Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1397 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (30 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (52 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (65 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (28 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (23 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (161 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (23 journals)
    - LAW (843 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (11 journals)

CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 160 of 160 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Criminologica : Southern African Journal of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Cement Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 364)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Annual Review of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 408)
Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 354)
Biometric Technology Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Boletín Criminológico     Open Access  
Brill Research Perspectives in Transnational Crime     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 401)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Graduate Journal of Sociology and Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice / La Revue canadienne de criminologie et de justice pénale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 259)
Champ pénal/Penal field     Open Access  
Computer Fraud & Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 375)
Computer Law & Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Contemporary Challenges : The Global Crime, Justice and Security Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Justice Review: Issues in Criminal, Social, and Restorative Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Corrections : Policy, Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Crime & Delinquency     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Crime and Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Crime Prevention and Community Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 115)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Crime Science     Open Access   (Followers: 56)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Crime, Security and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Criminal Justice and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Criminal Justice Matters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Criminal Justice Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Criminal Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Criminal Law Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Criminocorpus, revue hypermédia     Open Access  
Criminological Studies     Open Access  
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Criminology and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Crítica Penal y Poder     Open Access  
Critical Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Cryptologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Datenschutz und Datensicherheit - DuD     Hybrid Journal  
Delito y Sociedad : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Derecho Penal y Criminología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Detection     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
EDPACS: The EDP Audit, Control, and Security Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
Estudios Penales y Criminológicos     Open Access  
EURASIP Journal on Information Security     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 277)
European Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
European Journal of Probation     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Polygraph     Open Access  
European Review of Organised Crime     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Feminist Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Forensic Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 365)
Forensic Science International : Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forensic Science International: Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 287)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Homicide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
IEEE Security & Privacy Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Incarceration     Full-text available via subscription  
Information Security Journal : A Global Perspective     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Annals of Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
International Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Criminal Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Applied Cryptography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Criminology and Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Information and Coding Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Police Science and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 311)
International Journal of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Victimology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Computer Virology and Hacking Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Correctional Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Criminal Justice Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 130)
Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Journal of Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Criminology and Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 294)
Journal of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 374)
Journal of Gender-Based Violence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Illicit Economies and Development     Open Access  
Journal of International Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Penal Law & Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Perpetrator Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 415)
Journal of Quantitative Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Strategic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Justice Evaluation Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Justice Research and Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Kriminologia ikasten : Irakaskuntzarako aldizkaria     Open Access  
Kriminologisches Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Innovation and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Nordic Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Occasional Series in Criminal Justice and International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Police Journal : Theory, Practice and Principles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 323)
Police Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 299)
Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 300)
Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 333)
Policy & Internet     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Política Criminal     Open Access  
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Punishment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Research and Reports in Forensic Medical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Arbitrada de Ciencias Jurídicas y Criminalísticas Iustitia Socialis     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Criminalística     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Jurídicos y Criminológicos     Open Access  
Revista de Movimentos Sociais e Conflitos     Open Access  
Revista Digital de la Maestría en Ciencias Penales     Open Access  
Rivista di Studi e Ricerche sulla criminalità organizzata     Open Access  
Science & Global Security: The Technical Basis for Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation Initiatives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Security Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
South African Crime Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Theory and Practice of Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Trends in Organized Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 381)
URVIO - Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios de Seguridad     Open Access  
Women & Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 288)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.612
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 408  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0004-8658 - ISSN (Online) 1837-9273
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Postcolonial churn and the impact of the criminal justice system on
           Aboriginal people in Western Australia, 1829–2020

