Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1397 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (30 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (52 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (65 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (28 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (23 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (161 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (23 journals)
    - LAW (843 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (11 journals)

CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 160 of 160 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Criminologica : Southern African Journal of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Cement Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 360)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Annual Review of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 404)
Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 348)
Biometric Technology Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Boletín Criminológico     Open Access  
Brill Research Perspectives in Transnational Crime     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 398)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Graduate Journal of Sociology and Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice / La Revue canadienne de criminologie et de justice pénale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 256)
Champ pénal/Penal field     Open Access  
Computer Fraud & Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 281)
Computer Law & Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Contemporary Challenges : The Global Crime, Justice and Security Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Justice Review: Issues in Criminal, Social, and Restorative Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Corrections : Policy, Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Crime & Delinquency     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Crime and Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Crime Prevention and Community Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 109)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Crime Science     Open Access   (Followers: 57)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Crime, Security and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Criminal Justice and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Criminal Justice Matters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Criminal Justice Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Criminal Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Criminal Law Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Criminocorpus, revue hypermédia     Open Access  
Criminological Studies     Open Access  
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Criminology and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Crítica Penal y Poder     Open Access  
Critical Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Cryptologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Datenschutz und Datensicherheit - DuD     Hybrid Journal  
Delito y Sociedad : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Derecho Penal y Criminología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Detection     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
EDPACS: The EDP Audit, Control, and Security Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
Estudios Penales y Criminológicos     Open Access  
EURASIP Journal on Information Security     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 269)
European Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
European Journal of Probation     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Polygraph     Open Access  
European Review of Organised Crime     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Feminist Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Forensic Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358)
Forensic Science International : Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forensic Science International: Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 282)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Homicide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
IEEE Security & Privacy Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Incarceration     Full-text available via subscription  
Information Security Journal : A Global Perspective     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Annals of Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
International Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Criminal Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Applied Cryptography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Criminology and Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Information and Coding Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Police Science and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 312)
International Journal of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Victimology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Journal of Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Computer Virology and Hacking Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Correctional Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Criminal Justice Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 126)
Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Criminology and Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 288)
Journal of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 367)
Journal of Gender-Based Violence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Illicit Economies and Development     Open Access  
Journal of International Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Penal Law & Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Perpetrator Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 410)
Journal of Quantitative Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Strategic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Justice Evaluation Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Justice Research and Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Kriminologia ikasten : Irakaskuntzarako aldizkaria     Open Access  
Kriminologisches Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Innovation and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Nordic Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Occasional Series in Criminal Justice and International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Police Journal : Theory, Practice and Principles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 317)
Police Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 297)
Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292)
Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 324)
Policy & Internet     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Política Criminal     Open Access  
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Punishment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Research and Reports in Forensic Medical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Arbitrada de Ciencias Jurídicas y Criminalísticas Iustitia Socialis     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Criminalística     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Jurídicos y Criminológicos     Open Access  
Revista de Movimentos Sociais e Conflitos     Open Access  
Revista Digital de la Maestría en Ciencias Penales     Open Access  
Rivista di Studi e Ricerche sulla criminalità organizzata     Open Access  
Science & Global Security: The Technical Basis for Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation Initiatives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Security Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
South African Crime Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Theory and Practice of Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Trends in Organized Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 372)
URVIO - Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios de Seguridad     Open Access  
Women & Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 277)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Criminal Justice Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.652
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0734-0168 - ISSN (Online) 1556-3839
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • CJR Publications Received List

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 409 - 409
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Volume 47, Issue 3, Page 409-409, September 2022.

      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T04:01:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221102100
      Issue No: Vol. 47, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Averting Tragedy: An Exploration of Thwarted Mass Public Shootings
           Relative to Completed Attacks

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      Authors: Michael Rocque, Madison Gerdes, James Alan Fox, Grant Duwe, Madeline Clark
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      Scholarship on mass public shootings has increased in recent years as comprehensive datasets have become more available. As a result, much is known about the contextual and offender related characteristics of such attacks. However, less research has been conducted on attacks that were planned but ultimately did not occur. Understanding how mass public shootings may be thwarted or averted is important for both policy and theoretical reasons. In this paper, we describe a new dataset of averted mass public shooting threats (N = 194) from 2000–2019 and compare them to mass public shootings that were completed during this time (N = 97). Several noteworthy findings emerged, including that nearly half of the averted cases were reported by a friend or acquaintance, most targeted a specific location or group, and averted cases were more likely to involve school targets and co-offenders. Implications are discussed.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T06:50:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221117107
       
