Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1397 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (30 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (52 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (65 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (28 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (23 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (161 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (23 journals)
    - LAW (843 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (11 journals)

CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 160 of 160 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Criminologica : Southern African Journal of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Cement Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 364)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annual Review of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 408)
Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 354)
Biometric Technology Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Boletín Criminológico     Open Access  
Brill Research Perspectives in Transnational Crime     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 401)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Graduate Journal of Sociology and Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice / La Revue canadienne de criminologie et de justice pénale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259)
Champ pénal/Penal field     Open Access  
Computer Fraud & Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 375)
Computer Law & Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Contemporary Challenges : The Global Crime, Justice and Security Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Justice Review: Issues in Criminal, Social, and Restorative Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Corrections : Policy, Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Crime & Delinquency     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Crime and Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Crime Prevention and Community Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 115)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Crime Science     Open Access   (Followers: 56)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Crime, Security and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Criminal Justice and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Criminal Justice Matters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Criminal Justice Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Criminal Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Criminal Law Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Criminocorpus, revue hypermédia     Open Access  
Criminological Studies     Open Access  
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Criminology and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Crítica Penal y Poder     Open Access  
Critical Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Cryptologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Datenschutz und Datensicherheit - DuD     Hybrid Journal  
Delito y Sociedad : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Derecho Penal y Criminología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Detection     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
EDPACS: The EDP Audit, Control, and Security Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
Estudios Penales y Criminológicos     Open Access  
EURASIP Journal on Information Security     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 277)
European Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
European Journal of Probation     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Polygraph     Open Access  
European Review of Organised Crime     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Feminist Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Forensic Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 365)
Forensic Science International : Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forensic Science International: Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 287)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Homicide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
IEEE Security & Privacy Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Incarceration     Full-text available via subscription  
Information Security Journal : A Global Perspective     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Annals of Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
International Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Criminal Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Applied Cryptography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Criminology and Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Information and Coding Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Police Science and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 311)
International Journal of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Victimology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Computer Virology and Hacking Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Correctional Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Criminal Justice Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 130)
Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Criminology and Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 294)
Journal of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 374)
Journal of Gender-Based Violence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Illicit Economies and Development     Open Access  
Journal of International Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Penal Law & Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Perpetrator Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 415)
Journal of Quantitative Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Strategic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Justice Evaluation Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Justice Research and Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Kriminologia ikasten : Irakaskuntzarako aldizkaria     Open Access  
Kriminologisches Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Innovation and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Nordic Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Occasional Series in Criminal Justice and International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Police Journal : Theory, Practice and Principles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 323)
Police Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 299)
Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 300)
Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 333)
Policy & Internet     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Política Criminal     Open Access  
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Punishment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Research and Reports in Forensic Medical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Arbitrada de Ciencias Jurídicas y Criminalísticas Iustitia Socialis     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Criminalística     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Jurídicos y Criminológicos     Open Access  
Revista de Movimentos Sociais e Conflitos     Open Access  
Revista Digital de la Maestría en Ciencias Penales     Open Access  
Rivista di Studi e Ricerche sulla criminalità organizzata     Open Access  
Science & Global Security: The Technical Basis for Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation Initiatives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Security Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
South African Crime Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Theory and Practice of Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Trends in Organized Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 381)
URVIO - Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios de Seguridad     Open Access  
Women & Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 288)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Review of Victimology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.326
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 19  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0269-7580 - ISSN (Online) 2047-9433
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Event centrality and conflict-related sexual violence: A new application
           of the Centrality of Event Scale (CES)

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      Authors: Janine Natalya Clark, Philip Jefferies, Michael Ungar
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      Berntsen and Rubin’s Centrality of Event Scale (CES) has been used in many different studies. This interdisciplinary and exploratory article is the first to apply the scale and to analyse event centrality in the context of conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV). It draws on a research sample of 449 victims-/survivors of CRSV in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), Colombia and Uganda. Existing research on event centrality has mainly focused on the concept’s relationship with post-traumatic stress disorder and/or post-traumatic growth. This article, in contrast, does something new, by examining associations between high event centrality, resilience, well-being and experienced consequences of CRSV, as well as ethnicity and leadership. Its analyses strongly accentuate crucial contextual dimensions of event centrality, in turn highlighting that the concept has wider implications for policy and interventions aimed at supporting those who have suffered CRSV. Ultimately, the article juxtaposes event centrality with a ‘survivor-centred approach’ to CRSV, using the former to argue for a reframing of the latter. This reframing means giving greater attention to the social ecologies (environments) that shape legacies of sexual violence in conflict.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T05:22:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221116125
       
