Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1397 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (30 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (52 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (65 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (28 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (23 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (161 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (23 journals)
    - LAW (843 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (11 journals)

CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (161 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 160 of 160 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Criminologica : Southern African Journal of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription  
Advances in Cement Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Safety Promotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
African Security Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 360)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Annual Review of Criminology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 404)
Australian Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 348)
Biometric Technology Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Boletín Criminológico     Open Access  
Brill Research Perspectives in Transnational Crime     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 398)
Campbell Systematic Reviews     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Graduate Journal of Sociology and Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice / La Revue canadienne de criminologie et de justice pénale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Society of Forensic Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 256)
Champ pénal/Penal field     Open Access  
Computer Fraud & Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 281)
Computer Law & Security Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Contemporary Challenges : The Global Crime, Justice and Security Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Justice Review: Issues in Criminal, Social, and Restorative Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Corrections : Policy, Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Crime & Delinquency     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Crime and Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Crime Prevention and Community Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 109)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Crime Science     Open Access   (Followers: 57)
Crime, Histoire & Sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Crime, Security and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Criminal Justice and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Criminal Justice Matters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Criminal Justice Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Criminal Justice Studies: A Critical Journal of Crime, Law and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Criminal Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Criminal Law Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Criminocorpus, revue hypermédia     Open Access  
Criminological Studies     Open Access  
Criminologie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Criminology and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Crítica Penal y Poder     Open Access  
Critical Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Cryptologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Issues in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Datenschutz und Datensicherheit - DuD     Hybrid Journal  
Delito y Sociedad : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Derecho Penal y Criminología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Detection     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
EDPACS: The EDP Audit, Control, and Security Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
Estudios Penales y Criminológicos     Open Access  
EURASIP Journal on Information Security     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 269)
European Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
European Journal of Probation     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Polygraph     Open Access  
European Review of Organised Crime     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Feminist Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Forensic Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358)
Forensic Science International : Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Forensic Science International: Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 282)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Homicide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
IEEE Security & Privacy Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Incarceration     Full-text available via subscription  
Information Security Journal : A Global Perspective     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Annals of Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
International Criminal Justice Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Criminal Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Applied Cryptography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Criminology and Sociology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Electronic Security and Digital Forensics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Information and Coding Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Police Science and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 312)
International Journal of Prisoner Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Review of Victimology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Journal of Computer Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Computer Virology and Hacking Techniques     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Correctional Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Criminal Justice Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Criminal Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 126)
Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Criminology and Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 288)
Journal of Forensic Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 367)
Journal of Gender-Based Violence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Illicit Economies and Development     Open Access  
Journal of International Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Penal Law & Criminology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Perpetrator Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 410)
Journal of Quantitative Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Strategic Security     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Justice Evaluation Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Justice Research and Policy     Full-text available via subscription  
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Kriminologia ikasten : Irakaskuntzarako aldizkaria     Open Access  
Kriminologisches Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Law, Innovation and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Nordic Journal of Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Occasional Series in Criminal Justice and International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Police Journal : Theory, Practice and Principles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 317)
Police Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 297)
Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 292)
Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 324)
Policy & Internet     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Política Criminal     Open Access  
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Punishment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Research and Reports in Forensic Medical Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revista Arbitrada de Ciencias Jurídicas y Criminalísticas Iustitia Socialis     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Criminalística     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Jurídicos y Criminológicos     Open Access  
Revista de Movimentos Sociais e Conflitos     Open Access  
Revista Digital de la Maestría en Ciencias Penales     Open Access  
Rivista di Studi e Ricerche sulla criminalità organizzata     Open Access  
Science & Global Security: The Technical Basis for Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation Initiatives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Security and Defence Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Security Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
South African Crime Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Theory and Practice of Forensic Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Trends in Organized Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 372)
URVIO - Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios de Seguridad     Open Access  
Women & Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 277)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Punishment & Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.885
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 37  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1462-4745 - ISSN (Online) 1741-3095
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Book Review: Surviving Solitary: Living and Working in Restricted Housing
           Units by Daniel S Rudes with Shannon Magnuson and Angela Hattery

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michael Gibson-Light
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-28T06:08:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221117520
       