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katherine Roscoe, Barry Godfrey
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses how the criminalisation and imprisonment of Aboriginal people operated as tools of colonisation in Western Australia (WA) in the nineteenth century, and how this shaped the postcolonial criminal justice system. The racialised double standard embedded in the colonial foundations of state institutions, including the criminal justice system, rippled across generations of Aboriginal people: a reiterative and disruptive process that we dub the ‘postcolonial churn’. This term, adapted from the ‘carceral churn’, describes the destabilising mobilisations embedded in carceral and settler-colonial logics over the long term. It uses data from archival prison registers (Rottnest Island 1838–1931 and Roebourne Prison 1908–1961), as well as historic court, police and newspaper data to map the use of the criminal code in protecting and expanding colonial property rights in the original waves of settler-colonisation. WA is an outlier among the Australian colonies: it was the largest in terms of size (2,642,753 km2), the last colony to receive European convicts (1850–1868), and the last to be awarded self-government (1890). This created a situation where the British government dictated policy for legal forms of subjugation of Aboriginal people at the frontier (first for resisting pastoral industry, later as workers in it) which butted up against localised extra-legal violence by police and settlers. We can trace this dichotomy between policy and practice in the development of surveillance and policing of Aboriginal populations across time and settler-colonial space due to the protracted pace of frontier ‘development’. Revealing the mediated historical aspects of structural racism is crucial to analysing the persistence of racialised policing in postcolonial settings and understanding why, despite repeated inquiries into mistreatment of Aboriginal people, institutional inertia remains.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-10-03T06:01:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221129926
       
  • Criminal records, discrimination, and Aboriginal communities: Enhancing
           employment opportunities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bronwyn Naylor, Georgina Heydon
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      Criminal record checking is now widespread in Australia. Aboriginal people are disproportionately represented in the criminal justice system, for a range of reasons including historic levels of disadvantage due to colonisation. They are therefore disproportionately likely to be negatively affected by criminal record checking when seeking employment, when taking on community governance roles, when being considered as kinship carers and so on. At the same time, productive and rewarding employment, and engagement in governance roles, are vital aspects of Aboriginal people's participation, contribution and engagement across all parts of the Australian community. This article examines practices, protocols and experiences of employers, employment agencies and government organisations in Western Australia and the Northern Territory managing the potential impact of a criminal record on Aboriginal employment. The article identifies four fields that can give rise to good employment practice: Background Checking; Recruitment; Risk Management; and Support and Engagement.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-10-03T06:00:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221128996
       
  • Reflections on the in-prison recruitment and participation of men with a
           history of injecting drug use, in a longitudinal cohort study in Australia
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shelley Walker, Michael Curtis, Emma Woods, Lyn Pierce, Amy Kirwan, Ashleigh C. Stewart, Reece Cossar, Rebecca Winter, Paul Dietze, Stuart A. Kinner, James R.P. Ogloff, Tony Butler, Mark Stoové
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      Studies aimed at improving the health and well-being needs of people in prison are increasing in number. The ethical and logistical challenges of conducting this research, however, pose challenges for researchers which can limit its scope. Emerging literature provides insights into these challenges, but little is focused on the Australian perspective, and most are based on the experiences of recruiting and collecting data for ethnographic and qualitative research. Literature describing the challenges of conducting quantitative prospective studies in prisons is limited. Furthermore, despite the fact that people who inject drugs are overrepresented amongst prison populations, and experience higher levels of socioeconomic disadvantage and poorer health than the general prison population, we are unaware of literature describing the particular sensitivities associated with their recruitment and participation in research in prisons. We intend to address these gaps by drawing on our experience and reflecting on learnings that emerged from longitudinal research we conducted with 400 incarcerated males with recent histories of injecting drug use, in Victoria, Australia. Our aim is to provide guidance and lessons for future research.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-09-27T04:37:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221127047
       
  • The connection between work attitudes and Chinese correctional staff
           burnout

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jianhong Liu, Eric G Lambert, Shanhe Jiang, Jinwu Zhang
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      Officers are a valuable resource for prisons across the globe. Working in corrections is a demanding job with a higher-than-average risk of job burnout. Most prison burnout studies have focused on staff working in Western prisons, particularly those in the U.S. These studies have generally found an association between work attitudes and burnout among prison officers. However, a key question is whether the associations are universal or contextual, varying by nation. The current study examined the link between the major work attitudes of job involvement, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment and the burnout dimensions of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and feeling ineffective at work among staff at two Chinese prisons. According to the results of ordinary least squares multivariate regression tests, job involvement, and job satisfaction had significant negative effects on emotional exhaustion, but commitment did not. Only job involvement had significant negative effects on depersonalization. Job involvement and organizational commitment had significant negative effects on feeling ineffective, while job satisfaction had nonsignificant effects. The results indicate that the major work attitudes are negatively linked to job burnout for the studied Chinese prison staff; efforts should be undertaken to build these work attitudes to reduce burnout since burnout is linked to negative consequences for officers, inmates, and the prison. Based on previous research and current findings, some of the effects of work attitudes appear to be universal, and others appear to be contextual.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T07:38:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221127710
       