  • Everyday peace as a theory to explain victims’ peacemaking actions in
           intimate partner violence situations

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      Authors: Leanne M Kelly, Anthony Ware, Vicki-Ann Ware, Ellen Wachter, Rachel Hall
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper assesses the transferability of the concept of everyday peace, developed in the conflict and peace studies literature, to practices utilised by people experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). The relevance of everyday peace to IPV is assessed by mapping typologies of the concept against behaviour that victims implement to manage and survive abusive relationships. To collect these data, experienced family violence practitioners were asked to recount practice-based information about everyday strategies that victims use to avoid triggering or to de-escalate a perpetrator, thereby minimising immediate harm coming to themselves or others. Theming these behaviours against typologies of everyday peace demonstrated the significant relevance of this theory to IPV. As such, we suggest that everyday peace is a useful conceptual framework to apply to family violence. Our analysis finds that the everyday peace framework is particularly helpful for exploring victim agency in these contexts, reframing mundane and everyday strategies as agentic. In addition, everyday peace offers a means for better understanding victims’ actions, which could help develop more effective service responses supporting choice and agency in IPV situations.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-08-25T05:20:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221112677
       
  • Organizational support for the potentially traumatic impact of video
           evidence of violent crime in the criminal justice system: ‘We’re
           almost making more victims’

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      Authors: Arija Birze, Cheryl Regehr, Kaitlyn Regehr
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      As graphic video evidence becomes a standard element in the investigation and prosecution of violent crime, criminal justice organizations must consider and address exposure to and impact of this potentially traumatizing workplace material for criminal justice professionals. Using a discovery-oriented qualitative design and a long-interview method of data collection, this study explores organizational responses to the exposure of criminal justice professionals to a growing volume of video evidence of violent crime. Repeated exposure to high-quality video evidence has the effect of placing criminal justice professionals in the midst of traumatic events, resulting in responses that are akin to trauma contagion. However, organizational awareness and the acceptance of trauma and support systems have not kept pace with the exponential rise in exposure, often being deployed when the person is no longer able to continue in their role. As a result, affected individuals may over-rely on equally affected colleagues for support, intensifying the cycle of trauma contagion. Organizational responses to reduce trauma contagion and the psychological burden on professionals working with video evidence of violent crime should occur at three levels: prevention through moderating exposure; preparation through creating a culture of awareness and acceptance; and intervention through systematic and formal supports.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-08-03T10:34:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221112436
       
  • Amplifying victim vulnerability: Unanticipated harm and consequence in
           data breach notification policy

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      Authors: Dennis Gibson, Clive Harfield
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      Loss of control over one’s identity through identity usurpation, or identity theft, results in victimization characterized by multiple species of harm: material harms such as financial loss; medical harms such as psychological distress and consequential physiological illness; and moral harms such as infringement of autonomy. Digital data breaches are a common means by which identity can be usurped and laws have been enacted requiring data-holders to notify data subjects when their personal information held on digital databases has been compromised. The intention is that victims should then be able to undertake their own mitigation measures. This paper explores the efficacy of this approach as a solution and argues that this policy – particularly in the light of new digital criminal methodologies – creates a conflict of victims’ interests. It is an unintended outcome of policy that exacerbates, rather than resolves, identity usurpation and associated victimization in the digital environment.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T06:34:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221107683
       
  • Victimization and school: Young people’s experiences of receiving
           support to keep up with their schoolwork

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      Authors: Sara Thunberg
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      Victimization early in life can have several serious consequences, one of which concerns young people’s schoolwork. The present study therefore aims to investigate what support young people need to keep up with their schoolwork, based on their needs following victimization. The material consists of narrative interviews with 19 young people who were the plaintiffs at trials when they were 15–19 years old. The results show that several of the young victims did not want to go to school due to the risk of meeting their perpetrator, and because of that their grades declined when they were not physically present in school, they lost their motivation to study. There is also variation between the young victims about whether they perceive that the schools supported them and/or made adaptations to make sure they could continue with their schoolwork. The schools have a responsibility to make some adaptations, but it is not clear how far this responsibility stretches or to what extent the young victims themselves have been a part of the process. For this reason, they might not have perceived the potential adaptations and support they received from their schools as supportive. Suggestions are given concerning what the schools and other authorities need to think about when working with young victims of crime to make sure they continue with their schoolwork as much as possible.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T11:29:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221109284
       