  • Introduction: African penal histories in global perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Erin Braatz, Katherine Bruce-Lockhart, Stacey Hynd
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-27T06:35:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221109542
       
  • Radical right populism and the sociology of punishment: Towards a research
           agenda

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      Authors: Claire Hamilton
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The recent populist ‘explosion’ in the US, UK and Europe has pushed radical right populist movements to the centre of western politics. Given criminology's long experience of penal populism in the 1980s and subsequent decades, these developments raise important questions as to the role of sociology of punishment, and the wider discipline of criminology, in responding to far-right populism. This article aims to takes stock of the existing literature on this phenomenon with a view to proposing a tentative criminological research agenda that may contribute to our understanding of the recent rise of authoritarian politics in Europe, the UK and US. While highlighting the continued salience of the emotions in contemporary ‘security populism’, the article cautions against what has been described as a ‘pathologising’ approach to research in this area. Building on this, the paper advances an argument for a criminological research agenda based on a post-dualistic understanding of political affects that seeks to move the analytic focus beyond negativity.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-19T04:53:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221114802
       
  • Book Review: Carceral Con: The Deceptive Terrain of Criminal Justice
           Reform by Kay Whitlock and Nancy A. Heitzeg

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      Authors: Brian Pitman
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T07:23:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221114829
       
  • Book review: Prisoners of Politics: Breaking the Cycle of Mass
           Incarceration by Rachel Elise Barkow

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      Authors: Spencer Piston
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T07:23:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221114828
       
  • Something in the air: Toxic pollution in and around U.S. prisons

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      Authors: Elisa L. Toman
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Toxic chemicals are released into land, air, and waterways daily. Exposure to such chemicals, however, is not equally distributed across the U.S. It is well documented that communities without agency and capital, typically economically and socially disadvantaged, are those that suffer the brunt of the impacts of a polluted environment. These impacts can have both acute and chronic health consequences, leading to lower life expectancy, higher cancer rates, and compromised immune systems. Emerging qualitative work indicates that incarcerated persons – individuals who have no agency to leave their environment – are disproportionately affected by our polluting practices. This study argues that environmental regulations across the country allow polluting industries to poison confined populations. Nationwide data from the Environmental Protection Agency's Toxic Release Inventory is used to examine if industries geographically closer to correctional facilities emit greater amounts of toxic chemicals. Regional differences are examined as well. Results identify a pattern of harm – incarcerated persons who already have compromised health are also exposed to high levels of toxic chemicals.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T07:23:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221114826
       
  • Book review: Redistributing the Poor: Jails, Hospitals, and the Crisis of
           Law and Fiscal Austerity by Armando Lara-Millán

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      Authors: Natalie A. Pifer
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T07:05:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221113010
       
  • Book review: The Politics of Punishment: A comparative study of
           imprisonment and political culture by Louise Brangan

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      Authors: John Todd Kvam
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T06:05:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221112169
       
  • Book Review: Policing the Borders Within by Ana Aliverti

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      Authors: Leanne Weber
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T05:21:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221111608
       
  • Malleable detention: The restructuring of carceral space within U.S.
           immigration detention

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      Authors: Luis A Romero
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The expansion of immigration detention in the United States has been attributed to policy, privatization, and anti-immigrant racialization. This research extends understandings of immigration detention's growth by focusing on how Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) maintains the necessary space to detain migrants during this expansion. In this article, I introduce the concept of “malleable detention:” the flexible strategies and methods used to restructure space within immigration detention. I base this concept on findings from an analysis of the T. Don Hutto Detention Center - a detention site that has remained open despite various abuses, protests, and closures. Using statements from ICE officials, intergovernmental service agreements (IGSAs) between ICE and local governments, government reports, nongovernmental reports, and newspaper accounts, I find that the Hutto site displayed three forms of malleable detention. Detention was made malleable through repurposing non-detention space into detention space, maintaining flexibility in the detained populations, and reconfiguring contracts that helped keep detention open. Beyond the Hutto case, the malleable detention concept extends to detention sites throughout the U.S. This provides evidence into how ICE is able to sustain enough detention space that makes the U.S. the largest detainer of immigrants in the world.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T06:01:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221109539
       
