Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1397 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (30 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (52 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (65 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (28 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (23 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (161 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (23 journals)
    - LAW (843 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (11 journals)

CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 147 of 147 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Cement Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
African Security Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 341)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Asian Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 365)
Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 344)
Biometric Technology Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Boletín Criminológico     Open Access  
Brill Research Perspectives in Transnational Crime     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
British Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 380)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Graduate Journal of Sociology and Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice / La Revue canadienne de criminologie et de justice pénale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 264)
Champ pénal/Penal field     Open Access  
Computer Fraud & Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 389)
Computer Law & Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Contemporary Challenges : The Global Crime, Justice and Security Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Contemporary Justice Review: Issues in Criminal, Social, and Restorative Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Corrections : Policy, Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Crime & Delinquency     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Crime and Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Crime Prevention and Community Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 124)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crime Science     Open Access   (Followers: 56)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Crime, Security and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Criminal Justice and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Criminal Justice Matters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Criminal Justice Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Criminal Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Criminal Law Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Criminocorpus, revue hypermédia     Open Access  
Criminological Studies     Open Access  
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Criminology and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Crítica Penal y Poder     Open Access  
Critical Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Cryptologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Datenschutz und Datensicherheit - DuD     Hybrid Journal  
Derecho Penal y Criminología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Detection     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
EDPACS: The EDP Audit, Control, and Security Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
Estudios Penales y Criminológicos     Open Access  
EURASIP Journal on Information Security     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 276)
European Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
European Journal of Probation     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Polygraph     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Review of Organised Crime     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Feminist Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Forensic Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 363)
Forensic Science International : Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Forensic Science International: Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 279)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Homicide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
IEEE Security & Privacy Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Incarceration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Information Security Journal : A Global Perspective     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Annals of Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
International Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Criminal Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Applied Cryptography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Criminology and Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Information and Coding Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Police Science and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 308)
International Journal of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Victimology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Computer Virology and Hacking Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Journal of Criminal Justice Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Criminology and Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 284)
Journal of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 367)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of International Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Penal Law & Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 392)
Journal of Quantitative Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Strategic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Justice Evaluation Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Justice Research and Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Kriminologia ikasten : Irakaskuntzarako aldizkaria     Open Access  
Kriminologisches Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Innovation and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Nordic Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Occasional Series in Criminal Justice and International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Police Journal : Theory, Practice and Principles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 307)
Police Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 287)
Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 381)
Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 345)
Policy & Internet     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Política Criminal     Open Access  
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Punishment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Research and Reports in Forensic Medical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revista de Estudios Jurídicos y Criminológicos     Open Access  
Revista de Movimentos Sociais e Conflitos     Open Access  
Revista Digital de la Maestría en Ciencias Penales     Open Access  
Rivista di Studi e Ricerche sulla criminalità organizzata     Open Access  
Science & Global Security: The Technical Basis for Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation Initiatives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Security Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
South African Crime Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Theory and Practice of Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Trends in Organized Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356)
URVIO - Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios de Seguridad     Open Access  
Women & Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 312)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Criminal Justice and Behavior
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.426
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 47  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0093-8548 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3594
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • One Size Doesn’t Fit All: An Exploratory Typological Approach to
           Understanding Criminal Career Heterogeneity in Intimate Partner Homicide

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Olivier Péloquin, Julien Chopin, Francis Fortin, Jean-Pierre Guay, Eric Chartrand, Sarah Paquette
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Approximately one in seven homicides globally is committed by a partner within an intimate relationship. While criminology research on intimate partner homicide (IPH) perpetrators is extensive, their interactions with law enforcement remain underexplored. This study examines the criminal trajectories of IPH perpetrators to ascertain whether they exhibit common or diverse patterns. Utilizing data from Quebec’s official criminal events database, the study analyzes variables concerning the criminal histories of 1,780 individuals involved in attempted or completed IPH through latent profile analysis. Findings indicate five distinct profiles among IPH perpetrators: one-time, low-volume intimate partner violence (IPV), moderate-volume IPV, high-volume violence, and high-volume polymorphous perpetrators. The external validity of these profiles is assessed using additional criminal career, contextual, and situational variables. Implications for the justice system’s practices and challenges are also discussed.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-06-25T08:41:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241257604
       
  • Evaluations of Eight Communication Skills in Police–Civilian
           Interactions

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      Authors: Congyu Wang, Qiuyue Gao, Hu Wang
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      To create a framework encompassing a broad spectrum of police communication skills, our study utilized the Communicative Function Questionnaire, a validated tool from communication studies. Two cross-sectional surveys with 627 participants in China assessed the perceived importance of eight communication skills in police–civilian interactions. Study 1 indicated potential undervaluation of skills by police compared with civilians, although both groups rated them as moderately important or higher. Study 2 categorized police communication skills into two categories: functional (referential, regulative, conflict management) and relational (comforting, ego support, conversational, persuasive, narrative), with civilians favoring functional skills. Furthermore, our investigation into demographic influences on the evaluation of relational skills revealed that any of the following groups: men, individuals over 25, or residents of certain regions, placed a higher value on relational skills. Our findings highlight the importance of functional skills and suggest strategically developing relational skills tailored to the preferences of diverse demographic groups.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-06-24T10:20:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241260827
       
