Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1397 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (30 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (52 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (65 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (28 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (23 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (161 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (23 journals)
    - LAW (843 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (11 journals)

CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 160 of 160 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Criminologica : Southern African Journal of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Cement Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 360)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Annual Review of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 404)
Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 348)
Biometric Technology Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Boletín Criminológico     Open Access  
Brill Research Perspectives in Transnational Crime     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 398)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Graduate Journal of Sociology and Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice / La Revue canadienne de criminologie et de justice pénale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 256)
Champ pénal/Penal field     Open Access  
Computer Fraud & Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 281)
Computer Law & Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Contemporary Challenges : The Global Crime, Justice and Security Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Justice Review: Issues in Criminal, Social, and Restorative Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Corrections : Policy, Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Crime & Delinquency     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Crime and Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Crime Prevention and Community Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 109)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Crime Science     Open Access   (Followers: 57)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Crime, Security and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Criminal Justice and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Criminal Justice Matters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Criminal Justice Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Criminal Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Criminal Law Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Criminocorpus, revue hypermédia     Open Access  
Criminological Studies     Open Access  
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Criminology and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Crítica Penal y Poder     Open Access  
Critical Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Cryptologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Datenschutz und Datensicherheit - DuD     Hybrid Journal  
Delito y Sociedad : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Derecho Penal y Criminología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Detection     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
EDPACS: The EDP Audit, Control, and Security Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
Estudios Penales y Criminológicos     Open Access  
EURASIP Journal on Information Security     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 269)
European Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
European Journal of Probation     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Polygraph     Open Access  
European Review of Organised Crime     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Feminist Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Forensic Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358)
Forensic Science International : Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forensic Science International: Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 282)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Homicide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
IEEE Security & Privacy Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Incarceration     Full-text available via subscription  
Information Security Journal : A Global Perspective     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Annals of Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
International Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Criminal Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Applied Cryptography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Criminology and Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Information and Coding Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Police Science and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 312)
International Journal of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Victimology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Journal of Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Computer Virology and Hacking Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Correctional Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Criminal Justice Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 126)
Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Criminology and Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 288)
Journal of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 367)
Journal of Gender-Based Violence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Illicit Economies and Development     Open Access  
Journal of International Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Penal Law & Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Perpetrator Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 410)
Journal of Quantitative Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Strategic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Justice Evaluation Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Justice Research and Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Kriminologia ikasten : Irakaskuntzarako aldizkaria     Open Access  
Kriminologisches Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Innovation and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Nordic Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Occasional Series in Criminal Justice and International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Police Journal : Theory, Practice and Principles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 317)
Police Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 297)
Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292)
Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 324)
Policy & Internet     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Política Criminal     Open Access  
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Punishment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Research and Reports in Forensic Medical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Arbitrada de Ciencias Jurídicas y Criminalísticas Iustitia Socialis     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Criminalística     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Jurídicos y Criminológicos     Open Access  
Revista de Movimentos Sociais e Conflitos     Open Access  
Revista Digital de la Maestría en Ciencias Penales     Open Access  
Rivista di Studi e Ricerche sulla criminalità organizzata     Open Access  
Science & Global Security: The Technical Basis for Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation Initiatives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Security Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
South African Crime Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Theory and Practice of Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Trends in Organized Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 372)
URVIO - Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios de Seguridad     Open Access  
Women & Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 277)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Forensic Practice
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.205
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 61  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2050-8794 - ISSN (Online) 2050-8808
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Clinicians’ perceptions of virtual reality for firesetting

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      Authors: Katie Sambrooks , Lona Lockerbie , Shahid Majid , Theresa Gannon
      Abstract: Virtual reality (VR) is a novel technology that could be used in the assessment and/or treatment of deliberate firesetting. This study aims to develop an understanding of clinicians’ views of VR for deliberate firesetting, to identify areas where VR could potentially add value to current practice and any particular barriers to using VR in this context. Through an online survey, 73 clinicians rated their agreement with nine potential benefits of using VR for firesetting and 11 potential barriers to using it. They also provided free text responses detailing the greatest perceived potential benefit and the greatest perceived barrier. Factors related to intent to use VR for firesetting in the future were explored. Clinicians perceived the ability to safely expose clients to fire-related stimuli to be highly beneficial. However, clinicians were concerned about the possibility of re-traumatisation and logistic barriers. Previous experience of using VR with individuals who have set fires was significantly related to using it in the future. Further research establishing the feasibility and effectiveness of using VR with individuals who have set fires may help alleviate clinicians’ concerns. Increasing opportunities for clinicians to experience a firesetting VR programme may widen the implementation of firesetting VR. Previous research has only focused on clinicians’ perceptions of VR in the general field of forensic mental health and has failed to consider offence-specific applications.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-05-2022-0027
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Managing interviews in high-stake crime cases: practice guidance for
           developing suspect interview strategies using a LOST WEBSITES framework