  • Emerging Disparities in the Placement of Law Enforcement-Based Treatment
           Referral and Recovery Programs

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      Authors: Ellen A. Donnelly, Chenesia L. Brown, Allison McBride, Leo Beletsky, Tammy L. Anderson
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      Rising rates of opioid use disorder, overdoses, and opioid-related criminal offenses have prompted U.S. law enforcement agencies to adopt alternatives to arrest and formal criminal processing. Police departments frequently implement treatment referral programs and claim an affiliation with the Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI). Although expanding to hundreds of agencies, PAARI efforts may not be equally distributed across communities, raising concerns about access to non-arrest diversion and increasing disparities in the criminal processing of drug-related offenses. This study compares the characteristics and geographic placement of law enforcement agencies with and without PAARI programs in 29 states. Law enforcement agencies situated in communities with lower rates of poverty and smaller Black populations have lower odds of having a PAARI program. Agencies based in counties with more overdose deaths and greater unmet treatment needs have increased odds of deflection programing. This placement of PAARI programs reflects broader inequalities in criminal justice and health. More advantaged, predominantly white communities benefit from diversionary programs while fewer alternatives to formal criminal processing exist for lower-income areas and communities of color. Additional research should explore these growing disparities in the deployment of law enforcement-based treatment referral programs and their consequences on drug law enforcement.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-07-28T05:50:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221117109
       
  • In the Best Interests of the Child' Distinctions Between the
           rofessional Orientations of Juvenile and Adult Probation and Parole
           Officers

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      Authors: Riane M. Bolin, Brandon K. Applegate
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      Despite fundamental distinctions between the ideals of juvenile and criminal justice, little research has sought to establish the extent to which juvenile probation and parole officers’ orientations differ from those of their adult counterparts. Further, of the few studies that have explored this area of study, none have examined the role that organizational context may play in predicting professional orientation. Thus, this study aims to fill the gap in the literature by utilizing a sample of probation and parole officers drawn from three different types of agencies: juvenile-only supervision, adult-only supervision, and combined supervision. The results show that the system within which officers work is associated with professional orientation. Distinctions, however, are not as large or consistent as would be expected from strict adherence to the traditional ideals of the juvenile justice system versus the criminal justice system. The implications of these findings are discussed.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-07-28T05:49:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221117108
       
  • Perceptions of School Resource Officers: Protectors or Prosecutors '

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      Authors: Matthew Almanza, Makayla Mason, Chris Melde
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      Since the 1990s there has been a significant rise in the number of police officers in schools. There have been growing concerns regarding the effects of school resource officers (SRO) on students’ long-term outcomes and whether or not they are an effective aspect of school safety. Public opinion, especially among key stakeholder groups, impacts policy and practice decisions, and, therefore, there is a need to examine and synthesize the current state of the literature on stakeholder perceptions of SROs. We conducted a systematic review of the literature regarding student, teacher, principal, parent, and SRO perceptions of the role and effectiveness of SROs. The findings across thirty-one publications suggest that key stakeholder groups largely report SROs as a positive presence within schools. Findings are mixed across studies, however, and key differences in perceptions of law enforcement among important school stakeholder populations are discussed.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-07-26T06:29:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221113352
       
  • Examining Deviant Peer Association as a Moderator of the Relationship
           Between Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms and Substance Use

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      Authors: Thomas Wojciechowski
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      Borderline personality disorder has been identified as a robust risk factor predicting substance use. There is a dearth of research examining how peer ties may condition this relationship. This study hypothesized that deviant peer association would amplify the relationship between Borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms and substance use. The Pathways to Desistance data were analyzed. Ordered logistic regression was used to analyze data. Results indicated that elevated levels of BPD symptoms predicted increased substance use frequency. Deviant peer association moderated the effects of BPD symptoms on marijuana use frequency and daily cigarette use. This moderation effect was in the opposite direction hypothesized, indicating that greater levels of deviant peer association dulled the effect on BPD symptoms on substance use. The unexpected effect indicated that youth reporting symptoms may be buffered against the impact of strain by having any peer relationships, even deviant ones.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-07-26T06:29:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221105000
       