  • Suicide-Related Outcomes Among Adults in Custody: An Umbrella Review of
           Systematic Literature Reviews

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      Authors: Serena Bruno, Silvia Andreassi, Giulia Ballarotto, Valeria Carola, Silvia Cimino, Giacomo Ciocca, Barbara Cordella, Michela Di Trani, Federica Galli, Carlo Lai, Viviana Langher, Erika Limoncin, Manuela Tomai, Patrizia Velotti
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      We conducted a comprehensive umbrella review including all published meta-analyses and systematic reviews on suicide-related outcomes among adults in custody. Eligible studies were searched for in major scientific databases following the PRISMA method up to February 2023. The quality of each study was assessed using the AMSTAR-2 protocol. Twenty studies were included, consisting of 11 meta-analyses and nine systematic reviews. Factors associated with suicide outcomes among individuals in custody were categorized into five domains: clinical status, historical, custodial, criminological, and prevention. However, all systematic studies reported considerable heterogeneity (I2> 50%–85%). Most systematic literature reviews and/or meta-analyses showed moderate quality based on AMSTAR-2. This umbrella review highlights individual factors (in the clinical status and historical domain), contextual factors (in the custodial and criminological domains), and protective factors (in the prevention domain) to provide a clearer understanding of the prison-related domains involved in the development and maintenance of suicide-related outcomes.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-06-24T07:04:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241260806
       
  • “People, Places, and Things”: Understanding the Context of
           Participants’ Lives in a Diversion Drug Court

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      Authors: Elizabeth N. Hartsell, Mckenzie L. Jossie, Jodi Lane
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      To better understand the struggles drug court participants face and their relationship to graduation status, we took freehand notes during observations of staff meetings (N = 119) and court dockets (N = 147) and used thematic analysis to examine the notations. Themes included participants’ ongoing mental and physical health issues, legal issues outside of drug court, experience with both prosocial and antisocial relationships, drug use by family and friends, and a variety of treatment barriers even in a program designed to mitigate these. We expected ongoing legal issues outside of drug court, physical and mental health struggles, and family and friends being supportive, or not, to be related to graduation but they were not. However, COVID-19 and treatment barriers were significantly related to graduation status. Results add to the scholarly literature, especially that focusing on justice and court processes post-COVID-19, and can assist practitioners in understanding what factors may need more attention and resources.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-06-07T11:36:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241257606
       
  • Restorative Justice Behind Bars: People in Custody’s Facilitators and
           Barriers to Participating in Restorative Justice

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      Authors: Inbal Peleg-Koriat, Dana Weimann-Saks
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Restorative justice (RJ) is a way of doing justice following an offense that is oriented toward repairing individual, relational, and social harm. Despite indications of their contribution to rehabilitation, RJ is still used infrequently, especially in serious offenses. We believe implementing them in prison is likely to provide access to RJ to a wider population. Twenty-three adult correctional clients were interviewed about their attitudes toward participation in RJ while in custody. Specifically, the study examined facilitators and barriers affecting their willingness to participate. The facilitators found included the following: (1) Desire to seek forgiveness; (2) Expressing respect for the victim; (3) Reciprocity—the correctional client as a victim; and (4) Desire to renew relationships. The barriers identified were as follows: (1) Fear of the victims’ reactions; (2) Disbelief in the victim’s ability to forgive; and (3) Unwillingness to include their supporters. These facilitators and barriers are discussed with a view to implementing RJ in prisons.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-06-05T08:47:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241257608
       
  • How Does the Public Explain Police Misconduct' Race, Politics, and
           Attributions

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      Authors: Amanda Graham, Justin T. Pickett, Francis T. Cullen
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Why have public reactions to police misconduct been so polarized, and why have opposing social movements emerged in response' This study explores attributions of police misconduct, using a myriad of possible attributions and a population-matched national sample (N = 700), to extend our understanding of the perceived causes of police misconduct and who holds which attributions, focusing on race, racial attitudes, and political ideology. We find that attributions could be divided into (a) multifaceted attributions—the belief that misconduct has multiple causes; and (b) excusatory attributions—the belief that misconduct is caused by factors external to police officers and agencies. Endorsement of these attributions stems from racial and political attitudes, with mediation analyses finding that race plays an indirect role in endorsing attributions of police misconduct. As such, efforts to address police misconduct face not only a political power struggle but also a racially attitudinal one.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-05-31T06:23:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241253737
       