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      Authors: Martin Vaughan , Rebecca Milne , Gary Dalton , Steven Retford
      Abstract: High-stake crime investigations include cases such as murder and rape. The purpose of this paper is to outline the components of an interview strategy for suspects. In the UK, these interviews are often managed by Interview Managers who are tasked with developing effective interview strategies with the aim of ensuring all parties involved in the interview process are dealt with ethically and legally using research-based methods. This practitioner paper is based on the experience of the authors who have provided advice and support during high-stake crime investigations both nationally and internationally using the research-base to underpin their practical advice. To be effective, a suspect strategy constructed by an Interview Manager in high-stake crime investigations should be designed within a framework that covers the provision of strategic advice on research-based interview processes including: co-ordination of the interview process, monitoring of the interview process and evaluation of the interview process. To ensure interviews are effectively managed during high-stake crime investigations, the suspect interview strategy must be developed to a professional standard to allow for quality assurance and outside scrutiny. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first published paper that outlines the nature of a suspect strategy that is based on a Framework consistent with elements of the UK National Occupational Standards.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-04
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-05-2022-0022
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Staff experiences of working alongside peer support workers in forensic
           mental health community teams: a qualitative study

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      Authors: Elizabeth Nash , Samantha Taplin , Lauren Jade Rust , Robert Percival
      Abstract: Peer support workers (PSWs) are individuals with lived experience of mental health difficulties, who apply this to support and inspire others in their recovery. The role of PSWs is relatively new within the forensic health-care service. Although there has been little time for these roles to develop, PSWs have successfully integrated into community teams. Despite perceived benefits of having these workers within a multi-disciplinary team (MDT), the views held by mental health professionals in forensic services have not yet been studied. The purpose of this research is to develop an understanding of the experiences of staff working with PSWs in a community forensic team and the impact this has on them. Structured, individual interviews were conducted with eight mental health professionals, from a variety of disciplines, used across two community teams within forensic services. The data was examined according to thematic analysis. The data indicated general positive attitudes held by professionals surrounding the working with PSWs, including the themes “providing alternative perspectives”, “unique relationships” and “hope”. Yet, themes concerned around “role ambiguity”, “boundaries” and “the impact on PSWs” also arose. This study provides insight into the attitudes held by members of an MDT of working with PSWs. Although seemingly positive, the lack of clarity around the role of the PSW is problematic. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to explore the employment of PSWs in the context of UK forensic settings, highlighting the benefits and challenges of such from the perspective of staff.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-05-2021-0030
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Investigating the criminal thinking styles of mentally disordered
           offenders within the UK

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      Authors: Elizabeth Spruin , Tara Dunleavy , Chloe Mitchell , Belinda Siesmaa
      Abstract: This study aims to evaluate the utility and reliability of the Psychological Inventory of Criminal Thinking Styles (PICTS) to investigate the criminal cognitions of mentally disordered offenders (MDOs) from the UK. The reliability and validity of the PICTS scales were investigated within an MDO sample from the UK (N = 45) and compared to PICTS data from the USA and general offenders in the UK. The findings showed that the PICTS functioned in a similar way when used in MDO and non-MDO populations, indicating that from a psychometric perspective, the PICTS scales produce consistent results across both populations. Evidence is further provided to indicate that MDOs from the UK endorse criminal cognitions at a similar level to those in the USA and at a significantly higher level than general UK offenders. The implications and insight that these findings provide into the criminal cognitions of MDOs are discussed, with specific focus on the significant difference between general offenders and offenders with serious mental illness. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to use the PICTS with MDOs in the UK, comparing the criminal thinking styles of MDOs and non-MDOs.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-03-2022-0014
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • “The moment he realized he needed our joint assistance made the
           difference”: a multiple case study into working elements in the
           supervision of probation clients with debt

