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Acupuncture in Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.702
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0964-5284 - ISSN (Online) 1759-9873
Published by BMJ Publishing Group Homepage  [62 journals]
  • Effectiveness of acupuncture for fatigue in patients with
           relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled trial

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      Authors: Faezeh Khodaie, Abdorreza Naser Moghadasi, Amir Hooman Kazemi, Baixiao Zhao
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Fatigue is experienced by more than 65% of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). Some studies have supported the effectiveness of acupuncture in improving the symptoms of MS.Objective:The present research was intended to investigate the effectiveness of acupuncture plus amantadine compared with amantadine alone on fatigue in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) in the remission stage of the disease.Methods:In this randomized controlled trial, 60 participants with RRMS suffering from fatigue were recruited and randomized equally to acupuncture (n = 30) and control (n = 30) groups. The acupuncture group received treatment 2 to 3 times per week for 10 sessions over 4 weeks. Both the acupuncture and control groups received amantadine 100 mg daily and routine treatment with immuno-modulators. The primary outcome was the fatigue severity scale (FSS) score, which was evaluated at baseline, and after 2 and 4 weeks. The secondary outcome was the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life 54 (MSQOL-54) questionnaire score, measured at baseline and the end of the 4-week treatment period.Results:The severity of fatigue was reduced in both groups. However, after 4 weeks of treatment, the reduction of fatigue in the acupuncture group was more significant than in the control group (P 
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2023-02-01T11:02:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221150824
       
  • Acupuncture for trigger finger: a case report

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      Authors: Kaiyong Zhang, Peng Liu, Zixiang Geng, Bimeng Zhang
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T05:10:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221146202
       
  • Billing for perioperative acupuncture: current practices and future
           directions

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      Authors: Alexander B Stone, Roberta J Stack, Stephanie I Cheng
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T10:59:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221146203
       
  • Effects of electroacupuncture on the ventral tegmental area- nucleus
           accumbens dopamine pathway in rats with chronic sleep deprivation

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      Authors: Hanqing Xi, Wenzhong Wu, Shan Qin, Xiaoqiu Wang, Chengyong Liu
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Insomnia is a well-recognized clinical sleep disorder in the adult population. It has been established that acupuncture has a clinical effects in the treatment of insomnia; however, research on the underlying neural circuits involved in these effects is limited.Methods:The modified multiple platform method (MMPM) was used to establish a rat model of chronic sleep deprivation (CSD). Forty rats were randomly divided into a control (Con) group, (untreated) CSD group, electroacupuncture-treated CSD group (CSD + EA) and estazolam-treated CSD group (CSD + Estazolam group) with n = 10 per group. In the CSD + EA group, EA was delivered at Yintang and unilateral HT7 (left and right treated every other day) with continuous waves (2 Hz frequency) for 30 min/day over 7 consecutive days. In the CSD + Estazolam groups, estazolam was administered by oral gavage (0.1 mg/kg) for 7 consecutive days. The open field test (OFT) was used to observe behavioral changes. Immunofluorescence assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to observe the effects of EA on the ventral tegmental area (VTA)-nucleus accumbens (NAc) dopamine (DA) pathway. We also assessed the effects of EA on the expression of dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) in the NAc, which are the downstream targets of the VTA-NAc DA pathway.Results:After CSD was established by MMPM, rats exhibited increased autonomous activity and increased excitability of the VTA-NAc DA pathway, with increased VTA and NAc DA content, increased D1R expression and decreased D2R expression in the NAc. EA appeared to reduce the autonomous ability of CSD rats, leading to lower DA content in the VTA and NAc, reduced expression of D1R in the NAc and increased expression of D2R. Most importantly, EA produced effects similar to estazolam with respect to the general condition of rats with CSD and regulation of the VTA-NAc DA pathway.Conclusions:The therapeutic effect of EA in chronic insomnia may be mediated by reduced excitability of the VTA-NAc DA pathway, with lower DA content in the VTA and NAc, downregulated expression of D1R in the NAc and increased expression of D2R.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T10:57:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221146197
       
  • Effects of electroacupuncture at ST36 and BL20 on the diabetic rat testis

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      Authors: Gulnur Kizilay, Onur Ersoy, Cuneyt Bozer, Selim Demirtas, Selman Cikmaz, Ali Yılmaz
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:We aimed to evaluate the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) at ST36 and BL20 on the testicular tissues in a rat model of diabetes and to explore the mechanisms of action.Methods:A total of 34 male Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to a control group (n = 10), diabetes (D) group (n = 12) or diabetes + acupuncture (DA) group (n = 12). To model diabetes, rats in groups D and DA received an intraperitoneal injection of a single dose of 35 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ) dissolved in citrate buffer (pH = 4.5; 0.1 M) after 2 weeks of high-fat diet administration. Under xylazine/ketamine anesthesia, stainless steel needles (30 mm × 0.25 mm) were inserted bilaterally at ST36 and BL20. The needles were connected to an EA device via cables, and EA was applied for 30 min (15 Hz frequency and 0.2–1 mA intensity) twice a week for 5 weeks.Results:The effects of EA at ST36 and BL20 on blood glucose levels and body weight, biochemical parameters, histopathological, morphometric and immunohistochemical findings, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) analysis were evaluated. A significant decrease was detected in DA versus D groups in blood glucose levels, basement membrane thickness and apoptotic cell/tubule indices. In addition, there was a significant increase in the Johnsen scores, seminiferous tubule diameters, serum levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone, proliferation indices, and sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG) and insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) immunoreactivities.Conclusion:EA had multiple positive effects on blood glucose homeostasis and testicular structure/function in this rat model of diabetes. EA may be effective at preventing or eliminating histopathological damage in the diabetic testis.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T10:55:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221146196
       