  • In control, out of control or losing control' Making sense of men's
           reported experiences of coercive control through the lens of hegemonic
           masculinity

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      Authors: Sandra Walklate, Kate Fitz-Gibbon, Ellen Reeves, Silke Meyer, Jasmine McGowan
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      “I have never had a case that involved a female perpetrator of coercive control, and no such cases are documented in the literature” (Stark, 2007, p. 377). Stark's observation has become somewhat of a “truism” in the wider debate surrounding coercive control. Yet simultaneously coercive control is asserted as a gendered process, understandings of which appear to have elided and conflated victimhood and perpetration with femininity and masculinity. The purpose of this paper, based on empirical data, is to unpick some of these elisions and conflations and offer a more nuanced understanding of these debates using the lens of hegemonic masculinity. This paper is based on data derived from a national online survey conducted in Australia in 2021. The aim of this paper is to explore, and better understand male reported experiences of coercive control victimisation. The survey was completed by 1261 people, 206 (17%) of whom identified as men. These 206 responses are the focus of this paper. Representing one of the most comprehensive studies of men's self-reported experiences of coercive control, this survey data provides some insight into how male victim-survivors define and understand what they considered to be their experiences of coercive control. The findings provide an opportunity to offer a more nuanced appreciation of men's experiences of being in control, out of control or losing control.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T07:37:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221127452
       
  • Unpacking correctional workers’ experiences with transgender
           prisoners in Nova Scotia, Canada

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      Authors: Matthew S. Johnston, Ryan Coulling, Rosemary Ricciardelli
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      Empirical research on Canadian correctional workers’ successes, challenges, and attitudes towards accommodating gender diversity remains limited. Drawing on data garnered from two open-ended survey questions (n = 70) asking correctional workers in the community or institutions about their perspectives on working with trans populations, we explore how correctional workers in Nova Scotia, Canada accommodate or struggle to accommodate gender diversity in carceral settings. We found that respondents are generally mindful of issues pertaining to the safety and security of trans prisoners, usually espouse open-mindedness, and are generally able to work within correctional parameters to accommodate those with a diverse gender identity. Yet some respondents raised concerns and suspicion towards prisoners who present a safety risk to other prisoners and, in their view, may be manipulating human rights policies to cause harm to others. We take up these tensions critically and discuss the scholarly and practical implications of our findings, as well as possible avenues for future research.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T06:53:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221126242
       
  • Police preparedness to respond to cybercrime in Australia: An analysis of
           individual and organizational capabilities

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      Authors: Michael Wilson, Cassandra Cross, Thomas Holt, Anastasia Powell
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      The rapid growth in the availability of information and communications technologies has also expanded opportunities to commit cybercrime. Law enforcement officers are often the first responders to such incidents. Internationally, research has revealed how police preparedness to respond to cybercrime is mediated by organizational policies and procedures, as well as characteristics such as education, gender, and previous training for cybercrime investigations. However, there has been limited research in an Australian context examining police preparedness to respond to cybercrime. As such, this article examines the preparedness of Australian police personnel to respond to cybercrime incidents drawing on surveys with two state-wide police agencies (n = 422). Here, we examine the prevalence of cybercrime training across both agencies, levels of individual and organizational confidence about responding to cybercrime incidents, and their views about enhancing responses to cybercrime. The results suggest only half of the surveyed personnel have received some cybercrime-related training, with significantly less reporting specific instruction about how to receive and direct incident reports and manage digital crime scenes. Further, while personnel are modestly confident in their individual capabilities to respond to cybercrime incidents, they lack comparative confidence in their organizations and yearn for more resourcing and professional development. Implications for police resourcing, training, and practices are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-09-06T06:53:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221123080
       
  • Citizens’ attitudes toward legal authorities in Brazil: Examining the
           impact of crime, insecurity, and corruption