  • Managing inclusion or preparing for exclusion' A critical examination
           of gender-responsive management of female Central and Eastern European
           prisoners in England and Wales

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      Authors: Magdalena Tomaszewska, Karen Bullock, Jon Garland
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines practitioner understandings and implementation of gender-responsive support within female prisons in England and Wales in the context of a growing emphasis on effective deportation of foreign national prisoners. Drawing on a case study of female prisoners from Central and Eastern states of the European Union (EU), we argue that the aims of gender-responsivity, designed to address women's gendered vulnerabilities to support their re-entry in the UK, are pragmatically re-shaped to accommodate the uncertainty surrounding their immigration status. We show how in practice, gender-responsive support functions at best to ‘manage’ gendered needs of women who are ‘not of interest’ to immigration authorities, and at worst to legitimate exclusion by side-lining vulnerabilities of women deemed as having ‘no right to remain’ in the UK. This occurs in the context of limited access to legal redress to challenge deportation decisions, unevenly spread resources in the female prison estate, and practitioners’ occupational cultures which emphasise paternalistic valuations of female foreign national prisoners’ femininity. We locate the findings in criminological debates about ‘gendering of borders’ and conclude with a reflection on the implications for advocacy at the time of increasingly restrictive immigration controls following the UK's exit from the EU.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:32:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221108444
       
  • Book Review: Criminal Justice Responses to Maternal Filicide: Judging the
           Failed Mother by Emma Milne

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      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T06:18:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221109536
       
  • Lost in translation: The principle of normalisation in prison policy in
           Norway and the Netherlands

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      Authors: Jill van de Rijt, Esther van Ginneken, Miranda Boone
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The principle of normalisation has gained more prominence in international prison law, with both the United Nations Standard Minimum Rules (UN SMR) and the European Prison Rules (EPR) promoting normalisation to the guiding principles. In general terms, normalisation refers to shaping life in prison in resemblance to life outside prison. However, it largely remains unclear what this principle entails for prison policy. The general formulation in the UN SMR and EPR leave much discretionary room to national prison authorities. By conducting a (comparative) policy analysis, this article aims to uncover the normative standards derived from the UN SMR and EPR and how the principle translates into national laws and policies of Norway and the Netherlands. The analysis shows that although the main provision is generally formulated, some detailed norms are provided in other provisions on how elements of life in prison should be shaped, including limits and restrictions. In Norway and the Netherlands, normalisation is not explicitly mentioned in law, but is (to a varied extent) incorporated in policy. It is shown that, in practice, normalisation is closely tied to reintegration, which has important implications for the principle itself and the norms that are taken as point of reference.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T05:43:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221103823
       
  • Book Review: Social Democratic Criminology by Robert Reiner

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      Authors: David Brown
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T11:41:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221101122
       
  • Calories, commerce, and culture: The multiple valuations of food in prison

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      Authors: Collins Ifeonu, Kevin D. Haggerty, Sandra M. Bucerius
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In the last two decades, a body of critical scholarship has emerged accentuating the social and cultural importance of food in prison. This article employs a tripartite conceptual framework for contemplating and demarcating food's different valuations in prison. We draw from our interviews with over 500 incarcerated individuals to demonstrate how acquiring, trading, and preparing food is inscribed with use, exchange, and sign values. In doing so, we provide illustrative examples of how food informs processes of stratification, distinction, and violence in prison.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T07:42:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221097367
       
  • Parole, parole boards and the institutional dilemmas of contemporary
           prison release

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      Authors: Thomas C Guiney
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The decision to release is a defining feature of the carceral experience: at once a necessary function of a dynamic penal system, and a highly contested form of symbolic communication where the anxieties and contradictions of contemporary penality begin to coalesce. In this paper I argue that the institutions we rely upon to make these determinations in a fair, consistent and efficient manner are under increasing strain. Drawing upon insights from historical institutionalism, I seek to show that the parole board model of discretionary decision-making that first emerged during the highwater mark of mid-twentieth century penal modernism has proved remarkably resilient to reform, but is slowly fracturing into a more complex, multi-layered prison release landscape. I explore the implications of this gradual historical transformation and conclude this paper with a call for new ways of thinking about prison release as an increasingly interconnected sphere of penal governance.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T08:04:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221097371
       
