authoritative, which has fueled many politicized outcomes for correctional policy, practice and intervention. Reasonably, critical criminological discourse is steered primarily by the perspectives and voices of prisoners and victims. Yet this privileging leaves many questions remaining about how correctional workers in the contemporary era negotiate their complex duties of both prisoner care and accountability. Drawing on data garnered from open-ended survey responses of provincial and territorial correctional employees (n = 876) in Canada, we explore how Canadian correctional workers balance their emotional and occupational framework and perspectives with integrity. Informed through a lens of emotional labour, we find that many Canadian correctional workers recognize the need for, and gap in, prisoner care, mental health and rehabilitation, while also problematizing the shift and decline in prisoner accountability, which they believe jeopardizes both correctional worker and prisoner safety. We discuss the implications our findings present in relation to questions of power and control in prison spaces.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T11:11:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221105825
       
  • “Would your level of disgust change'” Accounting for variant
           reactions to fatal violence against women on social media

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      Authors: Paul Bleakley
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      The murders of Sarah Everard and Sabina Nessa, occurring in similar contexts in London over the course of 2021, prompted renewed public discourse around violence against women and the nature of stranger-perpetrated murder of women in British society. It also provided the opportunity to analyze our responses to such crimes as a community and, in particular, our expectations and assumptions about who is committing fatal violence against women. In this study, Facebook comments (n = 414) pertaining to the first identification of the alleged murderers in each of the above cases were analyzed for sentiment. This analysis revealed major differences in the levels of shock and/or surprise at Everard’s murderer (a police officer) being identified, compared with Nessa’s alleged killer (a migrant). The article assesses the divergent responses in each case and explores the reasons that allegations of migrant-committed crime appear to attract significantly lower rates of resistance than allegations of police crime.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T10:03:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221105155
       
  • Institutionalising restorative justice for adults in Scotland: An
           empirical study of criminal justice practitioners’ perspectives

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      Authors: Siobhan Butler, Giuseppe Maglione, Jamie Buchan
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      While in some European and extra-European countries the incorporation of restorative justice into policy frameworks is a dated and widely studied phenomenon, in others it is a more recent and scarcely researched process. The Scottish Government is making renewed efforts to institutionalise restorative justice including the ambitious goal of making adult restorative justice available nationwide by 2023. In this article, we analyse the consequences of these recent attempts, addressing a gap in knowledge on adult restorative justice in Scotland. We gathered views from justice professionals (n = 17), involved in organising and delivering adult restorative justice, on the implementation of the policy and the future of Scottish restorative justice. Findings show that participants support expanding restorative justice services, but are sceptical about the Scottish Government’s approach. They advocate for a coordinated but locally sensitive model of restorative justice development, to some extent challenging the stark opposition between ‘purist’ and ‘maximalist’ approaches to the expansion of restorative justice. These findings generate evidence to critically assess Scottish restorative justice policy and its implementation, while drawing implications for the development of restorative justice across Europe.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T09:59:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221104229
       
  • Book review: John Braithwaite, Macrocriminology and Freedom

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sandra Walklate
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T10:04:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221102999
       
  • Prisoners regulating prisons: Voice, action, participation and riot

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      Authors: Gillian Buck, Philippa Tomczak
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Prisoners are a critical source of prison regulation around the world, but regulation by (rather than of) prisoners remains little analysed. In this article, we utilise the 1990 riots at HMP Strangeways (England), as a case study of prisoners (re)shaping imprisonment. We examine prisoners’ roles in these riots and subsequent cross-sectoral regulatory activities. We innovatively use the four-phase process of translation from actor-network theory to guide document analysis of (1) Lord Woolf’s official inquiry into the riots and (2) the voluntary organisation Prison Reform Trust’s follow-up report. We explore how participatory approaches could inform prison regulation through (former) prisoners partnering with external regulators throughout the processes of identifying problems and solutions to establish broader alliances seeking social change.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T10:02:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221101997
       
  • Book review: Sentencing: New Trajectories in Law, by Elaine A. O. Freer

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gavin Dingwall
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T08:35:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221102998
       
  • Progression and parole: The perceived institutional consequences of
           maintaining innocence in prison in England and Wales

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      Authors: Emma Burtt
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on interviews via letter with 64 prisoners maintaining innocence across England and Wales, this article examines the perceived institutional consequences of claiming innocence within the prison environment. A myriad of areas, ranging from everyday living conditions, risk assessment, progression to ultimately parole, are all believed to be impacted by claims of wrongful conviction. As this article illustrates, such a position is often inconsistent with Prison Service Orders and Instructions. These prisoners are thus required to engage and work within a system that is not designed for them and that they believe penalises them as a result of their claims.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T07:31:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221098887
       