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      Authors: Francis D Boateng, Michael K Dzordzormenyoh, Damara Cavalcante
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper sought to understand public attitudes and behavior toward criminal justice institutions in Brazil. Using a cross-sectional data from a sample of Brazilians, we made very important and intriguing observations about Brazilians’ attitudes. Among these observations is the finding that the presence of crime results in favorable attitudes toward the Brazilian judiciary. Also, sense of security, corruption (bribe solicitation), and citizens’ trust in the media predicted attitudes toward criminal justice institutions and officials. Given that this study is one of the few studies that have examined this issue in the Brazilian context, the findings serve as a starting point for discussion about improving the relationship between citizens and the system. Specific implications of the findings are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T06:42:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221122939
       
  • The Mongrel Mob or Head Hunters' The association between
           neighbourhood-level factors on different types of gang membership in
           Aotearoa/New Zealand

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      Authors: Gregory D. Breetzke, Sophie Curtis-Ham, Jarrod Gilbert, Che Tibby
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research has shown that gang members typically emerge from more socially disorganised neighbourhoods. What is less known however is whether members of different types of gangs emerge from the same types of neighbourhoods. In this study, we use the social disorganisation theory as a framework to examine the spatial risk factors associated with two different types of gangs in New Zealand: Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs and New Zealand Adult Gangs. Overall, we found some consistency in spatial risk factors associated with gang membership by type in New Zealand; however, certain variables were significantly predictive of one type of gang membership but not of the other. The overall performance of our models also differed marginally depending on the type of gang being examined. In fact, our findings suggest some non-uniformity in the extent to which the various social disorganisation factors impact gang membership rates by type. The implications of this finding are discussed in the context of an ever-changing gang landscape in the country.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:08:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221121402
       
  • Decaffeinated resistance: Social constructions of wage theft in
           Melbourne’s hospitality industry

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      Authors: Emma Ferris, Stuart Ross
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      Wage theft, or the illegal non-payment of employee entitlements, is a pernicious and highly prevalent practice in industries across Australia, but particularly in hospitality. Despite recent media attention to cases involving some high-profile employers, little is known about how wage theft is experienced or understood by employees or the public. This research examines how wage theft is constructed and negotiated by employees and community members. Participants' constructions of wage theft reflected the consumerist, managerialist and individualist logics that have emerged in the wake of the intensive neoliberal restructuring of our economies and workplaces over the past three decades. It is argued that these views are also reflected in the current criminal enforcement regime that frames underpayment as a problem of rogue actors, rather than a social and structural issue. To disrupt the societal and disciplinary acceptance of wage theft, further criminological studies should aim to map out the direct and indirect harms arising from wage theft
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-07-25T11:27:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221115891
       
  • Examining the differences in perceived legal and non-legal factors between
           drink driving and drug driving

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Verity Truelove, Benjamin Davey, Natalie Watson-Brown
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      Drink and drug driving countermeasures have several similarities, yet also have a number of differences. To improve the effectiveness of these countermeasures, it is important to delineate the perceptions of both legal and non-legal factors between drink driving and drug driving. This study aimed to understand these differences and how legal and non-legal factors uniquely contribute to future intentions to engage in these illegal behaviours. A total of 546 licensed drivers who have a history of using both alcohol and drugs (marijuana, MDMA, and/or ice/speed) responded to an online survey that included legal deterrence measures as well as established measures of non-legal factors for both drink driving and drug driving. The non-legal factors included the fear of physical loss (e.g., fear of injuring yourself or others), social loss (e.g., social disapproval) and internal loss (e.g., guilt). Participants were more likely to report drug driving compared to drink driving, with a higher perceived chance of being caught for drink driving and more experience avoiding punishment for drug driving. Physical loss to others and internal loss were higher for drink driving. For both models, punishment avoidance was a significant predictor. Certainty of apprehension and severity punishment were only significant deterrents for drug driving, not drink driving. The threat of physical loss to oneself was a significant deterrent for drink driving, not drug driving. The results show that legal and non-legal deterrents are rated as lower for drug driving compared to drink driving, yet legal sanctions are still a deterrent for drug driving. Further, non-legal countermeasures are needed for both drink and drug driving that increase drivers’ perceived fear of physical loss to others, internal loss, and social sanctions associated with the behaviours.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-07-25T11:26:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221114481
       