  • “Secondary registrants”: A new conceptualization of the spread
           of community control

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      Authors: Chrysanthi S Leon, Ashley R Kilmer
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      U.S. policies influence worldwide responses to sexual offending and community control. Individuals in the U.S. convicted of sex offenses experience surveillance and control beyond their sentences, including public registries and residency restrictions. While the targets are the convicted individuals, many registrants have romantic partners, children, and other family members also navigating these restrictions. Findings from a qualitative study using written and interview responses from a hard-to-reach group—family members of registrants (n  =  58)—reveal legal and extra-legal surveillance and control beyond the intended target. We argue that family members are “secondary registrants” enduring both the reach of sex offense policies into their personal lives and targeted harms because of their relationship with a convicted individual, including vigilantism and a “sex offender surcharge.” Family members engage in advocacy work to ameliorate sex offense restrictions to counteract their own stigmatization and social exclusion. Conceptually, secondary registration captures the unique and expansive reach of policy, state surveillance, and coercion on registrant family members and raises new concerns about spillover harm. Secondary registration demonstrates an understudied example of the neoliberal penal practice of de-centering the state but with the addition of deep stigmatization and the spread of sovereign and vigilante violence onto families.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:55:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221094255
       
  • Enemy parole

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      Authors: Netanel Dagan
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Pushing and expanding the boundaries of the ‘criminology of the other’ and ‘enemy penology’ to the post-sentencing phase, this study aims to analyse parole for terror-related prisoners. For doing so, the study thematically analysed 207 decisions of the Israeli parole board for individuals labelled as ‘security prisoners’. It found that for security prisoners, the parole board employs a distorted version of the more discretionary-individualised logic that applies to ordinary prisoners. When performing such ‘enemy parole’ – and overwhelmingly denying parole to security prisoners – the parole board uses three conflicting discourses: security-group logic, responsibilisation and resentencing. Through these discourses, the parole board negotiates the categories of self/other and citizen/enemy in order to suspend the reintegrative components of ‘citizen parole’. In conclusion, ‘enemy parole’ is constructed as an exclusionary, punitive and exceptional process disguised as inclusionary, equal and legitimate.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T02:48:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221092983
       
  • Book Review: Normalizing Extreme Imprisonment: The Case of Life Without
           Parole in California by Marion Vannier

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      Authors: Christopher Seeds
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-04-08T05:55:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221092639
       
  • Penal diversity, penality and community sanctions in Australia

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      Authors: Arie Freiberg, Lorana Bartels
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores Australian penal diversity, through the lens of community sanctions. We first examine what is meant by ‘community sanctions’ and suggest that the problem of definition provides one of the reasons for the dearth of comparative studies on their use, compared with prison studies. The article then examines the concept of punitiveness, ‘penal reach’ or ‘penal load’. This is followed by examination of the use of community corrections (CC) in Australia and differences between jurisdictions and over time. We consider the relationship between imprisonment and CC rates and attempt to explain these differences. Our analysis suggests there is a need to expand the notion of punitiveness, to include non-custodial sanctions. Further exploration of Australia's trends in the use of CC and interjurisdictional variation is required. However, we suggest that becoming less fixated on imprisonment, as the primary measure of punitiveness, and instead understanding how the various community sanctions operate – not as alternatives to imprisonment, but as independent sanctions appropriate to a wide range of less serious offences – may enable us to better understand the true penal impact of a jurisdiction's criminal justice system and consequently craft more effective and appropriate penal policies.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-31T06:11:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221090495
       
  • Book Review: Privilege and Punishment: How Race and Class Matter in
           Criminal Court by Matthew Clair

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      Authors: Michael Lawrence Walker
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T07:03:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221090496
       
  • Transformational learning and identity shift: Evidence from a campus
           behind bars