  • Book review: Nicola O’Leary, A Victim Community: Stigma and the Media
           Legacy of High-Profile Crime

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      Authors: Freya Rock
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-06-04T09:55:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221100646
       
  • ‘Devastating, like it broke me’: Responding to image-based sexual
           abuse in Aotearoa New Zealand

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      Authors: Nicola Henry, Nicola Gavey, Clare McGlynn, Erika Rackley
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      The non-consensual taking or sharing of intimate images, also known as ‘image-based sexual abuse’, has become a widespread problem. While there has been growing attention to this phenomenon, little empirical research has investigated victim-survivor experiences. Drawing on interviews with 25 victim-survivors, this article focusses on the different responses to image-based sexual abuse in Aotearoa New Zealand. We found that victim-survivors had diverse and often multiple experiences of image-based sexual abuse, perpetrated for a variety of reasons, which extended beyond the paradigm of malicious ex-partners seeking revenge. Some participants described the harms experienced as ‘devastating’: a form of ‘social rupture’. Few had formally reported to police or pursued other justice options. While participants held different justice ideals, all sought recognition of the harms perpetrated against them. Yet they faced multiple obstacles when navigating justice, redress and support options. The authors conclude that far-reaching change is needed to improve legislative, policy and prevention responses to image-based sexual abuse.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-06-04T09:41:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221097276
       
  • Temporal measures of modern slavery victimisation

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      Authors: Carly Lightowlers, Rose Broad, David Gadd
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines police data to assess the duration for which different groups of victims of modern slavery endured exploitation and the length of time after their exploitation concluded before it was officially recorded. The article proposes that these measures of modern slavery victimisation can provide important insights into temporal dimensions of the problem and how best to intervene. Reference to current numbers of victims ‘rescued’, it is argued, can be misleading given the proportion of belated reports of exploitation. These are more indicative of systemic failures in the provision of statutory services that young and vulnerable people hesitate to call upon in the context of an increasingly hostile immigration environment.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T09:52:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221094988
       
  • Empowering the police during COVID-19: How do normative and instrumental
           factors impact public willingness to support expanded police powers'

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      Authors: Elise Sargeant, Molly McCarthy, Harley Williamson, Kristina Murphy
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      This article seeks to test the police ‘empowerment hypothesis’ to better understand public support for police powers during the COVID-19 pandemic. To do so, we draw on Australian survey data to compare the efficacy of the instrumental and normative models of police empowerment to enforce social distancing regulations. We find that instrumental concerns about risk dominate participants’ willingness to empower the police during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, when it comes to what police can do to encourage police empowerment, procedural justice appears to be more important than police effectiveness, supporting the normative model. Our article adds to the limited but growing body of research that examines the correlates of police empowerment and the conditions under which members of the public are willing to grant police expanded powers.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T09:49:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221094981
       
  • What is trauma-informed practice' Towards operationalisation of the
           concept in two prisons for women

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      Authors: Katherine M Auty, Alison Liebling, Anna Schliehe, Ben Crewe
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      A cultural initiative, ‘Becoming Trauma-Informed’, was introduced into prisons in England and Wales from 2015 based on the work of American clinical psychologist, Dr Stephanie Covington, and as part of a more general trend towards the recognition and treatment of trauma-related conditions in the community and in mental health settings. Becoming trauma-informed training for Prison Officers in England and Wales was carried out in all 12 women’s prisons during 2015–2017 and began in the long-term high-secure male estate from May 2018. The becoming trauma-informed work is based on considerable expertise, and a deep commitment by experts and practitioners to the development of trauma-informed practice. The authors welcome this ‘trauma-turn’ in thinking and practice and describe an extended pilot attempt to operationalise and measure its impact on the prison experience. The results were disappointing. By highlighting challenges, and exploring meaning-in-practice, we hope to contribute to the improvement of these initiatives.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T09:45:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221094980
       
  • Analysing the impact of being a sole or primary carer for dependent
           relatives on the sentencing of women in the Crown Court, England and Wales
           