  • Trauma-informed sentencing in South Australian courts

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      Authors: Katherine J McLachlan
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      Recently the concepts of ‘compassionate courts’, ‘humane justice’, ‘kindness in court’, and trauma-informed practice have emerged in legal theory and practice in the US, England, Scotland and Australia. This article uses a trauma-informed practice framework to examine how South Australian superior court judges acknowledge defendant trauma in sentencing. Trauma-informed sentencing practice requires that judges realise the presence of trauma, recognise its relevance, respond in a way that is informed by trauma and act to resist re-traumatisation. By using this ‘4Rs’ framework to analyse sentencing remarks of 448 defendants published in 2019, the presence of trauma-informed practice was explored. Analysis indicated that judges realised trauma was present in the lives of many defendants, particularly women and Aboriginal peoples, but did not always overtly recognise a link between trauma and criminal behaviour and were unlikely to refer to a defendant’s trauma history or use trauma-informed principles of practice in their sentencing response. Research findings were presented to judicial officers at a Judicial Development Day in 2021. The article reflects on those discussions as well as the primary research, when making recommendations for future sentencing practice primary for the judiciary, but also for legislators and legal practitioners.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T04:02:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221113073
       
  • Reporting to police by intimate partner violence victim-survivors during
           the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Anthony Morgan, Hayley Boxall, Jason L Payne
      First page: 285
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      There is evidence from around the world that rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) recorded by police have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. However, not all studies or data sources have shown a consistent increase, and it is not clear how these observed trends may have been influenced by changes in the propensity of victim-survivors to contact police during the pandemic. We use data from a large survey of women in Australia drawn from a national online research panel to examine correlates of police reporting and barriers to help-seeking among a subset of respondents who had experienced physical or sexual IPV during the period of the first national lockdown. Victim-survivors were less likely to have contacted police following the most recent incident if the time spent at home with their partner had increased. They were also more likely to say they were unable to safely seek advice or support on at least one occasion. Police were more likely to be contacted by the victim-survivor if they or their partner had lost their job or taken a pay cut, but there was no relationship with changes in financial stress. Results suggest containment measures introduced in response to COVID-19 may have influenced help-seeking behavior among IPV victim-survivors. This needs to be considered when conducting or interpreting studies on the impact of the pandemic on IPV using police data. Proactive responses to support IPV victim-survivors are needed during current and future restrictions and periods of reduced mobility.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T04:57:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221094845
       
  • Schools and neighborhoods: Moderating the counter-delinquency effect of
           school belonging with perceived collective efficacy

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      Authors: Glenn D Walters
      First page: 306
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to determine whether perceived collective efficacy moderated the prospective relationship between school belonging and delinquency. Analyses were performed on a sample of 4048 youth (2020 boys, 1936 girls) from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC-K). Linear and negative binomial regression analyses performed with maximum likelihood (ML) and maximum likelihood with robust standard errors (MLR) estimators produced consistent results. Bootstrapped and normal theory analyses disclosed a significant interaction between school belonging and collective efficacy after age, sex, indigenous status, physical condition of dwelling, physical condition of surrounding housing, household income, weak parental monitoring, perceived peer delinquency, and prior delinquency were controlled. Further review of the significant interactive effect revealed that the increased levels of school belonging predicted decreased levels of future delinquency, but only when perceived collective efficacy was also elevated. These results support the presence of a small but significant conditional promotive effect.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T05:14:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221110253
       
  • Is arrest for prohibited drug use a prelude to more serious offending'

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      Authors: Wai-Yin Wan, Don Weatherburn
      First page: 322
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      Although they constitute a significant fraction of the workload of most courts, very little research has been conducted on the criminal careers of those who commit minor offences. Such research is important for both theoretical and practical reasons. It is of theoretical importance because the criminal careers of those who commit minor offences may differ significantly from those who commit serious offences. It is of practical importance because the assumed rate of re-offending among minor offenders has a bearing on both the sentence imposed and the question of whether some offences should be decriminalised. Use or possession of a prohibited drug is a common minor offence – and one that many have argued should be decriminalised. Little is known, however, about the criminal careers of those convicted of this offence. We do not know what proportion are rearrested, what further offences (if any) they commit, or what factors affect the rate of offending among those who do have further contact with the criminal justice system. To answer these questions, we examined a cohort of 13,953 people whose first proven offence was for the use or possession of a prohibited drug and examined their criminal careers over an average period of 4.4 years (sd. = 3.4 years, range = 20.8 years). The majority (73%) had no further contact with the NSW criminal justice system. The most common offence among those who did re-offend was another drug possession offence. Significantly higher risks of re-offending were found among those living in areas in the lowest quartile of disadvantage and among those found in possession of cannabis. The implications of these findings are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T05:18:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221105898
       