  • Book Review: Police-Related Deaths in the United States by David Baker

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      Authors: Andrew M. Payne
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-16T05:47:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221108868
       
  • Perceptions of Substance Use Disorder and Associated Sanctions: A
           Factorial Vignette Experiment

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      Authors: Benjamin T. Kuettel
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines whether characteristics of people who use drugs (PWUD) influence public perceptions of substance use disorder (SUD) and punitiveness. Using a full-factorial vignette experiment, a nationwide sample (N = 448), and a series of regression models, I estimate the causal effect of characteristics of PWUD on substance use evaluations and punitiveness. Results reveal that drug type and prior criminal drug record affected both SUD and punitive judgements, implying a prosocial punitiveness, where punishments are intended to rehabilitate. Demographics of PWUD (e.g., race, sex, etc.) mattered little. However, racial resentment moderated the relationship between SUD and punitiveness, suggesting aggressive punitiveness. These findings imply that SUD evaluations and punitiveness are linked in the public mind, suggesting that citizens may see punishments as a way to address SUD by helping PWUD recover. This is not true for racially resentful respondents, who appear to want to punish PWUD for punishment's sake.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T05:54:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221105002
       
  • PTSD as a Predictor of Differential Development of Dual Systems Model
           Constructs: A Group-Based Trajectory Modeling Approach

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      Authors: Thomas Wojciechowski
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      The dual systems model is a prominent framework for understanding how differential cognitive development of impulse control and sensation-seeking predicts peak involvement in risky behaviors during adolescence. This study examines heterogeneity in the development of dual systems constructs and examines post-traumatic stress disorder as a driver of differential development. This study utilized data from all 11 waves of the Pathways to Desistance study. Group-based trajectory modeling was used to identify heterogeneity in developmental patterns of impulse control and sensation-seeking. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the relevance of post-traumatic stress disorder for predicting differential development. Results indicated that three-group models provided best fit to the data for both constructs. All groups in both models were highly stable and demonstrated rank stability. Meeting criteria for a lifetime diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder predicted patterns of stable and high sensation-seeking, but did not predict development of impulse control. Findings suggest that individuals suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder should be targeted with programming to diminish sensation-seeking; potentially through criminal justice system intervention.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T05:24:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221098371
       
  • The Role of the Media in the Fear of Crime: A Qualitative Study in the
           Portuguese Context

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      Authors: Cynthia Silva, Inês Guedes
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      The present study, using a Portuguese sample, is aimed at understanding how the media shapes the fear of crime experiences. Concretely, we explored how individuals interpret the content transmitted by the media and how these perceptions influence the fear of crime contextually situated. It was also our aim to explore if the area of residence (rural and urban), as well as certain sociodemographic characteristics (such as gender), were important in the way meanings are attributed to the media in experiences of insecurity. In total, 20 semi-structured interviews were undertaken (n = 12 women; 13 from rural areas and 7 from urban areas). Among the relevant results found in the present study, one of the conclusions we can highlight is that it is not possible to establish a clear relationship between media consumption and insecurity feelings. Indeed, media do not totally shape the fear of crime experiences, as a panoply of meanings has emerged, which makes their influence differential. Thus, aspects such as the sensationalism, the location of the reported crime, the realism of the news and the proximity to the event are examples of factors that emerged with great relevance in this investigation. In short, this study allowed the authors to reach a depth and diversity of meanings of insecurity, through several approaches that were the basis for their understanding and confirms the relevance of studying this theme from experiences and discourses using qualitative research.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T09:08:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221088570
       
  • The “Civilizing” Effect of Body-Worn Cameras on Police-Civilian
           Interactions: Examining the Current Evidence, Potential Moderators, and
           Methodological Limitations