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      Authors: Erica Kane, Shona Minson
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Most quantitative sentencing research treats women and men as a homogeneous group leading to gaps in the literature regarding women’s experiences of sentencing procedures. This is problematic given the vast array of known harms that result from incarcerating women, particularly those with caring responsibilities for children. This exploratory article shares the findings from a quantitative study which considers the sentencing of women, with a particular focus on the ‘sole or primary carer for dependent relatives’ mitigation when applied to mothers. Using data from the Crown Court Sentencing Survey 2011–2015, a sample of 18,314 women defendants was derived and investigated using descriptive, bivariate and regression analysis to explore the relationship between the ‘caring’ mitigation and non-custodial sentences. The findings suggest that when the mitigation is applied to sentences of women who are carers of dependents, it does not have a strong enough relationship with non-custodial sentences. This article provides hitherto unknown statistical data and highlights the need for further research.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T09:41:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221087490
       
  • Moral work in victim–offender meetings

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      Authors: Christopher Birkbeck, Greg Smith
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Although many studies of restorative justice touch on its moral dimensions, they provide a rather fragmentary view of the moral work that takes place in meetings between victims and offenders. We treat moral work as a discursive phenomenon that emerges through the evaluative rendering of character and behaviour in extended sequences of talk. Using transcripts from four victim–offender meetings, we explore how participants work within the structural constraints of the script to develop or resist particular moral conceptions of the incident, themselves and each other. We identify the significant role of the facilitator in the construction of narratives and reflections by the offender and victim, and find that ambivalence, selective attention and persuasion all appear to be necessary for achieving the moral work implied by the script.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T04:56:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221095976
       
  • Specialized knowledge: Understanding crime analyst’s roles and
           responsibilities and the impact of their work

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      Authors: Emma Brown, Dale Ballucci
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Using qualitative interview data, this article examines the role of crime analysts in producing knowledge, as well as the challenges they face. Through the collection and organization of data outlining pertinent information about specific districts, analysts aid in the implementation of policing practices. As such, analysts regard themselves as possessing a specialized form of knowledge, which they incorporate and draw on in the outputs they produce. We conclude that analysts do not always employ rigorous, scientific methodologies, while producing their intelligence outputs, suggesting rather that they rely on their familiarity and specialized knowledge of offenders and crimes in their district. Our findings are important to evaluate and understand how ‘data-driven’ policing is occurring and identifying ways to improve and utilize crime analysis approaches within policing.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T01:15:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221095980
       
  • Seeing the forest and the trees: Examining the impact of aggregate
           measures of recidivism on meta-analytic conclusions of intervention
           effects

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      Authors: Jessica Bouchard, Jennifer S. Wong
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Recidivism is a multidimensional construct that is operationalized in a variety of ways. We explored the impact of using aggregated measures of recidivism (i.e. multiple measures combined) versus disaggregated measures (i.e. defined specifically as parole violation, arrest, conviction, incarceration) in meta-analytic analyses of correctional intervention effectiveness. Using a sample of 20 meta-analyses, we compared within-study findings between aggregated and disaggregated measures. Over half (60%) of the studies differed with respect to the statistical significance of their aggregated versus disaggregated findings, suggesting that aggregated measures of recidivism may give an incomplete picture of treatment effectiveness. Disaggregating measures of recidivism in meta-analysis is recommended for a comprehensive assessment of the impacts of intervention approaches. Policy implications are discussed.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T09:02:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221090577
       
  • Streamlining out-of-court disposals: Assessing the impact on reoffending
           and police practice

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      Authors: Michael Rowe, Aaron Amankwaa, Paul Biddle, Lyndsey Bengtsson
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Police services in England and Wales have developed varied approaches to the use of conditional cautions, and this study examines the effectiveness of one set of reforms: a Revised Conditional Caution Framework. With an overall aim of diverting offenders from the Criminal Justice System and addressing offenders’ criminogenic needs, various programmes of meaningful activity were mandated for offenders. The Revised Conditional Caution Framework refers offenders to a relevant ‘pathway’, to address their offending behaviour(s). If an offender fails to complete the activity within the relevant pathway, without good reason, they revert back through the court system. The aim of the Revised Conditional Caution Framework was to apply meaningful conditions to the conditional caution (e.g. alcohol educational intervention), to focus upon addressing the root cause of the offending behaviour. In this study, the authors evaluated the effectiveness of the Revised Conditional Caution Framework in reducing reoffending. The research was conducted between January 2018 and May 2019 and adopted a mixed methodology of qualitative and quantitative research; notably, focus groups with police officers, semi-structured interviews with offenders and pathway providers and an analysis of police data on offender compliance levels. We found that the Revised Conditional Caution Framework is perceived by many professionals and offenders to provide a platform for tackling the root cause of recidivism and thereby reducing reoffending. It is argued that the premise of Revised Conditional Caution Framework is one that conceives of offending in individualistic terms that pay insufficient attention to the social and economic context in which offending is situated. The article also raises questions about the impact of the Revised Conditional Caution Framework on police professionalism and argues that it might be understood as a restriction on the exercise of discretion since it further restricts officers’ scope to respond to offenders and criminal behaviour.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T05:58:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221087492
       