  • Evaluation of the effects of manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture at
           LI4 and LI11 on perception thresholds: a prospective crossover trial

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      Authors: Aiko Oyamaguchi, Hiroshi Hanamoto, Yoshiki Tanaka, Sayo Takahashi, Hitoshi Niwa
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:The objective of the study was to investigate and compare the effects of manual acupuncture (MA) and electroacupuncture (EA) on current perception thresholds (CPTs) using quantitative methods.Methods:Twenty-nine healthy volunteers participated in this prospective crossover trial, in which three acupuncture methods were compared: control, MA, and EA. Acupuncture needles were inserted to a depth of 15 mm at LI4 and LI11 on the left side and retained for 30 min with or without electrical stimulation at a frequency of 2 Hz (EA and MA, respectively). The needles were removed and participants rested for 30 min. CPT in the left mental region was measured at 2000, 250, and 5 Hz, corresponding to the activation of Aβ, Aδ, and C-fibers, respectively, at four time points: baseline, T0; 15 min after needle application, T1; immediately after needle removal, T2; and 30 min after needle removal, T3. In the control session, only a sensory test was performed (without acupuncture).Results:Significant effects of time course on CPT were observed (p 
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T10:47:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221131339
       
  • Perforating globe injury after acupuncture treatment: two cases

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      Authors: Qimiao Wang, Yuanlong Zhang, Xin Wang, Yaju Pang
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T10:05:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221131338
       
  • Acupuncture for neurodermatitis: a case report

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      Authors: Kai-huan Zeng, Dong-nan Chen, Gai-qin Yang, Yong-gang Yu, Ting-ting Li
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2023-01-18T09:33:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221146201
       
  • Acupuncture for the treatment of constipation in Parkinson’s
           disease: a case report

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      Authors: Wujun Wang, Lianyan Jiang, Xianrong Feng, Mao Li
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2023-01-14T06:02:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221146200
       
  • Acupuncture targeting the minor salivary glands for dry mouth: a case
           report

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      Authors: Nobuari Takakura, Takahiro Yamada, Tomohiro Tanaka, Marina Yokouchi, Miho Takayama, Judith M Schlaeger, Hiroyoshi Yajima
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-12-13T08:35:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221131340
       
  • Electroacupuncture inhibits hippocampal neuronal apoptosis and improves
           cognitive dysfunction in mice with vascular dementia via the JNK signaling
           pathway

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      Authors: Yaru Liu, Zhenyang Yan, Yafei Ren, Woyu Wang, Yinze Ke, Yifan Wang, Rongming Qi
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Electroacupuncture (EA) has been shown to reduce cognitive impairment in vascular dementia (VaD) patients. However, the mechanism of action remains unknown.Objective:The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway plays an important role in apoptosis. Herein, we focused on whether EA can inhibit apoptosis and alleviate cognitive impairment by regulating the JNK signaling pathway using a mouse model of VaD induced by modified bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAo).Methods:In experiment I, 60 mice were randomly divided into a Sham group, BCCAo group, BCCAo + EA group, BCCAo + Sham-EA group, BCCAo + SP group (receiving the selective JNK inhibitor SP600125) and BCCAo + SP + EA group. Morris water maze tests, TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and flow cytometry were used to evaluate the effect of the EA intervention on VaD. In experiment II, 30 mice were randomly divided into a Sham group, BCCAo group, BCCAo + EA group, BCCAo + SP group and BCCAo + SP + EA group. Western blotting and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were used to detect protein and mRNA expression of key factors in the JNK signaling pathway in the hippocampus.Results:EA, SP600125 and EA + SP600125 significantly inhibited hippocampal apoptosis and improved cognitive impairment in VaD model mice. There were no significant differences between the BCCAo group and the BCCAo + Sham-EA group. EA, EA + SP600125 and SP600125 inhibited the phosphorylation of JNK and caspase-3. EA and EA + SP600125 promoted protein and mRNA expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) in the hippocampus of VaD mice and inhibited protein and mRNA expression of activator protein (AP)-1, p53 and Bax.Conclusion:EA can reverse cognitive deficits and inhibit hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in VaD model mice, at least partially through inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway and regulation of apoptosis signals.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-12-09T08:23:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221136878
       
  • Electroacupuncture of muscle and tendon attachments in an athlete with
           lateral epicondylitis of the humerus: a case report

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      Authors: Toshihiro Maemichi, Shigeru Meguriya, Atsuya Furusho, Toshiharu Tsutsui, Tsukasa Kumai
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T09:23:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221131335
       
  • Acupuncture treatment for persistent post-prostatectomy urinary
           incontinence: a case series

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      Authors: Chaoran Wang, Wentao Li, Xiaojiang Li, Haojian Zhang, Huichuan Tian, Yingjie Jia
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T09:17:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221131332
       
  • Intra-oral acupuncture treatment for chronic aspiration after esophageal
           cancer surgery: a case report

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      Authors: SunKyung Jin, WooJeong Lee, Hae Jeong Nam, Kyuseok Kim
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-11-26T09:07:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221125249
       
  • Efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture for oxaliplatin-induced
           peripheral neuropathy in colorectal cancer patients: a single-blinded,
           randomized, sham-controlled trial