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      Authors: G. van Beek , Vivienne de Vogel , Dike van de Mheen
      Abstract: Little is known about effective supervision of offenders with debt. This multiple case study aims to gain insight into working elements in offender supervision on debt. This is important for probation officers to choose the most effective interventions in daily offender supervision. This study included five best practice cases based on both interviews with involved professionals and clients and client file information. One case was described in detail to illustrate what probation officers and clients encounter when working on debt. All five cases were analyzed thematically using pattern matching techniques and crosscase syntheses on debt background, current supervision, barriers and working elements. Organization processes and lack of aftercare hinder effective supervision. Close collaboration with other professionals (e.g. debt counselors) is important in supervising clients with debt. The client’s own behavior and motivation for supervision are crucial in the success of debt supervision and can be both hindering and effective. Working elements in supervision depend on personal characteristics of professionals involved and on the extent to which elements of a working alliance, particularly trust and bonding, are built. Support and facilitation from probation organizations regarding primary conditions and collaboration, training professionals in methods of stimulating clients motivation and an effective working alliance are essential to supervise clients with debt adequately. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no other in-depth study has yet been conducted on working elements in supervision of probationers with debt.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-01-2022-0002
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Mental health and criminal justice: bridging two worlds

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      Authors: Chrispen Madondo , Marc Van der Putten
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to describe programs that aim at programs to divert people with a mental condition from the criminal justice system to mental health services are being initiated, but reporting is limited and fragmented. This study described programs that aim at diverting persons with mental health conditions out of criminal justice systems to community mental health services, with the intention to inform research and practice. A scoping review was used to map and synthesise diversion programs. Ten online data bases were searched. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews was used to direct the selection of sources. Research and evaluation publications and grey literature published from 2010 to 2021 in English language were included. Eight distinct diversion programs were identified across 24 countries or territories covering five phases of the criminal justice process. Diversion programs included crisis intervention teams, the electronic linkage system, mobile crisis units, the criminal justice liaison program, problem-solving courts, the abstinence-based program, the community equivalence program and the forensic assertive community treatment program. Although distinct programs have the potential to form a system of diversion across the continuum of the criminal justice process, only two territories moved in that direction. Diversion programs reported overwhelmingly originated from high-income countries. Stigma that labels people with mental health conditions as violent and dangerous need to be addressed. It is important to place diversion systems on national policy agendas and advocate for evidence-based interventions. The study provides a blueprint on diversion systems to set a research agenda and develop a road map, tailored towards local contexts.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-05-2022-0020
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Resettle intensive intervention and risk management service (IIRMS): a
           pathway to desistance'