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      Authors: Amy E Lerman, Meredith Sadin
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Identity-driven theories of desistance provide a useful model for understanding change in a carceral context. However, these theories often are not grounded in specific programmes or practices that might catalyze identity shift, and tend to focus narrowly on recidivism as the sole outcome of interest. In this study, we examine the role of prison higher education in identity-driven change through the process of transformative learning. Using administrative information on college-level course completion and an original longitudinal survey of prison college students, we show evidence of both between- and within-subjects shifts in individuals’ sense of self-efficacy, as well as their broader civic orientation. We further explore the role of identity using a survey experiment that randomly assigns individuals to a “student” versus “prisoner” identity label. We find that identity labelling has significant effects on both confidence in accomplishing one's goals and perceived likelihood of recidivism. We supplement these quantitative findings with qualitative interviews of prison college alumni. Our study suggests that access to higher education can be consequential for those in prison, and provides a broader framework through which to analyze the effects of prison programming that extends beyond recidivism.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-24T10:04:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221087702
       
  • The exercise of authority during interactions in custody hearings in São
           Paulo (Brazil): Building legitimacy through exclusion

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      Authors: Bruna Gisi, Efraín García-Sánchez, Fernanda Novaes Cruz, Giane Silvestre, Maria Gorete Marques de Jesus
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In Brazil, the Custody Hearing is a legal device established in 2015 to safeguard the rights of people arrested in flagrante delicto by the police. In an attempt to prevent the indiscriminate use of preventive detentions in the country, the custody hearings were created for the potential effects that an in-person meeting may have on the flow of the Criminal Justice System. While the recent literature on criminology has produced significant empirical data testing the effects of peoples’ evaluations of procedural justice during court hearings for institutional legitimacy, little is known about what happens during these situations of contact between citizens and judicial actors. Using data from the observation of 138 custody hearings at the largest Criminal Forum in Brazil, we analyzed in this work how interaction procedures and ceremonial resources are employed by judicial actors to exercise authority. By focusing on the quality of decision-making and the interpersonal treatment expressed in procedures, we sought to analyze the effects of the punitive framework for the construction of legitimacy. Our analysis of interactions in custody hearings indicates the existence of a claim to legitimacy which, counter to procedural justice principles, develops through the exclusion of the person subjected to that authority.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T08:47:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221087707
       
  • Slave “Corrections” in Luanda, Angola from 1836 to 1869

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      Authors: Tracy Lopes
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper uses thousands of cases of imprisonment published under the police section of a weekly gazette entitled Boletim Oficial do Governo da Província de Angola to explore the connections between slavery and the “birth of the prison” in Luanda, the capital of the Portuguese colony of Angola between 1836 and 1869. It demonstrates that as the colonial administration gradually abolished the institution of slavery in the mid-nineteenth century, masters and mistresses sent thousands of captives to jail for “correction,” which could include imprisonment, beatings, and forced labour. By focusing on “correction” cases, this paper problematizes the dichotomy between pre-modern and modern types of punishment and demonstrates that the prison in Luanda reinforced the violence of the slaveholding class.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T08:25:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221084117
       
  • Trans architecture and the prison as archive: “don’t be a queen and
           you won’t be arrested”

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      Authors: Tait Sanders, Jessica Gildersleeve, Sherree Halliwell, Carol du Plessis, Kirsty A Clark, Jaclyn MW Hughto, Amy B Mullens, Tania M Phillips, Kirstie Daken, Annette Brömdal
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Most incarceration settings around the world are governed by strong cisnormative policies, architectures, and social expectations that segregate according to a person's legal gender (i.e. male or female). This paper draws on the lived experiences of 24 formerly incarcerated trans women in Australia and the U.S. to elucidate the way in which the prison functions according to Lucas Crawford's theory of trans architecture, alongside Jacques Derrida's notion of archive fever. The paper displays how the cisnormative archive of the justice system and its architectural constructs impact trans women in men's incarceration settings, including how trans women entering the incarceration setting are able to embody gender in a way that is not reified by the insistences of those normative structures. In light of this, this paper advances a theoretical understanding of the prison as an archive and as an architectural construct, providing a new means of understanding how incarcerated trans persons may use and perform gender to survive carceral violence.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T03:22:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221087058
       