  • The power of professional ideals: Understanding and handling victims’
           emotions in criminal cases

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      Authors: Louise Victoria Johansen, Lin Adrian, Ida Helene Asmussen, Lars Holmberg
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how criminal justice actors interpret and process victims’ emotional expressions. On the basis of a qualitative study on the interactions between legal institutions and victims of violence in Denmark, the article demonstrates how police officers, prosecutors, victims’ counsel and judges each separately understand and evaluate victims’ emotional reactions. These actors interpret victims’ feelings according to their own professional roles and motivations so as to gain an overview of a case and the actions required of them in relation to it, resulting in quite different perceptions of victims’ needs and degree of trustworthiness. At the same time, professionals also interact across institutions by writing and exchanging case files, and in so doing police officers’ perceptions of victim reactions are often disclosed to both prosecutors and judges. This article contributes to existing knowledge of how different professional ideals specifically influence the handling of victims and their emotional needs, while the more general consensus on ‘appropriate emotions’ simultaneously generates knowledge across professions and institutional settings.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T11:13:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221100566
       
  • Why didn’t you resist' Situational influences on victim
           resistance during a rape

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      Authors: Julien Chopin, Eric Beauregard
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study is to examine factors influencing victim resistance during rape. Specifically, this study aims to understand which factors impact victim resistance using a multivariate approach focused on situational aspects related to offender, victim, and crime context characteristics. The sample includes 2,017 rape cases where victims did not resist, resisted passively, resisted verbally, or resisted physically. The first step of this study uses bivariate analyses to examine the relationship between the different categories of victim resistance and offender, victim, and crime context characteristics. Second, we computed three sequential binomial regressions in order to better understand the impact of each variable in multivariate modeling. The findings suggest that victim resistance is impacted by three main dimensions: victims’ physical and psychological vulnerabilities, the mentalizing of victimization risk, and the analysis of offenders’ vulnerabilities and additional risks to the victim. Both theoretical and practical implications for victims as well as for various actors in the criminal justice system are discussed.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T05:19:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221098762
       
  • ‘A shadow of me old self’: The impact of image-based sexual
           abuse in a digital society

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      Authors: Antoinette Huber
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      This article sheds a new light on the impact of image-based sexual abuse (IBSA) on women. Drawing on findings from 17 in-depth interviews, it details the emotional, physical and social impact of this online victimisation, and how the impact of IBSA manifests in women’s everyday lives. By also using these findings as a basis to examine online victimisation more broadly, this article brings to the fore broader considerations of how technology is facilitating a mutation in forms of sexual violence causing victims to encounter impacts which are specific to, or amplified by, technology. Therefore, it calls for greater attention to be paid to the impacts of IBSA and more research into how the relationships between the online and offline worlds require us to change our understanding of victimisation in an ever-increasing digital society.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T09:01:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580211063659
       
  • Everyone is victimized or only the naïve' The conflicting discourses
           surrounding identity theft victimization

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      Authors: Dylan Reynolds
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      Identity theft impacts millions of North Americans annually and has increased over the last decade. Victims of identity theft can face various consequences, including losses of time and money, as well as emotional, physical, and relational effects. Scholars have found that institutional messaging surrounding identity theft places responsibility on individuals for their own protection, which can mask institutions’ roles in identity theft’s prevalence. This paper presents findings from interviews with Canadian victims of identity theft and argues that conflicting discourses surround this crime. While identity theft victimizations are viewed as inevitable in the digital age, victims are often simultaneously stereotyped as old, naïve, or non-technologically savvy. Within this context, this research also finds that victims can express varying degrees of self-blame for having provided perpetrators with information or for having not better protected themselves. Finally, this paper argues that victims’ embarrassment and self-blame may impede help-seeking and reporting.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T08:50:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221091284
       
  • System-based victim advocates identify resources and barriers to
           supporting crime victims

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      Authors: Lisa De La Rue, Lilyana Ortega, Gena Castro Rodriguez
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      Often left out of conversations around criminal justice reform are the victims of violent crimes. One group of people who have the needs of crime victims at the forefront of their work are victim advocates. The current study examines barriers and resources for victim advocates in being able to do their work of supporting crime victims. Through interviews with nine system-based victim advocates points of intervention are identified, which if improved would allow victim advocates to better be able to support victims of crimes. Using principles of grounded theory analysis, four themes emerged: building partnerships and community support, intersectionality, resources and supports, and bureaucracy. In order to better support victim advocates in their work, systems need to remove bureaucratic barriers. There is also a need for access to culturally sensitive mental health services and supports.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T08:48:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221088340
       