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      Authors: Kaiyin Chan, Louisa Lui, Yukting Lam, Kaling Yu, Kwongwai Lau, Manchi Lai, Waiwai Lau, Lokyin Tai, Chunkin Mak, Zhaoxing Bian, Linda LD Zhong
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy is a major first-line conventional therapy for advanced and metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, oxaliplatin causes chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Acupuncture has long been used to alleviate limb numbness in Chinese medicine practice.Aim:The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture (EA) for the alleviation of CIPN in CRC patients.Design:This was a pilot single-blinded, randomized, sham-controlled trial.Setting/participants:Sixty eligible patients, who had been diagnosed with CRC and were undergoing oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy, were randomized in a ratio of 1:1 to the EA intervention group or sham acupuncture (SA) control group. During a 12-week treatment period, patients in the EA group received EA once a week, while patients in the SA group received SA; both groups were followed up for 12 weeks.Results:Compared with the SA group, the EA group exhibited significant alleviation of CIPN severity during chemotherapy. Moreover, EA also improved the physical function, role function, and social function of CRC patients. However, there were no significant differences in tests of vibration or light touch sensation. In addition, EA appeared to be a safe treatment for CIPN and was both feasible and acceptable to CRC patients during chemotherapy.Conclusion:This study showed preliminary evidence for the efficacy and safety of EA in acute CIPN among CRC patients, although further studies are needed to verify these effects and to further explore the potential role of EA in chronic CIPN (effects on which remain unclear).Trial registration number:NCT03582423 (ClinicalTrials.gov)
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T07:15:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221125421
       
  • Effects of electroacupuncture on liver function in mice with chronic
           alcoholic liver injury: visual display by in vivo fluorescence imaging

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      Authors: Xiao-jing Song, Shu-you Wang, Shu-yong Jia, Guang-jun Wang, Wei-bo Zhang
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Acupuncture can improve the symptoms of alcohol-induced bodily injury and has been accepted by the World Health Organization. In this study, in vivo fluorescence imaging (IVFI) was applied to display and evaluate the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on liver function (LF) in mice with chronic alcoholic liver injury (cALI).Methods:IVFI of the Cy5.5-galactosylated polylysine (Cy5.5-GP) probe targeting the liver asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) and liver indocyanine green (ICG) clearance was performed to visually evaluate the effect of EA at ST36 and BL18 on liver reserve function and hepatic metabolism in mice with cALI. In addition, changes in ASGPR expression, serum indexes of LF, and hepatic morphology were observed.Results:After EA at ST36 and BL18, the ASGPR-targeted fluorescence signals (FS) in the liver increased significantly in cALI mice (p 
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T08:10:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221125248
       
  • Electroacupuncture alleviates cognitive dysfunction and neuronal
           pyroptosis in septic mice

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      Authors: Yan Li, Zhaoying Li, Fujuan He, Chenguang Qin, Rui Fan, Fangxiang Zhang, Bin Wang
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Sepsis is defined as organ dysfunction caused by an uncontrolled response to infection and is followed by a high incidence of cognitive dysfunction, which can severely affect patients’ quality of life. Previous studies have suggested that electroacupuncture (EA) is protective against sepsis-associated cognitive dysfunction and that pyroptosis plays a vital role in cognitive function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of EA on cognition and neuronal pyroptosis in a mouse model of sepsis.Methods:Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery. Mice were randomly divided into three groups (control, CLP and CLP + EA). EA was performed at bilateral ST36 for three consecutive days after the surgery. The 7-day survival rate of each group was observed on the seventh day after the surgery. The Morris water maze (MWM) was used to test cognitive function from the 8th to 12th day after the surgery. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining to determine the structural integrity of hippocampal neuronal membranes and the number of surviving neurons in the hippocampal tissues, respectively. Expression of nucleotide-binding domain-like receptor protein 1 (NLRP1), caspase-1 and gasdermin-D (GSDM D) in hippocampal CA1 neurons was detected by Western blotting and real-time fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), and caspase-1 concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results:Compared with the CLP group, 7-day survival rates and cognitive function were significantly improved in the CLP + EA group. After EA treatment, the integrity of the hippocampal CA1 neuronal membrane and mortality of hippocampal neurons were significantly decreased, and expression of NLRP1, caspase-1 and GSDM D was downregulated.Conclusion:EA can alleviate cognitive dysfunction and neuronal pyroptosis in septic mice.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T02:15:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221117847
       
  • Effects of acupuncture on microglial polarization and the TLR4/TRIF/MyD88
           pathway in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

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      Authors: Lu-Xi Cao, Shu-Jun Lin, Si-Si Zhao, Shi-Qi Wang, Hai Zeng, Wen-An Chen, Zhuo-Wen Lin, Jia-Xu Chen, Ming-Min Zhu, Yi-Min Zhang
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Neuroinflammation caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to neurological deficits. Acupuncture can inhibit neuroinflammation and promote nerve repair; however, the specific mechanism is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore whether acupuncture could modulate the M1 and M2 phenotypic polarization of microglia in a rat model of TBI via the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/intracellular toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-β (TRIF)/myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) pathway.Methods:A total of 90 adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, SPF grade, were randomly divided into a normal group, model group and acupuncture group. Each group was further divided into three subgroups (first, third, and fifth day groups) according to the treatment time (n = 10 rats/subgroup). We used the modified neurological severity score (mNSS) method to quantify neurological deficits before and after modeling. We used Nissl staining to observe the pathological changes in brain tissue, flow cytometry to detect the proportion of M1 and M2 polarized microglia in the injured area on the first, third and fifth day, and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) to examine TLR4/TRIF/MyD88 expression in microglia on the first, third and fifth day, as well as expression of the amount of binding of TLR4 with TRIF and MyD88.Results:Compared to the model group, mNSS in the acupuncture group gradually decreased and pathological morphology improved. The proportion of CD11b/CD86 positive cells was decreased, while that of CD11b/CD206 was increased in the acupuncture group. Expression of IP TLR4, IP TRIF and IP MyD88 also decreased in the acupuncture group.Conclusion:The results of this study demonstrate that one of the mechanisms through which acupuncture mitigates neuroinflammation and promotes nerve repair in TBI rats may be inhibition of M1 phenotypic polarization and promotion of M2 phenotypic polarization through inhibition of the TLR4/TRIF/MyD88 signaling pathway.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T06:51:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221108214
       