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      Authors: Sue Ryan , Alaw Eldridge , Cormac Duffy , Ellen Crawley , Caroline O'Brien
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the demographic and reconviction data of individuals who had engaged in an established Intensive Intervention and Risk Management Service, a community service within the offender personality disorder pathway (OPD). Demographic information and reconviction data from the Police National Computer was accessed for all participants (n = 69) released to the service over a 10-year period (2008– 2018), 45 of who met criteria to be included in the study. Their intervention period spans custody to community, with an expected period of 2 years engagement upon release. Participants in the service had experienced significant traumatic histories, with four or more adverse childhood experiences. Individuals had a mean of 17 convictions for violent and/or sexual offences and an average of 11 years in custody prior to release. The average length of intervention at Resettle in the community was almost 19 months, with an additional minimum of six months in-reach prior to release. A total of 60% of individuals were recalled back to custody at least once during their intervention, with this being more likely for those who had been convicted of a violent rather than sexual offence. Within the group who were reconvicted, the reconvictions were for less serious offences than the index offence, with only 16% being convicted of an indictable offence. Almost two-thirds (64.4%) did not receive a further conviction post-intervention in the follow-up period. This follow-up study focused upon demographic and reconviction data from one established IIRMS. Although findings are not necessarily generalisable to other IIRMS and OPD pathway services, the demographic and reconviction data has important learning for how services may reflect upon engaging with individuals whose needs and risks had not previously been adequately met and managed upon release. This data are useful learning, for what may help individuals with complex needs upon release into the community after long sentences and how to best meet their needs. There are aspects of the Resettle IIRMS approach which could be applied to non-specialist services to encourage a holistic, compassionate and relational approach to reaching those with complex needs who pose significant risks to others. This follow-up study has provided access to participants’ engagement with an established IIRMS. Although participants “opt in” to the service whilst in custody, engagement on release becomes a probation licence condition; a fixed boundary regarding attendance and engagement which, although enables robust risk management and reduces the likelihood of drop-out, also raises consideration about choice and control. The four day per week service provides an intensive intervention, for those with complex needs and limited prior experience of living safely (with minimal risk to self or others) in the community. Participants were previously offered little hope of release or effective support because of their risk, need, complexity and, in some cases, concern about whether their risk could be effectively managed. Although not a panacea for all, the results are suggestive of a service that is navigating the boundary between “care and control” to good effect for future resettlement and desistance. The findings are important for service providers, commissioners and the public purse. The results are useful for the national development of IIRMS. The findings are also important for prisoners and people on probation to inform their decision-making regarding intervention choices and hope for what may be achievable.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-26
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-04-2022-0016
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Forensic psychiatry in times of COVID-19: a qualitative study into the
           concerns and needs of patients

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      Authors: Annabel Simjouw , Nienke Verstegen , Wineke Smid , Agnita Langeveld
      Abstract: The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the concerns and needs of forensic psychiatric patients regarding the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on their mental health and treatment. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine patients from various wards of the hospital. Using the consensual qualitative research method, these interviews were coded by a team of three researchers. Four domains emerged from the analysis, namely, restrictions, emotional consequences, coping and communication. One of the primary restrictions for patients was not being allowed to have physical contact with the people in their network/visitors. This prompted patients, in some cases, to decline visitors altogether. Emotional consequences of the COVID-19 measurements included anxiety, frustration and passivity. Ambiguity about the rules added to this frustration. Furthermore, a cut in autonomy was felt by patients due to them not being able to do their own grocery shopping. Despite these restrictions that were imposed on patients, the relationship between patients and staff was perceived as good and even improved according to the participants. A lack of autonomy emerged as a salient issue related to the restrictions within the hospital. Certain degrees of control may be inevitable, but it is nonetheless important to focus on the effect of control within forensic settings. This could be done by aiming to actively include patients in decisions that affect their living climate. Furthermore, it appeared that the “ballet dancer” approach was used by the staff of the hospital, leaving more room for individualized care. As perceived support is important to increase willingness to accept the treatment being offered, a focus on this approach in times of rapid change such as during a pandemic, would be recommended. Because few pandemics have occurred in the past century, little information is available about how a pandemic might affect patients residing in forensic psychiatric hospitals. To the best of the authors’ knowledge this is one of the first studies to assess concerns and needs of forensic psychiatric patients regarding the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-02-2022-0008
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A qualitative study exploring the experiences of multi-disciplinary staffs
           in a medium secure service when working from home and virtually during the
           COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Kim Liddiard
      Abstract: Little is known about the personal and professional experiences of staff when working virtually and from home during the COVID-19 pandemic in a medium secure environment. This study aims to overcome this issue. The current study used a qualitative design to specifically explore the following areas with nine multi-disciplinary staff using a semi-structured group discussion: how their everyday working practice had changed during the pandemic, the perceived impact of these changes on themselves as professionals, as well as identifying strengths and limitations associated with any new ways of working. A thematic analysis was conducted producing four main themes: emotional overload and confusion; technological problems; accessibility and emotional connectivity; adapting and making good. Data suggested that staff could experience feelings of guilt, loneliness and a sense of under-performing when working from home and virtually. Problems with technology in terms of resources and connectivity were also evident although unexpected advantages of virtual consultations included supporting gatekeeping and admissions assessments, allowing external stakeholders to better attend inpatient care and treatment planning meetings alongside improved family relations for patients. While this study has added to the existing knowledge base, it does have limitations that should be acknowledged when reading and drawing conclusions from the paper. First, a small sample was used and so the findings likely have poor generalizability outside of secure settings. Second, the small sample could mean that the current findings may not be representative of the views and experiences of the wider staff group employed within the service. Finally, the lead researcher who subsequently analyzed the data was employed within the service and may well have imposed their own biases on the data; however, this was potentially overcome by having a second rater review the emerging themes. The COVID-19 pandemic brought with it radical and innovative ways of working, and it is now important to consider lessons learned to further develop and support such new ways of working: one important area for further consideration is improved oversight of the psychological impact of home working on health-care professionals. It is, therefore, recommended that worker well-being be explored more regularly by line managers and clinical supervisors and sufficient safeguards introduced to reduce or remove any adversity identified. Of note, these safeguards/strategies should be both psychological and practical in nature. If elements of virtual working are set to continue post-pandemic, for example in the case of long distance admission assessments and/or to support external stakeholders attending patient meetings, then time and effort needs to be spent on improving access to resources, connectivity and the advancing of available technological equipment to support this working practice. This could be achieved via improved information technology relations to support technical troubleshooting and to provide much needed ongoing support. Enhanced training for staff in IT skills to better use equipment and approved platforms is also recommended. The acknowledged gains that emerged as a result of patients having access to iPads and tablets during the COVID-19 pandemic now needs to be extended and explored further to consider all of the other significant contributions greater access to these technologies could afford to patients’ recovery post-pandemic in secure environments. The experiences of staff working virtually, and from home, through a pandemic in secure services are relatively unknown. This paper, therefore, aims to contribute to the limited evidence base.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-06-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-04-2022-0017
      Issue No: Vol. 24 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Digital displacement of youth offending: addressing the issue