  • Researching inside police custody in four jurisdictions: ‘Getting in’,
           ‘getting on’, ‘getting your hands dirty’ and ‘getting through
           it’

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      Authors: Layla Skinns
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      As a unique criminal justice organisation, the police present challenges, but also opportunities for those who research them. These are examined, in terms of getting in, getting on, getting your hands dirty and getting through it, using data collected as part of a comparative multi-method study of police custody in large cities in Australia, England, Ireland and the United States in 2007 and 2009. As this research took place on the cusp of the proliferation of research with the police, retrospective examination of field notes is used to reflect on how the research process is influenced not just by one’s social origins but also by the culture of academia and the politics of knowledge production. It is argued that while research with the police is becoming the norm, research on the police is still of value as part of a diverse police research agenda.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T06:32:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221087491
       
  • What it takes to be a “Good” correctional officer: Occupational
           fitness and co-worker expectations from the perspective of correctional
           officer recruits in Canada

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      Authors: Marcella Siqueira Cassiano, Brittany Ann Bennett, Elizabeth Andres, Rosemary Ricciardelli
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Selecting individuals who are the right “fit” for correctional work is not an easy task for prison administrators because of the dangerous nature of correctional work and the centrality of prison employees in the prisoner’s rehabilitation process. We analyze fitness for correctional work from the employee’s perspective, complementing the scholarship focused on the employer’s view. We measure occupational fitness in terms of co-worker expectations, analyzing 104 semi-structured interviews conducted with Federal Canadian Correctional Officer recruits in 2018/2019. Recruits in our sample expected a correctional officer to be accountable, reliable, and confident. Understanding the mind-set of new hires provides insights into the correctional officer role and allows employers to align employer-employee expectations, as well as review training and recruitment, which can improve the employee well-being and reduce turnover rates.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T06:31:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221087488
       
  • Investigating the role of social media abuse in gender-based violence: The
           experiences of women police officers

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      Authors: Susan Watson
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Online abuse communicated via social networking sites has increased considerably in recent years, with a significant amount of pejorative communication targeted at women. This mixed methods research study investigates the online abuse received by women police officers in the course of their work. The study considers how the abuse received in the online space echoes other forms of gender-based violence, drawing upon evidence gathered from semi-structured interviews with serving senior police officers in England and Wales. The research has devised a seven-element framework to demonstrate that the online abuse directed at women is misogynistic, frequently includes violent threats and dismisses female contributions to online discussions. The study also reveals that the abuse directed at women varies significantly, depending on occupation, with women police officers more likely to receive abuse that questions their ability or criticises their appearance.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T06:29:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221087487
       
  • Book review: The Official History of Criminal Justice in England and
           Wales. Volume II: Institution-Building

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      Authors: Thomas Guiney
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T11:27:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221083054
       
  • Early release from prison with electronic monitoring: Hook for or
           hindrance to change'

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      Authors: Emma Villman
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      In Finland, prisoners can be placed outside prison with electronic monitoring up to 6 months before their regular conditional release. This supervised probationary freedom entails electronic monitoring in one’s own home, participation in productive activities (work, education and rehabilitation), and other specified forms of supervision. This article explores prisoners’ experiences of early release with electronic monitoring by analysing qualitative interviews with 18 prisoners before and after their release from prison. Using the desistance theory of cognitive transformation, the author argues that while early release with electronic monitoring can function as a ‘hook for change’, inherent elements of the programme serve to hinder change and desistance from crime. Even if the combination of control and social support characterizing the Finnish regime of early release with electronic monitoring can help to promote social integration, it creates a vast and demanding sentence less successful in integrating prisoners into the labour market.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T09:34:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221080887
       
  • ‘A welcome change . . . but early days’: Irish Service Provider
           Perspectives on Domestic Abuse and the Domestic Violence Act 2018