  • Producing exemplarity: Performance making in a Chinese prison

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      Authors: Zhang Xiaoye
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Penal order is closely linked to the broader social order in China and the disciplinary side of its maintenance. This article seeks to demonstrate, through the case of performance making, what order means to the Chinese prison authority, and how prisoners comply with and sometimes defy the system based upon various motivations. Using data from an ethnographic study on performance making in a men's prison during 2015–2018, this study aims to understand how an 'exemplary order' is maintained, and what kinds of compliance and resistance can be found. The findings suggest that “theatre in prisons” is not a Western invention to be borrowed, but a long-established institutional mechanism of order mainetence in China, as participation in prison's activities represents compliance with the regime order. However, compliance is also utilized by the prisoners not only for hedonistic gains but also for gaining social capital, which can have a strong positive influence on their quality of life inside and earlier release. This study will also demonstrate how the Chinese penal order maintenance shares similirities with modes of soft power found in British prisons, as well prisoner-officer collaboration found in other Global South countries, with a twist
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T12:14:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221085693
       
  • The jailhouse divergence: Why debtors’ prisons disappeared in 19th
           century Europe and flourished in West Africa

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      Authors: Sarah Balakrishnan
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      It has been argued that the debtors’ prison was abolished in 19th century Europe and North America because the institution contradicted the principles of modern capitalism; by confining debtors for unpaid loans, it punished the poor while hampering the creditor, who could not be repaid by a debtor rotting in jail. This essay revises these assumptions through a study of debtors’ prisons in 19th century Ghana. It argues that, in both Europe and West Africa, the debtors’ prison historically emerged as a hostage-taking institution. Families paid their members’ loans to free them. In 19th century Ghana, this system proved crucial to the spread of mercantile capitalism; debt inmates were released within a week and creditors were repaid in full. However, in Euro-America, a new belief in homo economicus as the ‘self-made man’ portrayed insolvency as an individual failure. The European nuclear family also reduced the financial base supporting the debtor. The result was that debtors faced months, if not years, behind bars. This essay suggests that debtors’ prisons disappeared in Europe, while flourishing in West Africa, not due to the emergence of capitalism, but because of the social fabric of credit relations—the financial obligations of Africa kin networks versus European families.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T12:13:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221081961
       
  • Cars, compounds and containers: Judicial and extrajudicial infrastructures
           of punishment in the ‘old’ and ‘new’ South Africa

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      Authors: Gail Super
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines non-state infrastructures of vigilante violence in marginalized spaces in South Africa. I argue that car trunks, shacks, containers, and other everyday receptacles function as the underside of official institutions, such as prisons and police lock-ups, and bear historical imprints of the extrajudicial punishments inflicted on black bodies during colonialism and apartheid. I focus on two techniques: forcing someone into the trunk of a vehicle and driving them around to locate stolen property, and confinement in garages, shacks, containers, or local public spaces. Whereas in formerly ‘whites only’ areas, residents have access to insurance, guards, gated communities, fortified fences, and well-resourced neighbourhood watches, in former black townships and informal settlements, this is not the case. Here, the boot, the shack, the shed, the car, and the minibus taxi play multiple roles, including as vectors and spaces of confinement, torture, and execution. Thus, spatiotemporality affects both how penal forms permeate space and time, and how space and time constitute penal forms. These vigilante kidnappings and forcible confinements are not mere instances of gratuitous violence. Instead, they mimic, distort, and amplify the violence that underpins the state's unrealized monopoly over the violence inherent in its claims to police and punish.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-28T12:54:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221079456
       
  • Book Review: Vagrants and Vagabonds: Poverty and Mobility in the Early
           American Republic by Kristin O’Brassill-Kulfan

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      Authors: Stephen E. Tillotson
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T06:02:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221079291
       
  • Imprisonment and Citizenship in Senegal, 1917–1946: The Case of the
           Originaires