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      Authors: Alex McCord , Philip Birch , Lewis A. Bizo
      Abstract: Global evidence suggests a potential displacement of youth offending from the physical to the digital landscape, requiring revision of existing detection and intervention methods. This study aims to explore pathways from harmful to illegal online activity perpetrated by young people, legislation and police perspectives, current detection methods and interventions. This perspective paper examines issues observed within a larger systematic literature review on digital youth offending. A trajectory from acceptable to harmful and subsequently illegal behaviour was identified, with a particular pathway from unethical video game activity to digitally dependent offending. Legislation and police perspectives vary by jurisdiction, with a common theme that increased officer education is key to the level of preparedness to investigate cases. Machine learning and automatic prevention show promise as detection and disruption processes, with education recommended for young people as a deterrent and redirection of skills to positive outcomes. Recommendations for further research include a broad survey of school students to include all identified areas of digital offending, which could drive the development of targeted education by law enforcement and partner agencies for young people. The shift in youth offending requires the justice and educational systems to adjust how they respond to youth crime. Policy and practise shifts can include further exploration of investigative hacking, education for law enforcement and educational prevention and redirection programmes aimed at youth. The digital displacement of youth offending is a progressively emerging concept. This paper examines the current state of response from educational and law enforcement agencies and discusses the next steps based on what is currently known.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-03-2022-0012
      Issue No: Vol. 24 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Developing immersive videos to train social cognition in individuals with
           schizophrenia in forensic psychiatry