  • Changes in Probation Officer Behavior and Caseload Recidivism Following
           Training in Cognitive-Behavioral Techniques

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      Authors: Damon Mitchell, Raymond Chip Tafrate, Stephen M. Cox, Tom Hogan, Guy Bourgon, Tanya Rugge
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Implementation of risk-need-responsivity principles in probation has fostered the development of programs that train probation officers (POs) to directly address clients’ criminogenic needs during office visits. This study examined changes in PO office visit behavior and changes in caseload recidivism rates, following participation in the Forensic Cognitive-Behavioral Techniques (CBt) training program. Training was delivered to 39 POs over 10 sessions. PO behavior and skills were assessed using pre- and posttraining audio-recorded office visits. Coders blind to the pre/post nature of the recordings rated them on multiple variables across three domains: (1) Use of CBt, (2) Office Visit Content, and (3) Communication/Relationship Building skills. At posttraining, POs demonstrated increased use of CBt, greater focus on criminogenic needs, and improved communication skills. Overall, caseload recidivism rates declined posttraining. Despite challenges, training programs like Forensic CBt are associated with more skilled interactions during office visits and reductions in recidivism.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-05-21T04:14:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241253122
       
  • Where Do Cops Stop' A New Dimension to Explore Spatial Patterns of
           Police Contacts

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      Authors: Cory Schnell, Hunter Boehme
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      While police officers must adapt behavior between places to effectively do their jobs, these decisions could result in some communities receiving different levels of exposure to the police. This study explores a new spatial measure of police contacts to observe these differences. We calculate neighborhood-specific Gini coefficients based upon the spatial distribution of 77,752 police-civilian stops at street segments and intersections nested within census tracts in Oakland, California. This coefficient presents a contrast between two divergent distributional patterns—the diffusion of police contacts to more places across neighborhoods and the concentration of contacts at fewer “hot spot” places within neighborhoods. The most consistent environmental explanation for these differences was the race/ethnicity of neighborhood residents, which was associated with the police stopping people across more places. Future research should continue to investigate this finding and examine the mechanisms that explain why spatial exposure to police contacts changes between places.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-05-13T07:29:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241249700
       
  • Women’s Homelessness and the Justice System: A Study of Desistance and
           Social (Re)integration Among Canadian Women Who Used or Did Not Use
           Criminal Activities to Survive

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      Authors: Mathilde Moffet-Bourassa, Isabelle F.-Dufour
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Women experiencing homelessness (WEH) are a marginalized group who often lack support services, leading them to adopt alternative survival strategies that leave them at risk of being victimized and becoming involved with the justice-system. To better understand this problem, we analyzed the adaptive strategies Canadian WEH use to survive. Comparing the life histories of WEH who turned to criminal activities (n = 4) with WEH who demonstrated prosocial resilience (n = 4) makes it possible to identify protective and risk factors for criminal behavior and to propose adaptive strategies that can be used to support these women to adopt a prosocial lifestyle. The results provide a framework for understanding the needs of WEH, filling a gap that results from the focus on men needs in most scientific literature and by many resources, and suggesting that meeting those needs may reduce the likelihood that WEH will become involved with the justice-system.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-05-13T07:13:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241249610
       
  • “We’ve Got History Now”: Victim and Justice-Involved Youth
           Experiences During Mediation Sessions

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      Authors: Cailey Strauss, Jorden A. Cummings, Kendall Deleurme
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Victim-offense mediation (VOM) is the process by which victims of crime meet the involved youth, in the presence of trained mediators, to process and address the emotional and practical ramifications of the crime. We aimed to qualitatively understand the experiences of victims and justice-involved youth during mediation sessions. Participants were recruited from one American and one Canadian mediation center, We combined field observations, semi-structured interviews, and multiple case study analyses with reflexive thematic analysis to explore nine cases of VOM participants’ experiences of the process and its potential link with various desired outcomes immediately following VOM. We generated five themes: Attempting to Satisfy Mediation Needs, Apologies, The Gravitational Pull of Victims, Finding a Healing Connection, and Corrective Emotional Experience & Challenged Expectations. We discuss these themes, the importance of relational processes, the importance and potential burden of the compelling victim, corrective emotional experiences, and the potential role of the mediators.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-05-01T07:35:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241237183
       
  • Examining the Measurement Invariance and Psychometrics of the Drug Abuse
           Screening Test for Adolescents (DAST-A) in Justice-Involved Youth