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      Authors: Stephanie Thompson, David M Doyle, Muiread Murphy, Rosemary Mangan
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      This article is an exploratory study of service provider perspectives on the impact and effectiveness of the recently commenced Domestic Violence Act 2018 in Ireland. Drawing on 22 semi-structured interviews with domestic abuse organisations, and a review of both national and provincial newspaper sources, the article highlights the challenges facing domestic abuse service providers in Ireland and identifies key areas in need of reform. The research was conducted during the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic, and as such, provides a unique insight into the experiences of frontline service providers, and the victims that availed of their services, during the public health crisis.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:49:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958211067912
       
  • Preventing future crime in adolescent drug offenders: A study of
           differential sanction effects on recidivism

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      Authors: Thomas Anton Sandøy, Ståle Østhus, Anne Line Bretteville-Jensen
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines and compares the effects on recidivism of the three most common legal responses to minor drug offences for adolescents in Norway. The essential question is whether alternative sanctions are more effective in preventing any reoffending in young people than the traditional fine. Using a longitudinal register data set, comprising all 15- to 17-year-old, first-time drug offenders in the 2000–2015 period (N = 3276), we investigate differences in duration between first legal decision and second arrest and the number of offences during follow-up. Our findings suggest that rehabilitative measures, in the form of a conditional waiver of prosecution with specified conditions, were more effective in preventing recidivism in adolescent drug offenders than a fine. Given the design of this sanction, which includes follow-up by social services and monitoring of drug use by health services, deferrals in recidivism may be caused by both positive rehabilitation experiences and negative punishment experiences.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-01-22T10:50:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958211070364
       
  • Painful lives: Understanding self-harm amongst care-experienced women in
           prison

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      Authors: Claire Fitzpatrick, Katie Hunter, Julie Shaw, Jo Staines
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Self-harm incidents in custody in England and Wales recently reached a record high, increasing particularly in women’s establishments. This article explores experiences of self-harm by drawing on interviews with care-experienced women in prison in England. Using prior care experience as the underlying thread enables us to explore this topic through a different lens. Considering the functions of self-harm that women described, including the communication, alleviation and ending of pain, highlights the painful lives of those experiencing both state care and control institutions. This reveals that women have often been failed across different systems, sometimes with devastating consequences. Urgent attention must be paid to the system failures affecting those previously deemed by the state to require welfare and protection.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-01-17T08:56:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958211067914
       
  • Rejecting and retaining aspects of selfhood: Constructing desistance from
           abuse as a ‘masculine’ endeavour

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      Authors: David Morran
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Evaluative studies of men who have attended domestic violence perpetrator programmes have, thus far, paid attention to the question of what they are expected to desist from. This is entirely appropriate. However, the question of what they are expected to achieve, or ‘become’, is less clearly articulated, indeed often overlooked. Based on a series of interviews with men who had completed perpetrator programmes, the narratives explored in this articles suggest that their abusive behaviour was underpinned by fears about how to ‘perform masculinity’ satisfactorily in the past. Consequentially, the programme experience was perceived as threatening or as ‘feminising’. However, the accounts of these men suggest that in desisting from abusive behaviour, issues of identity and processes of behaviour change remain profoundly gendered. Indeed, committing to desistance is perceived as something of an ‘heroic struggle’ in which qualities associated with being a ‘proper man’ are harnessed and utilised in the process.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T11:54:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958211070365
       
  • Decision-making, aggression, age, and type of crime as predictors of
           coping among young adult male maximum-security incarcerated offenders

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      Authors: Sheree Elizabeth Pretorius, Jacques Jordaan, Karel Esterhuyse
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.
      Correctional environments are regarded as degrading, dangerous, difficult, stigmatizing, stressful, unsafe, and violent. Young adult male incarcerated offenders need to acquire the necessary coping skills to survive in the correctional environment. This research study aimed to determine which variable(s) or set of variables explain a significant percentage of the variance in coping among young adult male incarcerated offenders in a South African private maximum-security correctional center. The research approach in this study was quantitative, and the nature of the research was nonexperimental. A correlational research design was used. The sample consisted of 187 young adult male incarcerated offenders. The hierarchical regression analysis results indicated that vigilance was the only predictor variable that statistically and practically significantly predicted seeking social support and problem-solving. This finding implies that young adult offenders who are more vigilant regarding decision-making are more inclined to solve problems better and use social support to cope better.
      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T08:52:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958211067916
       
  • Book review: Normalizing Extreme Imprisonment: The Case of Life Without
           Parole in California

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      Authors: Janani Umamaheswar
      First page: 654
      Abstract: Criminology & Criminal Justice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Criminology & Criminal Justice
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T11:28:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17488958221083056
       
 
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