  • Agency banking business and operators’ risk of exposure to criminal
           victimisation in Ibadan, Nigeria

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      Authors: Usman Adekunle Ojedokun, Ayomide Augustine Ilori
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the growing popularity of the agency banking business in Nigeria, a major problem confronting its operators is criminal victimisation. Thus, this study examined the risk of exposure of agency banking operators in Ibadan city to criminal attacks. Routine activity theory was deployed as the conceptual framework. Data were elicited from 11 operators of the business who were victims of criminal attacks and 20 of their counterparts who were yet to be victimised, using key informant and in-depth interview methods. Results showed that operators of agency banking business were being targeted by lone criminals and gangs of criminals using violent and non-violent tactics. Scamming through fake SMS credit/debit transaction alerts was the most common type of criminal victimisation suffered by people involved in the business. A combination of factors was responsible for their vocational-related victimisation. It is imperative for operators of agency banking business to invest in physical security appliances, such as CCTV surveillance system, protective barriers, and alarm devices.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T06:00:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221087743
       
  • Examining victims’ experiences of Community Protection Notices in
           managing anti-social behaviour

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      Authors: Zoe Rodgers
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      The Community Protection Notice (CPN) is a civil order designed to protect communities from anti-social behaviour (ASB) within England and Wales by addressing unreasonable and persistent conduct, which has ‘a detrimental effect on the quality of life of those in the locality’. Introduced under the ‘Putting Victims First’ agenda and the ASB, Crime and Policing Act (2014), the civil order can impose prohibitions alongside positive requirements upon any person aged 16 or over, business, or organisation. Before a CPN is issued, a Community Protection Warning (CPW) must be put in place by the police, local authority, social housing provider, or any other authorised persons with delegated power from the local authority. This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study that used semi-structured interviews to explore ASB victims’ experiences of CPWs/CPNs for the first time. Discussions focus upon the impact of the ASB, authorities’ responses, perceived effectiveness of CPWs/CPNs, and recommendations for change. Significant concerns emerge from the victims’ constructions of the CPN process regarding transparency, accountability, the correctability of requirements imposed, and victim involvement. The findings signify the need for an authentically restorative approach to ASB with three empirically grounded recommendations provided that account for ASB victims’ needs and vulnerabilities.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T10:15:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221081860
       
  • Just an ‘optional extra’ in the ‘victim toolkit’': The
           culture, mechanisms and approaches of criminal justice organisations
           delivering restorative justice in England and Wales

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      Authors: Rebecca Banwell-Moore
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite policy and guidance stating that all victims of crime should have ‘equal access’ to restorative justice in England and Wales, victim participation remains low. Here, the ways in which criminal justice agents – responsible for providing victim services, including restorative justice – offer restorative justice to victims are explored. Drawing upon empirical data collected from criminal justice organisations in two police force areas, this article outlines what factors lie behind the inconsistencies found across police forces in terms of structure and delivery of restorative justice. Work pressures, differing views of the suitability or effectiveness of restorative justice and a lack of systematic guidance that underpins the work culture of criminal justice organisations all impede victims’ access to restorative justice. This paper concludes with recommendations for embedding a culture of restorative justice within criminal justice organisations based upon the principles of inclusivity and engagement.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-03-19T11:22:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221079993
       
  • The impact of crime on tourists and the need for greater support for
           tourist victims

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      Authors: M Ozascilar, RI Mawby
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents the first research to address the impact of crime on citizens who suffer crime during a vacation. Based on a small sample of US residents victimised while visiting five different countries, and drawn from a crowdsourcing platform, it is, essentially exploratory. However, the findings suggest that tourist victims are severely affected by their experiences and that this impacts their feelings about revisiting the country where the offence occurred. Most victims reported receiving support from both formal and informal sources, but at the same time most said they would have appreciated more support. While more research is needed to build on this study, the findings do underline the need for a greater focus on both crime reduction and harm minimisation.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T12:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221080006
       
  • Apology–forgiveness cycle in restorative justice, but how'