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      Authors: Alexandra Mogadam, Tracey A. Skilling, Michele Peterson-Badali, Liam Hannah
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Substance abuse is a serious mental health concern and reoffense risk factor for justice-involved youth. The Drug Abuse Screening Test for Adolescents (DAST-A) is used to assess drug abuse in different contexts, yet its psychometric properties have not yet been thoroughly explored in youth justice samples. We examined the measurement invariance and psychometrics of the DAST-A in a diverse sample of 741 justice-involved youth (Nyoung men = 636). The tool showed strong reliability in the overall sample and subgroups (ω = .88–.94), and good convergent and concurrent validity. Logistic regression results indicated that, with each unit increase in DAST-A score, the odds of an substance use disorder (SUD) diagnosis increased by 23% (overall sample). The predictive validity findings were more robust for White youth than Black youth and as a result, a different cut-off score was explored for Black youth. The DAST-A demonstrated measurement invariance across gender and race. Practice implications are discussed.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-04-27T09:53:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241246437
       
  • Toward Accountability: A Qualitative Assessment of Supervision Officers’
           Responses to Noncompliance During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Lucas M. Alward, Ashley Lockwood, Jill Viglione
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic placed new strains on community corrections including officers’ ability to enforce and respond to client noncompliance. With system-wide closures to courthouses, delays in case processing, and limited incarceration space, supervision officers were faced with new challenges regarding the availability of sanction response options. The goal of the current study was to examine how supervision officers responded to noncompliance when traditional, incarceration-based sanctions were largely unavailable. Drawing on qualitative interviews with American probation/parole officers (PPOs) (n = 42), we identified several themes surrounding changes in officers’ strategies to address and respond to noncompliance. Results from thematic analysis suggest major changes in how PPOs monitored supervision compliance during the pandemic including changes to client supervision requirements, modality of contacts, and use of technology for remote surveillance. Findings also revealed changes in how PPOs applied traditional graduated sanctions during the pandemic. Implications of these findings are discussed.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-04-25T05:53:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241246149
       
  • An Intersectional Analysis of Perceptions of Race in U.S. Prisons From
           Individuals Previously Incarcerated With Mental Illness

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      Authors: Anthony Banks, Kelli E. Canada, Stacy Barrenger, Casey Bohrman, Anna Cox
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Despite efforts to reduce the number of people in the United States living in prison, people with mental illnesses continue to be overrepresented in prisons. This study explores how race impacts the prison experiences of individuals with mental illnesses. Thirty-seven participants were recruited from three states via flyers at community treatment providers and through word of mouth. Participants completed in-depth, semi-structured interviews and surveys to understand prison experiences and collect demographic information. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, framework method analysis, and an intersectional lens. Findings show that participant experiences were influenced by race through interpersonal interactions between those incarcerated and through interactions between people incarcerated and correctional staff. Intersectional identities underlying these interactions were explored including race, socioeconomic status, rural versus urban residents, and subordinate/dominant roles tied to power (e.g., staff vs. person incarcerated). These findings provide insight into how race, mental illness, and criminal-legal contact intersect.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-04-25T05:48:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241245719
       
  • When a Boy Hurts a Girl in Cyberspace: Facilitators’ Views on Potential
           Benefits and Challenges in Restorative Justice

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      Authors: Natalie Hadar, Ronen Shehman, Tali Gal
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Recent years have seen a significant increase in cyber sexual offenses (CSO) conducted through the creation and distribution of intimate images and videos of others without their knowledge or consent, oftentimes among minors. Restorative justice (RJ) offers a platform to conduct an open, direct, and safe dialogue between responsible persons (RP) and survivors. This explorative study aimed to identify the central characteristics of RJ processes conducted following CSO between youths and to explore their potential benefits and challenges. The study involved in-depth interviews with 10 RJ facilitators and mediators in Israel and Belgium, who led RJ processes following CSO among minors. In addition, content analysis of documents describing these processes was conducted. Four themes emerged: The uniqueness of youth CSO; features of direct encounter; intergenerational aspects; and the need to manage expectations of the process among youth, parents, and facilitators.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-04-22T08:57:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241246152
       
  • Person-Centered Combinations of Individual, Familial, Neighborhood, and
           Structural Risk Factors Differentially Relate to Antisocial Behavior and
           Psychopathology

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      Authors: Jordyn R. Ricard, Luke W. Hyde, Arielle Baskin-Sommers
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Research highlights risk factors across systems, from person to community, for understanding antisocial behavior. However, limited research used person-centered analyses to investigate how individual, familial, neighborhood, and structural risk factors cluster and relate to antisocial behavior. We applied latent profile analysis to questionnaires and Census-derived data (N = 478; Northeast sample). A five-profile solution fit best (1: Low Risk; 2: Elevated Personality Risk; 3: Elevated Family and Structural Risk; 4: Elevated Personality, Family, and Neighborhood Risk; 5: Elevated Neighborhood and Structural Risk). We compared profiles across questionnaire-based, interview-based, and criminal record outcomes. The Elevated Personality, Family, and Neighborhood Risk profile had the strongest relationship to risky behavior and an antisocial personality disorder diagnosis. The Elevated Neighborhood and Structural Risk profile showed the strongest relationship to number of crimes. These results elucidate patterns of co-occurring risk within-people, across systems, and reveal important commonalities and dissociations among forms of antisocial behavior.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-04-20T09:56:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241246146
       