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      Authors: Samuel Choi, Nicholas D. Michalski, Jamie A. Snyder
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      Past studies on the “civilizing” effect of body-worn cameras (BWC) on police and civilian behavior have yielded mixed results. Some studies have shown a reduction in the use of force reports (e.g., Ariel et al., 2015) and civilian complaints ( Hedberg et al., 2017) as a result of officers utilizing BWCs. However, other studies have found null effects (e.g., Yokum et al., 2017) or even the opposite findings (i.e., increases in use of force reports; Ariel et al., 2016a). In the current review, we aim to reconcile these inconsistencies by discussing psychological factors (i.e., police attitudes toward BWCs, civilian attitudes toward the police, geographic psychology, officer perceptions of self-legitimacy, and civilian stress) that may moderate the civilizing effect of BWCs. We also highlight the methodological issues (i.e., contamination, unit of analysis, and low base rates) that have burdened past studies involving field experiments and advocate for the use of multiple methods to strengthen any existing weaknesses in the literature. Overall, we argue for a closer examination of individual-level psychological factors and the use of multiple methods to help elucidate the ambiguities concerning the “civilizing” effect found in the BWC literature.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T07:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221093549
       
  • COVID-19 and Gun Violence: Keeping Unknown Shocks and Volatility in
           Perspective

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      Authors: Dae-Young Kim
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      The current study estimates the varying effects of the pandemic on gun violence by social distancing type, fatality, and location. Interrupted time series analyses are used to examine weekly crime data from 2016 to 2020 in New York City. Box-Cox power transformation and GARCH techniques are used to address the problems of non-normality and heteroscedasticity in the models. There were significant increases in fatal and non-fatal shootings during the relaxation of social distancing. The impact of the BLM protests and depolicing is significant for non-fatal shootings. The pandemic led to greater increases in gun violence in The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Queens, as opposed to Staten Island. In addition, there is some evidence of increases in the volatility of gun violence during the pandemic. High volatility implies crime rates are in severe flux, which then leads to greater uncertainty and fear for public safety. This paper surfaces useful information for guiding policy and practice.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-23T07:10:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221088571
       
  • Black, White, and Read all Over: Exploring Racial Bias in Print media
           Coverage of Serial Rape Cases

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      Authors: Lauren E. Wright, Stephen J. Watts
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      The discussion of race and crime has been a long-standing interest of researchers, with statistics consistently showing an overrepresentation of non-white offenders compared to their white counterparts – specifically in relation to violent crimes such as murder and rape. Prior research has found that about 46 percent of identified serial rapists are black, which correlates with other sensationalized violent crimes such as mass murder and serial murder (Wright, Vander Ven, & Fesmire; 2016). The news media are the primary sources of this kind of information for the general public, with previous studies acknowledging that the media primarily focus on discussing non-white offenders in their crime-based news stories. With the majority of Americans receiving their information about crime from the news media, it is important to increase our understanding of how they present crime information. The current study explores the print media representations of serial rapists, from 1940–2010, from five prominent newspapers: The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, and the Chicago Tribune. A content analysis was conducted on 524 articles covering 297 serial rape offenders from the data compiled by Wright and colleagues (2016) in which race of the offender was known. Results suggest that while newspapers dehumanize both white and non-white offenders, white offenders tend to have their behavior neutralized using techniques to garner more sympathy, while these same neutralization techniques are not generally applied to non-white offenders, thus potentially increasing racial and ethnic bias.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T07:56:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221088573
       
  • Book Review: Blind injustice: A former prosecutor exposes the psychology
           and politics of wrongful convictions by Godsey, M.

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      Authors: Sydney Flonnoy
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T05:27:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221082949
       
  • Book Review: Debating the drug war: race, politics, and the media by
           Rosino, M.