  • Electroacupuncture pretreatment protects septic rats from acute lung
           injury by relieving inflammation and regulating macrophage polarization

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      Authors: Jun Zhou, Lan Li, Mengjian Qu, Jinqu Tan, Guanghua Sun, Fu Luo, Peirui Zhong, Chengqi He
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Macrophage polarization toward the M2 phenotype may attenuate inflammation and have a therapeutic effect in acute lung injury (ALI).Objective:To investigate the role of electroacupuncture (EA) pretreatment on the inflammatory response and macrophage polarization in a septic rat model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI.Methods:Male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 24) were randomly divided into three groups (n = 8 each): control (Ctrl), ALI (LPS) and pre-EA (LPS + EA pretreatment). ALI and pre-EA rats were injected with LPS via the caudal vein. Pulmonary edema was assessed by left upper pulmonary lobe wet-to-dry (W/D) ratios. Lung injury scores were obtained from paraffin-embedded and hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections of the left lower pulmonary lobe. Inflammatory activation was quantified using serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and IL-10 levels measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Macrophage phenotype was determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and Western blotting.Results:Mean lung W/D ratio was significantly lower and serum IL-1β levels were decreased in pre-EA rats compared to ALI rats (P 
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-08-30T10:45:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221118588
       
  • Core outcomes were rarely reported overall in systematic reviews on
           acupuncture for osteoarthritis: a cross-sectional meta-epidemiological
           study

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      Authors: Tengyue Hu, Youlin Long, Rui Chen, Zixin Yang, Liqin Liu, Litao Huang, Jin Huang, Ga Liao, Liang Du
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To identify a comprehensive list of outcomes and explore the reporting rate of core outcome sets (COS) and related factors in systematic reviews (SRs) of acupuncture for osteoarthritis (OA).Study design and setting:Databases were searched for the relative SRs. Descriptive statistics were calculated as frequencies and percentages. Binary logistic regression was used to explore the factors affecting the reporting rate of COS.Results:We included 59 SRs. Outcome measures reported in the SRs were classified into 11 domains and 67 unique outcomes. No SR completely reported COS. In COS released in 2016, 75% of outcomes (6/8) were only reported by ⩽5% SRs. In COS released in 2019, the reporting rate was very low (from 0% to 17%) for 73.3% of outcomes (11/15). SRs published in the most recent 5 years had a significantly greater possibility of reporting COS (odds ratio (OR) = 4.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.33 to 16.88, p = 0.016).Conclusion:Core outcomes were rarely reported in systematic reviews of acupuncture for OA, with considerable heterogeneity in the use of outcomes. The publication of COS in the COMET (Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials) database may help promote the reporting of COS. We encourage systematic reviewers to use relevant COS.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T09:17:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221108215
       
  • Electroacupuncture relieves visceral hypersensitivity through modulation
           of the endogenous cannabinoid system

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      Authors: Ning Ma, Xiaojing Li, Qiuhua Li, Diqi Yang, Shen Zhuang, Sha Nan, Ai Liu, Mingxing Ding, Yi Ding
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Electroacupuncture (EA) can effectively relieve visceral hypersensitivity (VH). However, its mechanisms are still unclear.Objective:To investigate the impact of EA on VH caused by ileitis, and whether EA relieves VH by modulating the endogenous cannabinoid system (ECS).Methods:Thirty male native goats were randomly divided into a saline-treated control group (Saline, n = 9) and three 2,4,6-trinitro-benzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-treated VH model groups that underwent injection of TNBS into the ileal wall to induce VH and remained untreated (TNBS, n = 9) or received six sessions of EA (for 30 min every 3 days) (TNBS + EA, n = 6) or sham acupuncture (TNBS + Sham, n = 6). The visceromotor response (VMR) to colorectal distention (CRD) was measured after each EA treatment. Three goats in the Saline/TNBS groups were euthanized after 7 days for histopathological examination; the remaining 24 (n = 6/group) underwent sampling of the ileal wall, T11 spinal cord and brain nuclei/areas related to visceral regulation and ascending pain modulation system on day 22. Expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R), fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) was detected by immunohistochemistry.Results:VMR to CRD was greater in TNBS-treated goats than in saline-treated goats (p < 0.01) from day 7 to 22. After day 7, EA-treated goats showed a decreased (p < 0.05) VMR compared with untreated TNBS-exposed goats. TNBS treatment decreased CB1R and increased FAAH and MAGL expression in the ileum and related nuclei/areas; this was reversed by EA.Conclusion:EA ameliorates VH, probably by regulating the ECS in the intestine and nuclei/areas related to visceral regulation and descending pain modulation systems.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T05:14:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221107699
       
  • Electroacupuncture improves follicular development and metabolism and
           regulates the expression of adiponectin, AMPK and ACC in an obese rat
           model of polycystic ovary syndrome