  • Family Systems, Inequality, and Juvenile Justice

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      Authors: Nancy Rodriguez, Margaret Goldman
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      America’s juvenile justice system was founded on the notion that the juvenile court would serve as the “ultimate parent” for youth. Yet, the history of youth punishment challenges the promise of juvenile “justice.” To offer a more comprehensive account of the family systems in juvenile court, this study draws from the insights of historical research on youth punishment and family criminalization to examine juvenile court outcomes in Arizona. Combining a historical lens with insights from attribution theory, we use quantitative and qualitative methods to examine the relationship between diverse family systems, including single mothers, single fathers, extended families, and foster care families, and juvenile court outcomes (i.e., diversion, preadjudication detention, petition, and judicial dismissal). Our findings suggest the need for more complex understandings of both family and punishment, and more expansive theorizations of the sorts of solutions that match the scope and scale of the problem.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-04-20T09:50:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241246143
       
  • Perceptions of Probation Officer Procedural Justice and Recidivism: A
           Longitudinal Study in the Netherlands

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      Authors: Matthias Van Hall, Thomas Baker, Anja J. E. Dirkzwager, Paul Nieuwbeerta
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The importance of procedural justice for reducing offending behavior has been demonstrated in numerous contexts and among various criminal justice authorities. However, to date, few studies have evaluated the importance of procedural justice in the probation officer–client relationship. Understanding how to reduce offending and prevent recidivism among people on probation is important as this group represents people among the most likely to engage in future offending. Using longitudinal data from the Prison Project, this study examines the association between perceptions of probation officer procedural justice, felt obligation to obey the law, and recidivism during a 12-month follow-up period. Results indicate that procedural justice is associated with a greater felt obligation to obey the law and lower odds of recidivism. Like other criminal justice authorities, how probation officers interact with their clients may impact their clients’ offending behavior.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-04-12T12:24:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241244502
       
  • Examining the Utility of the Texas Risk Assessment System to Predict
           Community Supervision Compliance and Recidivism

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      Authors: Holly A. Miller, Elisa L. Toman, Kaitlyn M. Pederson
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Although most risk assessment research has examined tools in the prediction of recidivism, there is a growing body of literature that investigates risk assessment in the prediction of successful community supervision. The Texas Risk Assessment System–Community Supervision Tool (TRAS-CST) was developed from the Ohio Risk Assessment System–Community Supervision Tool (ORAS-CST) but has not been examined to predict recidivism or probation compliance. The current study investigates the predictive validity of the TRAS screener and full versions when examining supervision compliance and recidivism among a sample of 462 individuals on probation. Findings support predictive validity of incarceration due to rule violations and new offenses during supervision using the TRAS versions, along with the domains of the TRAS-CST version, although the effect sizes were small to moderate. Results also indicate that the domain scores on the full TRAS may provide important intervention focus for officers supervising individuals on community supervision.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-04-09T06:07:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241240991
       
  • Finding the Police Before the Police Find Them' Investigating How and Why
           Motorists Use Facebook for Knowledge of Roadside Drug Testing Locations

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      Authors: Laura Mills, James Freeman, Verity Truelove
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Facebook groups and pages exist that expose the locations of roadside drug testing, potentially undermining police enforcement and enabling punishment avoidance. This study aimed to understand how and why these sites are used, with a focus on Queensland motorists who reported using illicit drugs and/or medical cannabis and used Facebook police location communities. Interviews with 30 participants were conducted. A thematic analysis revealed that participants used police location communities to avoid receiving a charge for driving under the influence of drugs. Upon observation of a relevant roadside drug-testing location on police location communities, participants reported (a) delaying their driving and/or (b) circumventing the operation. Avoidance of roadside drug-testing locations appeared driven by the perception that laws for driving under the influence of drugs were unfair and that a charge for driving under the influence of drugs would negatively impact their life. The findings provide important knowledge regarding police location communities and have implications for how roadside drug testing could be most effectively operated.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-04-08T10:02:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241240064
       
  • Correctional Officer Responses to Workplace Trauma: Refining the Vicarious
           Trauma Toolkit

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      Authors: Frank Ferdik, Jon T. A. Gist, Hayden P. Smith
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The Vicarious Trauma Toolkit (VTT) was created as a mental health resource for first-responders such as police officers and fire fighters who are routinely exposed to vicarious workplace trauma. While VTT services are appropriate for these occupational groups, they seem less so for correctional officers who are also exposed to secondary trauma at work. To widen the VTT’s reach to a correctional context, open-ended questionnaire data gathered from correctional officers (N = 193) working in a Southeastern state prison system were analyzed inductively to understand the different types of trauma they encounter in their job, and their responses to trauma. Respondents cited both direct and vicarious trauma sources, including assaults, self-injury, and suicide. Their responses were categorized as either negative (alcohol use), neutral (professional detachment), or positive (gratefulness). Additional VTT resources that can reach an international audience of frontline workers are proposed in light of these findings.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-04-06T04:54:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241241012
       