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      Authors: Dior Konaté
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines the incarceration of the Originaires in colonial Senegal to illuminate how imprisonment had shaped or altered their French citizenship rights in prisons. Among the prison population in colonial Senegal were some Originaires, the residents of the Four Communes who were granted French citizenship rights as early as 1833, a status that remained ambiguous until 1916 when a new law made them full-pledged French citizens. But the colonial government restrictions on access to full French citizenship rights in the Four Communes compelled the Originaires to mobilize to defend those rights. Their struggle found a breeding ground in the colonial prisons where some Originaire prisoners made two types of claims: to equality with European prisoners based on notions of birthright citizenship and cultural claims to being a different category of prisoners that deserved differential treatment compared to “natives.” By building their requests for equal admission to the European regime around the violation of their citizenship rights, this study will demonstrate that Originaire prisoners made arguments that tied their claims-making specifically to race and status without losing sight of the cultural differences between themselves and “native” prisoners, all in the context of a racially segregated prison world.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T05:23:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221081950
       
  • Renouncing criminal citizens: Patterns of denationalization and
           citizenship theory

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      Authors: Milena Tripkovic
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the underlying aims of denationalization of criminal offenders by framing the discussion within citizenship theory. It argues that such citizenship revocation policies exclude individuals who are perceived as non-ideal citizens under a complex vision of citizenship that combines communitarian and liberal undertones, which has significant consequences for detecting those with weak claims to membership. To develop this argument, the article advances in the following way. I first argue that the ‘protective’ function of citizenship, which has so far shielded domestic offenders from expulsion, has been eroding due to increasing reliance on denationalization. I then show, by employing an original study of European policies, that the ‘protective’ function of citizenship is eroding not only in general terms, but that it furthermore targets citizens of a particular profile that is continuously changing. Finally, I argue that recent revocation policies that are premised on security concerns, promote a complex vision of citizenship that combines elements of communitarian and liberal conceptions of belonging and works to exclude citizens of foreign descent who, at the same time, repudiate liberal values. Consequently, the status of the criminal rather than non-citizen, gains prominence in determining those at risk of exclusion from the polity.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T05:23:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221080705
       
  • Penal Welfare or Penal Sovereignty' A Political Sociology of Recent
           Formalization of Chinese Community Corrections

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      Authors: Jize Jiang, Jingwei Liu
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we address two observed gaps in existing accounts on Chinese community corrections (hereafter CCC): 1) lack of multilevel understanding of this penal institution’s local variations in a highly centralized penal regime; 2) inadequate scrutiny of political logics of, and the authoritarian state’s significance in, its recent formal introduction. Those limits may inhibit adequate understandings of state power and punishment in an authoritarian polity like China. To that end, we argue for a multilayered and hybrid conceptualization of CCC as an assemblage of penal welfare and penal sovereignty to understand CCC’s formation and function. Fracturing the holistic entity of CCC, our study challenges the approach to viewing it as a system of singular logics and unifying structure, and contrasts three modes of operational practices across localities—bureaucratic, professionalization, and technology-dominant models. Moreover, our analysis of its political functions suggests that in effect penal sovereignty subjugates penal welfare within contemporary Chinese penality. Far from heralding the full-fledged rise of Chinese penal welfare, this legal formalization represents a space created for the authoritarian state to penetrate political ideologies, and to reclaim, consolidate and exercise sovereign power through managerial penal strategies in a rapidly developing and differentiating society.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-17T01:46:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221079793
       
  • Surveillance and the experience of the COVID-19 pandemic for formerly
           incarcerated individuals