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      Authors: Jing Zhou, Ping Yin, Qingyi Zhao, Zhihai Hu, Yi Wang, Guizhi Ma, Xinyi Wu, Lu Lu, Yin Shi
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder characterized by hyperandrogenism and follicular arrest. Electroacupuncture (EA) has been shown to be effective at improving hyperandrogenism and follicular arrest in PCOS; however, its mechanism of action remains to be deciphered.Objective:In this study, we investigated whether EA improved follicular development in an obese rat model of PCOS and regulated the expression of adiponectin, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC).Methods:EA was administered at CV3, CV4 and ST40. Changes in body weight, paraovarian fat, estrus cycle, ovarian morphology, levels of related hormones, and glucose and lipid metabolism were evaluated. In addition, protein and mRNA expression of adiponectin, AMPK and ACC was measured.Results:The body weight and paraovarian fat of rats in the EA group were reduced, while estrus cyclicity and ovarian morphology improved. Levels of free fatty acids, triglycerides, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly reduced in the EA group, as well as blood glucose levels. Furthermore, levels of testosterone and luteinizing hormone were reduced in the EA group, while estradiol levels were increased. Protein and mRNA expression of adiponectin, AMPKα1 and liver kinase B1 (LKB1) was found to be increased in the EA group, while protein and mRNA expression of ACC were significantly reduced.Conclusion: Our findings suggest that EA improved follicular development and metabolism and regulated expression levels of adiponectin, AMPKα1, LKB1 and ACC in our obese rat model of PCOS.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T05:00:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221107690
       
  • Dopamine relieves inflammatory responses through the D2 receptor after
           electroacupuncture at ST36 in a mouse model of chronic obstructive
           pulmonary disease

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      Authors: Xuemei Liu, Tao Fan, Jinshuai Guan, Ai Luo, Yan Yu, Daohong Chen, Bing Mao, Hongli Jiang, Wei Liu
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To detect the role of dopamine in the anti-inflammatory effect of electroacupuncture (EA) at ST36 in a mouse model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods:Twenty-eight male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into the control group, model group, sham EA (sham) group or ST36 EA (ST36) group in a 1:1:1:1 ratio (n = 7 each). The COPD mouse model was established through cigarette smoke (CS) exposure for 12 weeks. During the last 2 weeks, EA was applied at a sham point location or ST36 before CS exposure. Lung function, histopathological changes, inflammatory cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), inflammatory cytokines in BALF, plasma, lung tissue homogenate (LTH), and plasma dopamine levels were detected in the different groups. Furthermore, the role of different dopamine receptors was explored through intraperitoneal injections of non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist chlorpromazine, specific dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 and specific dopamine D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride hydrochloride prior to ST36 EA and CS exposure.Results:EA at ST36 improved lung function, alleviated lung and systemic inflammatory responses by reducing inflammatory cells and cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-1β in BALF, plasma and lung tissue in this COPD mouse model. Plasma dopamine was greatly increased after EA at ST36, negatively correlated with lung histological lesions and inflammatory cytokine levels, and positively correlated with mice body weight and lung function indicators. Chlorpromazine and eticlopride hydrochloride inhibited the anti-inflammatory effect of EA at ST36, while SCH 23390 showed no neutralizing effect.Conclusion:EA at ST36 could alleviate inflammation in this mouse model of COPD through the dopamine D2 receptor pathway.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T10:13:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221107684
       
  • Changes in stiffness at active myofascial trigger points of the upper
           trapezius after dry needling in patients with chronic neck pain: a
           randomized controlled trial

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      Authors: Juan Antonio Valera-Calero, Sandra Sánchez-Jorge, Jorge Buffet-García, Umut Varol, César Fernández-de-las-Peñas, Javier Álvarez-González
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background/objective:Since, to our knowledge, the effects of dry needling (DN) on active myofascial trigger point (MTrP) stiffness have not been analyzed previously with shear wave elastography (SWE), our aim was to compare the effects of a single session of DN and sham DN applied to the most active MTrP located in the upper trapezius muscle on clinical outcomes.Methods:A randomized, double-blinded sham-controlled trial was conducted; 60 patients were randomized into an experimental (DN) or sham (sham DN) group. Baseline data including sociodemographic and clinical characteristics were collected. SWE and pain pressure thresholds (PPTs) at the MTrP and a control point located 3 cm laterally were the main outcomes assessed before and 10 min after the interventions.Results:Patients receiving DN interventions experienced greater increases in the control point PPTs immediately after receiving the intervention compared with sham DN (p < 0.05), but no differences were found for the MTrP (p> 0.05). Post-intervention PPT improvements were found at both locations for both groups (p < 0.01). No significant changes for either MTrP or control locations were found for SWE outcomes in either group (all ps> 0.05). No significant within-group SWE differences were found in the DN or sham DN groups (p> 0.05).Conclusion:A single session of DN or sham DN applied to active MTrPs located in the upper trapezius muscle produced no detectable changes in stiffness at the MTrP or control locations. Real DN induced an immediate analgesic response at both MTrP and control locations, while sham DN induced an immediate MTrP response.Trial registration number:NCT04832074 (ClinicalTrials.gov).
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T06:57:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221104831
       
  • The effectiveness and safety of acupuncture/electroacupuncture for
           chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy: a systematic review and
           meta-analysis