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      Authors: Mathieu Dumont , Catherine Briand , Ginette Aubin , Alexandre Dumais , Stéphane Potvin
      Abstract: This study aims to develop immersive scenarios (immersive videos) to foster generalization of learning while addressing social cognition, a factor associated to violence in schizophrenia. The authors sought to develop immersive videos that generate a sense of presence; are socially realistic; and can be misinterpreted and, if so, lead to anger. A multiphase mixed method was used to develop and validate the immersive scenarios. The development phase consisted of preliminary interviews and co-design workshops with patients (n = 7) and mental health practitioners (n = 7). The validation phase was conducted with patients (n = 7) and individuals without mental disorders (n = 7). The development phase led to the creation of five scenarios (S1, S2, S3, S4, S5); they included social cues which could lead to self-referential and intentional biases. Results of the validation phase showed that all scenarios generated a sense of presence and were considered highly realistic. Three scenarios elicited biases and, consequently, moderate levels of anger (annoyance). Immersive videos represent a relevant and accessible technological solution to address social-cognitive domains such as self-reference bias. No intervention using immersive technologies had been developed or studied yet for individuals with schizophrenia at risk of violence in secure settings. This project demonstrated the feasibility of creating immersive videos which have relevant attributes to foster generalization of learning in the remediation of social-cognitive deficits.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-06-02
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-06-2021-0034
      Issue No: Vol. 24 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The experience of inequality and its impact on mental illness – thematic
           analysis of patients’ lived experiences admitted to secure mental health
           hospital

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      Authors: Kristina Brenisin , Aile Trumm , Elizabeth Akinwande , Kieran Breen
      Abstract: The concept of inequality refers to being treated unfairly in society and its impact on mental illness has been explored primarily using a quantitative research approach. Patients’ lived experiences of inequalities prior to their admission to a secure care setting need to be addressed with a higher priority as they can serve to improve our understanding of the factors underlying the development of mental illness at a personal level. The aim of this study is to explore participant’s views on whether for them the experience of inequality is associated with the development of mental illness. A qualitative study, using a thematic analytical approach, was carried out to explore patients’ lived experiences of inequalities. A total of 11 participants, who were receiving treatment in a UK secure mental health hospital, were recruited into this study. The concept of inequality was explored using semi-structured interviews. Data showed that patients had experienced a variety of inequalities which had negative impact on their mental health. Four main themes were identified from thematic textual analysis – abuse and its impact, a lack of support, the issue of labelling and the importance of understanding. Data showed that patients had experienced a variety of inequalities which had negative impact on their mental health. Four main themes were identified from thematic textual analysis – abuse and its impact, a lack of support, the issue of labelling and the importance of understanding. This is the first study, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, to consider intersectionality and admission to mental health units by interviewing patients in secure mental health setting.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-12-2021-0063
      Issue No: Vol. 24 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Service user experiences of a psychologically enhanced resettlement
           service [PERS] in an English open prison

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      Authors: Dannii Jarvis , Jake Shaw , Tamsin Lovell
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the experiences of adult male prisoners presenting with personality difficulties in an open (Category D) prison in the UK and their experience of a pilot offender personality disorder (OPD) pathway Psychologically Enhanced Resettlement Service (PERS) in the prison. Thirteen participants who had engaged with PERS were interviewed about their experiences of open conditions and the service. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Two superordinate themes were identified relating to participants’ experience of open conditions, highlighting the challenges they faced. These were “the impact of institutionalization” and “relational barriers”. Two superordinate themes were identified relating to participants’ experiences of PERS; these were “relationships with staff” and “service structure”. Each superordinate theme had subordinate themes. Analysis is based on a small number of interviews in one male prison, and only qualitative data were collected. A mixed-methods approach would enable the triangulation of results. Clinical importance for the pilot service is established, and there should be consideration for the rollout of PERS to other open establishments. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to explore the experiences of Category D prisoners within the open estate engaging with a pilot OPD pathway service. Findings illustrate the difficulties OPD service users encounter managing the transition into open prison conditions and highlight elements of the PERS model that can support this process. Clinical and research implications are identified.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-11-2021-0061
      Issue No: Vol. 24 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The dark figure of violence committed by discharged psychiatric inpatients