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      Authors: Mike Vuolo, Lesley E Schneider, Eric G Laplant
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      To date, most criminal justice research on COVID-19 has examined the rapid spread within prisons. We shift the focus to reentry via in-depth interviews with formerly incarcerated individuals in central Ohio, specifically focusing on how criminal justice contact affected the pandemic experience. In doing so, we use the experience of the pandemic to build upon criminological theories regarding surveillance, including both classic theories on surveillance during incarceration as well as more recent scholarship on community surveillance, carceral citizenship, and institutional avoidance. Three findings emerged. First, participants felt that the total institution of prison “prepared” them for similar experiences such as pandemic-related isolation. Second, shifts in community supervision formatting, such as those forced by the pandemic, lessened the coercive nature of community supervision, expressed by participants as an increase in autonomy. Third, establishment of institutional connections while incarcerated alleviated institutional avoidance resulting from hyper-surveillance, specifically in the domain of healthcare, which is critical when a public health crisis strikes. While the COVID-19 pandemic affected all, this article highlights how theories of surveillance inform unique aspects of the pandemic for formerly incarcerated individuals, while providing pathways forward for reducing the impact of surveillance.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T05:49:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221080696
       
  • Book Review: Punishment Without Crime: How Our Massive Misdemeanor System
           Traps the Innocent and Makes America More Unequal by Alexandra Natapoff

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      Authors: Matthew Clair
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-15T02:12:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221080698
       
  • Book review: Punishing Poverty: How Bail and Pretrial Detention Fuel
           Inequalities in the Criminal Justice System by Christine S. Scott-Hayward
           and Henry F. Fradella

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      Authors: Alexes Harris
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T07:53:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221079724
       
  • Ruptured alliances: Prosecutorial lobbying, victims’ interests and
           punishment policy in Illinois

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      Authors: Anya Degenshein
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      Using a combination of FOIA-requested legislative committee hearings and in-depth interviews, this manuscript investigates the work of Illinois prosecutorial lobbyists in state-level crime policy during a time of penal reform. I find that prosecutorial lobbyists are a regular and influential presence in policy discussions, advocating primarily for 'law and order' policies that expand prosecutorial discretion, even following the Great Recession. I also find that they repeatedly evoke their relationship to crime victims to frame their policy positions for a bipartisan audience. However, attention to discourse reveals that victims’ own interests regularly clash with prosecutorial discretion. These clashes create what I term discursive ruptures, or uncomfortable and surprising rhetorical fissures that emerge in what is otherwise seen as a near iron-clad political alliance. In such instances, prosecutors risk alienating a key source of their political legitimacy to protect their own discretionary authority. Beyond insight into momentary political discomfort, these ruptures suggest that the powerful and productive alliance between prosecutors and victims is neither as natural nor as robust as relational perspectives have generally assumed, unearthing fault lines in prosecutors’ unparalleled power to punish.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T09:49:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221077680
       
  • Book Review: Policing Life and Death: Race, Violence, and Resistance in
           Puerto Rico by Marisol LeBrón

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      Authors: Robert J. Durán
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T03:53:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221079292
       
  • Book Review: Professionalism in Probation: Making Sense of Marketisation
           by Matt Tidmarsh

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      Authors: Jamie Buchan
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-08T05:01:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221079000
       
  • Book Review: Neoliberalismo y castigo by I González Sánchez

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      Authors: José A. Brandariz
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-07T05:45:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221078999
       
  • Book Review: Presumed Criminal: Black Youth and the Justice System in
           Postwar New York by Carl Suddler

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      Authors: Alexandra L. Cox
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T02:08:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221076768
       
  • Death in a Black Maria: Transport as punishment in an African carceral
           state

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      Authors: Samuel Fury Daly
      Abstract: Punishment & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In March 1980, fifty men suffocated to death in the back of a police van, known as a Black Maria, in Lagos, Nigeria. In the Black Maria Tragedy, as it came to be called, several currents of Nigeria’s postcolonial history converged. They included the persistent problem of crime, the question of how much power to give men in uniform, and the problems of migration and regional integration (most of the victims came from neighboring countries). This article examines the 1980 incident not only for what it reveals about Nigeria, but about the larger workings of punishment in a postcolonial state. What techniques of punishment endured after the end of colonialism' Which of them did African governments find useful, and which did they discard' Where did the technology of the Black Maria come from, and what part did it play in the machinery of the Nigerian state' Looking beyond Nigeria, the Black Maria incident suggests that prison transport is an important part of the carceral landscape – and one that is easy to miss.
      Citation: Punishment & Society
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T01:24:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14624745221076774
       
 
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