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      Authors: Li-Xia Pei, Yue Yi, Jing Guo, Lu Chen, Jin-Yong Zhou, Xiao-Liang Wu, Jian-Hua Sun, Hao Chen
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a dose-limiting adverse effect of anticancer agents with virtually no effective treatment. Safe and effective therapies are needed urgently. Acupuncture shows therapeutic possibilities in this regard but needs to be further evaluated.Methods:A systematic search was conducted in seven databases from their inception to April 2020. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focused on acupuncture/electroacupuncture (EA) for the treatment of CIPN were included. Revman 5.3 software was used for meta-analysis if there was no significant heterogeneity. Otherwise, qualitative analysis was utilized.Results:Nine studies involving 582 patients were included in this review. Most of the studies exhibited unclear risk of bias because some details were not mentioned. As the clinical heterogeneity was significant, qualitative analysis was performed to describe nerve conduction velocity, effective rate for motor neuropathy, pain scores, quality of life and adverse events. Meta-analysis was performed on four studies to analyze the effective rate for sensory neuropathy due to inconspicuous heterogeneity. The results indicated that acupuncture may generate a better effect on sensory neuropathy than vitamin B (risk ratio = 1.60, 95% confidence interval = 1.31–1.95, I2 = 0%, p < 0.00001). The efficacy of EA plus glutathione (GSH) appeared to be better than that of GSH alone in alleviating sensory neurotoxicity and in improving nerve conduction velocity. Acupuncture plus methylcobalamin showed more favorable effects than methylcobalamin alone in relieving neuralgia, restoring nerve conduction velocity and improving quality of life. In terms of pain relief and improved CIPN-specific quality of life, acupuncture plus standard care was better than standard care alone. In terms of pain relief, EA was more effective than usual care.Conclusion:Acupuncture may be effective and safe in the treatment of CIPN according to the analyzed studies. However, more studies with higher methodological quality are warranted in order to be able to draw firmer conclusions. Future rigorous RCTs will be necessary to confirm the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for CIPN.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T05:17:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221076512
       
  • Motor function and fALFF modulation in convalescent-period ischemic stroke
           patients after scalp acupuncture therapy: a multi-centre randomized
           controlled trial

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      Authors: Yijun Zhan, Jian Pei, Jun Wang, Qinhui Fu, Jia Xu, Minghang Yan, Yiwen Cai, Xiao Cui, Wencheng Ye, Mingxia Fan, Qiurong Yu, Jie Jia
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Scalp acupuncture has been found to be effective at improving motor function after ischemic stroke, but few studies examining its central mechanisms of action have been carried out. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical effects of scalp acupuncture on motor dysfunction and changes in spontaneous brain activity in patients with ischemic stroke.Methods:This was an evaluator- and analyst-blinded, multi-center randomized controlled trial. A total of 108 convalescent-stage ischemic stroke patients with motor dysfunction were allocated to receive either scalp acupuncture combined with rehabilitation treatment (SR group) or rehabilitation treatment alone (RE group). Patients in both groups received treatment 5 times per week for 8 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA). Secondary outcome measures included the modified Barthel index (mBI), modified Rankin scale (mRS) and values of fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (fALFF) acquired using a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) technique.Results:Both groups showed significant improvements in motor function, daily life ability and degree of disability, as measured by FMA, mRS and mBI (p < 0.05), and the SR group showed a significantly greater improvement (p < 0.05). Compared with the RE group, the areas where the fALFF values increased in the SR group were located in the cerebellum, praecuneus, precentral gyrus, superior frontal gyrus and parietal lobe. The improvement in FMA scores had the strongest correlation with the baseline fALFF values of the ipsilateral precentral gyrus.Conclusion:Scalp acupuncture improved motor function in convalescent-period ischemic stroke patients, and effects were correlated with regulation of motor-relevant brain regions. The fALFF value of the ipsilateral precentral and postcentral gyri could be potential clinical indices for prognostication of motor dysfunction.Trial registration number:NCT03120650 (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov).
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T06:43:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221086289
       
  • The use of acupuncture in patients with Raynaud’s syndrome: a systematic
           review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

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      Authors: Fangwen Zhou, Emma Huang, Elena Zheng, Jiawen Deng
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To assess the effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment of Raynaud’s syndrome by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs).Methods:Studies were identified from English and Chinese databases from their inception to September 2020. The outcomes of interest were remission incidence, number of daily attacks, incidence of positive cold stimulation tests and incidence of cold provocation tests. We conducted meta-analysis and network meta-analysis using meta and gemtc.Results:Six trials (n = 272 participants) were included in the meta-analysis. Pairwise meta-analyses show that acupuncture was associated with increased remission incidence (risk ratio (RR) = 1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10 to 1.34), decreased daily number of attacks (weighted mean difference (WMD) = −0.57, 95% CI = −1.14 to −0.01), and increased incidence of positive cold stimulation tests (RR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.27 to 2.11). There was not enough evidence to associate acupuncture with decreased incidence of positive cold provocation tests. The network meta-analyses did not demonstrate significant results for the effectiveness of any acupuncture treatments (electroacupuncture or manual acupuncture ± moxibustion), compared with controls, in terms of remission incidence or daily number of attacks, possibly due to small sample sizes and a lack of statistical power.Conclusion:The use of acupuncture may be effective for the treatment of Raynaud’s syndrome in terms of increasing remission incidence, decreasing daily number of attacks and increasing incidences of positive cold stimulation tests. However, our findings should be interpreted with caution due to small sample sizes, very low quality of evidence and high risk of bias. Future large-scale RCTs are warranted.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T10:06:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221076504
       
  • Manual acupuncture at ST36 attenuates rheumatoid arthritis by inhibiting
           M1 macrophage polarization and enhancing Treg cell populations in
           adjuvant-induced arthritic rats