  • The Focal Concerns of Stalking Victims: Examining Victims’ Decisions to
           Engage Civil and Criminal Legal Systems

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      Authors: Patrick Q. Brady, Bradford W. Reyns
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Few studies have explored the focal concerns theory as a framework for understanding crime victims’ decisions to adopt civil/criminal interventions. Using data from the 2019 National Crime Victimization Survey, the current study finds support for the theory, highlighting several factors influencing formal help-seeking decisions aligned with factors legal actors also consider in arrest and charging decisions. Indeed, stalking victims were more likely to apply for protection orders and/or contact the police after experiencing a repeated course of unwanted conduct (e.g., blameworthiness) by intimate partners (e.g., community protection) that caused victims to fear for themselves or others (e.g., community protection) and/or to access victim services (e.g., practical constraints). In addition, most victims believed they were targeted by stalkers who felt entitled, desired power and control, or felt rejected. The findings suggest implications for improving civil and criminal-legal responses to stalking complaints by outlining areas to probe during interviews for further corroboration.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-03-30T05:06:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241238344
       
  • The Influence Mechanism of Prison Police’s Depression: A
           Cross-Lagged Analysis

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      Authors: Xiaoqing Zeng, Hui Guo
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Due to the particularity of the work of the prison police, the prevalence of depression is increasing. To explore the influence mechanism of prison police depression, this study used questionnaire to measure burnout, work–family conflict, and depression of prison police in two follow-ups with 6-month intervals, and the number of valid subjects was 118. Cross-lagged analysis and longitudinal mediation analysis were used for data processing. The results showed that job burnout and depression among prison police can influence and predict each other. Work–family conflict significantly positively predicted depression. Burnout and work–family conflict are important predictors of changes in depression among prison police. The policy and practice implications of the findings are discussed at the end of the study.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-03-26T04:55:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241240307
       
  • Sports Involvement, Head Injury, and Delinquency: Evidence From a Sample
           of Juvenile Justice Involved Youth

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      Authors: Kristina Block, Eric J. Connolly
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research suggests that youth sports participation is moderately associated with reduced delinquency. However, little is known about whether head injury dampens this protective role of sports involvement. This study analyzes data from a sample of juvenile justice involved youth to assess (a) the relationship between sports involvement and head injury, (b) whether groups of sports involved youth with and without a head injury report varying levels of general, violent, and/or nonviolent delinquency, and (c) potential sex differences across these group. Results suggest that sports participation is not associated with head injury. Nonsports involved youth with a head injury report higher levels of general and violent delinquency, compared to nonsports involved youth without a head injury. Sports involved females with a head injury report higher levels of general and violent delinquency, compared to sports involved males with a head injury. Implications and avenues for future research are discussed.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-03-26T04:49:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241238351
       
  • “We Have Unique Experiences”: Familial Socialization of
           Children of Incarcerated Parents

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      Authors: Melissa E. Noel, Britany J. Gatewood, Sydni Myat Turner, Bahiyyah Muhammad
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      As millions of parents are held behind bars, there is a growing concern not only for the outcome for these individuals, but for their children. Researchers have pointed to familial socialization as a way for children to navigate their perceived social identities and combat negative outcomes. Thus, this study explored how family members mitigate adverse life outcomes for 82 adult children of incarcerated parents in a similar function as other social identifications. The findings illustrate four interconnected agents of parental incarceration socialization: “the talk,” familial beliefs, relationship with the incarcerated parent, and expression and navigation. Similar to other social identities, a socialization process occurs for children of incarcerated parents, which informs how they should navigate society. This includes what to say to others, how to interact with the criminal legal system, how people will perceive them, and the challenges and opportunities they may face from childhood to adulthood.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-03-25T05:56:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241240063
       
  • A Mixed-Methodological Inquiry of Correctional Population Responses Toward
           the Prison Rape Elimination Act

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      Authors: Frank Ferdik, Hayden p. Smith, Creaig A. Dunton
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      For the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) to prevent sexual victimization in the correctional system, incarcerated persons and corrections staff must hold favorable views of this law, and behave in manners conducive toward its mission. In regards to behavior, both populations must report allegations of sexual misconduct, and be cautious in their interactions with one another. Currently, no study has researched whether these perceptual and behavioral expectations are being followed, or the factors influencing them. Mixed-methodological questionnaire data gathered from incarcerated persons (n = 490) and corrections staff (n = 222) who were in three state prisons located in the southeastern United States revealed how our custodial sample, compared to staff, were less likely to view PREA favorably, or to adopt behaviors supportive of this policy. Statistically significant correlates of self-reported behaviors included age, sex, and race. Discussion of results centers around ways of creating institutional cultures embracing of PREA.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-03-25T05:54:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241238412
       