  • Community around the Child: Evaluation of a program to reduce the
           criminalisation of Australian youth in out-of-home care

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      Authors: Danielle C Newton, Lesley A Hardcastle, Soula A Kontomichalos, Jane A McGillivray
      First page: 338
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      Young people in residential out-of-home care are universally over-represented in the criminal justice system. This study presents an evaluation of Community around the Child, an early-intervention initiative designed to reduce contact with the criminal justice system among young people living in residential care in Victoria, Australia. Interviews and focus groups with professionals (n = 44) produced data that were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. The study found the program promoted positive relationships between young people in care and police and between police and residential carers. Increased knowledge on the part of both carers and police about the impact of trauma on young people’s behaviour and methods for supporting young people to regulate their behaviour contributed to these positive relationships. The study calls for a holistic, therapeutic response to the individual needs of young people who have experienced and continue to experience trauma. Essential to this is the provision of training in trauma informed care for police and other stakeholders.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-07-05T06:15:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221110272
       
  • Déjà Q in the Australian nightlife: ID scanners and violent crime in
           night-time entertainment districts

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      Authors: Kurt M Piron, Grant J Devilly
      First page: 359
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      On July 1, 2017, the mandatory use of identification (ID) scanners as a prerequisite to licenced venue entry came into effect in all 15 major night-time entertainment districts (NEDs) across Queensland (Australia). This relatively contemporary situational crime prevention technique functions to (1) supplement traditional door-staff enforced control access and (2) increase personal accountability by reducing perceived anonymity inside licenced venues. The current study examined the association between the ID scanner legislation and violent crime rates in the Fortitude Valley NED (Brisbane, Queensland), a leading hotspot for street violence. Police crime data was examined one year before ID scanner enforcement, and one year after, with each year matched quarterly to test Pearson’s chi-square contingencies by time of year. Violent summary offences (less serious violent offences) increased substantially in the first three months following the ID scanner legislative change, while general summary offences (i.e., public nuisance) and indictable offences (e.g., assaults) remained statistically unchanged. The introduction of ID scanners was the only legislative change that occurred in the Fortitude Valley NED during data collection, suggesting a highly probable link to the observed spike in violent offences. Potential determinants of this upsurge in violence are discussed, including inefficient queue management and increased provocations for violence in queues to nightclubs resulting from the prolonged ID scanning process.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-04-22T06:11:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221094874
       
  • Psychological distance and fear of crime: Towards a new understanding of
           risk perception formation

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      Authors: Jacques Mellberg, Michael L. Chataway, Matthew J. Ball, Toby Miles-Johnson
      First page: 377
      Abstract: Journal of Criminology, Ahead of Print.
      The current study seeks to enhance the theoretical development of fear of crime by exploring the complex cognitive processes involved in risk perception formation. We apply Trope and Liberman’s construal level theory (CLT) of psychological distance to understand how and why these complex cognitive processes might shape an individual’s worry about crime. We pilot survey measures designed to capture perceptions of psychological distance and worry about crime using a convenience sample of N = 265 residents from Townsville, Queensland, Australia. Results of confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) reveal that these new measures have good scaling properties and that each dimension of psychological distance is empirically distinct. Multiple linear regression demonstrates that temporal, social and hypothetical psychological distance predicted worry at a statistically significant level, however, spatial distance was in the expected direction but was not statistically significant. These findings suggest that CLT is an appropriate lens to understand how individuals perceive their risk of criminal victimisation, but further research is needed to refine spatial distance survey measures. We recommend future research explores how psychological distance may interact with other well-known correlates of worry, such as age, gender and ethnicity.
      Citation: Journal of Criminology
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T05:14:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/26338076221105899
       
 
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