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      Authors: Miltonette Olivia Craig
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T05:05:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221082952
       
  • Book Review: Why hackers Win: power and disruption in the network society
           by Patrick Burkart & Tom McCourt

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      Authors: Jay S. Albanese
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T05:43:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221082951
       
  • Sentencing of Technical and Low-Level Supervision Violations: An Analysis
           of Fixed Effects Across Federal Judicial Districts

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      Authors: Joseph A. DaGrossa
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      A considerable amount of previous research has examined the iatrogenic effects of mass imprisonment. This work has often considered the fact that the sentencing of people for low-level supervision violations is a contributing factor to the prison population. Relatively little work, however, has examined the factors which specifically influence the sentencing of probation and parole violators for technical and other low-level infractions. The present study analyzed over 44,000 cases of individuals who appeared in federal courts between 2013 and 2017 for relatively minor violations of federal community-based supervision. Using multilevel analysis to account for the nested quality of federal sentencing data, the study examined assorted individual-level legal and extra-legal effects on various sentencing outcomes. Effects were found for gender, having admitted to supervision violations, and predicate offense of conviction. Implications are presented.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T05:29:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221078341
       
  • Comparing Fatal Encounters, Mapping Police Violence, and Washington Post
           Fatal Police Shooting Data from 2015–2019: A Research Note

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      Authors: Benjamin P. Comer, Jason R. Ingram
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      This research note empirically assessed similarities and differences among three open-source data sets from 2015-2019. Fatal police shooting incidents were compared across Washington Post, Mapping Police Violence, and Fatal Encounters data over a five-year period. One-way ANOVAs, bivariate correlations, and proportional percentage differences were used to examine mean differences, correlational strength, and yearly percentage difference trends. No significant mean differences were observed between Fatal Encounters, Mapping Police Violence, and Washington Post. With one exception, bivariate correlations between all three data source dyads were consistently strong. Percentage difference comparisons among data source dyads, however, revealed that the sources are becoming more dissimilar in their reporting of fatal shootings over time. Our results complement existing literature that has compared open-source police shooting data to government sources and suggest that the three data sources were strongly associated with one another from 2015-2019. Increasing differences between sources, however, necessitate continued inspection of the data across the various open-source platforms over time.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T06:39:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168211071014
       
  • Comparing the Sexual and Mental Health of Justice-involved Youth Across
           Gender and Sexual Orientation

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      Authors: Kevin J. Hsu, Angela L. Walden, Ashley D. Kendall, Nyssa L. Snow-Hill, Erin M. Emerson, Geri R. Donenberg
      First page: 354
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      Justice-Involved youth may experience unique sexual and mental health risks related to both their gender and sexual orientation. Although previous research has revealed important gender and sexual orientation differences in the sexual and mental health of Justice-Involved youth, no study has yet examined gender and sexual orientation differences simultaneously within the same sample. The present study addressed this gap in a sample of 347 probation-involved youth, 13–17 years old, recruited as part of a randomized controlled trial of PHAT Life, an HIV/STI, mental health, and substance use prevention program. On the one hand, female and non-heterosexual youth were less likely than male and heterosexual youth to report having ever had sex and to be considered high sexual risk. On the other hand, female youth were more likely than male youth to test positive for STIs and to report certain mental health problems, but non-heterosexual youth showed no difference from heterosexual youth. Finally, female non-heterosexual youth were more likely to report externalizing problems than youth of other gender and sexual orientation combinations. Findings highlight the need for prevention and intervention efforts that specifically target Justice-involved youth who identify as female, non-heterosexual, or both.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T03:04:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221078343
       
  • Back in My Day: Generational Beliefs About School Shootings

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      Authors: Amanda Graham, Cheryl Lero Jonson, Heejin Lee
      First page: 369
      Abstract: Criminal Justice Review, Ahead of Print.
      Following a school shooting, the public and media search to understand what factors led to such tragedy. Faced with grief, fear, and confusion, people often seek to make sense of traumatic events. As such, this study uses a 2020 Amazon Mechanical Turk survey (N = 739) to examine the impact of generational cohort on the blameworthiness of various perceived causes of school shootings. Findings support some generational differences. Baby Boomers were more likely to believe in societal-related causes of school shootings compared to Millennials and Generation Z. Conversely, Millennials and Generation Z were more likely than Baby Boomers to attribute the cause of school shootings to bullying, mental health, and school security. These findings suggest that future school shooting policies will seek to address bullying, mental health, and school security, while policies surrounding societal factors may be phased out.
      Citation: Criminal Justice Review
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T07:07:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07340168221098367
       
 
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