  • Philosophies in Community Supervision of Gang-Involved Youth and Adults

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      Authors: Miltonette Olivia Craig, Meagan Zurn, Debi Elliott, Jenn Roark
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The wide expansion of community supervision has resulted in large-scale reliance on probation officers to facilitate change among both youth and adults. This is especially true for supervising high-risk populations, such as gang-involved individuals. To understand how probation officers balance the dual goals of public safety and rehabilitation, in-depth interviews with 12 youth and adult officers in Oregon were conducted. Results revealed that both groups had a shared understanding of gang pathways and desistance barriers. However, they held differing views on the factors that drive success and compliance. Youth officers utilize therapeutic philosophies and emphasize restoration through community resources to help youth desist from gang activity. Adult officers endorse law enforcement philosophies, emphasize accountability and personal choices, and center punitive strategies when using interagency collaboration. This study contributes to the literature on role perceptions and decision-making, and suggests that continuity of care in supervision philosophies can yield more successful outcomes for high-risk youth and adults.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-03-25T05:51:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241238341
       
  • Substance Use and Peer Associations: How Relationships Between Women on
           Community Supervision and Their Supervising Officers Matter

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      Authors: Marcus Tyler Carey, Kyle Curtis Mueller
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      The growth in the population of women on probation and/or parole has prompted the need for research that examines static and dynamic risk predictors for recidivism among them, particularly substance use and negative peer associations. Using a longitudinal study of 402 drug-involved and justice-involved women on probation/parole in 16 Michigan counties, this study employed the Dual-Role Relationship Inventory—Short Form (DRI-SF) and personal characteristics to examine how the perceptions of women under community supervision regarding their supervising officers correlated to risks for substance use and negative peer associations. We found those perceptions to be robust predictors of substance use and negative peer associations among our sample. The dynamics of that correlation are discussed, as are implications for practice.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-03-23T12:07:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241237193
       
  • Criminogenic Risk Assessment Beyond Juvenile Justice: Exploring the
           Predictive Ability of the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory
           (YLS/CMI) in Norway

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      Authors: Harald Kanestrøm, Marianne Stallvik, Stian Lydersen, Norbert Skokauskas, Siri Hoftun, Camilla Karlsen Nilsen, Jannike Kaasbøll
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      This study evaluated the predictive properties of the Youth Level of Service/Case Management Inventory (YLS/CMI) in 646 Norwegian adolescents (63% males) placed in non-secure, community-based residential care. Using receiver operating characteristics and logistic regression, the study explored the YLS/CMI’s efficacy in predicting various recidivism outcomes across subgroups. The inventory demonstrated to be a significant predictor for all categories of offending behavior (area under the curve ranged from .62 to .77). Although the YLS/CMI total risk score showed a robust association with offending across subgroups, there were discernible variations in predictive ability between males and females. This pattern extended to analyses of subdomains and have implications for clinical use. Overall, the findings support the YLS/CMI as a useful tool for predicting delinquency in a Norwegian residential setting and contribute to the expanding body of literature supporting the instrument’s utility across various cultures and contexts.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-03-22T05:26:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241237181
       
  • Mental Health Needs, Substance Use, and Reincarceration: Population-Level
           Findings From a Released Prison Cohort

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      Authors: Amanda Butler, Tonia L. Nicholls, Hasina Samji, Sheri Fabian, M. Ruth Lavergne
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the role of mental health, substance use, and comorbidity in relation to time to reincarceration. Our study included all people released from provincial correctional facilities in British Columbia, Canada, from 2012 through 2014 (N = 13,109). Using data from a mental health screening tool, we examined the relationship between four diagnostic groups (mental health needs alone, substance use disorders alone, co-occurring disorders, and no disorders) and time to reincarceration over a 3-year follow-up period. We found that people with co-occurring disorders and substance use disorders were at substantially elevated risk of reincarceration compared with those with no disorders or mental health needs alone. Mental health needs alone was not significantly associated with reincarceration after adjusting for covariates. Correctional, health, and social services must work synergistically to improve health and criminal justice outcomes, particularly for people with substance use and co-occurring disorders.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-03-21T06:30:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241238327
       
  • Innate Health: A Novel Examination of What Explains Well-Being, Prosocial
           Behavior, and Aggression Among Men Living in a U.K. Prison