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      Authors: Nannan Yu, Fuming Yang, Xue Zhao, Yongming Guo, Yuan Xu, Guangchang Pang, Yinan Gong, Shenjun Wang, Yangyang Liu, Yuxin Fang, Kun Yu, Lin Yao, Hui Wang, Kuo Zhang, Baohu Liu, Zhenguo Wang, Yi Guo, Zhifang Xu
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:Acupuncture has been found to be effective at relieving many inflammatory pain conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We aimed to assess the anti-inflammatory potential of manual acupuncture (MA) treatment of RA using adjuvant-induced arthritic (AIA) rats and to explore the underlying mechanisms.Methods:The anti-inflammatory and analgesic actions of MA at ST36 (Zusanli) in AIA rats were assessed using paw withdrawal latency and swelling, histological examination and cytokine detection by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). The cell–cell communication (CCC) network was analyzed with a multiplex immunoassay of 24 immune factors expressed in the inflamed joints, and the macrophage and Treg populations and associated cytokines regulated by MA were investigated using reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), ELISA and flow cytometry.Results:MA markedly decreased heat hyperalgesia and paw swelling in AIA rats. MA-treated rats also exhibited decreased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β) coupled with increased anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1) in the ankle joints at protein and mRNA levels. CCC network analysis confirmed that macrophages are of critical importance and are potential therapeutic targets in RA. Repeated treatment with MA triggered a macrophage phenotypic switch in the paws, with fewer M1 macrophages. Prominent increases in the Treg cell population and TGF-β1 in the popliteal lymph nodes demonstrated the immunomodulatory effects of MA. Furthermore, a selective TGF-β1-receptor inhibitor, SB431542, attenuated the anti-inflammatory effects of MA and MA-induced suppression of the levels of M1-released cytokines.Conclusion:These findings provide novel evidence that the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of MA on RA act through phenotypic modulation involving the inhibition of M1 macrophage polarization and an increase in the Treg cell population, highlighting the potential therapeutic advantages of acupuncture in controlling pain and ameliorating inflammatory conditions.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T05:50:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221085278
       
  • Efficacy and safety of acupuncture as a complementary therapy for sepsis:
           a systematic review and meta-analysis

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      Authors: Jin Xian, Ling Wang, Changyun Zhang, Jian Wang, Yushuo Zhu, Huijuan Yu, Xin Zhang, Qiwen Tan
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Sepsis is a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by dysregulation of the host response to infection. Acupuncture is used for treatment of inflammatory diseases; however, its effectiveness and safety as a complementary therapy for sepsis has not been fully explored.Methods:Data were retrieved from eight databases. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared acupuncture plus conventional therapies versus conventional therapies alone were included. Pre-specified primary outcomes were mortality at 28 days and Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores.Results:A total of 17 studies with 1099 participants were included in this study. In terms of the primary outcomes, acupuncture plus routine therapy reduced mortality at 28 days (risk ratio (RR)): 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.52 to 0.91, p < 0.001) and APACHE II scores (mean difference (MD): −2.84, 95% CI: −4.09 to −1.58, p < 0.001) at day 7 after treatment compared with routine therapy alone. In terms of secondary outcomes, acupuncture plus routine therapy reduced white blood cell counts and levels of procalcitonin (PCT), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and lactic acid and intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), and improved CD3+, CD4+ and monocytes of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR at day 7 after treatment compared with routine therapy alone. However, acupuncture plus routine therapy had no significant effects on levels of IL-10, C-reactive protein (CRP), CD8+ and CD4+/CD8+ ratios compared with routine therapy alone. Quality of evidence was low to very low for all parameters (GRADE).Conclusion:The available evidence showed that combination of acupuncture and routine therapy may have benefit for sepsis compared with use of routine therapy only. Due to the low degree of certainty regarding its effects, further research is required.Trial registration number:ICRD42019141491 (PROSPERO).
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T08:53:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221086288
       
  • Health professionals’ attitudes towards acupuncture/acupressure for
           post-operative nausea and vomiting: a survey and implications for
           implementation

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      Authors: Zhen Zheng, Wanda S Stelmach, Jason Ma, Juris Briedis, Raphael Hau, Mark Tacey, Jeannette Atme, Debra Bourne, Julie Crabbe, Catherine Fletcher, Paul Howat, Jenny Layton, Charlie C Xue
      First page: 16
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:Level 1 evidence supports the use of acupuncture/acupressure (A/A) to manage post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV). This study aimed to survey healthcare professionals’ attitudes towards A/A, influencing factors and barriers to implementing this effective non-drug intervention into peri-operative care.Methods:A validated, anonymous survey with 43 questions was emailed or distributed as a hard copy at meetings to anaesthetists, midwives, nurses, obstetricians, gynaecologists and surgeons at a public hospital in Australia. Descriptive data were presented. Influencing factors were explored using chi-square analysis. Multinomial logistical regression was used to identify the influences of confounding factors.Results:A total of 155 completed surveys were returned, reflecting a response rate of 32%. The majority of participants were female (69%), nurses/midwives (61%) and aged between 20 and 50 years old (76%). Eighty-three percent of respondents considered A/A ‘clearly alternative’ medicine or ‘neither mainstream nor alternative’. Eighty-one percent would encourage patients to use acupressure for PONV if it was offered at the hospital. Previous personal use of A/A was the key factor influencing attitudes and openness to clinical use. The key barriers to implementation were perceived lack of evidence and lack of qualified providers and time.Conclusion:Hospital-based healthcare professionals strongly supported the evidence-based use of A/A for PONV despite considering the therapy to be non-mainstream and having limited A/A education or history of personal use, providing a positive context for an acupressure implementation study. Significant gaps in training and a desire to learn were identified.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T08:46:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221085282
       
  • Electroacupuncture attenuates ac4C modification of P16 mRNA in the ovarian
           granulosa cells of a mouse model premature ovarian failure