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      Authors: Masahiro Suzuki, Tamera Jenkins
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      The apology–forgiveness cycle is a simple but powerful process for conflict resolution. Given the prevalence of apology and forgiveness in restorative justice (RJ), the apology–forgiveness cycle may take place. However, there is a lack of theoretical understanding of the relationship between apology and forgiveness in the RJ processes. After identifying key elements and impediments of the apology–forgiveness cycle during RJ meetings based on the existing literature, we develop a theoretical model of the apology–forgiveness cycle during RJ encounters. This typology explains how the apology–forgiveness cycle is intertwined with the RJ process, subsequently facilitating, blocking, and changing its sequence. There are four cycles: (1) apology facilitating forgiveness, (2) apology without forgiveness, (3) forgiveness promoting apology, and (4) forgiveness without apology. We conclude by offering future directions for research on the apology–forgiveness cycle in RJ.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T12:35:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221079994
       
  • The nature and extent of sexual assault in the sky: Shining a light on a
           ‘black box’

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      Authors: Christina Mancini, Kristen M Budd, Bailey M Brown, Sami Hausserman, Sydney Smith
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      Strikingly, federal data sources tracking the nature and extent of sexual assaults that occur aboard airlines are incomplete and typically not released to the public. In order to better understand this relatively hidden social phenomenon, we conducted a content analysis of media reports published over approximately a 20-year period (2000–2020). Within these media reports, we analyzed the incident characteristics of in-flight sexual assaults, reporting behaviors of victims, airline responses to victimization, and criminal justice processes such as adjudication. Findings reveal certain patterns in the coverage concerning victim and perpetrator characteristics, offense characteristics, flight information, and post-offense outcomes. In synthesizing study results, we apply tenets of routine activities theory (RAT) and the #MeToo perspective. We outline implications for future study and policy.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-03-14T06:27:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221079996
       
  • Long-term partners – Reflections on the shifts in partnership
           responses to domestic violence

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      Authors: Kirsty Welsh
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      Whilst pioneering partnership work first took place in the battered women’s or refuge movement in England and Wales, the response that came to dominate in the 1990s and 2000s mirrored that associated with crime prevention more generally and Home Office crime prevention in particular. This reflected the increasing positioning of domestic violence as ‘real crime’ and the moves at this time to view domestic violence through a ‘crime lens’. In the last 10 years or so, there has been a clear shift, with the prevailing approach now dominated by initiatives such as Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences, Independent Domestic Violence Advisors and Specialist Domestic Violence Courts. These initiatives have achieved considerable success in reducing risks to high-risk victims. Yet, in doing so, they establish a very particular framework for responding to domestic violence, positioning and promoting it as high-risk victimisation and moving to see it through an ‘exceptional risk’ lens. This paper examines shifts in the partnership response to domestic violence in England and Wales. It argues that, not only are the vast majority of lower risk women excluded from the prevailing framework but, in focusing on high-risk reduction, intervention within this framework fails to address women’s complicated and often contradictory needs in relation to abuse. The prevailing partnership response rests on a notion of safety as risk cessation rather than one which prioritises expansion of women’s space for action and freedom from the legacies of abuse. It concludes that, whilst partnership has huge practical and philosophical potential as a response to domestic violence, only by seeing domestic violence through the lens of diminished possibilities and with a broader conceptualisation of safety can a partnership framework support women to achieve theirs.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T09:37:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580211059273
       
  • An examination of the interrelationship between disordered gambling and
           intimate partner violence

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      Authors: James Banks, Jaime Waters
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      In response to the liberalisation and deregulation of gambling across much of the Western world, academics continue to examine gambling-related harms that result from the increased availability of gambling products and services. This paper explores the interrelationship between disordered gambling and intimate partner violence. Qualitative data were derived from interviews with 26 female research participants, illustrating how intimate partner violence perpetrated by men with gambling disorders is often instrumental in nature. The narratives of our respondents indicated that coercive and controlling practices were employed by the intimate partner with a gambling disorder to (a) access money for gambling; (b) hide their gambling behaviour from others; (c) assuage their guilt and apportion blame to the female partner for their disordered gambling and abusive behaviour. Consideration is given to how criminal justice, domestic violence, victim and gambling support agencies may best address the needs of partners and families impacted by disordered gambling.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-01-18T09:06:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580211065508
       
  • Expected but not accepted: Victimisation, gender, and Islamophobia in
           Australia