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      Authors: Jeanne L. Catherine-Gray, Adriaan J. M. Denkers
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Evidence shows that well-being for mental health in prison is an important component of prison rehabilitation efforts—including notably lowering recidivism rates after release. While support for well-being initiatives in U.K. prisons has grown, few prison programs offer a health-promoting focus or invest in well-being interventions. Therefore, this study seeks to replicate and extend emerging data on an innate health intervention. Volunteers from HMP Nottingham (N=127) participated in normal prison programming. The intervention group (n=66) received an additional 3-day intensive. This study found higher levels of innate health, self-control, well-being, and prosocial behavior and lower levels of aggression within the intervention group and as compared with the control group. Next, we conducted a mediation analysis to test if innate health, self-control, and/or social desirability bias could explain these positive changes. Importantly, innate health did play a mediating role equivalent to and/or partnering with self-control, whereas social desirability bias did not.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-03-21T06:26:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241230472
       
  • Justice Perceptions, Sexual Identity, and Race: Likelihood of Police
           Reporting Intentions Following Sexual Assault

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      Authors: Elizabeth Culatta, Kaitlin M. Boyle, Sophia Shaiman, Tara E. Sutton
      Abstract: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Ahead of Print.
      Perceptions of law enforcement shape a willingness to report crime and are particularly important for sex crimes and among groups oppressed or neglected by the legal system. We examine three types of perceptions of justice—the fairness of outcomes (distributive), procedures (procedural), and victim treatment (interpersonal). We expect each measure of justice perceptions to increase the likelihood of reporting, or recommending a friend report, a hypothetical sexual assault to police. Our survey of 18- to 24-year-old women (N = 1,414) oversampled women of color and stratified the sample by educational attainment. In a series of path analyses, we find full support for our hypotheses about reporting one’s own sexual assault and partial support for encouraging a friend to report based on perceptions of three forms of justice. In addition, we examined indirect effects of sexual identity and race on reporting intentions and discuss how those patterns are partially driven by negative perceptions of justice.
      Citation: Criminal Justice and Behavior
      PubDate: 2024-03-20T12:11:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00938548241227546
       
 
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  Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1397 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (30 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (52 journals)
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CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 147 of 147 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Cement Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
African Security Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 341)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Asian Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 365)
Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 344)
Biometric Technology Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Boletín Criminológico     Open Access  
Brill Research Perspectives in Transnational Crime     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
British Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 380)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Graduate Journal of Sociology and Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice / La Revue canadienne de criminologie et de justice pénale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 264)
Champ pénal/Penal field     Open Access  
Computer Fraud & Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 389)
Computer Law & Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Contemporary Challenges : The Global Crime, Justice and Security Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Contemporary Justice Review: Issues in Criminal, Social, and Restorative Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Corrections : Policy, Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Crime & Delinquency     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Crime and Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Crime Prevention and Community Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 124)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crime Science     Open Access   (Followers: 56)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Crime, Security and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Criminal Justice and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Criminal Justice Matters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Criminal Justice Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Criminal Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Criminal Law Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Criminocorpus, revue hypermédia     Open Access  
Criminological Studies     Open Access  
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Criminology and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Crítica Penal y Poder     Open Access  
Critical Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Cryptologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Datenschutz und Datensicherheit - DuD     Hybrid Journal  
Derecho Penal y Criminología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Detection     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
EDPACS: The EDP Audit, Control, and Security Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
Estudios Penales y Criminológicos     Open Access  
EURASIP Journal on Information Security     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 276)
European Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
European Journal of Probation     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Polygraph     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Review of Organised Crime     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Feminist Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Forensic Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 363)
Forensic Science International : Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Forensic Science International: Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 279)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Homicide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
IEEE Security & Privacy Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Incarceration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Information Security Journal : A Global Perspective     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Annals of Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
International Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Criminal Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Applied Cryptography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Criminology and Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Information and Coding Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Police Science and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 308)
International Journal of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Victimology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Computer Virology and Hacking Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Journal of Criminal Justice Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Criminology and Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 284)
Journal of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 367)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of International Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Penal Law & Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 392)
Journal of Quantitative Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Strategic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Justice Evaluation Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Justice Research and Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Kriminologia ikasten : Irakaskuntzarako aldizkaria     Open Access  
Kriminologisches Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Innovation and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Nordic Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Occasional Series in Criminal Justice and International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Police Journal : Theory, Practice and Principles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 307)
Police Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 287)
Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 381)
Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 345)
Policy & Internet     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Política Criminal     Open Access  
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Punishment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Research and Reports in Forensic Medical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revista de Estudios Jurídicos y Criminológicos     Open Access  
Revista de Movimentos Sociais e Conflitos     Open Access  
Revista Digital de la Maestría en Ciencias Penales     Open Access  
Rivista di Studi e Ricerche sulla criminalità organizzata     Open Access  
Science & Global Security: The Technical Basis for Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation Initiatives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Security Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
South African Crime Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Theory and Practice of Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Trends in Organized Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356)
URVIO - Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios de Seguridad     Open Access  
Women & Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 312)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)

           

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