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      Authors: Zixiang Geng, Peng Liu, Jiajia Lin, Xiaoli Nie, Long Yuan, Kaiyong Zhang, Huiru Jiang, Bingrong Li, Te Liu, Bimeng Zhang
      First page: 27
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a type of pathological aging, which seriously interferes with the fertility of affected women. Electroacupuncture (EA) may have a beneficial effect; however, its mechanism of action is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of EA on ovarian function in ovarian granulosa cells (OGCs) in a cyclophosphamide (CTX)-induced mouse model of POF.Methods:Mice were divided into three groups: wild type (WT) group, CTX group and CTX + EA group. EA was administered under isoflurane anesthesia at CV4, ST36 and SP6 for 30 min every 2 days, 2–3 times per week for a total of 4 weeks. Effects of EA on ovarian weight and level of estrogen were examined. The mRNA and protein expression levels of cell cycle–associated proteins were detected and mRNA modifications were analyzed.Results:EA significantly increased ovarian weight and reduced the proportion of atretic follicles in mice with CTX-induced POF (p < 0.05). EA increased the level of estrogen in the peripheral blood of mice and inhibited the modification of total mRNA N4-acetylcytidine (ac4C). A significant increase in the expression of P16 and N-acetyltransferase 10 (NAT10) and a significant decrease in the expression of Cyclin D (CCND1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) were observed in the OGCs of POF mice (p
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T12:14:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221085284
       
  • Antidepressant effects of acupuncture in a murine model: regulation of
           neurotrophic factors

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      Authors: Teruhisa Yamamoto, Jun Kawanokuchi, Nobuyuki Nagaoka, Ken Takagi, Torao Ishida, Tomoya Hayashi, Ning Ma
      First page: 38
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:GV20 and Yintang are important targets in acupuncture treatment for depression. In this study, we examined the antidepressant effects of simultaneous acupuncture stimulation at GV20 and Yintang.Methods:We compared the antidepressant effects of manual acupuncture (MA) stimulation at GV20 and Yintang, compared to acupuncture stimulation at two control point locations on the back of the mice (overlying the spinal column) and imipramine administration in a forced swimming (FS)-induced mouse model of depression, and examined the mRNA and protein expression of neurotrophic factors, including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin (NT)-3, and NT-4/5 in the brains by real-time polymerase chain reaction in two different experimental schedules – preventive (MA given alongside FS modelling) and therapeutic (MA given after FS-induced depression was already established).Results:MA at GV20 and Yintang significantly reduced the immobility time of mice with FS-induced depression in both preventive and therapeutic experimental designs, with effects that were comparable to those of imipramine administration. Immobility time following simultaneous acupuncture stimulation of the two control point locations overlying the spinal column was significantly suppressed only 2 weeks after the start of FS in the preventive effect experiment, and the suppressive effect was significantly lower than that of simultaneous acupuncture stimulation at GV20 and Yintang. In the therapeutic effect experiment, there was no change in the increase in immobility time after the end of FS. MA at GV20 and Yintang significantly increased the expression of BDNF and NT-3 in the preventive evaluation and NGF, BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4/5 in the therapeutic effect evaluation.Conclusion:Our findings suggest that simultaneous acupuncture stimulation at GV20 and Yintang is effective for the prevention and treatment of depression, and the effect likely involves modulation of the expression of multiple neurotrophic factors.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T08:43:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221085279
       
  • An audit of structure-based medical acupuncture by a single provider in
           patients with musculoskeletal pain using PROMIS scores as the outcome

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      Authors: Chi-Tsai Tang, Michael Sookochoff, Lee Rhea, Jonathan Carrier, Heidi Prather, Ling Guan
      First page: 48
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.
      Background:To assess whether structure-based medical acupuncture (SMA) can improve Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) scores in patients presenting with musculoskeletal pain.Methods:An audit was conducted of all patients presenting with musculoskeletal pain treated by a single provider with SMA in 2017. Inclusion criteria included a pre-treatment and at least one post-treatment PROMIS score. Patient demographics and previous treatments tried were recorded. Documented events other than acupuncture that were thought to interfere with PROMIS scores were recorded, and no further scores were used after these events. A maximum of nine visits after the initial visit were used. The PROMIS domains assessed included anxiety, depression, pain interference and physical function.Results:Seventy-two patients who had been treated with SMA met the inclusion criteria. Sixty-five of the patients (90%) had chronic pain. For their presenting complaint, 59 (82%) had previously sought treatment from another non-operative provider, 60 (83%) had tried physical therapy, and 20 (28%) had even had surgery. Despite this, SMA appeared to be able to significantly improve PROMIS anxiety at visits 1–3 and PROMIS depression at visit 3. After just one treatment, minimal clinically important differences (MCID) were reached in 32%–44% of patients for PROMIS anxiety, 17%–36% for PROMIS depression, 28%–29% for PROMIS physical function, and 21%–36% for PROMIS pain interference, based on low and high cut-offs of a range of quoted MCID values.Conclusion:In a difficult patient population with musculoskeletal pain, SMA is a technique that can likely be used to improve PROMIS anxiety and depression, although no firm conclusions can be drawn from this uncontrolled clinical audit. Of note, MCIDs were sometimes obtained even after just one treatment.
      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-09-13T10:37:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221118589
       
  • Acupuncture for female sexual dysfunction: a case report

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      Authors: Sen-lin Ye, Yue Feng, Ru-yi Zhou, Cai-gui Luo
      First page: 55
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-10-26T05:13:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221125427
       
  • Electroacupuncture following deep needle insertion at BL39 and BL40
           improves acute anterior cruciate ligament injury: a case report

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      Authors: Cong Deng, Haishan Zheng, Xiaolin Zhuo, Jinxiong Lao
      First page: 58
      Abstract: Acupuncture in Medicine, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Acupuncture in Medicine
      PubDate: 2022-10-28T12:07:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09645284221125251
       
 
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