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      Authors: Derya Iner, Gail Mason, Nicole L Asquith
      First page: 286
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      Muslim’s women’s visibility and perceived vulnerability make them primary targets of routine Islamophobia in public spaces. This article builds on existing research on intersectionality between Islamophobia, gender, and victimisation. It offers fresh data on Islamophobia against women by analysing complaints of interpersonal hostility (N = 73) made to the Islamophobia Register Australia between 2016 and 2017. This quantitative analysis confirms that there is much consistency between Western nations in the nature of Islamophobia directed to women. At the same time, the article brings new perspectives to our understanding of Islamophobic hostility. Drawing on an in-depth analysis of eight case studies, the article illuminates the restrictive impact that routine Islamophobia has on Muslim women’s daily lives, generating a sense of responsibility for their own safety in the absence of bystander intervention. Yet, with comparatively high levels of social capital, participants in our study did not simply acquiesce to stereotypes that deny them the status of ‘ideal’ victim. Instead, they sought to reduce the destructive impact of victimisation through active attempts to raise public awareness and reassert agency. Our study shows that Muslim women’s responses to Islamophobia are not homogeneous. This variation originates in heterogeneity between Muslim women in Western countries.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T09:52:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221084115
       
  • Patriarchy, political enmity, and domestic violence: Exploring abusive
           mixed intimate partnerships in a conflict zone

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      Authors: Edna Erez, Revital Sela-Shayovitz, Peter R Ibarra
      First page: 305
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      Mixed couples face more marital conflict than endogamous couples. Drawing on intersectional theory and narrative victimology, this study examines women’s accounts of abuse in mixed heterosexual Arab/Palestinian–Israeli Jewish intimate partnerships amid the Israeli–Palestinian conflict. The narratives of 25 women formerly in an abusive relationship are the primary data, which are supplemented by a comprehensive list of calls seeking advice or intervention from a non-governmental organization (NGO) that assists women in mixed relationships, and the NGO’s recorded in-service training sessions during which social workers discuss clients’ plights and abuse exposure. Consistent with research on mixed couples, the women’s narratives connect their abuse to differences, dynamics, and tensions rooted in cultural, religious, and social beliefs and practices. Importantly, the narratives also highlight how the Israeli–Palestinian conflict amplifies and escalates the women’s abuse. Intersections of gender, religion, and nationality as well as life in a conflict zone critically affect the abuse dynamic the women experience. The article concludes with a discussion of the relevance of narrative victimology and political enmity for intersectional approaches to domestic violence.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T12:32:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221079961
       
  • Theorising victim decision making in the police response to domestic abuse

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      Authors: Nathan Birdsall, Laura Boulton
      First page: 330
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      The paper provides a conceptual argument for the importance of understanding victim decision making in responding to cases of domestic abuse. It applies core elements of decision-making theory to illustrate how victims may undergo different forms of thinking, could be affected by bias, consider gain and loss differently, and suffer from decision inertia. Suggestions are provided on how this perspective could be used in practice to deliver a victim empowerment approach in policing. However, the paper also expresses the importance of the theory’s limitations, especially around external validity, and suggests that research across various disciplines is critical to determine whether the perspective could be placed onto an empirical footing.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T09:08:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580211063658
       
  • Do structural choice theory and the ‘risky lifestyles’ perspectives
           predict immunity as well as victimization' A test using zero-inflated
           mixed-effect SEM analyses of adolescent victimizations in South Korea

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      Authors: Melissa Rorie, Seong-min Park, Matthew P West
      First page: 345
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescent victimization experiences can cause serious distress to victims and have been shown to be international phenomena. While victimization in various forms tends to peak in adolescence, its trajectories vary depending on individual and structural characteristics as well as the type of offending. Using structural choice theory and the ‘risky lifestyles’ perspective as our framework, the present study expanded on prior research by examining adolescent victimization in South Korea and using sophisticated statistical models to examine the unique predictors of ‘immunity’ in addition to victimization. In doing so, we supported previous research indicating that structural choice theory predicts adolescent victimization, but we added to that literature in finding that immunity was also a function of one’s environment as well as individual-level characteristics.
      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T09:16:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580211057330
       
  • Book review: Genocide and Victimology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rick A Matthews
      First page: 367
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T07:21:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221101635
       
  • Book review: Adversarial Justice and Victims’ Rights: Reconceptualising
           the Role of Sexual Assault Victims

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Paul G Cassell
      First page: 369
      Abstract: International Review of Victimology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: International Review of Victimology
      PubDate: 2022-07-05T11:02:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/02697580221104832
       
 
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