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      Authors: Kaitlin Hardin , Nicholas Scurich
      Abstract: Official criminal justice statistics (e.g. arrest rates) underestimate the frequency of crime because not all crime gets reported to authorities, a phenomenon known as the “dark figure of crime.” The present study aims to examine the dark figure of violence committed by discharged psychiatric patients. Multiple reporting modalities permitted a direct comparison between patients whose violence was officially detected to those whose violence was self-reported but not officially detected, along with differences in the nature of violent acts. Only 5% of violent individuals were officially detected, 26% of violent individuals were both officially detected and self-reported their violent behavior, while 68% of violent individuals self-reported their violent behavior and were not officially detected. The type of violent acts did not vary as a function of whether they were officially detected or self-reported. However, differences were observed for the location of violence, the relationship to the victim and whether an injury resulted. Older individuals, those with prior arrests and those with higher psychopathy scores are some of the factors associated with an increased likelihood of officially detected violence. The data were collected from three sites in the USA. Generalizing the specific findings to other locations and countries ought to be done cautiously. Studies ought to include multiple methods to measure violence. Self-report seems to be especially important to the extent one is concerned with measuring actual violence rather than violence that gets detected by legal authorities. This study highlights an important limitation of relying exclusively on official criminal justice statistics when studying violence or recidivism in the community.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-05-02
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-11-2021-0058
      Issue No: Vol. 24 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Narratives of life after political imprisonment: Republican and Loyalist
           ex-prisoners in Northern Ireland

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      Authors: Nigel Hunt , Stacey Willis
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of prison experience in ex-political prisoners in Northern Ireland in the context of changing and conflicting master narratives. A series of nine interviews were conducted with Loyalist and Republican political ex-prisoners in Northern Ireland. Eight were male and one was female. All had been in prison for substantial sentences relating to the Troubles. This study highlighted the challenges faced by political ex-prisoners regarding the changing conflicting master narratives in Northern Ireland and identified how they deal with these challenges. The participants adapted to post-conflict society by attempting to understand and make sense of their experiences, including justifying their actions as appropriate for the era and identifying positive changes in society resulting from the conflict. A narrative approach can be beneficial for understanding the experiences of political ex-prisoners. It enables a theoretical perspective to look not only at the personal but also at social elements of why people behave as they do. The findings demonstrate that political ex-prisoners do have different experiences to non-political ex-prisoners. The sample size was small and was drawn from a specific group of political ex-prisoners who were actively seeking reconciliation. The findings may be different for other groups. A narrative approach can help the practitioner understand the context in which a person lives; ex-political prisoners may be very different from ordinary ex-prisoners because of the context in which they were imprisoned and the reasons for which they were imprisoned. They are likely to continue with the narrative of the conflict they fought in and may still have the same aims (e.g. Northern Ireland to become part of Ireland), though they may or may not believe in the same means. These are issues that should be discussed and elaborated when working with ex-political prisoners. The master narratives active in the society into which the political ex-prisoner is released may impact the success or otherwise of their re-integration into society. Understanding the role of conflicting master narratives in dealing with the implications of being an ex-political prisoner.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-10-2021-0052
      Issue No: Vol. 24 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Finding words for the unspoken: family intervention in forensic settings

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      Authors: Andy Cook , Julie Payne
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to describe family intervention (FI) with four families in which the service user is under the care of forensic mental health services. There is a focus on identifying how systemic practice is used or adapted in working with families who have a family member who has presented risk and caused harm. Four case studies are used to provide a basis for the exploration of commonalities in practice between the cases and the utility of FI within forensic services, which have the dual purpose of promoting mental health recovery and reducing offending/risk behaviour. Family work can be a key healing tool in the recovery journey of forensic service users and their families. An integrated systemic and psycho-educational FI approach was found to be appropriate in the cases described. Issues particular to forensic services are identified; these include the role of safety planning; the function of talking about the history of trauma in the family including the impact of offending behaviour; mediating difficult relationships between family members and professionals; and overcoming barriers to having difficult and emotive conversations. The absence of outcome assessments limits the findings to observational data and self-reported experiences from the authors. FI can be safely and effectively used within forensic settings, facilitated by practitioners competent in working with trauma and complexity, as an integrated component of the therapeutic treatment. There are recognised barriers to the provision of FI within forensic settings, with limited research regarding the application of such therapies with forensic patients and their families. This paper adds to the small pool of knowledge regarding useful applications of FI in such settings.
      Citation: The Journal of Forensic Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JFP-01-2022-0007
      Issue No: Vol. 24 , No. 3 (2022)
       
  • The Journal of Forensic Practice

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